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Prestigious Scottish Funding Council Awards are available to high calibre applicants for this programme. The SFC has selected this programme in recognition of the high demand for students with these qualifications. Read more
Prestigious Scottish Funding Council Awards are available to high calibre applicants for this programme. The SFC has selected this programme in recognition of the high demand for students with these qualifications. The awards cover all tuition costs; for further information, please see: http://www.glasgow.ac.uk/postgraduate/funded/

This Masters introduces you to the study of the history of collecting, as it has been pursued by individuals and by civic, educational or national institutions. It examines cultures of collecting and various modalities for the presentation of collections as developed in Asia, Europe, and more specifically Britain, from the late 18th century onwards through to the present. You will consider a range of theoretical and ethical issues as well as financial and societal mechanisms, which have informed collecting practices historically and that continue to do so. You will explore methodological approaches and core concepts, such as connoisseurship, taste and professionalisation, and consider how international travel, the trajectory of the art market and other types of exchange have impacted upon collecting practices.

Key facts

• MLitt: 12 months full-time; 24 months part-time
• Contact: Dr. Minna Torma:

Why Glasgow

• You will learn from world-leading researchers and develop expert knowledge in this specialised area within History of Art.
• Glasgow’s civic and university collections are some of the richest and most diverse in Europe and are of international standing. The University’s own Hunterian Museum and Art Gallery is the oldest public museum in Scotland and has extensive holdings covering fine art, geology, anatomy and the history of medicine.
• Our research forum provides you with a lively and stimulating introduction to methodological debates within art history. It provides a sense of art history’s own history as well as contemporary concerns and practice, examining the beliefs and values that have informed various forms of historical and visual analysis and enquiry. It is focused around a series of seminars or workshops run by members of staff and visiting academics.

You will take five core courses and one optional course and complete a dissertation 15,000 words in length (including footnotes but excluding bibliography) which will be on a topic chosen in consultation with the tutors and the programme convenor. You will also have the opportunity to take part in a field trip.

Core courses

• Research methods in practice
• Cultures of collecting
• Collecting East Asian art
• Collecting landscapes

Optional courses

• Patterns of collecting Chinese art
• Economies of collecting contemporary art

And then you may choose
• a Humanities Advanced Technology and Information Institute (HATII) course: 2D Digitisation (Theory and Practice)
• a course from elsewhere in the College of Arts, subject to the approval of the programme convenor.

Or from these options offered by History of Art
• Independent study
• Hunterian placement
• Work placement

Background

This programme introduces you to the study of the history of collecting, as it has been pursued by individuals and by civic, educational or national institutions. It examines cultures of collecting and various modalities for the presentation of collections as developed in Europe, Asia, North America and more specifically Britain, from the late 18th century through to the present. You will consider a range of theoretical and ethical issues alongside cultural, financial and societal mechanisms that have informed collecting practices historically and which continue to do so. You will also have the opportunity to explore a range of different collections from the encyclopaedic to the concise, and to question their context and strategies of presentation and their circulation through loan.

Themes of the programme include:
• How collections have been framed by: questions of subjectivity; by the emergence of nation states or the pursuit of empire; by the emergence of exchange and circulation mechanisms such as the market; and by broader societal processes informing the collecting practices of institutions and individuals
• The significance of a range of factors to collections and their histories, including: connoisseurship, taste and travel, the operations of the market, patterns of exchange, the professionalization of the curator, specialisation of knowledge, civil society and benefactors

Through its courses and the work placements it offers, the programme seeks to offer you sustained engagement and contact with collections in context. Teaching is based partly in the classroom and partly in collections, and the University’s own Hunterian collections provide a consistent point of departure and contextualisation for the students. The programme makes use of public and private collections accessible in Glasgow, Edinburgh, Dundee and further afield in Scotland.

The programme includes a field trip to Newcastle and the Northeast.

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This Masters programme offers an interdisciplinary approach to studying the history of collecting and collections from an international perspective. Read more
This Masters programme offers an interdisciplinary approach to studying the history of collecting and collections from an international perspective. In particular, it focuses on the trajectory of artefacts through time and space and their historical legacy. Subjects covered include methodological approaches and legal issues relating to provenance and restitution, illegal trafficking of cultural objects, connoisseurship, taste, the patterns of collecting and viewing both private and public and the politics of display. The programme will move the collective debate beyond the usual focus on the Western tradition.

Why this programme

-This programme is unique to Scotland and the UK as it combines aspects of art history and law and places them in a broad international context.
-You will learn from world-leading researchers and develop expert knowledge in this specialised area of art history.
-Glasgow’s civic and university collections are some of the richest and most diverse in Europe and are of international standing. The University’s own Hunterian Museum and Art gallery is the oldest public museum in Scotland and has extensive holdings covering fine art, geology, anatomy and the history of medicine. The new facilities at Kelvin Hall support object-based study as a number of courses will include handling sessions of the objects in the collections.
-Work placement opportunities are offered within the programme on a competitive basis. In addition to Scottish institutions, work placements take place in the Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C.
-Our research forum provides you with a lively and stimulating introduction to methodological debates within art history. It provides a sense of art history’s own history as well as contemporary concerns and practice, examining the beliefs and values that have informed various forms of historical and visual analysis and enquiry. It is focused around a series of seminars or workshops run by members of staff and visiting academics.

Programme structure

The programme structure comprises of four core courses and a dissertation (these are compulsory). In addition you can choose two optional courses, either from the ones provided within the programme or from available courses across the College of Arts.

The dissertation (15,000 words in length, including footnotes but excluding bibliography) will be on a topic chosen in consultation with the tutors and programme convenors. You will also have an opportunity to take part in a field trip.

The learning and teaching approaches covered in the programme include: lectures (built around case studies), seminars and discussions (supported by relevant published sources), handling sessions and supervision.

Core and optional courses

Core courses
-Cultures of Collecting – Collecting Cultures (semester 1)
-Methodologies 1: Object Biography (semester 1)
-Objects in Motion 1: Provenance (semester 1)
-Objects in Motion 2: Global Illicit Trafficking (semester 2)

Optional courses
-Objects in Motion 3: Restitution (semester 2)
-Archaeological Theory and Interpretation (semester 2)
-Approaching the Ancient World through Material Culture (semester 1)
-Introduction to Museology (semester 1)
-Art Crime (Semester 2 online)
-Repatriation, Recovery, Return (summer online)
-Independent Study (usually semester 2)
-Work Placement (semester 2)

Career prospects

This Masters programme is intended to provide you with a strong foundation from which to embark upon a career in the visual arts, the art market, museums and galleries, heritage and historic properties.

Graduates have gone on to hold positions in museums and galleries (both public and private) in Scotland and elsewhere in the UK and have, more broadly, entered the commercial, cultural and heritage sectors in a number of roles. The programme also provides an excellent platform for you to move into PhD studies and an academic career.

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The MA is offered by the University of Buckingham and the National Gallery in association with Waddesdon Manor (Rothschild Collections). Read more

Course outline

The MA is offered by the University of Buckingham and the National Gallery in association with Waddesdon Manor (Rothschild Collections).

Investigating American and European art markets and cultures of collecting from the Renaissance to the present day, it is taught by staff from the University of Buckingham, the National Gallery and Waddesdon Manor.

Find out more about our School of Humanities on http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/humanities/.

A unique MA

A unique feature of the course will be access to two of the greatest surviving art dealers’ archives: Agnew’s, acquired by the National Gallery in 2014, and Colnaghi’s, housed since February 2014 in the Windmill Hill Archive, Waddesdon Manor. It is the first MA in the UK to offer, under the guidance of experts, practical training on how to use, unlock and analyse these rich holdings.

Study trips to Paris and Florence

The course will include study trips to Paris and Florence where students will have the opportunity to study a number of key European collections such as the Edmond de Rothschild collection in the Louvre and the Stefano Bardini collection in Florence as well as visiting important local archives.

Course structure

The course will start in September 2016 and will finish the following September. It comprises two introductory weeks on principles and methodologies followed by three 4-week taught modules delivered in the Autumn and Winter terms. During the third term, and under supervision, students research a dissertation which will be submitted at the end of September 2017.

Subject to the agreement of the Programme Director, there are some options for part-time study, one day a week over two years, or by deferral of the dissertation.

A pathway to a career in the art world

Aimed at art historians, would-be curators, art market professionals, collectors and individuals with a general interest in the arts, the programme provides a pathway to a career in the art world or as a step towards further postgraduate research.

Apply here http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/humanities/ma/art-market-and-history-of-collecting.

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This course explores the visual and material culture that forms the roots of Western civilisation. The works of art studied are the basis of many of the great national collections in Europe, the Americas and Australia. Read more
This course explores the visual and material culture that forms the roots of Western civilisation. The works of art studied are the basis of many of the great national collections in Europe, the Americas and Australia. They include: Greek ceramics, Roman glass, medieval metalwork and ivories, illuminated manuscripts, sculpture and panel paintings of the Renaissance. The course is appropriate for those who want to develop specialist knowledge of the history, materials, production processes, iconography, historiography and museum presentation of this material. The methodologies used are cross-disciplinary, embracing archaeology, art history, cultural studies and anthropology.

These modules are all underpinned with in-depth lectures from experts in the field, seminars and

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This unique programme offers a postgraduate education which provides an overview of the developments in European art from Antiquity through the Medieval period to the Renaissance. Read more
This unique programme offers a postgraduate education which provides an overview of the developments in European art from Antiquity through the Medieval period to the Renaissance. Students can work in detail on a subject of their choice, while following a course which traces the transformations, continuities and revivals over three millennia of art. Beyond a lecture series which covers the arts in all media, the focus is on small group teaching, with seminars, visits and handling sessions, which stress object analysis and developing professional skills. Access is given to extraordinary material from the collections of London and works coming through the Christies auction house, and there are frequent trips to other sites in the UK and in Europe.
The core lecture series, covering material from Antiquity to the Renaissance, and delivered by both Christie’s faculty and outside experts, underpins all components of the programme. Our study trips are an integral part of this course. These take you to a number of major sites and museums in the UK, while two longer trips are made to European centres, one of which is usually Rome. This will allow you to experience the art and architecture of Antiquity, the Middle Ages and the Renaissance at the centres of its production. Culture and Ideology Seminars will teach you the importance of iconography, patronage and artistic context of Early European works of art. In these seminars you will develop the skills to deliver presentations and generate seminar discussion

Object-based study is the foundation of our teaching and will provide you with relevant training for the public and commercial art worlds. This includes practical and research-based study of materials and techniques, style, dating, quality and authenticity. You will be trained in cataloguing to auction house and museum standards. Handling sessions and visits to museums and to Christie’s warehouse form an essential part of the course. Engagement with current debates about curatorial practice will enable you to devise fresh approaches to the display and interpretation of art works. You will learn how to produce reports on works of art to a professional standard. You will explore varieties of art criticism, developing skills to review exhibitions. Methodology seminars acquaint you with the historiography, and equip you with the theoretical tools for the analyses of works of art.

Postgraduate Diploma students have the option to convert to the Master's degree at the beginning of the second term, contingent upon having achieved a minimum grade and the approval of the Course Director.

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This 10-month program focuses on the analysis of contemporary art work and the understanding of evolving demands of the art market in a global context. Read more
This 10-month program focuses on the analysis of contemporary art work and the understanding of evolving demands of the art market in a global context. The techniques of management, communication, marketing and the knowledge of law and regulations contribute in providing the expertise required when working in the field of contemporary art.

Based in the heart of Paris, on the premises of IESA Art & Culture, students are within easy access to all the major Parisian museums, auction houses and contemporary art galleries. Class visits to the most prominent contemporary art museums, galleries, and auction houses are organized to allow students to dialogue with curators, art historians, and gallerists.

Study trips to art centers in France are organized during each semester to allow students to network with seasoned professionals in the art sector.

Structure

The program consists of 3 trimesters:

2 trimesters of classwork (Oct-Dec/ Jan-March) and a trimester dedicated to internships (April-June) allowing students to gain professional experience (Jan-March).

During the last two trimesters, students will work on a personal project to be presented in front of a professional jury in order to validate the certificate.

Each trimester contains 200 contact hours over a 10-week period. Courses are taught in English.

Students are attributed a mentor for personalized coaching and will follow group methodology sessions to guide them in the research and development of their personal project.

1st trimester:

The History of the Contemporary Art in Europe and United States; the Economics of the Contemporary Art Market; Art Law; Art and Project Management; Communication and the Marketing, Research, Development and Management of Artistic projects (content, business plan, legal structure, communication, marketing); visits and workshops with professionals.

2nd trimester:

The Current and Future Art Markets, the History of Contemporary Art Outside of Europe; E-communication and E-marketing of Art and Luxury Products; Negotiating Sales of Art Objects; Promoting Artistic Projects, a Brand, Artists, and Contemporary Art and Luxury Products; Exhibition planning; Visits and Workshops with professionals; Methodology; mentoring sessions.

3rd trimester:

Full-time internship, methodology sessions, sessions with mentor to follow up on personal projects.

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The Masters in Museum Studies will help you develop the knowledge, understanding and skills required of today’s versatile museum professional. Read more
The Masters in Museum Studies will help you develop the knowledge, understanding and skills required of today’s versatile museum professional. It has been designed in conjunction with employers to meet their needs for well-rounded museum professionals trained in the latest theoretical and practical approaches.

Why this programme

-Glasgow’s civic and university collections are the richest and most diverse outside of London and are of international standing.
-Taught alongside staff from the University's own museum and art gallery, The Hunterian, the degree programme provides a combination of academic and practitioner input.
-If you want to develop a career in the cultural heritage sector, this programme has been developed for you.
-Three versions of the degree allow you follow standard or specialist strands.
-There are great opportunities for you to take practice based courses or work placements at the museums and galleries that partner the programme.
-We welcome applicants from across the arts and sciences, current professionals or career changers, from the UK or abroad.

Programme structure

Three different strands of the MSc Museum Studies are offered. The Theory and Practice strand is our standard Museum Studies programme where the museum itself is the primary object of study.

Two specialist strands: Collecting and Provenance; and Artefact and Material Culture, enable you to combine courses in Museum Studies with specialist courses from Masters programmes provided by Archaeology and History of Art.

Each strand will give you a different mix of core and optional courses. All students take two 20 credit common core courses in Museology and Research and Professional Skills. You also take four 20 credit courses from your strand (a combination of strand core and optional courses) and one 60 credit research project.

Core and optional courses

Strands

Theory and Practice
-Museum Interpretation and Learning (Core)
-Museum Practice
-Heritage and Cultural Informatics
-Curating the Sciences
-American Material Culture
-Phenomenology
-2D Digitisation
-Approaching the Ancient World
-Work Placement
-Hunterian Exhibition Course
-International Trafficking in Cultural Objects

Collecting and Provenance (in conjunction with History of Art)
-Cultures of Collecting (Core)
-Object Biography
-Provenance
-Collecting and Display
-Restitution
-2D Digitisation
-Approaching the Ancient World
-Work Placement
-Hunterian Exhibition Course
-International Trafficking in Cultural Objects

Artefact and Material Culture (in conjunction with Archaeology)
-Material Culture in Context (Core)
-Process of Artefact Studies (Core)
-Critical Themes in the Display and Reception of Objects
-Science Based Analysis of Archaeological Material
-Early Medieval Artefacts
-Viking & Late Norse Artefacts
-2D Digitisation
-Approaching the Ancient World
-Work Placement
-Hunterian Exhibition Course
-International Trafficking in Cultural Objects

Career prospects

Career opportunities exist in a variety of roles within the cultural heritage sector; these include museums and galleries as well as historic houses, heritage sites and consultancy. Roles range from front of house, education and outreach to collections management, curation, marketing and management.

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The course is intended for students who have a substantial background in geography or a related discipline with a good first degree. Read more
The course is intended for students who have a substantial background in geography or a related discipline with a good first degree. It aims to provide: (i) broad-based training in geographical research, its philosophical backgrounds and debates, and interpretation of geographical literature, (ii) comprehensive training in research methods in human geography and the social sciences as a whole, and (iii) the opportunity to develop large scale research management skills by completing a research thesis under academic supervision and guidance. Students choose two geography modules, which are combined with two modules in research design and methods, and a thesis. The course aims to develop general transferable skills for research employment in a wide range of walks of life, or as the first stage of a PhD thesis.

The course is intended to give students a broad-based advanced training and critical awareness of geographical research and its methods, including awareness of the research methods of related disciplines. The course is offered to all students hoping to undertake a PhD in Human Geography. Hence the thesis often forms a ‘pilot’ for a larger scale PhD proposal and will include a review of the relevant literature, research questions, an outline and evaluation of appropriate research methods, and an assessment of the initial findings and their significance.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/eaggmpmgr

Course detail

The course aims to develop further the students’ understanding of the relationship between society, nature and space, emphasising both global and local processes and connections. They develop further their skills of assessing the merits of contrasting theories, explanations and policies; collecting and critically judging, evaluating and interpreting varied forms of evidence; preparing maps and diagrams; employing various methods of collecting and analysing spatial and environmental information; combining and interpreting different types of evidence to tackle specific problems; recognising the ethical and moral dimensions of study.

Learning Outcomes

At the end of the 11 months, students taking the MPhil in Geographic Research will be expected to have:

- Acquired a broad knowledge of qualitative research methods and general statistics
- Acquired the skills to use library and internet resources independently
- Acquired specialist knowledge of the relevant literature related to their thesis
- Acquired skills to independently structure their research design
- Given a presentation on their thesis to their peers and academic staff
- Written three essays and one thesis

Format

Each student is allocated a thesis supervisor before the course begins. Generally up to 10 meetings of up to one hour of one-to-one supervision as well as briefer meetings when needed.

The Department runs a series of seminars during term which students on this course should attend. This introduces them to the breadth of the discipline and a new level of academic debate. Students may attend other lectures, seminars, classes and reading groups after consultation with their supervisors. Students attend Research Methods classes and lectures in the first and second term. Students are also expected to take part in their research group’s activities.

Skills and research training programme = 8 x 1 hour lectures in first term and optional lectures in the 2nd term. hours per term

Social Science Research Methods Centre (SSRMC) courses: workshops and practicals. Approx. 15 hours per term hours per term

Dissertation presentation in 3rd term.

Written feedback on each submitted essay and the dissertation.

Assessment

- 20,000 word dissertation; oral examination at discretion of examiners
- 3 essays or other exercises of up to 4,000 words

Continuing

70% overall in MPhil

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

ESRC (1+3) for applicants who plan to continue to PhD. (1+3 = one year MPhil and 3 years PhD)
AHRC Masters via CHESS Scheme for AHRC topics approved for the AHRC DTP at University of Cambridge.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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This course has been developed to offer thought leaders in the financial planning sector the opportunity to contribute to the broader development of the profession through study of financial planning concepts, theories and models, and engagement in applied research. Read more

Overview

This course has been developed to offer thought leaders in the financial planning sector the opportunity to contribute to the broader development of the profession through study of financial planning concepts, theories and models, and engagement in applied research. You will work with like-minded individuals and be supported by academic staff, with expertise in the financial planning area, throughout the research process, culminating in submission of a dissertation.

Themes

Units on the programme will include the following core themes:
• Understanding research philosophies and methodology
• Critically reviewing existing literature
• Formulating a research design
• Collecting and analysing data
• Writing a dissertation.

Course in Depth

Units On the programme will cover the following themes:

Academic and Professional Development (30 credits)
This is a unit that has been designed to help you develop critical thinking, reflective thinking and other study skills, including analysis and research skills to successfully study at Masters level and to prepare the ground for you to move forward into the Dissertation stage.

Dissertation (60 credits)
The Academic & Professional Development unit provides the foundation for this, the final stage of your MSc. Upon successful completion will have demonstrated ability to:
• Identify the macro and micro organisational context for your dissertation and the objectives of their research.
• Critically review and synthesize the relevant literature on the subject area in order to construct a conceptual framework to underpin your research.
• Identify the nature of relevant evidence and associated data sources to support achievement of your research objectives.
• Apply an appropriate methodology for collecting and analysing primary data with due regard to ethical considerations.
• Interpret and present data clearly, integrating data from different sources where applicable and critically discussing your findings.
• Appraise the implications of your research outcomes to managerial professional practice in response to strategic issues.

Career prospects

The principal objective of these programmes is to examine knowledge claims and understanding of financial planning concepts, theories, behaviour and management practices, and to develop your skills to allow you to undertake a meaningful piece of applied research. The outcome of your research will add to the exiting body of knowledge in your chosen area and make a contribution to the development and status of financial planning as a profession.

Feedback from graduates suggest that your experiences and attainment of the MSc qualification will provide opportunities for you to add value to, and to differentiate, the financial planning services you provide.

Special Features

• You will be taught in the Business School’s £75 million teaching and research headquarters on All Saints Campus. Watch the video to find out more.
• This programme has an advanced standing route for mature students who have relevant professional qualifications and substantial work experience in a financial planning environment. Through advanced standing we can give you academic credit for your current qualifications. Consequently you only need to study selected units and can achieve an MSc in a shorter timeframe. The tuition fees for this route are also lower because you only pay for the units you need to take rather than having to study all the units for the MSc.
• This programme is delivered by academics with an appreciation of the issues being addressed by financial planning communities and research expertise that is , underpinned by academic study, professional qualifications and several years’ experience of supervising individuals with little or no previous experience of the rigours of academic research.
• Watch a student story video: Mark Ormston, MSc Financial Planning and Business Management: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JRB4OQnQmEU
• Watch a student story video: Jayne Gibson, MSc Financial Planning and Business Management: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q1VBPmOGZXM

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The Place Management and Leadership programme is an international part-time course that is predominantly for existing practitioners in the place management sector. Read more
The Place Management and Leadership programme is an international part-time course that is predominantly for existing practitioners in the place management sector. Place management encompasses a range of professions internationally, including town and city centre management, market management, Downtown and Mainstreet management, destination management and marketing, Business Improvement District management and city marketing and branding. It is increasingly involving civic society and the third sector, and embraces new approaches to place change such as the Transition Town movement. For this reason the course is also suitable for local politicians and local community members leading or contributing to place initiatives

The programme has been designed around the worldwide professional standards developed by the Institute of Place Management to support those that are already in, or wish to move into, a strategic role in place management. A blended learning delivery model is adopted. Each 30 credit unit is delivered through a 3 day block of master classes, followed by distance learning and tutor support.

This is a unique course and we are the only university to offer postgraduate qualifications in Place Management. The course is fully accredited by the Institute of Place Management. Delivered by a team of internationally renowned academics and practitioners, all assessments are designed to have impact on specific locations and you will be able to network with managers and leaders in a variety of places.

Units of Study

Principles of Place Management, Marketing and Branding
Combining theory from both business and geography with real-word practice, this unit will introduce you to the principles of place management, marketing and branding from an interdisciplinary and multi-stakeholder perspective. Place management, marketing and branding draws from a variety of disciplines and professions. The unit will critically explore the following:
Definitions of place
The application of business principles to place
Cover issues such as place competition
Approaches to understanding exogenous and endogenous development
Neoliberalism and the homgenisation of place
Place communication and promotion
Place marketing and contemporary perspectives on branding
Contested places
Nested places
Concepts of place attachmentment and ‘embeddedness’

Place Leadership, Governance and Partnership Development
Drawing on theory from both public and private sector management, the unit will equip you with the ability to understand leadership and partnership development in the context of place, as well as understanding a range of governance structures within a variety of cultural and other contexts. The unit will also cover leadership theory within the context of place, as well as reviewing various forms of governance and exploring the partnership development process in place.

Place Development Theory and Practice
This unit aims to introduce students to critical perspectives on 21st Century place development drawing on theoretical and empirical material from an international context. Place development encapsulates different types and scales and places; for example, urban and rural places, neighbourhoods, cities and regions. The unit explores the influential theoretical underpinnings of place development, focusing on key readings of urban theorists, and scholars of regional and rural development.

Research Methods
This unit will develop your critical thinking, reflective writing and other study skills — including analysis and referencing — to successfully study at Masters level and in particular to introduce students to general research methods needed to successfully develop a dissertation proposal or research brief.

Dissertation
You are expected to identify, structure, frame and investigate a complex managerial or business issue and produce a substantial written document of their achievements and conclusions. You may fulfil the requirements of the unit by undertaking one of five types of dissertation:

Consultancy based: Answering distinct research questions, which are triggered by an issue of strategic or operational importance to a specific place. This mainly features conducting fieldwork (collecting primary data) in the place, with the objective of offering an appropriate short to medium term solution to the location, and also drawing out the implications for the wider professional practice.
Empirically based: Answering distinct research questions, which are triggered by an issue of strategic or operational importance. This mainly features conducting fieldwork (collecting primary data) with the objective of drawing out the implications for the wider professional practice.
Library based: Answering distinct research questions, which are triggered by an issue of strategic or operational importance, mainly by gathering secondary data and doing a meta-analysis of published interpretations of existing data sets, with the objective of drawing out the implications for the wider professional practice.
Action Learning: Reflective examination and interpretation of a problem-solving, ‘action intervention’ made by the author in his/her place through the lens of relevant literature with the objective of demonstrating insights and enhanced competence, and drawing out the implications for the wider professional practice.
Enterprise-based Location Plan: The development a location plan for a social enterprise, underpinned by secondary data and fieldwork on the proposed location, with the objective of a possible launch of a small enterprise partnership.

Special Features

• You will be taught in the Business School’s £75 million teaching and research headquarters on All Saints Campus.
• This course is accredited by the Institute of Place Management

Career Prospects

Two thirds of over 400 surveyed UK town centre managers have identified that they want additional development in this area. Graduates are expected to combine their Place Management qualification with their current qualifications and personal achievements to develop a unique profile that stands out from other candidate.

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Inventing Modern Art enables you to understand how painting, design and architecture took new forms and meanings in an age of radical social, scientific and technological change. Read more
Inventing Modern Art enables you to understand how painting, design and architecture took new forms and meanings in an age of radical social, scientific and technological change. Working with leading experts, you will learn to interpret these from theoretical as well as object-based approaches.

Why this programme

-World-leading resources, from Charles Rennie Mackintosh’s School of Art to the Burrell Collection and The Hunterian, home to the world’s largest public Whistler display.
-State-of-the-art collections access at the new Kelvin Hall Study Centre, and tuition by specialists including the Mackintosh and European Modernism Academic Curator.

Programme structure

The programme offers a wide-ranging mix of taught and research components, and is taught by a team including the Academic Curator in Mackintosh studies and European Modernism, and experts in the Enlightenment, Whistler, Impressionism, the Vienna Secession, and dress history.

The 20-credit core course on 'Research Methods in Practice' is taken by all students in Semester 1, and provides an introduction to the key techniques and principles of advanced art-historical study and research. This provides a foundation for the programme's other components, which consist of:
-A compulsory dissertation (60 credits; 15-20,000 words, including footnotes and bibliography). This is submitted in August and written under the guidance of a specialist tutor. It provides opportunity for self-directed research on a topic chosen by the student in consultation with the programme convener and the tutor.
-Five individual option courses, each worth 20 credits. These enable you to study particular themes or artistic movements in depth, and, if desired, also to obtain work experience. They include opportunities for first-hand engagement with relevant work in local collections and the new Kelvin Hall Collections Study Centre, and are selected from the following list.

Some courses are taught in Semester 1 and some in Semester 2 (not all are available each year):
-Whistler, Impressionism, and European Avant-Gardes
-Impressionism: Innovation and Invention 1874-1926
-The Artistic House
-Reading International Art Nouveau
-Historicism: German Art, Architecture and Design 1850-1918
-The Birth of Modern Fashion? Textiles and Dress, 1680-1815
-Victorian Visions: Dress and Textiles c. 1837-1901
-Scottish Textile Histories
-Object-based research in the decorative arts
-Collecting East Asian Art
-Scientists, Antiquarians and Collectors
-Landscape Art and the Geography of 18th Century Britain
-Cultures of Collecting
-Provenance
-Work Placement
-Independent Study
-Student Exhibition
-Semester Abroad (Ecole du Louvre, Paris)
-Research Forum

One or more of your option courses may be chosen from those available in other College of Arts subjects, to create a distinctive interdisciplinary emphasis within your degree. The programme convener will give guidance on choices relevant to your personal goals and interests.

Career prospects

The programme provides a strong foundation for work in the museum, heritage, and education sectors, as well as in media, publishing, and arts administration. Its distinctive object-based study sessions and field trips introduce you to key professionals, whilst the placement option provides 'live' work experience - an essential first step in much arts employment. Our Art History Masters' graduates have secured curatorial posts at institutions including the Palace of Westminster, V&A Museum, Ironbridge Museum, and Thomas Jefferson's Monticello, as well as specialist positions with film and TV companies and auction houses. For those interested in an academic career, the dissertation component provides essential preparation for doctoral research.

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This MA is unique in combining the study of Buddhism, Buddhist art, and the techniques and conservation of Buddhist art. Offered by The Robert H. Read more
This MA is unique in combining the study of Buddhism, Buddhist art, and the techniques and conservation of Buddhist art. Offered by The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Centre for Buddhist Art and Conservation at The Courtauld, the MA was established as a one-year degree in 2013. In order to build on and expand the strengths of the programme, the MA is changing in 2017 to a two-year degree taught in collaboration with SOAS.

The MA now brings together world-famous institutions: The Courtauld for the study of art history and conservation, and SOAS for the study of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Drawing on the unique strengths of the two institutions and their exceptional faculties, the new curriculum of the MA provides detailed and systematic teaching over two years. Each discipline is introduced, expanded and integrated to allow students to obtain the best possible learning experiences and skills acquisition. Designed to provide increased specialisation over the two years, the course culminates in research and a substantial dissertation in the final months.

Offered once every two years, applications are now invited for the programme beginning autumn 2017. Taught by a wide range of specialists from both The Courtauld and SOAS, the MA also benefits from teaching by visiting experts. The course includes study trips to museums in the UK and Europe, and a longer study trip to India to develop an appreciation of Buddhist art in its original contexts. Students also benefit from conferences and public events regularly held by the Ho Centre at The Courtauld.

Drawing also on the research and conservation work undertaken by The Courtauld’s Conservation of Wall Painting Department in Bhutan, China and India, this MA is specifically designed to equip students with knowledge of:

‌•the central concepts of Buddhism, and their historical diffusion;
‌•the history of Buddhist art in its various religious, social and cultural contexts;
‌•the materials and techniques involved in the making of various types of Buddhist art;
‌•approaches to the conservation of Buddhist art, including understanding of the ethical, technical and administrative issues involved.

This MA provides a comprehensive grounding in the history of Buddhism, Buddhist art and its conservation for those intending to pursue further specialist conservation education, and for those who wish to proceed into related fields such as art-historical research, curating, and site-management.

About eight students are accepted on the MA. Applicants from different academic and geographical backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Previous experience in any of the fields covered by the MA is not required.

Please Note: Plans are being made for the redevelopment of The Courtauld’s home at Somerset House. The project, called Courtauld Connects, will include the development of state-of-the-art teaching and research facilities. During the redevelopment the location of some teaching will move. Further information on Courtauld Connects will be published on The Courtauld’s website over the coming months.

Programme Structure

This two-year MA combining the study of Buddhism, Buddhist art, and the techniques and conservation of Buddhist art, is structured to provide increased specialisation during the course, with a substantial dissertation at the end. The programme consists of interwoven strands. Led by Professor David Park and Dr Giovanni Verri at The Courtauld, and by Dr Christian Luczanits and Dr Vincent Tournier at SOAS, it includes teaching by a wide range of specialists from both institutions and from elsewhere. Some strands will be taught at The Courtauld or on-site, while for others students will join classes at SOAS.

Year 1
The objectives of this year are to provide a grounding in the concepts of Buddhism and their historical diffusion; an appreciation of the chronological development, regional variations and major themes of Buddhist art; an understanding of the making of different types of Buddhist art, and of the ethical, legal and other issues underlying the conservation and display of Buddhist art; and an interdisciplinary exposure to the imagining and presentation of Buddhas and their achievements in South Asia, juxtaposing the textual perspective with what is communicated through imagery. The formal teaching is reinforced through a study trip in the second term to museums in Paris or elsewhere in Europe, and in the third term by a longer study trip to India.

‌•Strand 1: Critical Concepts in Buddhist Studies Convenor: Vincent Tournier (SOAS) This course is designed to provide a broad understanding of the major processes and dynamics at work in the growth and development of Buddhism as a pan-Asian religion, and with the key methodological tools required to approach this major cultural force in its fascinating diversity.

•Strand 2: History of Buddhist Art Convenors: David Park (The Courtauld) & Christian Luczanits (SOAS) This course provides an overview of Buddhist art with regard to its chronological development, regional variations, major themes, and the multiplicity of different media. Buddhist art in collections will also be studied, examining aspects of collecting and display.

•Strand 3: The Making of Buddhist Art, and Conservation Principles Convenor: Giovanni Verri (The Courtauld) This course provides an introduction to the making of Buddhist art from its origins. Primary sources and technical studies are used to understand the different types of materials employed. It will also provide an introduction to the principles, ethics and other issues underlying the conservation and display of Buddhist art.

•Strand 4: Imag(in)ing Buddahood in South Asia Convenors: Christian Luczanits & Vincent Tournier (SOAS) This course engages in an interdisciplinary manner with the central idea of Buddhism, as it developed within and beyond its South Asian cradle. Bringing together the expertise of an art historian and a historian of Buddhist thought, it will provide exposure to a diversity of approaches to textual, iconographic, and archaeological sources, to understand how Buddhas and their achievements were imagined, presented and encountered by Buddhist practitioners.

‌•Strand 5: Study trip to museums in Europe To examine Buddhist art in major museums in Paris or elsewhere, considering art-historical, technical and conservation aspects, as well as display and management issues.

•Strand 6: Fragile Inheritance: the Conservation of Buddhist Art Convenor: David Park (The Courtauld) To examine the measures directly involved in the preservation of Buddhist art in museums and in situ; and to examine particular major case studies in detail with regard to the legal, ethical, management, practical and other issues involved.

Year 2
Strand 6 continues in Year 2. More specialised teaching is introduced in a variety of areas: texts, and their relationship to Buddhist objects; the scientific examination and imaging of Buddhist art; and a choice of specialised courses in Buddhist studies and Buddhist art, allowing students to pursue particular interests and to assist in the choice of dissertation topic. The dissertation, undertaken over a period of fourteen weeks, should consider an aspect of the original techniques, conservation, management, curating, history or use of Buddhist art.

‌•Strand 6: Fragile Inheritance: the Conservation of Buddhist Art Continued from Year 1

•Strand 7: Texts on and around Buddhist objects Convenors: David Park (The Courtauld) & Vincent Tournier (SOAS) This course will

‌-explore the many ways by which texts inform, respond to, and accompany Buddhist objects across Asian societies. It will, in particular, -explore the Text-Image relationship, examining how textual and visual narratives respond to each other. It will introduce students to the methods of epigraphy and codicology, including the increasing use of imaging technologies.

‌•Strand 8: Analysis and Imaging of Buddhist Art Convenor: Giovanni Verri (The Courtauld) This course provides an introduction to methods of examination and analysis through the use of visual observations and scientific instruments, and an introduction to and basic instruction in the technical imaging of Buddhist art including multispectral imaging.

•Strand 9: Choice of one of the following specialised courses in Buddhist Studies and one in Buddhist Art at SOAS Students will select these courses in consultation with their tutors, on the basis of their previous background and career objectives; options will also depend on availability at SOAS. This further specialism will aid students in their choice of dissertation topic. Presentations and discussions at The
Courtauld will enable students to harmonise their experience.

Specialised Course in Buddhist Studies

-Buddhism in Tibet (Ulrich Pagel)
-Chinese Buddhism in the Pre-modern Period (Antonello Palumbo)
-East Asian Buddhist Thought (Lucia Dolce)
-The Buddhist Conquest of Central Asia (Ulrich Pagel)
-Specialised Course in Buddhist Art

-Buddhist and Hindu Art of the Maritime Silk Route (Peter Sharrock)
-Collecting and Curating Buddhist Art in the Museum (Louise Tythacott)
-Illustrated Manuscript Cultures of Southeast Asia (Anna Contadini & Farouk Yahya)
-Sacred Art and Architecture of Ancient Korea (Charlotte Horlyck)
-The Figure of the Buddha: Theory, Practice and the Making of Buddhist Art History (Ashley Thompson)
-Tibetan Buddhist Monuments in Context (Christian Luczanits)

‌•Strand 10: Dissertation: A major component of the MA is a 12,000-word dissertation, undertaken in the second and third terms of Year 2. The dissertation topic should focus on the original techniques, conservation, management, curating, history, or use of Buddhist art. Students are encouraged to design their research to reflect the interdisciplinary nature of the MA. Selection of the topic will be undertaken in the first term of Year 2 in consultation with course tutors, and will include assessment of the state of research, and production of an illustrated outline proposal with references.Topics have been varied; those of the previous one-year MA have included:

-19th– and early 20th-century copies and photographs of the Ajanta murals;
-narrative and biography in early Tibetan teacher portraits;
-tree and forest imagery in Buddhist Yamato-e handscroll paintings;
-technical study and investigation of Nagthangs;
-materials and techniques of red dyed gold from Southeast Asia;
-the influence of Tibetan Buddhism on Ming Imperial porcelains;
-examination and assessment of the environmental conditions of the Textile Museum of Bhutan.This range demonstrates the scope for students to research avenues that significantly develop their individual interests and skills, while also providing a contribution to the field.

Teaching Methods

Teaching methods and work required of the students are related to each strand and include:

‌•lectures: to impart factual information;
‌•seminars: to provide a forum for open discussion, and to allow assessment of the development of the individual student’s critical abilities;
‌•student seminars: to develop skills in gathering, organising and presenting a body of information, including visual material;
‌•essays: to develop skills in written communication and research methodology;
‌•reports: on the study trips;
‌•tutoring: to provide individual guidance, and to allow monitoring of the student’s progress.

How to Apply

Before starting your application, please ensure that you read and refer to the following three sets of information. Then access our Online Application System by selecting the relevant "Apply Now” link from the table of courses, below.

Follow this link for the information: http://courtauld.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/postgraduate-how-to-apply

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study History at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study History at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The MA in History is an exciting programme that covers a wide range of topics in history from the Middle Ages onwards.

Key Features of MA in History

The wide-ranging expertise of Swansea University's historians offers the study of British, European, American or Asian History. The History MA allows students to explore the history of art and culture, empire, gender, politics, religion, sexuality and science.

Students on the MA History programme are introduced to key concepts that shape the study of history. The MA in History students benefit not only from the unusual concentration of historians at Swansea, but also from the existence of the College of Arts and Humanities Research Centres, the Callaghan Centre for the Study of Conflict, Power and Empires and the Richard Burton Centre.

History MA students benefit from the the College of Arts and Humanities' Graduate Centre. The Graduate Centre fosters and supports individual and collaborative research activity of international excellence and offers a vibrant and supportive environment for students pursuing postgraduate research and taught masters study including the MA in History programme. The Centre provides postgraduate training to enhance academic and professional development and facilitates participation in seminar programmes, workshops and international conferences.

The full-time History course structure is split across the year with three modules taken in each academic semester (a total of six modules) and then a dissertation over the summer. History students study three compulsory modules and three optional modules. The dissertation is written on a specialist research topic of the student's choosing.

Part-time study for MA in History is available.

MA in History Programme Aims

- To acquire advanced knowledge and understanding of a range of topics related to history.
- To develop theoretical and methodological skills relevant to all aspects of the study of history.
- To lay a solid foundation of knowledge and analytical and presentational skills for further research work in the field.

Modules on the MA in History

Modules on the History course typically include:

• Historical Methods and Approaches
• New Departures in the Writing of History
• Communicating History
• Directed Reading in History
• From Princely Possessions to Public Museums: A History of Collecting and Display
• Power, Conflict, and Society in the Modern World
• Venice and the Sea
• Medieval Manuscripts
• Fascism & Culture

Who should Apply?

Students from a history or related background. Students interested in preparation for postgraduate research, MPhil or PhD, or who wish to develop skills and knowledge related to history.

Research Interests

All staff in the Department of History and Classics are research active and publish books and articles in their areas of expertise. Staff and students are members of a range of Arts and Humanities research centres: the Callaghan Centre for the Study of Conflict, Power and Empire, the Richard Burton Centre for the Study of Wales and the Research Groups: MEMO: the Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Research and GENCAS: the Centre for Research into Gender in Culture and Society. Regular research seminars and lectures are run through these groups and through the Research Institute for Arts and Humanities (RIAH) giving students including those of the MA in History programme access to cutting-edge research.

Careers

Career expectations are excellent for History graduates. MA degree holders in History may move on to doctoral study or enter employment in such areas as museums, heritage and tourism; marketing, sales and advertising; business, art, design and culture; media and PR; social and welfare professions; humanitarian organisations; the civil service, and education.

Student Quote

“I graduated with a First-Class Honours BA History degree and an MA in History from Swansea University. My four years of study here were truly the most enjoyable of my life so far! The lecturers, tutors and all members of the History department were also incredibly friendly and always willing to help. The History MA was fully funded by a University Alumni bursary. The range of modules available to MA students is exceptional and the facilities here are fantastic. With a designated Arts and Humanities Postgraduate computer room and common-room area, as well as the University’s very own archives, Swansea is a great place to study History.”

Cath Horler, History, MA

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Produce high quality original research in the areas of sport, exercise, nutritional and health sciences. This programme provides an excellent platform for progression to PhD-level study as well as other related career paths. Read more

Summary

Produce high quality original research in the areas of sport, exercise, nutritional and health sciences. This programme provides an excellent platform for progression to PhD-level study as well as other related career paths.

This programme is for students who want to focus on a research topic with a view to create new knowledge within the growing area of sport and exercise science. You will be guided by experts in the field who will support you to produce high quality original research.

You will have the opportunity to work with state-of-the-art equipment in the laboratories. Our expertise will allow students to employ the latest techniques in the pursuit of producing significant and original research that is publishable. Some of the techniques include modified ELISA’s, Real-Time PCR, Western Blot, isotope methodology for metabolism, 2-3D motion analysis using MaxTRAQ and Vicon, force analysis using Kistler force plates and isokinetic dynamometers, muscle ultrasound, and neuromuscular electrical stimulation.

You will automatically gain access to our research community in the Sport and Exercise Science Research Centre (SESRC) and Health Sciences Research Centre (HSRC). The research centres are active in researching diabetes, obesity, diseased and healthy metabolism, neuromuscular function, biomechanics in elite and pathological populations, environmental physiology, nutrition in athletic and chronic diseased populations, protein synthesis and muscle growth, sport & exercise psychology and performance and well-being.

Content

The key modules on this course revolve around you producing a high-level independent research project, which will prepare you for higher levels of research and study.

The course begins with a research methods module which will equip you with a comprehensive understanding of different approaches to research, allowing you to choose the correct method for your project, depending on your specific area of interest. You will study key philosophical questions as to the nature of science and knowledge, and develop a critical awareness of the principles and practice of qualitative and quantitative approaches and techniques. You will also be introduced to the management of ethical issues associated with collecting and analysing data on human participants.

You will also be guided on the development of your research proposal, and be invited to attend the Sport Science Seminars Series to frame your understanding of current sport-related research.

Other modules on the programme allow you to study more in-depth knowledge and gain relevant practical skill in biomechanics, psychology, and/or physiology that are invaluable for your dissertation project.

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If you are an ambitious social science, engineering or mathematics graduate, the internationally-recognised Transport Planning course will equip you with the tools to help address global challenges such as climate change mitigation and reduction through the development of safe and efficient city transport networks and mass public transport. Read more

Overview

If you are an ambitious social science, engineering or mathematics graduate, the internationally-recognised Transport Planning course will equip you with the tools to help address global challenges such as climate change mitigation and reduction through the development of safe and efficient city transport networks and mass public transport.

For those already in the profession, this course is seen in the industry as the passport to recognition by professional bodies.

Be taught by academics with an international reputation whose research sets industry standards, on a course that has been designed in close collaboration with industry. This includes policy, travel behaviour, modelling, data analysis, land use planning, and public transport planning and management using research and evidence from around the world.

Use research models and tools developed by our staff that set industry standards around the world.

A degree in Transport Planning will not only provide you with a deeper understanding of these analytical and predictive tools, but also gives you:
• Hands on experience of collecting and evaluating data: the key to good planning
• Expertise in sustainable spatial analysis
• Deep insights into human travel behaviour to ensure plans are successfully implemented.

And experience what it is like to be part of a project team working across numerous subject boundaries relevant to the transport sector. Through this, gain insights into how transport planning, social science, economics, environmental science, modelling and engineering can work together to design transport solutions to global challenges. This industry-inspired initiative will enable you to apply your knowledge to real world transport issues in the field.

Your colleagues will be among the best and brightest from Latin America to the Far East, from Africa to Europe and the UK. Together you will learn planning techniques that will help you develop transport networks that are founded on robust evidence, sustainable and equitable social principles, state-of-the-art modeling, accurate data analysis, and a profound understanding of human psychology.

You can also study this subject at Postgraduate Diploma level, part time or full time.

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