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Masters Degrees (Cognitive Robotics)

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This MSc course aims to integrate two active and rapidly developing fields, computational neuroscience and cognitive robotics, to generate innovative strategies and solutions for scientific problems and technological limitations. Read more
This MSc course aims to integrate two active and rapidly developing fields, computational neuroscience and cognitive robotics, to generate innovative strategies and solutions for scientific problems and technological limitations.

From modelling human cognition to programming robots to act in their environment, this course crosses the boundary between several disciplines, including biology, neuroscience, psychology, and computer science.

The CNCR MSc course is highly interdisciplinary encompassing psychology, cognitive science, neuroscience, computational modelling, neuroimaging, robotics, and patient rehabilitation. The Course is designed for those who are interested in applying knowledge of neural systems, brain function, and modeling to research in human cognition, perception, sensory and motor systems as well as the design of bio-inspired and biologically plausible robotic systems. It has a strong research focus with hands-on modules and practical applications. The course is aimed at both students from psychology/neuroscience with a strong quantitative background and at students from computer science and physics that want to apply their knowledge to neuroscience.

Employability

You will receive training in computational and research methods, and will gain an overview of current research in neuroscience and robotics. The programme will prepare you to go onto high quality PhD programmes, leading to work in a range of fields from advanced robotics to cognitive neuroscience.

Many of our students receive job offers before they graduate. Recent students have found employment working and training in an IT consultancy; software engineering at Google; and setting up startup companies to develop IT products inspired by human cognition.

Several of our students receive PhD offers before completing the course; one of our recent students will be studying for a PhD in computational neuroscience at University College Dublin with funding secured via a postgraduate award from the Irish Research Council. Others choose to stay at Birmingham for PhD study. The course gives you an opportunity to showcase your talent in the School of Psychology and the School of Computer Science, and to increase your chances of pursuing an academic career within the University of Birmingham.

About the School of Psychology

The School of Psychology is one of the strongest and most active psychology departments in the country. We are ranked among the top five psychology departments for research and have a reputation for excellent teaching.

With around 800 undergraduates, 250 postgraduates including 100 PhD students, and 140 research and teaching staff we are one of the largest psychology departments in the UK.

The School currently has a live research grant portfolio of £14.1m generating an annual income of around £3.8m. Of our 140 staff, 63% are core funded, and 37% are research funded.

The School hosts four specialist research centres:

- Centre for Human Brain Health
- Centre for Applied Psychology
- The Cerebra Centre for Neurodevelopmental Disorders
- Centre for Computational Neuroscience and Cognitive Robotics

Staff and students benefit from our extensive links with local hospitals and clinics, other universities, schools and nurseries, industrial companies and local and national government departments.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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What is intelligent behaviour? How can robots communicate with each other? In this programme you will learn how to design and implement intelligent systems. Read more
What is intelligent behaviour? How can robots communicate with each other? In this programme you will learn how to design and implement intelligent systems.

The core topics in The Master's programme Artificial Intelligence are: autonomous perceptive systems, cognitive robotics and multi-agent systems.

- Autonomous Systems
A robot taking samples and collecting information on the moon is an example of an autonomous system. It operates and carries out missions independently. Regardless of their surroundings, it responds with a certain intelligence. While traditional AI focuses on cognition and reasoning as isolated abilities, we strongly believe in perception as an active behavior, which is integrated into general cognition.

- Cognitive Robotics
The courses taught in the area of cognitive robotics are related to research in social robotics, to the origin of robotic communication and to the way in which robots recognize movement. Research is conducted at the Artificial Intelligence and Cognitive Engineeringinstitute.

- Multi-agent Systems
When a team of robots play footbal they have to communicate and cooperate with each other. This is an example of a multi-agent system. When designing these systems, techniques from computing science and logic are combined with knowledge about the interaction amongst humans and animals.

Why in Groningen?

- Be part of a Programme with excellent reviews
- Challenging graduation projects

Job perspectives

Once you have obtained your Master's degree in Artificial Intelligence, you can apply your skills in research & development, for instance air traffic and space labs, where you make sure that intelligent and innovative technologies are used during the design process. You could also choose to get a job at a research institute where you work as a researcher. This can be done at a university (PhD) or at a research institute like TNO. About 50% of our students chooses a career as a scientist.

Where do graduated master AI students work at the moment? Maarten van Grachten and Mathijs Homminga did the AI master in the old doctoral program and they specialized in very different directions. Mathijs works as a software engineer at the IT-company Evermind. He programs and implements innovative IT-projects for shops. Maarten is doing a PhD in Barcelona where he investigates how a computer can compose jazz music.

Job examples

- Industrial Research & Development
- PhD research position
- Software engineer

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Cognitive Science is a discipline in growing demand, and Edinburgh is a widely recognised leader in this area, with particular strengths in natural language, speech technology, robotics and learning, neural computation and philosophy of the mind. Read more

Programme description

Cognitive Science is a discipline in growing demand, and Edinburgh is a widely recognised leader in this area, with particular strengths in natural language, speech technology, robotics and learning, neural computation and philosophy of the mind.

You will gain a thorough grounding in neural computation, formal logic, computational and theoretical linguistics, cognitive psychology and natural language processing, and through a vast range of optional courses you will develop your own interests in this fascinating field.

Programme structure

You follow two taught semesters of lectures, tutorials, project work and written assignments, after which you will learn research methods before individual supervision for your project and dissertation.

You will choose a ‘specialist area’ within the programme, which will determine the choice of your optional courses. The specialist areas are:

Cognitive Science
Natural Language Processing
Neural Computation and Neuroinformatics

Compulsory courses:

Informatics Research Review
Informatics Research Proposal
Introduction to Java Programming (for students who do not already meet the programming requirements for the taught masters)
Dissertation

There are several optional courses to choose from, such as:

Accelerated Natural Language Processing
Automated Reasoning
Computational Cognitive Neuroscience
Human-Computer Interaction
Machine Learning and Pattern Recognition
Natural Language Understanding
Neural Computation
Text Technologies for Data Science
Bioinformatics
Topics in Cognitive Modelling

Career opportunities

This programme will give you a deep understanding of the expanding domain of cognitive science through formal study and experiments. It is perfect preparation for a rewarding academic or professional career. The quality and reputation of the University, the School of Informatics and this programme will enhance your standing with many types of employer.

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The programme provides you with understanding and experience of the research methods and techniques appropriate for applied settings. Read more
The programme provides you with understanding and experience of the research methods and techniques appropriate for applied settings.

There is a taught component with a focus on the specialist skills and methods required to conduct and evaluate psychological research in clinical settings. There are also two research placements and a final research project which are all supervised by staff affiliated to the Doctorate in Clinical Psychology programme or working in clinical areas.

Successful students should graduate with skills and experience to strengthen their applications for PhD research, DClinPsy training, clinical research and/or Assistant Psychologist posts.

This programme will equip you with research skills that will be helpful when working towards a career in clinical or other applied psychology fields, or in clinical research.

Programme content

The programme will consist of two research placements and a research project, supervised by staff affiliated to the Doctorate in Clinical Psychology programme or working in clinical areas. Taught components cover issues such as:

- Practical, ethical and professional issues in applied research
- Audit, evaluation, and research for service-planning
- Questionnaire design and survey research
- Qualitative research
- Outcome research
- Single case and small n designs
- Writing a literature review
- Interview skills

About the School of Psychology

The School of Psychology is one of the strongest and most active psychology departments in the country. We are ranked among the top five psychology departments for research and have a reputation for excellent teaching.

With around 800 undergraduates, 250 postgraduates including 100 PhD students, and 140 research and teaching staff we are one of the largest psychology departments in the UK.

The School currently has a live research grant portfolio of £14.1m generating an annual income of around £3.8m. Of our 140 staff, 63% are core funded, and 37% are research funded.

The School hosts four specialist research centres:

- Centre for Human Brain Health
- Centre for Applied Psychology
- The Cerebra Centre for Neurodevelopmental Disorders
- Centre for Computational Neuroscience and Cognitive Robotics

Staff and students benefit from our extensive links with local hospitals and clinics, other universities, schools and nurseries, industrial companies and local and national government departments.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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This taught postgraduate course is aimed at students who may not have studied computing exclusively but who have studied a considerable amount of computing already. Read more
This taught postgraduate course is aimed at students who may not have studied computing exclusively but who have studied a considerable amount of computing already.

If you want to become a specialist in a particular area of computing, this course will provide a first crucial step towards that goal.

This specialism focuses on artificial intelligence and knowledge engineering, and the development of computational and engineering models of complex cognitive and social behaviours.

Study areas include: cognitive robotics, complexity, complex systems, computational finance, computer networks, and distributed systems. We also offer specialisms in:

Computational Management Science
Machine Learning
Software Engineering
Secure Software Systems
Visual Information Processing

Each specialism has a flexible mix of breadth and depth, consisting of two or three compulsory modules as well as choices from a selection of core and optional modules.

You choose nine modules, seven of which must be selected from a group of eleven modules appropriate for the specialism.

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As Psychology reaches out to tackle the big questions facing society today, skills and experience in psychological research are becoming more and more in demand. Read more
As Psychology reaches out to tackle the big questions facing society today, skills and experience in psychological research are becoming more and more in demand.

The course is comprised of taught modules, a research placement in a research laboratory and a research project to produce a dissertation. The taught part covers, among other areas, experimental design and analysis, critical thinking and reading, computer use, oral presentation and scientific writing. During the research placement and project, students gain hands-on experience and knowledge in specific topics such as child development, memory, language, learning, motor control, motivation, visual perception or social psychology, appetite, abnormal development, mental health resilience and neuropsychology.

Our MSc in Psychology offers students an exciting course with the flexibility to develop specific interests, whilst at the same time an excellent opportunity to develop the technical and transferable skills needed to succeed in a wide range of research-related jobs.

About the School of Psychology

The School of Psychology is one of the strongest and most active psychology departments in the country. We are ranked among the top five psychology departments for research and have a reputation for excellent teaching.
With around 800 undergraduates, 250 postgraduates including 100 PhD students, and 140 research and teaching staff we are one of the largest psychology departments in the UK.
The School currently has a live research grant portfolio of £14.1m generating an annual income of around £3.8m. Of our 140 staff, 63% are core funded, and 37% are research funded.
The School hosts four specialist research centres:
- Centre for Human Brain Health
- Centre for Applied Psychology
- The Cerebra Centre for Neurodevelopmental Disorders
- Centre for Computational Neuroscience and Cognitive Robotics
Staff and students benefit from our extensive links with local hospitals and clinics, other universities, schools and nurseries, industrial companies and local and national government departments.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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The MA in Psychology offers an excellent opportunity to gain insight and in-depth knowledge of contemporary topics in Psychology. Read more
The MA in Psychology offers an excellent opportunity to gain insight and in-depth knowledge of contemporary topics in Psychology.

This course offers a unique mix of modules that, unlike a more typical MSc, focuses on integrating knowledge in Psychology and communicating those ideas to the public. The course also provides students with a range of transferable skills that are needed to succeed in a wide range of research-knowledge positions. The course is particularly aimed at students who do not want to actively conduct lab-based research, and would prefer to focus on extending their understanding of Psychology and synthesizing current knowledge in new and meaningful ways. Students have the opportunity to build in-depth knowledge in at least two areas of contemporary Psychology, to develop their critical analysis skills, and to hone their science writing and communication skills.

The course is run by one of the largest and most active Psychology departments in Britain with an excellent reputation for both teaching and research.

About the School of Psychology

The School of Psychology is one of the strongest and most active psychology departments in the country. We are ranked among the top five psychology departments for research and have a reputation for excellent teaching.
With around 800 undergraduates, 250 postgraduates including 100 PhD students, and 140 research and teaching staff we are one of the largest psychology departments in the UK.
The School currently has a live research grant portfolio of £14.1m generating an annual income of around £3.8m. Of our 140 staff, 63% are core funded, and 37% are research funded.
The School hosts four specialist research centres:
- Centre for Human Brain Health
- Centre for Applied Psychology
- The Cerebra Centre for Neurodevelopmental Disorders
- Centre for Computational Neuroscience and Cognitive Robotics
Staff and students benefit from our extensive links with local hospitals and clinics, other universities, schools and nurseries, industrial companies and local and national government departments.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

Read less
As Psychology and Neuroscience reach out to tackle the big questions facing society today, skills and experience in new and emerging techniques in brain imaging as they relate to cognitive neuroscience are in demand. Read more
As Psychology and Neuroscience reach out to tackle the big questions facing society today, skills and experience in new and emerging techniques in brain imaging as they relate to cognitive neuroscience are in demand.

The MSc in Brain Imaging and Cognitive Neuroscience is an exciting course that offers students the flexibility to develop specific interests, whilst at the same time an excellent opportunity to develop the technical and transferable skills needed to succeed in a wide range of research-related jobs.

The course uses a range of taught modules, a major research placement module and an independent research project leading to a dissertation.

Key features of the course are:

- One to one contact with research active staff
- An opportunity to specialize in Cognitive Neuroscience, gaining specific skills in neuroimaging and programming
- Find out what’s really hot or not in contemporary Cognitive Neuroscience
- Learn transferable skills that enhance employability

This course offers an excellent opportunity for advanced learning in Brain Imaging and Cognitive Neuroscience. For many students this course helps them to develop a more focused set of interests and skills within Cognitive neuroscience so that they can choose the next career step that is best for them. For others, who have already identified the sub-specialty that fires their career aspirations, the course allows them to delve more deeply into their subject and to gain more specific skills and knowledge needed to build their chosen career. An aim of the course is to give students a boost in securing an interesting and exciting job in the workplace or a place on a high quality PhD course after graduation.

About the School of Psychology

The School of Psychology is one of the strongest and most active psychology departments in the country. We are ranked among the top five psychology departments for research and have a reputation for excellent teaching.

With around 800 undergraduates, 250 postgraduates including 100 PhD students, and 140 research and teaching staff we are one of the largest psychology departments in the UK.

The School currently has a live research grant portfolio of £14.1m generating an annual income of around £3.8m. Of our 140 staff, 63% are core funded, and 37% are research funded.

The School hosts four specialist research centres:

- Centre for Human Brain Health
- Centre for Applied Psychology
- The Cerebra Centre for Neurodevelopmental Disorders
- Centre for Computational Neuroscience and Cognitive Robotics

Staff and students benefit from our extensive links with local hospitals and clinics, other universities, schools and nurseries, industrial companies and local and national government departments.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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We offer excellent research opportunities, supported by our links with local hospitals and clinics, local schools and nurseries, other University departments, industrial companies and departments of local and national government, both in this country and overseas. Read more
We offer excellent research opportunities, supported by our links with local hospitals and clinics, local schools and nurseries, other University departments, industrial companies and departments of local and national government, both in this country and overseas.

There are facilities for Erasmus exchanges with the Universities of Leuven (Belgium), Nijmegen (Netherlands), Copenhagen, Paris and Padova (Italy).

About the School of Psychology

The School of Psychology is one of the strongest and most active psychology departments in the country. We are ranked among the top five psychology departments for research and have a reputation for excellent teaching.
With around 800 undergraduates, 250 postgraduates including 100 PhD students, and 140 research and teaching staff we are one of the largest psychology departments in the UK.
The School currently has a live research grant portfolio of £14.1m generating an annual income of around £3.8m. Of our 140 staff, 63% are core funded, and 37% are research funded.
The School hosts four specialist research centres:
- Centre for Human Brain Health
- Centre for Applied Psychology
- The Cerebra Centre for Neurodevelopmental Disorders
- Centre for Computational Neuroscience and Cognitive Robotics
Staff and students benefit from our extensive links with local hospitals and clinics, other universities, schools and nurseries, industrial companies and local and national government departments.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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Taking BEng (Hons) Robotics to the next level, this MEng course digs deeper into the robotic technologies that are shaping today and tomorrow. Read more
Taking BEng (Hons) Robotics to the next level, this MEng course digs deeper into the robotic technologies that are shaping today and tomorrow. Providing an extra year of insight and training, your learning will be informed by robotics research pushing boundaries worldwide led by our very own teaching staff. You’ll build technical and managerial skills that you can put into practice daily, through a final group project that will set your course for success when you graduate.

You will experience learning that meets the highest standard academic requirements set by The Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET). You will draw on unique opportunities to engage in world-class robotics research, and in a variety of activities. You’ll capitalise on the opportunity to take a work placement in your second or third year, putting your robotics skills into action in the real world. You will take the fastest route to Chartered Engineer status.

Key features

-Benefit from outstanding teaching: in the 2016 National Student Survey 93 per cent of our final year students said that “The course is intellectually stimulating”.*
-Immerse yourself in a degree accredited by the Institution for Engineering and Technology (IET) on behalf of the Engineering Council for the purposes of fully meeting the academic requirement for registration as a Chartered Engineer (CEng).
-Keep pace with the fast-moving world of robotics, on a course that cuts a path through the latest research across technologies and disciplines.
-Take the fastest route to Chartered Engineer status.
-Experience learning that meets the highest standard academic requirements set by The Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET).
-Undertake a major robotics design and implementation in your final project, showcasing your technical and managerial skills. Develop your technical content, legal and business skills as well as team working and project planning.
-Capitalise on the opportunity to take a work placement in your second or third year, putting your robotics skills into action in the real world.
-Rise to the challenge as part of the Plymouth Humanoids team, battling it out in a variety of international robot competitions.
-Develop professional writing skills as well as strengthening your technical design skills.
-Refine your professional project management skills, with dedicated professional support from staff across the entire final year on every different aspect of your project.
-Work alongside internationally-renowned staff in a leading service and cognitive robotics research environment.
-Draw on unique opportunities to engage in world-class robotics research, and in a variety of activities (for example, in the humanoid robot football, Federation of International Robot-soccer Association (FIRA) competition).

Course details

Year 1
In your first year you'll learn through doing, developing your knowledge and practical problem solving skills in our dedicated robotics and communications laboratories. From analogue and digital electronics to engineering mathematics, you'll build up the essential foundations of robotics. Group project work will also help you develop your communication skills and you'll learn structured design procedures for hardware and software all brought together in an integrating robotics project.

Core modules
-ELEC143 Embedded Software in Context
-BPIE112 Stage 1 Electrical/Robotics Placement Preparation
-ELEC141 Analogue Electronics
-ELEC142 Digital Electronics
-ELEC144 Electrical Principles and Machines
-MATH187 Engineering Mathematics

Optional modules
-ELEC137PP Electronic Design and Build
-ROCO103PP Robot Design and Build

Year 2
Throughout your second year, you'll develop a greater understanding of underlying engineering principles and circuit design methods. Again there's an emphasis on team-work, with the opportunity to do both group and individual presentations of your projects. You'll use industrial standard software tools for design and simulation, data monitoring and control, all valuable preparation for your final year individual project or for a placement year.

Core modules
-MATH237 Engineering Mathematics and Statistics
-ROCO222 Introduction to Sensors and Actuators
-BPIE212 Stage 2 Electrical/Robotics Placement Preparation
-ROCO224 Introduction to Robotics
-ROCO218 Control Engineering
-ELEC240 Embedded Systems
-ELEC241 Real Time Systems

Optional placement year
Your optional work placement experience gives opportunities to put theory into practice, grow your understanding of robotics in the real world and showcase your growing expertise. We can help you find industrial placement opportunities in the UK, France, Germany or even Japan. Placements will complement your studies with on-the-ground experience and could lead to final year sponsorship. Many of our graduates are offered permanent jobs with their placement company.

Core modules
-BPIE332 Electrical Industrial Placement

Year 4
This is when your skills, expertise and know how come into their own. Through your individual project you'll consolidate your knowledge, explore and evaluate new technologies and showcase your potential. You'll demonstrate your communication skills in an oral and written presentation of your project. Refining the independent learning skills you've developed throughout the course, you'll build a proactive, imaginative and dynamic approach to learning, vital for your future robotics career.

Core modules
-ROCO318 Mobile and Humanoid Robots
-PROJ324 Individual Project
-ELEC351 Advanced Embedded Programming
-AINT308 Machine Vision and Behavioural Computing

Optional modules
-ELEC345 High Speed Communications
-AINT351 Machine Learning

Final year
The MEng includes additional technical modules and a large interdisciplinary design project. There is also the possibility of continuing your studies to MSc level in the same academic year.

Core modules
-ROCO503 Sensors and Actuators
-ROCO504 Advanced Robot Design
-PROJ515 MEng Project
-AINT512 Science and Technology of Human-Robot Interaction

Every undergraduate taught course has a detailed programme specification document describing the course aims, the course structure, the teaching and learning methods, the learning outcomes and the rules of assessment.

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This MSc is taught at the UK’s longest established centre for artificial intelligence, which remains one of the best in the world. Read more

Programme description

This MSc is taught at the UK’s longest established centre for artificial intelligence, which remains one of the best in the world.

Our research draws on neuroscience, cognitive science, linguistics, computer science, mathematics, statistics and psychology to span knowledge representation and reasoning, the study of brain processes and artificial learning systems, computer vision, mobile and assembly robotics, music perception and visualisation.

We aim to give you practical knowledge in the design and construction of intelligent systems so you can apply your skills in a variety of career settings.

Programme structure

You follow two taught semesters of lectures, tutorials, project work and written assignments, after which you will learn research methods before individual supervision for your project and dissertation.

Compulsory courses:

Informatics Research Review
Informatics Research Proposal
Introduction to Java Programming (for students who do not already meet the programming requirements for the taught masters)
Dissertation

You will choose a 'specialist area' within the programme, which will determine the choice of your optional courses:

Intelligent Robotics
Agents, Knowledge and Data
Machine Learning
Natural Language Processing

You can choose from a variety of optional courses including:

Advanced Vision
Algorithmic Game Theory and Its Applications
Computer Animation and Visualisation
Machine Learning and Pattern Recognition
Natural Language Understanding
Robotics: Science and Systems
Human-Computer Interaction
Software Architecture, Process and Management
Text Technologies for Data Science
Computational Cognitive Neuroscience

Career opportunities

Our students are well prepared for both employment and academic research. The emphasis is on practical techniques for the design and construction of intelligent systems, preparing graduates to work in a variety of specialisms, from fraud detection software to spacecraft control.

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The accredited Master of Science program in Computer Science is a two-year program that has been designed for international and German graduate students. Read more
The accredited Master of Science program in Computer Science is a two-year program that has been designed for international and German graduate students. The curriculum is very flexible. Students can compile their individual study plans based on their background and interests. It is also a very practical program. In addition to lectures and tutorials, students will complete two seminars, one or two projects and the master thesis.

In the beginning students will choose one or two key courses. Key courses are courses which introduce the students to the research areas represented at the Department of Computer Science. The following key courses are offered:

• Algorithm Theory
• Pattern Recognition
• Databases and Information Systems
• Software Engineering
• Artificial Intelligence
• Computer Architecture

After that, students can specialize in one of the following three areas:

• Cyber-Physical Systems
• Information Systems
• Cognitive Technical Systems

Here are some examples of subjects offered in the three specialization areas:

Cyber-Physical Systems:

• Cyber-Physical Systems – Discrete Models
• Cyber-Physical Systems – Hybrid Control
• Real Time Operation Systems and Reliability
• Verification of Embedded Systems
• Test and Reliability
• Decision Procedures
• Software Design, Modeling and Analysis in UML
• Formal Methods for Java
• Concurrency: Theory and Practice
• Compiler Construction
• Distributed Systems
• Constraint Satisfaction Problems
• Modal Logic
• Peer-to-Peer Networks
• Program Analysis
• Model Driven Engineering

Information Systems:

• Information Retrieval Data Models and Query Languages
• Peer-to-Peer Networks
• Distributed Storage
• Software Design, Modeling and Analysis in UML
• Security in Large-Scale Distributed Enterprises
• Machine Learning
• Efficient Route Planning
• Bioinformatics I
• Bioinformatics II
• Game Theory
• Knowledge Representation
• Distributed Systems

Cognitive Technical Systems:

• Computer Vision I
• Computer Vision II
• Statistical Pattern Recognition
• Mobile Robotics II
• Simulation in Computer Graphics
• Advanced Computer Graphics
• AI Planning
• Game Theory
• Knowledge Representation
• Constraint Satisfaction Problems
• Modal Logic
• Reinforcement Learning
• Machine Learning
• Mobile Robotics I

We believe that it is important for computer science students to get a basic knowledge in a field in which they might work after graduation. Therefore, our students have the opportunity to complete several courses and/or a project in one of the following application areas:

• Bioinformatics
• Educational Sciences
• Geosciences
• Cognitive Sciences
• Mathematics
• Medicine
• Meteorology
• Microsystems Engineering
• Physics
• Political Sciences
• Psychology
• Sociology
• Economics

In the last semester, students work on their master’s thesis. They are expected to tackle an actual research question in close cooperation with a professor and his/her staff.

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Understanding naturally intelligent systems, building artificially intelligent systems, and improving the interactions between humans and artificial systems. Read more

Overview

Understanding naturally intelligent systems, building artificially intelligent systems, and improving the interactions between humans and artificial systems.

As humans, we may be intrigued by the complexity of any daily activity. How do we perceive, act, decide, and remember? On the one hand, if we understand how our own intelligence works, we can use this knowledge to make computers smarter. On the other hand, by making computers behave more like humans, we learn more about how our own cognition works.

The AI Master’s programme at Radboud University has a distinctly cognitive focus. This cognitive focus leads to a highly interdisciplinary programme where students gain skills and knowledge from a number of different areas such as mathematics, computer science, psychology and neuroscience combined with a core foundation of artificial intelligence.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/ai

Scientific and practical applications

Slowly the human brain has been revealing its mystery to the scientific community. Now that we are actually able to model and stimulate aspects of cognition, AI researchers have gained a deeper understanding of cognition. At the world-renowned Donders Institute, the Max Planck Institute and various other leading research centres, we train our students to become excellent researchers in this area.

At Radboud University we also teach students how to develop practical applications that will become the next generation of products, apps, therapies and services. Our department has been awarded several prizes for its pioneering role in bringing innovations from science to society, e.g. in Assistive Technology for people with disabilities. You’ll be taught the skills needed to conduct and steer such innovation processes. Many Master’s research projects have both a scientific and a practical component.

Specialisations

Computational modelling is the central methodology taught and used in this programme. Depending on the area of study, the computational models can range from behavioural models of millions of individuals interacting on the web, to functional models of human or robot decision-making, to models of individual or networks of artificial neurons. At Radboud University we offer the following three specialisations (on campus simply known as Computation, Robot and Web):

- Computation in Neural and Artificial Systems
Learn how to create artificial information systems that mimic biological systems as well as how to use theoretical insights from AI to better understand cognitive processing in humans.

- Robot Cognition
Understand all aspects of Human-Robot interaction: the programming that coordinates a robot’s actions with human action as well the human appreciation and trust in the robot.

- Web and Language Interaction
Learn how to build the intelligence used to power the future of the Web.

Research project and Internship

To finalise your AI master's programme, you have the choice of either an Internship (18EC) and Research Project (30EC) or a single larger Extended Research Project (48EC). During the internship you have the chance to acquire additional AI relevant skills either at a research lab or at a company. During the Research Projects phase, you get to put what you have learned during your master's programme into practice. You can perform your research work in the AI department, at other research departments at the University (e.g. the Behaviour Science Institute or Donders Institute) or at an external company (such as Philips or TNO). You are also encouraged to go abroad for your internship and/or research project (previously students have gone to Stanford University in California and Aldebaran Robotics in Paris). To help you decide on a thesis topic, there is an annual Thesis Fair where academics and companies present possible project ideas.

Job opportunities

Our Artificial Intelligence graduates have excellent job prospects and are often offered a job before they have actually graduated. Many of our graduates go on to do a PhD either at a major research institute or a university with an AI department. Other graduates have started their own companies or work for companies interested in cognitive design and research.

Find out how to apply here http://www.ru.nl/masters/ai

Meet Radboud University

- Information for international students
Radboud University would like to meet you in your country (http://www.ru.nl/meetus) in order to give all the information you need and to answer any questions you might have about studying in the Netherlands. In the next few months, an advisor of Radboud University will be attending fairs in various countries, always accompanied by a current or former student.
Furthermore, we understand if you would like to see the Radboud Campus and the city of Nijmegen, which is why we organise an Master's Open Day for international students (http://www.ru.nl/openday) which will take place on 5 March 2016.

- Information for Dutch students
Radboud University offers students in the Netherlands plenty of opportunities to get more information on your programme of choice, or get answers to any questions you might have and more. Apart from a Master's Evening and a Master's Day, we also organise Orientation Days and a Master’s Afternoon for HBO students.

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Understanding all aspects of Human-Robot interaction. the programming that coordinates a robot’s actions with human action as well the human appreciation and trust in the robot. Read more
Understanding all aspects of Human-Robot interaction: the programming that coordinates a robot’s actions with human action as well the human appreciation and trust in the robot.
At present, there are many sensors and actuators in every device – so they may become embedded in a physical reality. For robots that move around in a specific setting there is a pressing need for the development of proper methods of control and joint-action. The embedded, embodied nature of human cognition is an inspiration for this, and vice versa. Computational modelling of such tasks can give insight into the nature of human mental processing. In the Master’s specialisation in Robot Cognition you’ll learn all about the sensors, actuators and the computational modelling that connects them.
Making sense of sensor data – developing artificial perception – is no trivial task. The perception, recognition and even appreciation of sound stimuli for speech and music (i.e. auditory scene analysis) require modelling and representation at many levels and the same holds for visual object recognition and computer vision. In this area, vocal and facial expression recognition (recognition of emotion from voices and faces) is a rapidly growing application area. In the area of action and motor planning, sensorimotor integration and action, there are strong links with research at the world-renowned Donders Centre for Cognition.
At Radboud University we also look beyond the technical side of creating robots that can move, talk and interpret emotions as humans do. We believe that a robot needs to do more than simply function to its best ability. A robot that humans distrust will fail even if it is well programmed. Culture also plays a role in this; people in Japan are more open to the possibilities of robots than in, for example, the Netherlands. We will teach you how to evaluate humans’ attitudes towards a robot in order to use that information to create robots that will be accepted and trusted and therefore perform even better.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/ai/robot

Why study Robot Cognition at Radboud University?

- We offer a great mix of technical and social aspects of robot cognition.

- This programme focuses on programming robot behaviours and evaluating them rather than building the robots themselves. We teach you to programme robots that will be used in close contact with human beings, for example in healthcare and education, rather than in industry.

- Our cognitive focus leads to a highly interdisciplinary AI programme where students gain skills and knowledge from a number of different areas such as mathematics, computer science, psychology and neuroscience combined with a core foundation of artificial intelligence.

- This specialisation offers plenty of room to create a programme that meets your own academic and professional interests.

- Together with the world-renowned Donders Institute, the Max Planck Institute and various other leading research centres in Nijmegen, we train our students to become excellent researchers in AI.

- To help you decide on a research topic there is a semi-annual Thesis Fair where academics and companies present possible project ideas. Often there are more project proposals than students to accept them, giving you ample choice. We are also open to any of you own ideas for research.

- Our AI students are a close-knit group; they have their own room in which they often get together to interact, debate and develop their ideas. Every student also receives personal guidance and supervision from a member of our expert staff.

Our research in this field

The programme is closely related to the research carried out in the internationally renowned Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour. This institute has several unique facilities for brain imaging using EEG, fMRI and MEG. You could also cooperate with the Behavioural Science Institute and work in its Virtual Reality Laboratory, which can be used to study social interaction between humans and avatars.

An example of a possible thesis subject:
- Engaging human-robot interactions in healthcare for children and/or the elderly
Social robots are often deployed with 'special' user groups such as children and elderly people. Developing and evaluating robot behaviours for these user groups is a challenge as a proper understanding of their cognitive and social abilities is needed. Depending on the task, children for example need to be engaged and encouraged in a different way than adults do. What are effective robot behaviours and strategies to engage children and/or elderly people? How can these robot behaviours be evaluated in a proper way?

Career prospects

Our Artificial Intelligence graduates have excellent job prospects and are often offered a job before they have actually graduated. Many of our graduates go on to do a PhD either at a major research institute or university with an AI department. Other graduates work for companies interested in cognitive design and research. Examples of companies looking for AI experts with this specialisation: Philips, Siemens, Honda, Mercedes, Google. Some students have even gone on to start their own companies.

Job positions

Examples of jobs that a graduate of the specialisation in Robot Cognition could get:
- PhD Researcher on Cognitive-Affective Modelling for Social Robots
- PhD Researcher on Automatic analysis of human group behaviour in the presence of robots
- PhD Researcher on Automatic analysis of affective quality of conversations in human-robot interaction
- Advisor and innovation manager in the healthcare industry
- Social robotics and affective computing for robots expressing emotions
- Developer of control algorithms for using optic flow in drones
- Advisor for start-up company on developing new uses for tactile displays
- Team member in design of emotion recognition and training for autistic children

Internship

Half of your second year consists of an internship, giving you plenty of hands-on experience. We encourage students to do this internship abroad, although this is not mandatory. We do have connections with companies abroad, for example in China, Finland and the United States.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/ai/robot

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Targeted action. there is more to it than you think. How do you pick out your own glass of beer out of all the other glasses on the bar? How do you find your way in a building? How do you walk from one room to the other - and how do you do that with your eyes closed?. Read more

Master's specialisation in Perception, Action and Control

Targeted action: there is more to it than you think
How do you pick out your own glass of beer out of all the other glasses on the bar? How do you find your way in a building? How do you walk from one room to the other - and how do you do that with your eyes closed?
How do you perceive colour under constantly changing lighting conditions? How does a tennis player prepare himself to return a ball which yet has to be played? And what role do eye and head movements play in this? How are we able to write?
Catching a ball, grabbing a cup, writing down a sentence: these are all targeted actions that you often perform without thinking about them. Performing perceptuomotor tasks as a team such as in sports, understanding the actions of others, joint action in collaborative and competitive contexts: these are examples of hot topics in social neurocognition in which Nijmegen scientists are highly interested.
To patients who suffered a brain haemorrhage automatic actions come not so naturally any more. They find it extremely difficult to perform them. Why is that? Which neurocognitive processes play a role in these actions? That is what researchers who study perception and action want to discover.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/cns/perception

General requirements:

- Bachelor's degree
The graduation date of the last attained BA/BSc degree relevant for this programme must be within five years of applying to the programme.

- English skills
The Cognitive Neuroscience Master's programme (MSc CNS) is an English programme: all courses and examinations are taught in English. For the general language requirements of the Radboud University click here. Foreign students please note that the MSc CNS programme requires the following minimum scores: TOEFL: 600 (paper-based test), 250 (computer-based test), 100 (internet-based test); IELTS 7.0 or higher.

- Mathematics & Physics
Students who did not follow physics in their high school curriculum and/or who have not been trained in mathematics at level B (including concepts such as matrix algebra, differentiation, integration, complex numbers), are advised before the start of the programme to work on the assignment in Chapters 1, 2, 7, 8 and 11 (three chapters on physics and two on mathematics) of R.K. Hobbie: "Intermediate Physics for Medicine and Biology", Springer Verlag, New York, 1997; third edition, ISBN 1-56396-458-9).

Career prospects

If you have successfully completed the specialisation Perception, Action and Control you will have ample experience in current research and analysis techniques in perception, three-dimensional motor research, psychophysiological studies, neuroimaging and electromyographical studies. You will also be able to apply formal theories on and models of perceptive functions, sensomotor functions, and complex actions in your research.
With this educational background you may find a position with one of the industrial or non-industrial research institutes in the Netherlands or abroad (e.g. traffic research, man-machine interaction, etc.). Also in health care there is an increasing demand for cognitive neuroscientists, for example, in rehabilitation centres.

Our approach to this field

Perception, Action & Control is a central research area within different faculties of Radboud University. It is aimed at the three basic components of current Cognitive Neuroscience: modelling (e.g. in physics), designing and conducting behavioural studies (e.g. in psychology) and measuring the neurobiological foundations of behaviour. The various research groups of the Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour that study these processes use a wide range of modern research facilities which enables them to provide natural stimuli and measure complex everyday behaviour. The close cooperation between the various disciplines also characterises the content of the courses in this specialisation.

Our research in this field

Researchers working on Perception Action and Control study sensorimotor mechanisms, their cognitive and social components, their clinical implications, and their relevance for robotics.

The PAC theme is closely integrated with the RadboudUMC themes Disorders of movementand Stress-related disorderslead by Bas Bloem and Aart Schene respectively. An overview of RadboudUMC themes can be found here https://www.radboudumc.nl/Research/Themes/Pages/default.aspx .

Research methods include theoretical analysis, psychophysical and behavioural studies, neurophysiological techniques, neuroimaging, clinical and pharmacological interventions, developmental and genetic approaches.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/cns/perception

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