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The School of English at Nottingham has long been in the forefront of research and teaching in the interface between language, literature and culture. Read more
The School of English at Nottingham has long been in the forefront of research and teaching in the interface between language, literature and culture.

The MA Literary Linguistics provides an exciting opportunity to explore the interface of language, cognition, literature and culture. You will work with several leading world figures while discovering your own position as a stylician. The programme covers a wide range of material, with options to develop your own thinking and pursue your own interests and research.

The principle of language study that we have established at Nottingham combines theoretical and ideological dimensions with practical applications. We believe in a humane linguistics and a rational approach to literary scholarship.

This course explores the role of language in literature using a variety of approaches, ranging from discourse analysis to corpus linguistics and cognitive poetics. We believe that linguistics and literary study cannot be separated, and we aim to turn you into a creative-thinking interdisciplinary expert in literary linguistics.

Key facts

The key features of this course include a theoretical grounding in research methodology and linguistic description; one-to-one tuition with expert members of staff; teaching informed by active leading-edge researchers in the field; innovative and engaging teaching methods; access to many online resources and flexibility in course content.
The MA Literary Linguistics is one of the most prestigious programmes in the world, established for over 50 years
This MA is convened in the Centre for Research in Applied Linguistics.
The MA Literary Linguistics is also available as a web-based distance learning course.
The School was ranked 7th for English in The Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2015 and 9th in the UK for 'research power' (REF 2014).

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You’ll study the sociocultural, historical and structural complexities of the English language with the possibility to study other modern languages as well, if you choose. Read more

About the course

You’ll study the sociocultural, historical and structural complexities of the English language with the possibility to study other modern languages as well, if you choose.

There are four pathways to choose from: Literary Linguistics, Social and Historical Approaches, Structural and Theoretical Linguistics, and Modern Languages (co-run with the School of Modern Languages and Cultures). You can follow one exclusively or combine the four.

The Literary Linguistics pathway examines a range of approaches to literary linguistic study including cognitive poetics, corpus stylistics and narratology; Social and Historical Approaches investigates complex real-world language problems in different social and historical contexts; Structural and Theoretical Linguistics explores the foundational mental structures and processes underlying language; and Modern Languages offers students the opportunity to study similar aspects of Slavic, Germanic and/or Romance languages.

As your understanding of theory develops, you’ll learn how to analyse language and how to carry out research projects. If you choose a work placement, you might also develop skills in marketing, archiving, teaching or publishing.

Your career

Our graduates are working in teaching (primary, secondary, FE, HE and TESOL), publishing, marketing, libraries, fundraising, charities and the public sector. A masters from Sheffield is a sound basis for a PhD at any leading university.

How we teach

Our expertise covers all aspects of the subject, so whatever you’re interested in you’ll get the best possible advice and support. We provide training in research methods and you can choose to go on a work placement as part of your course.

You’ll be taught by academics whose work is published internationally. Their specialisms include language acquisition, historical language studies, applied linguistics, literary linguistics, discourse analysis and sociolinguistics.

We have a lively research culture. Through lectures and weekly seminars we’ll introduce you to the latest ideas. You’ll have the opportunity to explore these ideas in your own research.

With the School of Languages and Cultures, we established the new University Centre for Linguistic Research to gather and support postgraduate linguistics research across the University.

Our resources

We have specialist recording equipment for fieldwork and experimental work. Interactive computer-based workshops will introduce you to corpus-linguistic technology.

The University library subscribes to several electronic databases including JStor, Early English Texts online and Eighteenth-century Collections online. For more advanced reading, there’s a regular free minibus service to the British Library at Boston Spa.

Core module

Research Methods.

Examples of optional modules

Linguistics in Context; Linguistics in Practice; Research Practice; Literary Language: narrative and cognition; Literary Language: history and culture; Work Placement with Research Project.

Teaching and assessment

The MA offers world-leading expertise in all areas of English language and linguistics, and is therefore capable of offering the best possible support for students’ interests on any topic. You’ll benefit from our expertise in many fields, from language variation and change, psycholinguistics and syntax to conversation analysis, dialectology and the language–literature interface. Our enthusiastic staff publish internationally. Within the School of English, we hold weekly research seminars which give you the chance to hear about the latest developments.

You’ll be taught through seminars and workshops. There are also work placement opportunities in schools, museums, libraries or local businesses. Assessment varies by module, but includes essays and presentations.

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This module brings literature and linguistics together. Through a series of interdisciplinary modules, you’ll explore the language of literature. Read more

About the course

This module brings literature and linguistics together. Through a series of interdisciplinary modules, you’ll explore the language of literature. Subjects include: stylistics, cognitive poetics, postcolonial language and literatures, and the history of literary and linguistic thought.

Your career

You’ll examine early modern texts, language and culture. Staff expertise includes palaeography, rhetoric, news writing, the sermon, drama, and issues of political, sectarian and national identity between 1400 and 1700. Modules (including modules from History) can be tailored to suit your interests. You’ll complete one core module, optional modules and a dissertation.

Cultural life

There is always something going on, and there are plenty of chances to get involved. We have extensive links with arts and heritage organisations including Arts Council England and Sheffield Theatres. Recent poetry readings featured Carol Ann Duffy and Ciaran Carson. Our Arts/Science Encounters events bring together musicians, writers, architects and academics to explore ideas. The English Society, run by our students, organises theatre trips, guest lectures, and seminars. Students also get the chance to take part in drama and readings.

First-rate facilities

We’re based in a brand new building at the heart of the campus. There are computer workstations especially for postgraduates and a DVD library with viewing facilities. Our theatre workshop is a fully equipped teaching/performance area with excellent film-viewing facilities and audio suites.

Specialist resources

The University Library subscribes to the major periodicals and full-text electronic archives, including Early English Books Online and Eighteenth-Century Collections Online. Special collections include an outstanding collection of Restoration drama, the Hope Collection of eighteenth-century periodicals, the Jack Rosenthal scripts collection, and papers of contemporary writers such as Anita Brookner, Marina Warner, Fay Weldon and Peter Redgrove.

Funding

There are a number of studentships and fee bursaries available, funded by the University. Deadlines for funding applications are usually in winter/early spring. For details, see our website.

Research training for PhD

If you intend to progress to a PhD, your course can be tailored to include essential research training. The same applies to students on the online course.

Part-time study

Part-time students usually take one taught module in each semester. In the second year, you’ll also take a dissertation module. For most courses, you’ll need to come in for one half-day per week. The MA Creative Writing is taught in the evening. Some modules, such as Theatre and Performance, may require greater time commitment. We try to be as flexible as possible to accommodate the different needs of our students.

Core modules

Literary Language: narrative and cognition; Literary Language: history and culture.

Examples of optional modules

May include: Literature and Language in the Workplace; Exchanging Letters; Contemporary Poetry; Memory and Narrative; Languages of the British Isles.

Teaching and assessment

Teaching is by seminars. You’re assessed on your essays, coursework and a 15,000-word dissertation.

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Our MA English Literature is an open and flexible programme designed to give you the possibility of exploring the full diversity of English literature. Read more
Our MA English Literature is an open and flexible programme designed to give you the possibility of exploring the full diversity of English literature.

We want you to join in the debates over the nature of literature, the future of English literature, and the past and new cultural experiences of writing and communication which are shaping our lives, with our team of active researchers and committed teachers.

We see research as a public activity, and the course offers ways in which to explore the research process as engagement in the cultural conversation.

Our modules offer the opportunity to research a diverse range of literary periods and forms – from the Early Modern to Contemporary fiction, engaging with genres including historical fiction, fantasy literature, modernism, e-writing, and film.

The MA also explores a wide range of critical and theoretical approaches, including historical and textual analysis, ethical reading, cognitive poetics, and critical theory.

Home Tuition Fees for 2017

1 Year full time: £6300.00

Part time - Module Fee £1050.00. Dissertation Fee £2100.00

Alumni discount 10% for students applying within five years of completion of an undergraduate course at Chichester.

Overseas Fees 2017 £10,920.00

Please take the time to look out for updates on our funding page: http://www.chi.ac.uk/study-us-0/fees-finance/funding-and-money-advice-0/funding-postgraduate-students

Our facilities
The Department of English and Creative Writing is a thriving and successful Department, with a staff of active researchers and committed teachers.

The Department hosts the Centre for Research in Folklore, Fairytales and Fantasy, the South Coast Eighteenth-Century and Romantic Research Group, which hold regular research events, alongside a full Departmental programme, including film showings, visiting speakers, and theatre talks.

Recent visiting speakers include Dame Gillian Beer, Professor Jacqueline Simpson, Dr Frances White, and Professor Jacqueline Labbe.

In collaboration with our colleagues in Creative Writing, we also have regular events with writers and poets Simon Brett, Matthew Sweeney, Mavis Cheek, Helen Dunmore, Michele Roberts, and Jo Shapcott.

The Department has close contact with local cultural institutions: the Chichester Festival Theatre, Pallant House Gallery, the Chichester Public Records Office, and other local institutions.

These offer you further research opportunities. Chichester and the local area has a strong literary history, attracting writers from the eighteenth-century radicals William Blake and Charlotte Smith, to H. G. Wells and Mervyn Peake.

Learning Resource Centre

The Learning Resource is the hub of the learning environment. It has two upper floors of library resources, one for silent study and one for quiet study, both of which have recently been refurbished.

On the ground floor, you’ll find the Support and Information Zone, Media Centre, Otter Gallery, Costa Coffee and a variety of IT resources.

The Bishop Otter LRC also offers:

130 open access PC workstations
45 Apple iMacs
Ample printing facilities
Netbooks available on loan
Professional editing suites
Media loans counter
Wi-Fi and plug points throughout
Where this can take you
Our MA is designed to transform you into an active and confident researcher in the broad field of English Literature.

The course is a gateway to PhD research, providing an opportunity to focus your research, develop your independence in a supportive environment, and refine your research skills.

The MA is also for anyone who wants to develop their skills, subject knowledge, and confidence in research and the presentation of research.

It is particularly relevant for careers in research-related fields, from librarianship to arts management, for teachers in English Literature and related subjects, and for careers requiring high-level abilities in writing, presentation, and critical analysis.

Indicative modules
Literature in the Present Moment

What is literature and how do we think literature today? The concept of ‘literature’ is crucial and elusive, expanding under the impact of digitalisation and new forms of creative and critical writing. In this course students will explore new techniques in archival research, issues in intellectual history, theoretical developments, and the transformations of the very concept of ‘literature’, past and present.

Theatres of Pain and Pleasure, 1400-1700

Focusing on the Renaissance stage this course explores the theatre as a site of bodies engaged with forms of pain and pleasure: crime, sexuality, war and religion. Ranging across Shakespeare, Jacobean Tragedy, and Restoration Comedy, you will explore the space of the city and a rich diversity of sites, local and national, of theatrical representation.

Visions of the Real: Literature, Myth, and Science, 1800-Present

Fiction has always has a tense relationship with reality. Is fiction more real than reality, as literary characters come to ‘life’, or is fiction a betrayal of reality? In this course you will engage with the blurred lines between literature, science and myth. From the moment of the Enlightenment and Romanticism, in tension between the ‘clear’ vision of reality and the power of myth, the course traces out the crisis of realism, from fantasy literature to modernism to the avant-garde.

Activating Research

How do you become a researcher? Exploring the research process as one that involves integrating a range of ‘voices’, from primary texts, archives, peers, critical and theoretical work, and audience, this course gives you the capacity to engage with this diversity. While research is often presented as an intensely private and personal activity, this course will help you develop your research project as a public process, giving you the tools to find your own critical voice and the confidence to engage with peers, the academic community, and the public.

Teaching and Assessment
You will be assessed over four modules, three with an assessment of an essay of 5,000 words.

The module on ‘activating research’ will be assessed by a presentation (25%) and a written submission (3000 words).

The Dissertation will be a 15,000 assessment.

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The UBC English Graduate Program, one of the most vibrant and wide-ranging in Canada, has been awarding the M.A. degree since 1919 and the PhD degree since 1962. Read more

About the Graduate Program

The UBC English Graduate Program, one of the most vibrant and wide-ranging in Canada, has been awarding the M.A. degree since 1919 and the PhD degree since 1962. Students may earn these degrees in each of two areas: English Literature and English Language. Indeed, the UBC English Department is one of the few departments in North America to offer a language program in addition to its literary programs.

English Language

The English Language program includes specializations in history and structure of language, discourse and genre analysis, and history and theory of rhetoric. Faculty members in the Language program teach and supervise research in descriptive linguistics, historical linguistics, cognitive linguistics, functional grammar, semantics, pragmatics, discourse analysis, stylistics, genre studies, and history and theory of rhetoric. Students in the English Literature program can take advantage of Language graduate courses; recent offerings include courses on reported speech and its rhetorical versatility across genres; the uses of classical rhetoric for contemporary critical practice; and cognitive approaches to the language of literature. By the same token, Language students can take advantage of the wide variety of Literature courses our department offers.

English Literature

The English Literature program includes specializations across the periods, genres, and major figures of British, North American and World Literature in English. Current research initiatives on the part of faculty include such diverse topics as the ecocritical study of Renaissance drama; the triumph of transport in Romantic poetry; the impact of radio and television on modernist poetics; the politics of post-identity in Asian American literature, and the role of war and its traumatic shocks in twentieth-century Canadian, U.S. and British literature. Graduate students can also choose to work across disciplinary fields, taking advantage of UBC's outstanding interdisciplinary programs in Medieval Studies, Canadian and U.S. Studies, Studies in Sexuality, and Science and Technology Studies, among others.

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Our MMus programme is distinctive in its range of musicological, compositional and performance-based elements. Read more
Our MMus programme is distinctive in its range of musicological, compositional and performance-based elements.

You will benefit from the diversity of our research strengths, numerous ensemble performance opportunities and expertise in a range of musical fields, including contemporary music for the concert hall, popular music, film music, opera, acoustic, electronic and computer-generated music.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

The Composition pathway of the MMus Music programme is designed to develop your individual compositional style and technique through tutorial guidance and opportunities for performances, workshops and recordings.

Various stylistic and generic strands can be pursued individually or in combination, including jazz, music for screen and multimedia, contemporary music for the concert hall and computer sound design.

You will take two compulsory research training modules followed by a combination of composition-related options. Having completed the Postgraduate Diploma stage of the programme, you will progress to Masters stage and submit a composition folio.

The programme provides ideal preparation for future research work at PhD level.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time students must study at least two taught technical modules per academic year. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Research Training for Practitioners A
-Research Training for Practitioners B
-Composition A
-Composition B
-Composition Folio
-Studio Techniques
-Performance A
-Conducting A
-Orchestral Management 1
-Creative Practice A
-Rock Track Poetics
-African American Music
-Historical Performance Practice
-Compositional Techniques
-Contemporary Issues in the Cultural Industries
-English Music from Elgar to Britten
-Synthesis and Music Programming
-Screen Music Studies
-Performance A
-Performance B
-Conducting B
-Orchestral Management 2
-Digital Music Improvisation 2
-Anglo Celtic Song Traditions
-Jazz Studies 2
-Opera Studies
-Baroque Fugue in Practice
-Applied Music 2
-Musical Theatre

RESEARCH

Our work achieves wide international circulation, both through established scholarly channels and, distinctively, through broadcast media (such as BBC TV, Channel 4, BBC Radio 3 and Radio 4, and National Public Radio in the USA).

School staff are much in demand for pre-concert talks at venues such as London’s South Bank and Barbican centres. The research environment at Surrey is sustained by open discussion and debate, and through the regular airing of work-in-progress.

Our work is strengthened by the ready input of our peers and research students at various stages allowing collective engagement to foster innovation.

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The MMus (Composition) programme aims to provide students with a high quality education in the creative, re-creative, technical, critical, vocational and academic areas of the subject. It aims to provide students with the necessary skills, techniques and methodologies to work at an advanced level with a critical awareness of the discipline.

The programme aims to reflect current developments within the theory and practice of music composition and, in so doing, to educate students so that they may work confidently and constructively within the musical culture of the present.

The programme aims to offer the necessary preparation for students wishing to undertake doctoral level study in practice-based areas.

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:

Knowledge and understanding
-Research methods and resources and how these may be used to interpret knowledge
-Interdisciplinarity within music and arts research
-The broad range of approaches to the present day theory and practice of music to the level necessary for their original application

Intellectual / cognitive skills
-Frame research questions
-Critically assess, respond to and operate in current areas of musical research and practice
-Reflect critically on and contextualise personal practice

Professional practical skills
-Produce stylistically original and technically professional compositions

Key / transferable skills
-Communicate subject knowledge clearly
-Self-direction and autonomy
-Originality in problem solving
-Work in and manage groups
-Efficient time management

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

Read less
Our MMus programme is distinctive in its range of musicological, compositional and performance-based elements. Read more
Our MMus programme is distinctive in its range of musicological, compositional and performance-based elements.

You will benefit from the diversity of our research strengths, numerous ensemble performance opportunities and expertise in a range of musical fields, including contemporary music for the concert hall, popular music, film music, opera, acoustic, electronic and computer-generated music.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

The Conducting pathway is only available part-time. It is designed to develop conducting techniques to a professional level, and to enhance the understanding of relevant theoretical principles.

You will attend conducting classes (including score analysis and preparation, rehearsal techniques, gestural techniques, critical analysis of recordings) and contribute to rehearsals with the Symphony Orchestra, Chamber Orchestra, ensembles and Chamber Choir.

Two compulsory research training modules are followed by a combination of specialism-related modules and optional modules.

Having completed the Postgraduate Diploma stage of the programme, you will progress to Masters stage and complete your final portfolio of work.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time students must study at least two taught technical modules per academic year. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Research Training for Practitioners A
-Research Training for Practitioners B
-Conducting A
-Conducting B
-Advanced Conducting
-Composition A
-Studio Techniques
-Performance A
-Orchestral Management 1
-Rock Track Poetics
-African American Music
-Historical Performance Practice
-Compositional Techniques
-Contemporary Issues in the Cultural Industries
-English Music from Elgar to Britten
-Synthesis and Music Programming
-Composition B
-Screen Music Studies
-Performance B
-Conducting B
-Orchestral Management 2
-Digital Music Improvisation 2
-Anglo Celtic Song Traditions
-Jazz Studies 2
-Opera Studies
-Baroque Fugue in Practice
-Applied Music 2
-Musical Theatre

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The MMus (Conducting) programme aims to provide students with a high quality education in the creative, re-creative, technical, critical, vocational and academic areas of the subject. It aims to provide students with the necessary skills, techniques and methodologies to work at an advanced level with a critical awareness of the discipline.

The programme aims to reflect current developments within the theory and practice of music composition and, in so doing, to educate students so that they may work confidently and constructively within the musical culture of the present.

The programme aims to offer the necessary preparation for students wishing to undertake doctoral level study in practice-based areas.

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:
-Knowledge and understanding
-Research methods and resources and how these may be used to interpret knowledge
-Interdisciplinarity within music and arts research
-The broad range of approaches to the present day theory and practice of music to the level necessary for their original application

Intellectual / cognitive skills
-Frame research questions
-Critically assess, respond to and operate in current areas of musical research and practice
-Reflect critically on and contextualise personal practice

Professional practical skills
-Rehearse and conduct a range of ensembles to the standard required of public performance
-Score reading skills
-Historical research skills - sources, editions, performance practices, etc

Key / transferable skills
-Communicate subject knowledge clearly
-Self-direction and autonomy
-Originality in problem solving
-Work in and manage groups
-Efficient time management

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

Read less
Our MMus programme is distinctive in its range of musicological, compositional and performance-based elements. Read more
Our MMus programme is distinctive in its range of musicological, compositional and performance-based elements.

You will benefit from the diversity of our research strengths, numerous ensemble performance opportunities and expertise in a range of musical fields, including contemporary music for the concert hall, popular music, film music, opera, acoustic, electronic and computer-generated music.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

The Creative Practice pathway of the MMus Music programme is designed for creative musicians who cannot easily separate performance and composition in their work, for example, musicians working in improvised music, singer-songwriters or those interested in live electronics.

You will take two compulsory research training modules, after which teaching and study progress from closely taught modules designed to secure and extend your technique to more autonomous, project-based learning opportunities.

Having completed the Postgraduate Diploma stage you will progress to Masters stage and submit a final portfolio of work. This portfolio will likely feature a combination of live performance and composition.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time students must study at least two taught technical modules per academic year. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Research Training for Practitioners A
-Research Training for Practitioners B
-Conducting A
-Conducting B
-Advanced Conducting
-Composition A
-Studio Techniques
-Performance A
-Orchestral Management 1
-Rock Track Poetics
-African American Music
-Historical Performance Practice
-Compositional Techniques
-Contemporary Issues in the Cultural Industries
-English Music from Elgar to Britten
-Synthesis and Music Programming
-Composition B
-Screen Music Studies
-Performance B
-Conducting B
-Orchestral Management 2
-Digital Music Improvisation 2
-Anglo Celtic Song Traditions
-Jazz Studies 2
-Opera Studies
-Baroque Fugue in Practice
-Applied Music 2
-Musical Theatre

SELECTION PROCESS

Potential applicants may make an appointment for an informal interview with the Programme Director if practicable. All applicants will be asked either to submit a sample of written work, a DVD of their performance, or samples of their compositional work, or to sit an audition depending on their chosen specialism.

RESEARCH

Our work achieves wide international circulation, both through established scholarly channels and, distinctively, through broadcast media (such as BBC TV, Channel 4, BBC Radio 3 and Radio 4, and National Public Radio in the USA). School staff are much in demand for pre-concert talks at venues such as London’s South Bank and Barbican centres.

The research environment at Surrey is sustained by open discussion and debate, and through the regular airing of work-in- progress. Our work is strengthened by the ready input of our peers and research students at various stages allowing collective engagement to foster innovation.

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The MMus (Creative Practice) programme aims to provide students with a high quality education in the creative, re-creative, technical, critical, vocational and academic areas of the subject. It aims to provide students with the necessary skills, techniques and methodologies to work at an advanced level with a critical awareness of the discipline.

The programme aims to reflect current developments within the theory and practice of music creation that combines performance and composition elements and, in so doing, to educate students so that they may work confidently and constructively within the musical culture of the present.

The programme aims to offer the necessary preparation for students wishing to undertake doctoral level study in practice-based areas.

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:

Knowledge and understanding
-Research methods and resources and how these may be used to interpret knowledge
-Interdisciplinarity within music and arts research
-The broad range of approaches to the present day theory and practice of music to the level necessary for their original application

Intellectual / cognitive skills
-Frame research questions
-Critically assess, respond to and operate in current areas of musical research and practice
-Reflect critically on and contextualise personal practice

Professional practical skills
-Produce original, conceptually rich and explorative creative practice which will likely include (improvised) performance alongside composed material

Key / transferable skills
-Communicate subject knowledge clearly
-Self-direction and autonomy
-Originality in problem solving
-Work in and manage groups
-Efficient time management

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

Read less
Our MMus programme is distinctive in its range of musicological, compositional and performance-based elements. Read more
Our MMus programme is distinctive in its range of musicological, compositional and performance-based elements.

You will benefit from the diversity of our research strengths, numerous ensemble performance opportunities and expertise in a range of musical fields, including contemporary music for the concert hall, popular music, film music, opera, acoustic, electronic and computer-generated music.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

The Musicology pathway of the MMus Music programme is designed to accommodate a flexible approach that reflects staff research expertise, students’ own specialisations and the increasingly polyglot nature of the discipline.

Art and popular music are both catered for within the pathway, drawing on the expertise of staff across these areas.

You will take two compulsory research training modules followed by a combination of compulsory specialism-related modules and optional modules. You may then choose to undertake a dissertation of either 60 or 90 credits.

The programme provides ideal preparation for future research work at PhD level.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time students must study at least two taught technical modules per academic year. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Research Training A
-Research Training B
-Readings in Musicology A
-Readings in Musicology B
-Case Studies A
-Case Studies B
-Dissertation
-Studio Techniques
-Screen Music Studies
-Rock Track Poetics
-African American Music
-Historical Performance Practice
-English Music from Elgar to Britten
-Performance A
-Anglo Celtic Song Traditions
-Jazz Studies 2
-Opera Studies
-Baroque Fugue in Practice
-Musical Theatre

SELECTION PROCESS

Potential applicants may make an appointment for an informal interview with the Programme Director if practicable. All applicants will be asked either to submit a sample of written work, a DVD of their performance, or samples of their compositional work, or to sit an audition depending on their chosen specialism.

RESEARCH

Our work achieves wide international circulation, both through established scholarly channels and, distinctively, through broadcast media (such as BBC TV, Channel 4, BBC Radio 3 and Radio 4, and National Public Radio in the USA). School staff are much in demand for pre-concert talks at venues such as London’s South Bank and Barbican centres.

The research environment at Surrey is sustained by open discussion and debate, and through the regular airing of work-in- progress. Our work is strengthened by the ready input of our peers and research students at various stages allowing collective engagement to foster innovation.

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The MMus (Musicology) programme aims to provide students with a high quality education in the wide range of theoretical perspectives on and methodological approaches to present day musical study.

It aims to provide students with the necessary skills, techniques and methodologies to work at an advanced level with a critical awareness of the discipline.

The programme aims to reflect current developments within the theory and practice of musicology and, in so doing, to educate students so that they may work confidently and constructively within the musicological culture of the present. The programme aims to offer the necessary preparation for students wishing to undertake doctoral level study in practice-based areas.

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:

Knowledge and understanding
-Key questions in contemporary musicology
-Disciplinary overlaps in musicology
-The broad range of approaches to present day musicology

Intellectual / cognitive skills
-Frame research questions
-Critically assess, respond to and operate in current areas of musicology
-Understand what constitutes musicological evidence
-Undertake an advanced research project to an appropriate depth

Professional practical skills
-Writing and delivering conference papers
-Summarising musicological arguments and debates
-Choosing appropriate methodologies
-Accessing appropriate resources
-Communicating understanding clearly in writing
-Structuring a large scale piece of written work

Key / transferable skills
-Communicate and present ideas effectively
-Reason critically
-Organise and plan own work
-Adopt a proactive approach to problem-solving
-Make decisions in complex situations

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

Read less
Our MMus programme is distinctive in its range of musicological, compositional and performance-based elements. Read more
Our MMus programme is distinctive in its range of musicological, compositional and performance-based elements.

You will benefit from the diversity of our research strengths, numerous ensemble performance opportunities and expertise in a range of musical fields, including contemporary music for the concert hall, popular music, film music, opera, acoustic, electronic and computer-generated music.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

The Performance pathway of the MMus Music programme will develop your professional expertise on your instrument/voice within the context of the range of departmental opportunities for performance.

You will be tutored and assessed on one instrument (or voice) by visiting professionals of national and international standing who will guide you in consolidating and developing your technique, repertoire, knowledge and interpretative insight.

The two compulsory research training modules are followed by a combination of specialism-related modules and optional modules. Having completed the Postgraduate Diploma stage of the programme, you will progress to Masters stage and submit a folio of your work.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time students must study at least two taught technical modules per academic year. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Research Training for Practitioners A
-Research Training for Practitioners B
-Conducting A
-Conducting B
-Advanced Conducting
-Composition A
-Studio Techniques
-Performance A
-Orchestral Management 1
-Rock Track Poetics
-African American Music
-Historical Performance Practice
-Compositional Techniques
-Contemporary Issues in the Cultural Industries
-English Music from Elgar to Britten
-Synthesis and Music Programming
-Composition B
-Screen Music Studies
-Performance B
-Conducting B
-Orchestral Management 2
-Digital Music Improvisation 2
-Anglo Celtic Song Traditions
-Jazz Studies 2
-Opera Studies
-Baroque Fugue in Practice
-Applied Music 2
-Musical Theatre

SELECTION PROCESS

Potential applicants may make an appointment for an informal interview with the Programme Director if practicable. All applicants will be asked either to submit a sample of written work, a DVD of their performance, or samples of their compositional work, or to sit an audition depending on their chosen specialism.

RESEARCH

Our work achieves wide international circulation, both through established scholarly channels and, distinctively, through broadcast media (such as BBC TV, Channel 4, BBC Radio 3 and Radio 4, and National Public Radio in the USA). School staff are much in demand for pre-concert talks at venues such as London’s South Bank and Barbican centres.

The research environment at Surrey is sustained by open discussion and debate, and through the regular airing of work-in- progress. Our work is strengthened by the ready input of our peers and research students at various stages allowing collective engagement to foster innovation.

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The MMus (Performance) programme aims to provide students with a high quality education in the creative, re-creative, technical, critical, vocational and academic areas of the subject. It aims to provide students with the necessary skills, techniques and methodologies to work at an advanced level with an critical awareness of the discipline.

The programme aims to reflect current developments within the theory and practice of music performance and, in so doing, to educate students so that they may work confidently and constructively within the musical culture of the present.

The programme aims to offer the necessary preparation for students wishing to undertake doctoral level study in practice-based areas.

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:

Knowledge and understanding
-Research methods and resources and how these may be used to interpret knowledge
-Interdisciplinarity within music and arts research
-The broad range of approaches to the present day theory and practice of music to the level necessary for their original application

Intellectual / cognitive skills
-Frame research questions
-Critically assess, respond to and operate in current areas of musical research and practice
-Reflect critically on and contextualise personal practice

Professional practical skills
-Give authoritative, controlled, informed and technically skilled performances in a live concert situation

Key / transferable skills
-Communicate subject knowledge clearly
-Self-direction and autonomy
-Originality in problem solving
-Work in and manage groups
-Efficient time management

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

Read less

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