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Masters Degrees (Cognitive Anthropology)

We have 16 Masters Degrees (Cognitive Anthropology)

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Anthropology prides itself on its inclusive and interdisciplinary focus. It takes a holistic approach to human society, combining biological and social perspectives. Read more
Anthropology prides itself on its inclusive and interdisciplinary focus. It takes a holistic approach to human society, combining biological and social perspectives.

All of our Anthropology Master’s programmes are recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as having research training status, so successful completion of these courses is sufficient preparation for research in the various fields of social anthropology. Many of our students go on to do PhD research. Others use their Master’s qualification in employment ranging from research in government departments to teaching to consultancy work overseas.

We welcome students with the appropriate background for research. If you wish to study for a single year, you can do the MA or MSc by research, a 12-month independent research project.

If you are interested in registering for a research degree, you should contact the member of staff whose research is the most relevant to your interests. You should include a curriculum vitae, a short (1,000-word) research proposal, and a list of potential funding sources.

About the School of Anthropology and Conservation

Kent has pioneered the social anthropological study of Europe, Latin America, Melanesia, and Central and Southeast Asia, the use of computers in anthropological research, and environmental anthropology in its widest sense (including ethnobiology and ethnobotany).

Our regional expertise covers Europe, the Middle East, Central, Southeast and Southern Asia, Central and South America, Amazonia, Papua New Guinea, East Timor and Polynesia. Specialisation in biological anthropology includes forensics and paleopathology, osteology, evolutionary psychology and the evolutionary ecology and behaviour of great apes.

Course structure

The first year may include coursework, especially methods modules for students who need this additional training. You will work closely with one supervisor throughout your research, although you have a committee of three (including your primary supervisor) overseeing your progress. If you want to research in the area of applied computing in social anthropology, you would also have a supervisor based in the School of Computing.

Research areas

- Social Anthropology

The related themes of ethnicity, nationalism, identity, conflict, and the economics crisis form a major focus of our current work in the Middle East, the Balkans, South Asia, Amazonia and Central America, Europe (including the United Kingdom), Oceania and South-East Asia.

Our research extends to inter-communal violence, mental health, diasporas, pilgrimage, intercommunal trade, urban ethnogenesis, indigenous representation and the study of contemporary religions and their global connections.

We research issues in fieldwork and methodology more generally, with a strong and expanding interest in the field of visual anthropology. Our work on identity and locality links with growing strengths in customary law, kinship and parenthood. This is complemented by work on the language of relatedness, child health and on the cognitive bases of kinship terminologies.

A final strand of our research focuses on policy and advocacy issues and examines the connections between morality and law, legitimacy and corruption, public health policy and local healing strategies, legal pluralism and property rights, and the regulation of marine resources.

- Environmental Anthropology and Ethnobiology

Work in these areas is focused on the Centre for Biocultural Diversity. We conduct research on ethnobiological knowledge systems and other systems of environmental knowledge as well as local responses to deforestation, climate change, natural resource management, medical ethnobotany, the impacts of mobility and displacement and the interface between conservation and development. Current projects include trade in materia medica in Ladakh and Bolivia, food systems, ethno-ornithology, the development of buffer zones for protected areas and phytopharmacy among migrant diasporas.

- Digital Anthropology: Cultural Informatics, Social Invention and Computational Methods

Since 1985, we have been exploring and applying new approaches to research problems in anthropology – often, as in the case of hypermedia, electronic and internet publishing, digital media, expert systems and large-scale textual and historical databases, up to a decade before other anthropologists. Today, we are exploring cloud media, semantic networks, multi-agent modelling, dual/blended realities, data mining, smart environments and how these are mediated by people into new possibilities and capabilities.

Our major developments have included advances in kinship theory and analysis supported by new computational methods within field-based studies and as applied to detailed historical records; qualitative analysis of textual and ethnographic materials; and computer-assisted approaches to visual ethnography. We are extending our range to quantitative approaches for assessing qualitative materials, analysing social and cultural invention, the active representation of meaning, and the applications and implications of mobile computing, sensing and communications platforms and the transformation of virtual into concrete objects, institutions and structures.

- Biological Anthropology

Biological Anthropology is the newest of the University of Kent Anthropology research disciplines. We are interested in a diverse range of research topics within biological and evolutionary anthropology. These include bioarchaeology, human reproductive strategies, hominin evolution, primate behaviour and ecology, modern human variation, cultural evolution and Palaeolithic archaeology. This work takes us to many different regions of the world (Asia, Africa, Europe, the United States), and involves collaboration with international colleagues from a number of organisations. We have a dedicated research laboratory and up-to-date computing facilities to allow research in many areas of biological anthropology.

Currently, work is being undertaken in a number of these areas, and research links have been forged with colleagues at Kent in archaeology and biosciences, as well as with those at the Powell- Cotton Museum, the Budongo Forest Project (Uganda) and University College London.

Kent Osteological Research and Analysis (KORA) offers a variety of osteological services for human remains from archaeological contexts.

Careers

Higher degrees in anthropology create opportunities in many employment sectors including academia, the civil service and non-governmental organisations through work in areas such as human rights, journalism, documentary film making, environmental conservation and international finance. An anthropology degree also develops interpersonal and intercultural skills, which make our graduates highly desirable in any profession that involves working with people from diverse backgrounds and cultures.

Many of our students go on to do PhD research. Others use their Master’s qualification in employment ranging from research in government departments to teaching to consultancy work overseas.

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Research within this area centres on ethnobiological knowledge systems and other systems of environmental knowledge and is supported by members of the Centre for Biocultural Diversity (http://www.kent.ac.uk/sac/research/research-centres/cbcd/index.html). Read more
Research within this area centres on ethnobiological knowledge systems and other systems of environmental knowledge and is supported by members of the Centre for Biocultural Diversity (http://www.kent.ac.uk/sac/research/research-centres/cbcd/index.html).

We research local responses to deforestation, climate change, natural resource management, medical ethnobotany, the impacts of mobility and displacement and the interface between conservation and development. The Centre has an Ethnobiology Lab and Ethnobotanical Garden, and extensive collaborative links, including with the Royal Botanic Gardens (Kew), and Eden Project.

MSc by Research
This course is a one-year full time or two-year part-time programmes. You research and write a thesis under the supervision of one or two academic staff.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/204/ethnobiology

Course structure

The first year may include coursework, especially methods modules for students who need this additional training. In general, you work closely with one supervisor throughout your research, although you have a committee of three (including your primary supervisor) overseeing your progress.

Study support

- Postgraduate resources

The School has a lively postgraduate community drawn together not only by shared resources such as postgraduate rooms, computer facilities (with a dedicated IT officer) and laboratories, but also by student-led events, societies, staff/postgraduate seminars, weekly research student seminars and a number of special lectures.

The School houses well-equipped research laboratories for genetics, ecology, visual anthropology, virtual paleoanthropology, Animal Postcranial Evolution, biological anthropology, anthropological computing, botany, osteology and ethnobiology. The state-of-the-art visual anthropology laboratory is stocked with digital editing programmes and other facilities for digital video and photographic work, and has a photographic darkroom for analogue developing and printing. The biological anthropology laboratory is equipped for osteoarchaeological and forensic work. It curates the Powell-Cotton collection of human remains, together with Anglo-Saxon skeletons from Bishopstone, East Sussex. The ethnobiology laboratory provides equipment and specimens for teaching ethnobiological research skills, and serves as a transit station for receiving, examining and redirecting field material. It also houses the Powell-Cotton collection of plant-based material culture from Southeast Asia, and a small reference and teaching collection of herbarium and spirit specimens (1,000 items) arising from recent research projects.

Kent has outstanding anthropology IT facilities. Over the last decade, the School has been associated with many innovatory projects, particularly in the field of cognitive anthropology. It provides an electronic information service to other anthropology departments, for example by hosting both the Anthropological Index Online and Experience-Rich Anthropology project. We encourage all students to use the Centre’s facilities (no previous experience or training is necessary).

Anthropology at Kent has close links with the nearby Powell-Cotton Museum, which has one of the largest ethnographic collections in the British Isles and is particularly strong in sub-Saharan African and Southeast Asian material. It also houses an extensive comparative collection of primate and other mammalian material. Human skeletal material is housed at the Kent Osteological Research and Analysis Centre within the School.

Anthropology, together with the Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology (DICE) form the School of Anthropology and Conservation.

- Researcher Development Programme

Kent's Graduate School co-ordinates the Researcher Development Programme (http://www.kent.ac.uk/graduateschool/skills/programmes/tstindex.html) for research students, which includes workshops focused on research, specialist and transferable skills. The programme is mapped to the national Researcher Development Framework and covers a diverse range of topics, including subjectspecific research skills, research management, personal effectiveness, communication skills, networking and teamworking, and career management skills.

Research areas

Work in these areas is focused on the Centre for Biocultural Diversity. We conduct research on ethnobiological knowledge systems, ethnoecology, and other systems of environmental knowledge, as well as local responses to deforestation, climate change, natural resource management, medical ethnobotany, the impacts of mobility and displacement and the interface between conservation and development. The Centre has an Ethnobiology Lab and Ethnobotanical Garden, and extensive collaborative links, including with the Royal Botanic Gardens (Kew), and Eden Project.

Careers

As a School recognised for its excellence in research we are one of the partners in the South East Doctoral Training Centre, which is recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC). This relationship ensures that successful completion of our courses is sufficient preparation for research in the various fields of social anthropology. Many of our students go on to do PhD research.

The School has a very good record for postgraduate employment and academic continuation. Studying anthropology, you develop an understanding of the complexity of all actions, beliefs and discourse by acquiring strong methodological and analytical skills. Anthropologists are increasingly being hired by companies and organisations that recognise the value of employing people who understand the complexities of societies and organisations.

Many of our alumni teach in academic positions in universities across the world, whilst others work for a wide range of organisations.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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Taught by expert researchers, this innovative MSc combines evolutionary anthropology, focusing on the behaviour of human and non-human primates, with evolutionary, developmental and cognitive psychology. Read more
Taught by expert researchers, this innovative MSc combines evolutionary anthropology, focusing on the behaviour of human and non-human primates, with evolutionary, developmental and cognitive psychology.

You gain an interdisciplinary understanding of the origins and functions of human behaviour and can select from a range of advanced topics such as evolutionary anthropology, primatology, human behaviour, cognitive psychology, developmental psychology and intergroup relationships.

The programme places a strong emphasis on critical thinking and understanding of both the broad fields and the specialisms within. Core to the programme is the development of research methods, culminating in a piece of original research, written up in the form of a publication-ready journal article. The MSc in Evolution and Human Behaviour is a perfect foundation for PhD research: it provides theoretical background, discipline specific knowledge and advanced, quantitative research methods.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/190/evolution-and-human-behaviour

Why study with us?

- A unique, interdisciplinary, combination of Evolutionary Anthropology and Psychology.

- Taught by expert, active researchers in evolutionary approaches to understanding behaviour.

- Select from a range of advanced topics such as Evolutionary Anthropology, Primatology, Human Behaviour, Developmental Psychology & Cognitive Neuroscience.

- Perfect foundation for future PhD research: theoretical background, discipline-specific knowledge and advanced research methods.

- For students with an undergraduate degree in anthropology, psychology, biology or a related discipline.

- A research component that results in a publication-ready journal article.

Course structure

The programme places a strong emphasis on critical thinking and understanding of both the broad field and the specialisms within. Core to the programme is the development of research methods, culminating in a piece of original research, written up in the form of a publication ready journal article.

Modules

Please note that modules are subject to change. Please contact the School for more detailed information on availability.

SE992 - Advanced Topics in Evolutionary Anthropology (15 credits)
SP801 - Statistics and Methodology (40 credits)
SE993 - Advanced Topics in Primate Behaviour (15 credits)
SE994 - Advanced Topics in HUman Behaviour (15 credits)
SP844 - Advanced Topics in Group Processes (20 credits)
SP851 - Advanced Topics in Cognitive Development (20 credits)
SP856 - Groups and Teams in Organisations (15 credits)
SP827 - Current Issues in Cognitive Psychology and Neuropsychology (40 credits)
SP842 - Advanced Developmental Social Psychology (20 credits)
SE855 - Research Project (Evolution & Human Behaviour) (60 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is by computing tests, unseen examinations, coursework and a project report.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide the opportunity for advanced study of human behaviour from an evolutionary perspective, combining approaches from both evolutionary anthropology and evolutionary psychology

- provide teaching that is informed by current research and scholarship and that requires you to engage with aspects of work at the frontiers of knowledge

- help you to develop research skills and transferable skills in preparation for entering academic or other careers as an evolutionary scientist

- enable you to manage your own learning and to carry out independent research

- help you develop general critical, analytic and problem-solving skills that can be applied in a wide range of settings.

Careers

As a School recognised for its excellence in research we are one of the partners in the South East Doctoral Training Centre, which is recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC). This relationship ensures that successful completion of our courses is sufficient preparation for research in the various fields of social anthropology. Many of our students go on to do PhD research. Others use their Master’s qualification in employment ranging from research in government departments to teaching to consultancy work overseas.

Higher degrees in anthropology create opportunities in many employment sectors including academia, the civil service and non-governmental organisations through work in areas such as human rights, journalism, documentary film making, environmental conservation and international finance. An anthropology degree also develops interpersonal and intercultural skills, which make our graduates highly desirable in any profession that involves working with people from diverse backgrounds and cultures.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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About the MSc Programme. This is a specialist stream within our general MSc Social Anthropology programme focusing on the anthropological study of human learning and cognition. Read more

About the MSc Programme

This is a specialist stream within our general MSc Social Anthropology programme focusing on the anthropological study of human learning and cognition. You will examine cognitive development from a cross-cultural perspective in a Department which combines a strong tradition of fieldwork-based research with innovative experimental research.

Compulsory components include a general core course in Social Anthropology, a specialist core course in The Anthropology of Learning and Cognition, and a 10,000 word dissertation on an approved topic within the subfield of anthropology of learning and cognition subfield.

This programme will be of special interest to those who want to study the psychological mechanisms that make human cultures possible and want to study human psychology from a cross-cultural perspective. It is suitable for graduates with a degree in any discipline, and prior knowledge of anthropology is not essential. It is suitable either as an introduction to the subject for those intending to proceed with other careers, or is an ideal preparation for further research work in anthropology and related disciplines.

Graduate destinations

The programme is an ideal preparation for research work in anthropology and related fields.

Further information on graduate destinations for this programme



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Course description. An opportunity to explore this cutting-edge field, where philosophy, psychology, neuroscience, linguistics, computer science and anthropology come together to discover how the mind works. Read more

Course description

An opportunity to explore this cutting-edge field, where philosophy, psychology, neuroscience, linguistics, computer science and anthropology come together to discover how the mind works.

You’ll be based in the Department of Philosophy but you’re free to take any MA module in the departments of Archaeology, Human Communication Sciences, Linguistics and Psychology.

Core modules

  • Cognitive Studies Seminar
  • Dissertation

Other modules include

  • Computational Neuroscience
  • Current Issues in Psychological Research
  • Evolutionary Primatology
  • Fundamentals of Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Hominid Palaeontology
  • Language and Linguistics
  • Mind and Language Research Seminar
  • Philosophy of Psychology

Teaching and assessment

Lectures and seminars. Fortnightly supervision for guided reading.

You’ll write a long essay for each module and a dissertation.

If you’re going on to a PhD you may choose to write a PhD proposal.



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This programme is a pathways-based research degree, with a strong emphasis on the development of skills and specialism in Palaeoanthropology. Read more

This programme is a pathways-based research degree, with a strong emphasis on the development of skills and specialism in Palaeoanthropology.

Palaeoanthropology (combining Palaeolithic archaeology, biological anthropology and genetics) is one of the fastest-changing disciplines. Beyond the headlines of “the earliest” and “the most advanced” lies a huge range of evidence to explore and master, focusing on how our early ancestors and their relatives lived their lives and responded to opportunities and setbacks. Here at Southampton we have particular strengths in social and technological responses of hominins (the species directly ancestral to our own) to changing environments and landscapes, and have been shaping the debates on these key aspects for several decades.

Introducing your degree

Palaeoanthropology is a pathway within the MSc degree, and it aims to give you a diverse and in-depth experience of the discipline’s key themes. There is a strong emphasis on the development of practical skills in the study of ancient material culture, in visiting some key Palaeolithic sites, and in reconstructing the environments and lifeways of our hominin ancestors. From seven million years ago, and Sahelanthropus tchadensis, to the molecular biology of Neanderthals and anatomically modern humans, and through to collections of beautiful American Palaeo-Indian Clovis points, this pathway master’s will prepare you for future research in human origins, or give you an in-depth understanding of our amazing evolutionary journey, depending on what you want out of your MSc.

You will acquire an expertise in looking at hominin material culture which will include a mixture of traditional techniques, as well as some of the ways of analysing artefacts that Southampton is pioneering. Students will also learn the latest theoretical issues in human evolution and engage with some of the most up to date arguments surrounding our ancient ancestors from staff actively shaping those debates. Students with an interest in general Prehistory will find many of the modules and topics available on the Palaeoanthropology Pathway of interest and relevance.

You will be based in the John Wymer Laboratory, which is CAHO’s (Centre for the Archaeology of Human Origins) nerve centre. Here you will have daily access to our extensive teaching collections of replica and real stone tools, our hominin skull collection, and a large library of original and rare offprints and books focused on our most ancient ancestors and their world as well as on modern-day primates. The Wymer is a lively research and teaching space where you will be in the company of other MSc students, as well as our Ph.D researchers. We also have an experimental knapping and ancient technology area, where you can use our equipment to test key questions. You will automatically be a member of CAHO, and can participate in all its various activities. You will also have the opportunity of taking modules in related subjects such as skeletal anatomy or evolutionary and molecular biology to broaden your knowledge base.

Through CAHO you will be linked to a huge network of Human Origins teachers and researchers who are at the forefront of their disciplines. We aim to provide an enjoyable but challenging experience and convince you that the interdisciplinary study of hominin ‘deep history’, understanding who and what we are, and how behaviours developed, is one of our greatest intellectual journeys.

Overview

You will engage with hands-on, real-world archaeological materials and situations, including opportunities to collaborate with a range of stakeholders and partners in the archaeological sector through a professional placement. By these means you will acquire skills for vocational employment or subsequent PhD research. Your programme will be embedded within Southampton Archaeology’s distinctive research culture, with world-class expertise, diverse practice, and contacts with the commercial environment and the heritage sector.

The specialism in Palaeoanthropology includes elements that familiarise you with human evolution; primatology; early tool manufacture and use; cognitive and anthropological approaches to the human past; and key debates in British and European prehistory from our earliest ancestors onwards. 

Important aspects of the programme are available across all specialisms. These include the compulsory dissertation module, which should focus on an area of your specialism, if you have chosen one. Furthermore, modules from each pathway are open to you as options, regardless of your chosen specialism. By these means you will be able to build a personalised and flexible programme tailored to your needs.

This programme includes opportunities for credit-bearing placements within organisations involved in commercial archaeology, heritage management, fieldwork projects and/or museums. The placements are typically organised by the University, and may be available to students following all specialisms, or crossing between them.

View the programme specification document for this course



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The Drama by Practice as Research programme is for practitioners who want time to develop and reflect on their work in a supportive and challenging environment. Read more
The Drama by Practice as Research programme is for practitioners who want time to develop and reflect on their work in a supportive and challenging environment.

It is also for recent graduates who want either to develop a body of practice or to conduct practice-based research at a higher level.

The programme leads through supervision to project planning with practice-based presentations, which are then written up for the final dissertation.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/280/drama-practice-as-research

About the Department of Drama and Theatre

Postgraduate Drama and Theatre studies at Kent has a very strong reputation for research and supervision in contemporary theatre and performance. We are the home of two renowned international research centres, the European Theatre Research Network (ETRN) and the Centre for Cognition, Kinesthetics and Performance (CKP).

The wide-ranging interests of our international team of leading and emerging researchers (from the UK, Australia, Italy, Greece, Germany, France and other countries) include research strengths in contemporary performance, applied theatre, Shakespeare, 18th-century theatre, multimedia performance, popular performance, directing and dramaturgy, and physical performer training.

Our distinctive focus at Kent is on theatre as practice, whatever the topic, area, mode and methodology of research, and we encourage postgraduate students to make use of our close links and contacts with local, national and international (especially European) theatre companies, venues, schools and artists, both for research and to encourage professional postgraduate development.

Study support

- Postgraduate resources

The School of Arts’ award-winning Jarman Building offers professional standard drama facilities, along with social spaces and a dedicated centre for postgraduate students.

Additional facilities across the Canterbury campus include two theatres: the 113-seat Aphra Theatre (a courtyard-type gallery theatre space); and the Lumley Theatre, which is a flexible and adaptable white room space. Drama students also benefit from an additional rehearsal studio, a sound studio, a theatre design suite and an extensively equipped construction workshop.

The University’s Templeman Library is well resourced in our subject area and houses special collections of 19th-century manuscripts – playbills, programmes, prints and other theatre ephemera – theatrical biography and the history of the stage in the 19th and 20th centuries. It also has particular strengths as a research resource in English Renaissance drama, Russian and French theatre, and British theatre since 1900. We also house the Jacques Copeau Archive and the British Grotowski collection.

- Conferences and seminars

We have strong links with organisations such as the International Federation for Theatre Research (IFTR) and the Theatre and Performance Research Association (TaPRA), and encourage postgraduates to present work within national and international conferences. Also, we run regular research seminars, workshops, and performance-related events led by members of staff, students, and invited experts and practitioners.

- Dynamic publishing culture

Staff publish regularly and widely in journals, conference proceedings and books. Among others, they have recently contributed to: New Theatre Quarterly; Contemporary Theatre Review; TDR: The Drama Review; Performance Research; Shakespeare Survey.

- Researcher Development Programme

Kent's Graduate School co-ordinates the Researcher Development Programme (http://www.kent.ac.uk/graduateschool/skills/programmes/tstindex.html) for research students, which includes workshops focused on research, specialist and transferable skills. The programme is mapped to the national Researcher Development Framework and covers a diverse range of topics, including subjectspecific research skills, research management, personal effectiveness, communication skills, networking and teamworking, and career management skills.

Research areas

- European Theatre

At Kent, the UK’s European university, we have set up the European Theatre Research Network to facilitate and foster the exchange of theatre traditions, contemporary practices and academic discussion on the near European continent and also in the new European states. We invite postgraduate research students to contribute to and play a part in this expanding network. For further information, please see http://www.europeantheatre.org.uk

- Cognition, Kinesthetics and Performance

The Centre for Cognition, Kinesthetics and Performance brings together Drama staff and staff in Engineering and Digital Arts; Psychology; Anthropology; and the Tizard Centre to explore the possibilities of interdisciplinary dialogue and collaboration between researchers and practitioners in the fields of cognitive neuroscience, interactive performance, digital media, disability studies, and applied performance. For further information, please see http://www.kent.ac.uk/ckp

Careers

Arts graduates have gone on to work in a range of professions from museum positions and teaching roles to working as journalists and theatre technicians. Our graduates have found work in Pinewood Studios, The National Theatre and other arts, culture and heritage-related organisations, in roles including editorial assistants and even stunt doubles.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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This programme gives students the opportunity to closely explore a topic in an area of drama, theatre and contemporary performance at the highest level of academic study. Read more
This programme gives students the opportunity to closely explore a topic in an area of drama, theatre and contemporary performance at the highest level of academic study.

The programme draws on the Drama Department and School of Arts’ longstanding international reputation in the development of practice as research and brings students into a research environment of excellence.

Key areas of focus within the department include cognition and performance, applied and socially engaged theatre, popular performance and European theatre. Practice focuses on dance, physical actor training, puppetry, live art, autobiographical and documentary performance, providing a rich context for postgraduate study.

Our two drama-based research centres actively involve postgraduate students - the Centre for Cognition, Kinesthetics and Performance and the European Theatre Research Network. Research students attend and support the many seminars these centres offer each term and a selection of School seminars. There are dedicated postgraduate events where students can present their research in a constructive atmosphere. Discipline-specific methodology training is provided through one-to-one supervision and/or group workshops.

The department also facilitates Work in Progress meetings to help foster the research culture, improve students’ research skills and bring together members of the postgraduate research community.

Individual staff research interests cover a wide range of both historical and contemporary aspects of the theory and practice of theatre, and supervision is available in all these areas.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/351/drama-by-thesis-practice

About the Department of Drama and Theatre

Postgraduate Drama and Theatre studies at Kent has a very strong reputation for research and supervision in contemporary theatre and performance. We are the home of two renowned international research centres, the European Theatre Research Network (ETRN) and the Centre for Cognition, Kinesthetics and Performance (CKP).

The wide-ranging interests of our international team of leading and emerging researchers (from the UK, Australia, Italy, Greece, Germany, France and other countries) include research strengths in contemporary performance, applied theatre, Shakespeare, 18th-century theatre, multimedia performance, popular performance, directing and dramaturgy, and physical performer training.

Our distinctive focus at Kent is on theatre as practice, whatever the topic, area, mode and methodology of research, and we encourage postgraduate students to make use of our close links and contacts with local, national and international (especially European) theatre companies, venues, schools and artists, both for research and to encourage professional postgraduate development.

Study support

Postgraduate resources
The School of Arts’ award-winning Jarman Building offers professional standard drama facilities, along with social spaces and a dedicated centre for postgraduate students.

Additional facilities across the Canterbury campus include two theatres: the 113-seat Aphra Theatre (a courtyard-type gallery theatre space); and the Lumley Theatre, which is a flexible and adaptable white room space. Drama students also benefit from an additional rehearsal studio, a sound studio, a theatre design suite and an extensively equipped construction workshop.

The University’s Templeman Library is well resourced in our subject area and houses special collections of 19th-century manuscripts – playbills, programmes, prints and other theatre ephemera – theatrical biography and the history of the stage in the 19th and 20th centuries. It also has particular strengths as a research resource in English Renaissance drama, Russian and French theatre, and British theatre since 1900. We also house the Jacques Copeau Archive and the British Grotowski collection.

Conferences and seminars
We have strong links with organisations such as the International Federation for Theatre Research (IFTR) and the Theatre and Performance Research Association (TaPRA), and encourage postgraduates to present work within national and international conferences. Also, we run regular research seminars, workshops, and performance-related events led by members of staff, students, and invited experts and practitioners.

Dynamic publishing culture
Staff publish regularly and widely in journals, conference proceedings and books. Among others, they have recently contributed to: New Theatre Quarterly; Contemporary Theatre Review; TDR: The Drama Review; Performance Research; Shakespeare Survey.

Researcher Development Programme
Kent's Graduate School co-ordinates the Researcher Development Programme (http://www.kent.ac.uk/graduateschool/skills/programmes/tstindex.html) for research students, which includes workshops focused on research, specialist and transferable skills. The programme is mapped to the national Researcher Development Framework and covers a diverse range of topics, including subjectspecific research skills, research management, personal effectiveness, communication skills, networking and teamworking, and career management skills.

Research areas

- European Theatre

At Kent, the UK’s European university, we have set up the European Theatre Research Network to facilitate and foster the exchange of theatre traditions, contemporary practices and academic discussion on the near European continent and also in the new European states. We invite postgraduate research students to contribute to and play a part in this expanding network. For further information, please see http://www.europeantheatre.org.uk

- Cognition, Kinesthetics and Performance

The Centre for Cognition, Kinesthetics and Performance brings together Drama staff and staff in Engineering and Digital Arts; Psychology; Anthropology; and the Tizard Centre to explore the possibilities of interdisciplinary dialogue and collaboration between researchers and practitioners in the fields of cognitive neuroscience, interactive performance, digital media, disability studies, and applied performance. For further information, please see http://www.kent.ac.uk/ckp

Careers

Arts graduates have gone on to work in a range of professions from museum positions and teaching roles to working as journalists and theatre technicians. Our graduates have found work in Pinewood Studios, The National Theatre and other arts, culture and heritage-related organisations, in roles including editorial assistants and even stunt doubles.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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This programme is unique within the UK in catering specifically for those working, or interested in working, in the field of children, youth and international development. Read more

About the course

This programme is unique within the UK in catering specifically for those working, or interested in working, in the field of children, youth and international development.

The Children, Youth and International Development MA will equip you with the conceptual understanding and breadth of empirical knowledge to critically evaluate policy and practice in the area of children, youth and development.

The core modules focus on key issues relating to children, youth and international development, including the rights and participation of young people. They also prepare students in research design and practice. The optional modules offer a unique opportunity to appreciate in depth how children and youth-related issues are addressed from alternative disciplinary perspectives.

Aims

Working with and for young people in the Global South offers an exciting career full of challenges and rewards. This MA provides a varied programme with a global perspective that equips students for roles at senior levels in international development organisations, government ministries and global agencies.

The programme equips you with:

The conceptual understanding and breadth of empirical knowledge that will enable you to critically evaluate research, policy and practice in the area of children, youth and development.
An understanding of differing disciplinary perspectives on childhood and youth, and their theoretical and empirical contributions.
The skills necessary to design and undertake research relating to children, youth and international development.
Methodological, cognitive and transferable skills and substantive knowledge that will prepare you for employment, further study and civic engagement.

Course Content

The programme combines four core taught modules (accounting for 90 credits) with 30 credits worth of options.

The programme is intended to relate to the needs of organisations working in the field of children, youth and international development. Students will have the opportunity to undertake a sustained project with an external organisation as part of a placement module. This may be an organisation with which they already have links, such as a current of former employer. They may also choose to apply their 60 credit dissertation to the needs of an identified community or organisation.

Compulsory Modules:

International Development, Childhood and Youth
Young Lives in the Global South
Global Agendas on Young People, Rights and Participation
Researching Children, Childhood and Youth
Dissertation

Optional Modules:
(Please note, not all options are available every year and some have capped intakes.)

Sociology of Youth and Youth Work
Contemporary Issues in Youth and Community Work
Social Policy
Anthropology of Education and Learning
Anthropological Perspectives on War and Humanitarianism
Psychological Development
Applied Learning (via placement)

Special Features

High value placements: Students may opt for the ‘Applied Learning’ module which involves a short placement (one or two days a week for 10 weeks) with an organisation that works in the field of children, youth and international development. Through the placement, a series of workshops and coursework assignments they will examine the relevance and responsibility of their academic studies to community work, voluntary action and paid work, as well as having the opportunity to develop transferable, personal and subject specific skills to enhance their employability on completing their postgraduate degree.

Pioneering research: In both core and specialist option modules, students will be exposed to innovative high profile research in the field of children, youth and international development.

Eramus Exchange: An Erasmus agreement exists between the Brunel University’s MA in Children, Youth and International Development, and the MPhil in Childhood Studies at the Norwegian Centre for Child Research (NOSEB), Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) in Trondheim. The exchange programme has two places for students from the MA Children, Youth and International Development. The exchange period is the second term / semester (approximately January to May). Erasmus students do not pay tuition fees at NOSEB, and are entitled to an Erasmus grant (€375/month) to cover any additional costs.

Teaching

A range of teaching and learning techniques are employed on the programme, most of which stress the active involvement of students in discussion and debate. The MA also emphasises reflective, independent learning, both by individuals and groups, and students are well supported to achieve this - through tutorials, workshops and seminar discussions.

Staff place a strong emphasis on tutorial support and all students are assigned to a tutorial group. Regular tutorials focus on the development of study skills (critical reading and writing), careers support, exam and assignment preparation, feedback on assessments and help in developing research proposals.

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Psycholinguistics, the scientific study of the psychology of language, is one of the most important areas of cognitive psychology. Read more
Psycholinguistics, the scientific study of the psychology of language, is one of the most important areas of cognitive psychology. How we produce, understand, acquire, and use language, and how these processes are affected by ageing and brain damage, are core topics in understanding human behaviour.

Why study Psychology of Language at Dundee?

In addition to its theoretical interest, psycholinguistics has several important applications, including how a second language should best be taught, how children should be taught to learn to read and write, artificial intelligence, computer-assisted communication, and the treatment of developmental and acquired language disorders. Such applications ensure that there is a wealth of professional career paths available to postgraduates in the area in addition to an academic career.

This course is affiliated with our world-leading Language Research Centre (LaRC).

The School of Psychology also has much specialised equipment, dedicated laboratories and world class research facilities. These include EEG labs, many eye tracking systems, 2D and 3D movement tracking systems, and offsite fMRI access via the Clinical Research Centre at Ninewells Teaching Hospital.

Every full-time MSc student in the department is entitled to use computer facilities available in the Psychology department and throughout the University. We provide access to all the basic software tools that you are likely to need for your MSc.

Aims of the Programme

This course will enable you to:

Pursue and develop the advanced study of research methods in Psychology and in particular to address contemporary issues of epistemology, data collection, measurement and data analysis.
Approach problems in research by critical evaluation of existing psychological paradigms and research literature and to apply this to current theoretical or applied issues in Psychology.
Develop advanced research skills which will be relevant to policy and practice in the workplace.
Develop and demonstrate advanced knowledge and skills in research design, methodology and statistical analysis
Develop and demonstrate a comprehensive knowledge and understanding of current research in a specialised field of experimental or applied Psychology.
Engage in the analysis, synthesis, planning, execution and evaluation of research at an advanced level.
Make an original contribution to scientific knowledge, methodology or practice in a research project either grounded in experimental psychology or in an applied area relevant to the learner's employment.
Develop and practice dissemination and presentation skills to peers and to wider academic and professional audience
provide an advanced understanding of scientific issues in the chosen topic specialisation.

"I enjoyed all aspects of the course, especially the opportunity to conduct two independent pieces of research. Furthermore, I found the taught modules very helpful and a good basis for every researcher. Most importantly, I enjoyed the support of both staff and students in a highly collaborative environment"
MSc student, 2011

Who should study this course?

The course offers students an excellent theoretical and practical grounding in research methods in Psychology, building upon the levels of skill and knowledge attained in their first degree in Psychology (as recognised by the British Psychological Society for Graduate Membership).

The course will provide a first year of research training for students intending to continue with postgraduate research or further professional training within Psychology (e.g. health, occupational or educational psychology) or related disciplines (e.g. sociology, social anthropology, or education).

Postgraduate culture

We have a close postgraduate community with a diverse combination of nationalities. The School runs a Postgraduate seminar and a departmental seminar twice weekly throughout teaching semesters, with invited speakers to the seminars. These seminars are a great way to broaden your awareness of contemporary issues within the field of Psychology, to present your own work, and to network with other postgraduate students.

The School of Psychology also has its own Facebook group, where you can find out more about their activities.

This course is aimed at

Psychology graduates wishing to enhance their knowledge of the psychology of language and communication
Graduates considering a professional training in a language-related discipline (e.g. speech pathology)
Psychology graduates intending to progress to a PhD.

How you will be taught

Learning methods will include oral and written presentations, peer assessments of oral presentations, problem-solving assignments and feedback, and interactive computer assignments. Some of the exercises will be group-based and will be followed by presentation of the results of the analysis. Learners will be expected to be able to respond adequately to questions relating to the interpretation of the analyses.

One-on-one supervision of a research dissertation by a single tutor is designed to promote continuity in the learning experiences provided.

What you will study

Students will take the following modules:

Core modules:

Research Foundations
Qualitative Research Methods
Advanced Quantitative Methods
Research in Practice
Research Dissertation

Two advanced modules, typically from:

Gesture, Cognition and Communication
Reading Development and Disability
Comparative Communication and Cognition
Altered States of Consciousness

How you will be assessed

The course is assessed by coursework only.

Each module is worth 20 credits apart from the Research Dissertation Module which is worth 60 credits. The total number of credits awarded is 180 for an MSc course.

Careers

Students from this course have gone on to do PhDs. The higher degree also generally improves job prospects when competing against other Psychology graduates in other fields such as education, artificial intelligence, computer-assisted communication, and the treatment of developmental and acquired language disorders.

Overseas Academic Scholarships

The School of Psychology offers three Overseas Academic Scholarships of £3,000 each to overseas (international) taught postgraduate students. These awards are competitive based on academic merit and a personal statement which details and supports the applicant's interest in their chosen taught postgraduate programme. The deadline to apply for this scholarship is 30th June 2014.

A 5% discount on tuition fees is applicable for international applicants to the School of Psychology who pay the full amount (for the year), in advance, by a given deadline. Please visit our 5% discount webpage for full details.

Other sources of funding for postgraduate students can be found on our Scholarships webpage

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Master's specialisation in Philosophy of Mind (Research). Philosophy of mind and cognition touches on some of the most profound questions about ourselves. Read more

Master's specialisation in Philosophy of Mind (Research)

Philosophy of mind and cognition touches on some of the most profound questions about ourselves: What does it mean to have a mind? How is the brain related to the mind? What is consciousness? How can our mental states drive our actions? Do we have free will?

Traditionally, philosophy of mind is part of the analytical method in philosophy. Recently, however, a more phenomenological approach to typical questions in the philosophy of mind has provided a refreshing new look on old topics. Additionally, the advance of cognitive neuroscience is providing a new method to address old questions. Philosophy of Mind and Cognition in Nijmegen combines traditional analytical theorizing with insights from phenomenology and the empirical sciences.

Information for students of the Research Master

In Philosophy of Mind and Science you study problems such as mental causation, phenomenal consciousness and the nature of mental state attribution from the viewpoint of neurophenomenenology and the embodied embedded cognition paradigm.

The research carried out in this section (‘cognitiefilosofie') covers a number of traditional topics: mental causation, perception of, for example, colour, phenomenal consciousness and qualia, theories of mind, mental content and the nature of folk-psychology.

These subjects are specifically addressed against the backdrop of the idea that cognition is essentially embodied. This is the basic premise of the 'embodied embedded cognition paradigm', the 'enactive' approach to cognition and specific body-based forms of neurophenomenology.

Three smaller research projects take place within this section: (1) 'The Bisected Mind', the idea that folk psychology can be regarded as an interpretation of body-based behavioural tendencies and tries to reconcile indeterminacy of mental state attribution with mental realism (Slors). (2) 'Phenomenal Consciousness and Mental Causation', which addresses the problem of the causal efficacy of phenomenal states as well as the possibility of a science of consciousness (van de Laar). (3) 'Colour Perception', which aims to reconcile different theories on the nature of colour and colour perception by developing the idea that the concept of colour is multi-layered, instead of monolithic (van Leeuwen).

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/philosophy/mind

Career prospects

Philosophy has a unique role within contemporary society. Unlike other academic disciplines, its subject matter is not limited to one set of questions, or one domain of investigation. Philosophers delve into all aspects of science and society. In order to do this, they must possess two essential skills, namely the ability to analyse complex issues logically and conceptually and the ability to document their conclusions in clear and persuasive language. Such skills are not innate. They require intensive training. The Research Master's programme in Philosophy constitutes the first professional step towards the acquisition of these skills.

Job positions

This programme has been designed for people with the ambition to do research. Graduates tend to fall into three groups. A majority of the students continue their research within academia by applying for a doctoral programme in the Netherlands or abroad. We take particular pride in the fact that more than 75 percent of our graduates manage to obtain a PhD position within two years of graduating. A second group goes on to teach philosophy at secondary schools. And a third group enter research-related professions outside of education. Our graduates are also represented in journalism, science policy, and politics.

Our approach to this field

Philosophy has a unique role within contemporary society. Unlike other academic disciplines, its subject matter is not limited to one set of questions, or one domain of investigation. Philosophers delve into all aspects of science and society. In order to do this, they must possess two essential skills, namely the ability to analyse complex issues logically and conceptually and the ability to document their conclusions in clear and persuasive language. Such skills are not innate. They require intensive training. The Research Master's programme in Philosophy constitutes the first professional step towards the acquisition of these skills.

Our research in this field

What makes this programme special?

The English-taught Research Master's programme in Philosophy is a two-year course that is meant for students of proven ability who wish to prepare for an academic career in philosophy. We offer the following to provide you with the best possible academic background:

- A combination of internationally acclaimed research and excellent teaching

- Research seminars in the history of philosophy, continental philosophy and analytic philosophy

- A broad range of specialisations in Philosophical Anthropology, Metaphysics, Philosophy of mind, Philosophy of language and Logic, Philosophical Ethics, Social and Political Philosophy and the History of Philosophy

- An emphasis on the training of research skills

- A personal supervisor who guides you throughout the programme

- An excellent preparation for post-graduate life by means of the specialised character of the Research Master's thesis, which is composed of a publishable article and of a PhD research proposal

- A high chance of obtaining a PhD position in the Netherlands or abroad

- An international climate.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/philosophy/mind



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Are you dismayed, disturbed and totally disenchanted with what is happening to the only real planetary home we have? So are we. But are you also excited by the opportunities and prospects this opens up for us to create a better, brighter and more beautiful world? So are we. Read more

Are you dismayed, disturbed and totally disenchanted with what is happening to the only real planetary home we have? So are we.

But are you also excited by the opportunities and prospects this opens up for us to create a better, brighter and more beautiful world? So are we.

Then join us in this innovative new postgraduate programme from Schumacher College in collaboration with the School of Architecture, Design and Environment at Plymouth University, the School of Design at Carnegie Mellon University, the Dartington Hall Trust and surrounding communities.

Ecological Design Thinking

Never has there been a more important time for a new approach for engaging with the challenging situations we face from the local to the global levels. In a rapidly changing dynamic situation, solutions rarely remain optimal for very long and continuous active participation is a necessary ingredient for success. Growing resilience in individuals and communities is the way to keep going despite the continuous change around us.

Our programme in Ecological Design Thinking embraces and explores this complex world of interactions with lively engagement and an optimistic approach. It offers powerful, practical and ecology-centred skills and knowledge to apply to a diverse range of practices from design, education and business to the more specific roles of leadership, management and consultancy.

The Ecological Design Thinking programme is trans-disciplinary, insightful and universal in its application; pragmatic and integrative in its operation. It brings together theoretical and practical discourses on ecologically inspired design, with methods of design thinking that are merged with the latest developments in anthropology, psychology and socio- political economics. It aims to create a novel ground for change makers at the forefront of our transition to sustainable societies.

Ecologically inspired design includes the study of ecological worldviews, systems dynamics and applied complexity theory alongside the philosophies and practices of permaculture and biomimetic design.

Design thinking is a well-established participatory technique grounded in the empathic understanding of the feelings, experiences and emotions of others. It engages people in lively conversations, visually stimulated interactions and playful prototyping. It frames problems as opportunities, forms insights and generates creative and collaborative solutions in complex situations.

The Ecological Design thinking programme aims to provide a nourishing environment for participants by incorporating short-courses led by internationally recognised thinkers, place-making projects in collaboration with the Dartington Hall Trust, the home of Schumacher College, and short placements offered by external partner organisations.

This programme is the fourth radical postgraduate programme developed at Schumacher College and contributes to and enhance the College’s ongoing collaborative inquiry into sustainable living – a live and networked inquiry of practice underway around the world by the College’s 20,000 alumni and others.

Who is this course for?

We would be delighted to receive your application whether you are coming directly from an undergraduate degree, taking time-out to study mid-career or wanting an opportunity to develop your understanding of a practice that is of great importance to all of our futures. We encourage applications from community practitioners and activists as well as planners, educators, architects, politicians and policy makers. You do not necessarily need a first degree in design to apply for this course. You only need to be enthusiastic, resilient and committed.

We are looking for enthusiastic agents of change who are ready to co-design new approaches to the way we live that are socially just and ecologically sustainable. We are looking for those prepared to take risks and stand on the cutting-edge of new practices in this area.

Schumacher College welcomes students from all over the world in a diverse mix of cultural experience and age that allows for rich peer- to- peer learning.

You Will Learn

  • The foundation of an ecological worldview through subjects such as ecology, deep ecology, systems thinking, complexity science and Gaia theory.
  • Living systems principles through the philosophy and practice of permaculture design, biophilia and biomimicry.
  • Creative and process-focused problem solving techniques by applying the methods and principles of design thinking
  • A multi-perspective appreciation of ethical issues and their implications for the future consequences of redesigning existing systems and creating new ones.
  • To apply ecological design thinking knowledge and skills to the design of social systems as a part of an emerging new economics
  • Personal and group enquiry practices to raise awareness of the interdependent relationship between the individual, society and nature and between theory and practice
  • Co-creative participatory practices and theoretical principles for new approaches to the ecological design process that include a range of stakeholders in the full lifecycle of projects, and you will apply these both in the studio, on the Dartington Hall Estate and in short placements on live projects

Special Features

An interdisciplinary programme integrating design methods with those of ecology and the social sciences.

An integrative design programme rooted in deep ecological understanding and practice and informed by cutting edge thinking in new economic approaches and social dynamics.

A balanced distribution of time and resources on skill-based and cognitive-based knowledge and between practice and theory.

Access to some of the world’s leading thinkers and practitioners in design, Gaia theory, complexity, climate science, systems thinking, new economics and social change.

Short courses led by internationally recognised thinkers and researchers.

Short practical placements with a range of partner organisations operating at the leading edge of social innovation.

An immersive, integrative and transformational teaching and learning approach rooted in the principles established by Schumacher College and Dartington Hall, and engaged in a living and working community on and around the Dartington Estate in Devon.

Where you will go?

Ecological Design Thinking can be applied to a wide range of contexts, from the personal to the societal. This programme aims to create a new generation of designers, entrepreneurs, policy-makers, educators, researchers, consultants and activists. Graduates will have the skills and knowledge to work for sustainable change in the public and private sectors as well as in civil society, or to set up their own projects or organisations that will contribute to the transformation of society.



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This MA in Creative Producing is the first programme ever offered in Theatre producing in a UK university. Created in 2002 as Producing, Promoting & Managing Theatre it then changed into the shorter present title in 2006. Read more
This MA in Creative Producing is the first programme ever offered in Theatre producing in a UK university. Created in 2002 as Producing, Promoting & Managing Theatre it then changed into the shorter present title in 2006. It has built strong links and recognition within the industry and many companies actively seek to work with our students and graduates.

This is a degree that is heavily embedded into the Theatre making industry and is useful for those wanting to develop careers as producers, directors, venue managers, writers, agents, company and production management, marketing, event management, casting agents, among many others. It is based in Theatre, but is also relevant in many other areas such as Film and TV, as well as general business and commerce. The content is focused on the professional skills of the producer, giving a broad but in depth understanding of the commercial, creative and contemporary issues needed to succeed in the business we call Showbusiness.

As a participant you will experience an intense taught period over the first term where you will learn the business and personal skills needed to develop, negotiate and create business and artistic plans, through a mix of workshops, seminars and lectures. You are stimulated to develop further your own individual creative approaches to Theatre, exploring ideas and critical awareness. We do this through looking at the current state of play within the world of Theatre; we invite key people to give talks and workshops, starting you on the road to building effective future networks. This is assessed through a mix of presentations, written case studies, and group research projects.

In term 2 you then work more independently on the application of your skills you can choose to have a work placement or in depth company analysis, this is assessed by regular blogs and a reflective or analytical written report. You then develop your own creative idea as a business plan, assessed through a full written submission and a presentation pitch to a panel of experts. Instead of the Business Plan you can choose an optional module from the School of Arts that you can demonstrate will support the focus of your studies and dissertation. Over the summer you will then work on your agreed dissertation.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/1212/creative-producing

About the Department of Drama and Theatre

Postgraduate Drama and Theatre studies at Kent has a very strong reputation for research and supervision in contemporary theatre and performance. We are the home of two renowned international research centres, the European Theatre Research Network (ETRN) and the Centre for Cognition, Kinesthetics and Performance (CKP).

The wide-ranging interests of our international team of leading and emerging researchers (from the UK, Australia, Italy, Greece, Germany, France and other countries) include research strengths in contemporary performance, applied theatre, Shakespeare, 18th-century theatre, multimedia performance, popular performance, directing and dramaturgy, and physical performer training.

Our distinctive focus at Kent is on theatre as practice, whatever the topic, area, mode and methodology of research, and we encourage postgraduate students to make use of our close links and contacts with local, national and international (especially European) theatre companies, venues, schools and artists, both for research and to encourage professional postgraduate development.

Research areas

- European Theatre

At Kent, the UK’s European university, we have set up the European Theatre Research Network to facilitate and foster the exchange of theatre traditions, contemporary practices and academic discussion on the near European continent and also in the new European states. We invite postgraduate research students to contribute to and play a part in this expanding network. For further information, please see http://www.europeantheatre.org.uk

- Cognition, Kinesthetics and Performance

The Centre for Cognition, Kinesthetics and Performance brings together Drama staff and staff in Engineering and Digital Arts; Psychology; Anthropology; and the Tizard Centre to explore the possibilities of interdisciplinary dialogue and collaboration between researchers and practitioners in the fields of cognitive neuroscience, interactive performance, digital media, disability studies, and applied performance. For further information, please see http://www.kent.ac.uk/ckp

Careers

Our graduates now work as producers in the West End and Broadway, they have opened new theatres in Cape Town, become performer’s agents in New York and Los Angeles, run theatres across the UK, they work as casting agents, theatre managers, umbrella organization administration, large scale opera company managers, theatre marketing, TV and Film development among many other specialisms. Visit a West End producer and it is likely they have working for them, or know of, someone who has graduated from this programme.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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Occupational therapy practice is concerned with enhancing the daily lives of individuals with a very broad range of physical, mental health or social needs. Read more
Occupational therapy practice is concerned with enhancing the daily lives of individuals with a very broad range of physical, mental health or social needs. As an occupational therapist you will work with clients to improve function and enable them to fulfil the demands of their daily lives with greater satisfaction. You will work with people of all ages from all walks of life, in hospital, in the community, in their place of employment or in their home, and have the opportunity to work in a very wide variety of professional practice areas.

The fundamental aim of the MSc Occupational Therapy (pre-registration) programme is to enable you to graduate with a master’s degree in occupational therapy and be eligible to apply for registration as an occupational therapist with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) in the UK. The Degree does not provide eligibility to practice in any other country although the degree is WFOT recognised.

HCPC approved and COT/WFOT accredited

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/occupational-therapy-pre-registration/

Why choose this course?

- Graduates from this programme will be fit for purpose, practice, and award in the UK. We enable you to develop a profound understanding of the potential for occupational therapy to promote the health and wellbeing of the population. Skills acquired will be evidenced based, innovative and give you the capacity to make a significant contribution to the profession, specifically contribute to excellence in client care and the professional knowledge base. On successful completion of the degree and 1000 hours of clinical practice education you will be eligible to apply for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council as a registered Occupational Therapist in the UK.

- Many of our graduates go on to further educational development at PhD/DPhil and professional doctorate level. We are mindful of the anticipated transformation of practice over the next 20 years as well as the changes to demographics and the political innovation resulting in the widening participation agenda. We therefore aim to attract graduate students, who are academically able, demonstrate appropriate values of self-determination, motivation and critical awareness of learning needs and show potential for leading leadership, innovation and research.

- Based in Oxford, the environment for learning is rich with diversity, culture, specialist health and social care resources, academic resources as well as close commuting links to London.

- Our programme is staffed by occupational therapists expert in diverse clinical specialities, and supported by occupational therapy practice educators from all areas of mainstream and specialist practice. Our lecturers are experienced in their specialist practice areas and have reputations for excellence with established links with colleagues, organisations and institutions at national and international level.

- This course benefits from shared and inter-professional education opportunities, in addition to profession specific ones, to develop the professional qualities and attributes for current and future health and social care practice.

- Our ongoing investment in a new technology infrastructure is enabling the teaching team to exploit successful technology-enriched learning throughout the programme. We have a large and dedicated building in Oxford (Marston Road) equipped with state-of-the-art classroom and clinical skills and communication suites and resources. We run a weekly Hand Therapy clinic and a monthly Community Occupational Therapy Assessment Clinic for the public. Students are invited to observe other qualified OT's working in these clinics.

- We have a strong research profile, with experienced researchers working in established areas of cancer care, children and families, drug and alcohol, physical rehabilitation and enablement, inter-professional education and collaborative practice.

- Established in 1938, we are the oldest School of Occupational Therapy in England, and have one of the best occupational therapy library collections in the country.

- We have an excellent track record of high levels of student satisfaction, low student attrition rates and high employability.

Teaching and learning

MSc in Occupational Therapy is taught alongside the well-established and highly-regarded BSc (Hons) Occupational Therapy.

Pre-registration Masters students will be taught alongside the undergraduate students in all occupational therapy specific modules. These will be identified with different module numbers and names to those of the undergraduate programme. This dual level teaching in classroom will provide you with the opportunity to learn the core skills and specific attributes of occupational therapy alongside the BSc (Hons) Occupational Therapy students.

However, the pre-registration Masters students are provided with an enhanced level 7 learning experience with module specific tutorials to explore a more critical and evidence based approach to the subject matter and thus develop professional competence in academic, research and digital literacy, critical thinking and personal self-awareness.

Our approach will require you to actively engage in these Masters level tutorials and become self-directed, innovative, creative and critical learners. Teaching will assist you to construct knowledge through the analysis, synthesis and conceptualisation of your learning experiences, thus developing a lifelong approach to learning. This supports employability in a marketplace that demands adaptability, continuous development and leadership.

You will have the opportunity for face-to-face and virtual learning activities. Our inter-professional module is taken alongside other health and social care pre-registration master's level students, enabling you to prepare for the interdisciplinary work you will encounter in the health and social care environment.

Working at master’s level, you will focus on developing your knowledge in occupational therapy, which is evidence-based and strongly underpinned by research.

This master's degree will:
- Enable you to be a reflective, proactive, innovative and adaptable occupational therapy practitioner, with the ability to critique research and evaluate the effectiveness of evidence in a wide variety of practice settings.

- Develop a critical understanding of the theory of occupation and teach you to challenge existing models and approaches used in occupational therapy from an informed perspective.

- Provide opportunities to develop your ability to work both independently and as part of a team in the context of social, technological, administrative and policy changes.

How this course helps you develop

This course is mapped against the University's postgraduate attributes so that all occupational therapy graduates are equipped with the skills of academic literacy, digital and information literacy, global citizenship, research literacy, critical self awareness and personal literacy. These attributes are in addition to the NHS core values of respect and dignity, commitment to quality of care, compassion, and aspiring to improve the lives of others where everyone counts and we work together for patients.

Careers

The majority of graduates from the occupational therapy degrees work as qualified and registered occupational therapists, but there are increasing opportunities to work in non-specified professional roles in mental health and community settings. There are also increasing numbers of employment roles that are not explicitly described or advertised as an ‘occupational therapist’ but match the skills specification of an occupational therapist. This is due to the changing nature of health and social care practice and the new and emerging roles and opportunities for occupational therapy.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

The Centre for Rehabilitation within the Department of Sport and Health Sciences has strong leadership in the director, Professor Helen Dawes. The Centre brings together research, education and care. It is underpinned by a strong, well-published research group, the Movement Science Group, along with clinical expertise, rehabilitation, knowledge and care of adults and children with neurological conditions. Within the Centre, staff, students and alumni across the Faculty of Health and Life Sciences are engaged in a number of research projects.

Examples of ongoing research projects within the faculty:
- Driving rehabilitation - cognitive mechanisms of driving and performance implications for clinical populations

- Fatigue management – Central and peripheral fatigue and mechanisms in clinical populations

- Dual task control in Stroke - influence on community mobility

- Efficacy of Intensive motor learning programmes – Themed (Magic) camps for children with hemiplegia

- Arts in Health Research – collaboration with Breathe Arts Health Research with research opportunities across many arts related activities

- Virtual Reality (VR) technologies – development and implementation of VR technologies in rehabilitation

- Early identification of motor and sensory processing impairments in children

- Sensory processing disorders and impact on function and behaviour in children with autism

- Measurement and monitoring of rehabilitation participation- Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI), Systematic Review of Vocational Rehabilitation for people with TBI

- Therapy for hand writing in people with Parkinson’s disease (PD)

- Monitoring movement in people with neurological conditions – mechanisms and impact e.g. head drop in Parkinson Disorder

- Physical activity impact on sleep, behaviour cognition, health and wellbeing in children with neurodisability

- Falls in people with learning disabilities – an understanding of the impact of anxiety

- A Functional Electrical Stimulation Plantar flexion System for Bone Health Maintenance in Spinal Cord Injury Patients

- Professional development Perspectives of Occupational Therapists working in the NHS and concepts of Occupational Balance, Cultural perspectives and attitude change in professional identity acquisition.

Research areas and clusters

Our staff are involved in research both independently and collaboratively.

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The Linguistics MA allows you to study phonology and syntax alongside a pathway of your choice in English Language or Language Acquisition The course, characterised by its flexibility, equips you with the research skills necessary to undertake independent study in linguistics. Read more

The Linguistics MA allows you to study phonology and syntax alongside a pathway of your choice in English Language or Language Acquisition The course, characterised by its flexibility, equips you with the research skills necessary to undertake independent study in linguistics.

The common subjects the course covers include theoretical and general linguistics, descriptive linguistics, applied linguistics, and combinations of these specialisms. By choosing one of the pathways, you will be able to focus on your area of specific interest.

By the end of the course you will understand and engage with ideas at the forefront of linguistic research and address linguistic questions and problems currently being debated.

Delivery

During two 12-week semesters you will study six modules delivered through lectures, seminars, workshops and field work. These are supplemented by academic events and invited international specialists. You work closely with your supervisor on a 15,000 –18,000-word dissertation.

Facilities

The School of English Literature, Language and Linguistics is a lively and diverse community with over 700 undergraduates and 200 postgraduates.

We are based in the Percy Building where the majority of your seminars and tutorials will take place. Our purpose-built postgraduate suite includes several dedicated computer clusters, meeting rooms, a kitchen and lounge area.

Linguistics postgraduates also benefit from a dedicated space reserved for members of the Centre for Research in Linguistics and Language Sciences. This space provides a range of resources, including access to linguistics software (eg Childes, Clan, Elan, Praat), linguistic corpora (eg DECTE, ICE, ICAME), and specialised equipment such as the eye tracker.

You also have access to the award-winning Peter Robinson Library, which has an extensive audio-visual collection.

Pathway

The Linguistics MA has two specialist pathways leading to different awards:

  • MA Linguistics: English Language
  • MA Linguistics: Language Acquisition

The pathways allow you to focus on your area of particular interest, which could range from lexical innovation, sociolinguistics, computational linguistics, child language acquisition or psycholinguistics. Whichever pathway you choose, you gain:

  • research skills necessary for independent study in linguistics and English language
  • critical engagement with current work in the subject area
  • confidence to address linguistic questions and participate in current theoretical debates
  • advanced knowledge of a range of issues in the subject area
  • mastery of the methods and skills required to obtain and interpret relevant research data

All pathways involve selecting modules covering the two central linguistic disciplines of phonology and syntax.



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