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Masters Degrees (Coding)

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Audiovisual experiences are key drivers, not just for entertainment but also for business, security and technology development. Read more
Audiovisual experiences are key drivers, not just for entertainment but also for business, security and technology development. Video accounts for around 80 per cent of all internet traffic and some mobile network operators have predicted that wireless traffic will double every year for the next 10 years - driven primarily by video. Visual information processing also plays a major role underpinning other industries such as healthcare, security, robotics and autonomous systems.

This challenging, one-year taught Master’s degree covers a range of advanced topics drawn from the field of multimedia signal processing and communications. The programme covers the properties and limitations of modern communication channels and networks, alongside the coding and compression methods required for efficient and reliable wired and wireless audio-visual transmission. It provides students with an excellent opportunity to acquire the necessary skills to enter careers in one of the most dynamic and exciting fields in ICT.

The programme builds on the research strengths of the Visual Information Laboratory and the Communication Systems and Networks Group within the Faculty of Engineering at Bristol. Both groups are highly regarded for combining fundamental research with strong industrial collaboration and their innovative research has resulted in ground-breaking technology in the areas of image and video analysis, coding and communications. Both groups also offer extensive, state-of-the-art research facilities.

This MSc provides in-depth training in design, analysis and management skills relevant to the theory and practice of the communication networks industry. The programme is accredited by the Institution of Engineering and Technology until 2018, and is one of only a handful of accredited programmes in this field in the UK.

Programme structure

Your course will cover the following core subjects:
Semester One (50 credits)
-Coding theory
-Communication systems
-Digital filters and spectral analysis
-Mobile communications
-Networking protocol principles

Semester Two (70 credits)
-Digital signal processing systems
-Speech and audio processing
-Optimum signal processing
-Biomedical imaging
-Image and video coding
-Engineering research skills

Research project
You will complete a substantial research project, starting during Semester Two and completed during the summer. This may be based at the University or with industrial partners.

Careers

This one-year MSc programme covers all aspects of current and future image and video communications and associated signal processing technologies. It will prepare you for a diverse range of exciting careers, not only in the communications field, but also in other areas such as management consultancy, project management, finance and government agencies.

Our graduates have gone on to have rewarding careers in some of the leading multinational communications companies, such as Huawei, China Telecom, Toshiba, China Mobile and Intel. Some graduates follow a more research-oriented career path with a number of students going on to study for PhDs at leading universities.

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Who is it for?. This course is suitable for students from any degree background with an interest in current affairs and digital journalism. Read more

Who is it for?

This course is suitable for students from any degree background with an interest in current affairs and digital journalism. Some experience of social media and/or data work can be useful for those wishing to specialise in these fields.

Objectives

This Interactive Journalism MA has a particular emphasis on digital media, and prepares you to enter and/or further develop a career in online journalism in particular. It has a strong reputation for preparing students for both specialist jobs, such as data journalism, social media and audience development, as well as broader roles in digital journalism. Teaching from current journalists ensures up-to-date skills and relevant industry contacts.

The curriculum reflects the continuing development of digital journalism through interactive content and formats that engage users as active participants.

Innovative modules focus on social media and audience development, data journalism and coding for journalists. Video and audio work are also geared to online publication.

Academic facilities

You will gain practical skills in our digital newsrooms, with access to cameras, audio recorders and other equipment, with dedicated technical support.

In 2014 we completed a £12m development project for our journalism facilities. These facilities were developed in consultation with experts from the BBC and ITN, and include two digital newsrooms - impressive modern facilities that enable you to learn the skills required to produce newspapers, magazines and websites.

  • A television studio: enabling simultaneous multi-media broadcast and a major expansion in the number of news and current affairs programmes produced
  • Four radio studios: enabling an increase in output and the potential to explore a permanent radio station
  • Two radio broadcast newsrooms: high-tech facilities that enable you to learn how to produce a radio programme
  • Two digital newsrooms: impressive modern facilities that enable you to learn the skills required to produce newspapers, magazines and websites
  • Two TV editing and production newsrooms: state-of-the-art facilities that enable you to learn about TV production.

Placements

We actively encourage all our journalism student to gain journalism experience during their studies with us. Professional experience is an important step in developing a career in journalism and it helps students by put their learning into practice and make contacts in the industry.

Work experiences are not formally assessed or arranged as part of the MA Programme but your personal tutor may be able to advise you in suitable organisations to approach that may suit your chosen career path.

Teaching and learning

Some modules are taught in lecture theatres, such as Ethics, Rules and Standards and UK Media Law, but some involve small-group workshops that allow you to develop your journalistic skills and knowledge with the support of our expert academics.

Shorthand

Our students have the option of taking part in a Teeline shorthand course alongside their studies. This costs £100 (refundable if you reach 100 words per minute) and runs across two terms.

Assessment

All MA Journalism courses at City are practical, hands-on courses designed for aspiring journalists. As a result, much of your coursework will be journalistic assignments that you produce to deadline, as you would in a real news organisation. Assessment is often through a portfolio of journalistic assignments of this kind.

Modules

This course will prepare you for work in the rapidly changing environment of online journalism, with a focus on the key areas of social media, audience development, data journalism and coding.

You will develop these digital specialisations alongside essential journalistic skills of writing, reporting, newsgathering, interviewing and features - core elements of City's renowned Journalism MA programme. Multimedia work is geared to online publication.

Core modules

  • Journalism Ethics (30 credits) – You put practical journalism in an ethical context with case studies and there are discussion groups in the second term.
  • Journalism Portfolio (30 credits) - You develop the essential skills of reporting, from ideas and research to interviewing and writing, news and features, and using the Freedom of Information Act in journalism.
  • Final Project (30 credits) – You explore a topic of your choice in depth to produce one or more pieces of journalism, in text-based or online multimedia formats, ideally for publication online and/or in print.
  • Social, Community and Multimedia Management (30 credits) – Social media and shareable content strategies for audience development, plus video shooting and editing for online.
  • Data Journalism (15 credits) – The essentials of data journalism
  • Advanced Data and Coding (15 credits) – Taking your data journalism further with advanced tools and techniques, plus an introduction to coding for journalists.
  • UK Media Law (15 credits) - You learn the basics of UK Media Law to enable you to work in a UK newsroom.
  • Political Headlines (15 credits) - You learn the structure of British Government and how it works; and you meet journalists who report and present it.

Career prospects

Students benefit from a central London location, unrivalled industry contacts and a thorough grounding in the best practices of professional journalism.

Recent graduates have gone on to work in both specialist digital roles (such as social media, audience development and data journalism) and as reporters and sub-editors.

According to the Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey (DLHE), previous graduates in employment six months after completing the course earn an average salary of £27,500.

Employers include:

  • Associated Press
  • Google
  • Storyful
  • BuzzFeed
  • Metro
  • BBC
  • Financial Times
  • The Times
  • The Guardian
  • The Daily Telegraph
  • Daily Mirror
  • City AM
  • The Independent
  • Bloomberg News
  • The Daily Mail
  • Property Week
  • MSN
  • Aeon Magazine
  • Manchester Evening News.


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This unique course offers critically-engaging themes and technologies, providing skills in immersive storytelling to reflect rapid changes in the games industry. Read more

This unique course offers critically-engaging themes and technologies, providing skills in immersive storytelling to reflect rapid changes in the games industry.

Whether you are looking to build retail or museum installations or you want to use games to tell cinematic stories, this program explores how to craft deeply compelling, critical games and interactive work both for clients and creative practice.

The MA in Independent Games and Playable Experience Design focuses on developing aesthetic awareness, creating compelling mechanics and the ability to craft innovative narratives in games and immersive experiences. Students will be given the skills needed to run a small business and produce quality design on a highly professional level.

Visiting guest lecturers, researchers and artists from around the world will stimulate your critical thinking while inspiring your creativity. Skills based workshops in the latest fabrication and production methodologies will empower you to build stunning installations.

This program will provide access to education and skills new creators will need to be successful in the marketplace.

Why this course?

As technologies have integrated into our everyday lives, elements from games have been woven into everything from the way museums educate the public to how scientists do cancer research. With the rise of mobile, console creators no longer hold a monopoly on gaming platforms. This new found freedom has resulted in an explosion of independent games creating new genres of play. From putting players in immersive augmented worlds to telling transformational personal narratives, these new experiences are redefining the rules of play. Games are now just part of everyday life. As a result, markets that were dominated by traditional media have begun to leverage the ability of games to tell stories, share the news, generate knowledge and educate the public. An explosion of games and apps has created a new breed of entrepreneur which uses small teams to create projects that are accessible to millions. This rising market has become a driving economic reality within the UK.

Modules & structure

Core modules

You will study the following modules:

  • Approaches to Play 1 (15 credits)
  • Approaches to Play 2 (15 credits)
  • Final Projects (60 credits) 

Additionally, a selection of optional modules to the value of 15 and 30 credits will be provided from an annual list for each term and will be made available by the department. 

The current list of optional proposed modules for 2017-2018 is:

  • Introduction to Modelling and Animation (15) 
  • Creative Data (15 Credits) 
  • Workshops in Creative Coding 1 (15 Credits) 
  • Workshops in Creative Coding 2 (15 Credits) 
  • 3D Virtual Environments and Animation (15) 
  • Entrepreneurial Modelling (15) 
  • Physical Computing (30 or 15) 
  • Interactive Fiction (15)

Please note that due to staff research commitments not all of these modules may be available every year.

Option modules

  • Entrepreneurial Modelling (30 credits)
  • Introduction to Modelling and Animation (15 credits)
  • Physical Computing
  • Workshops in Creative Coding 1 (15 credits)
  • Workshops in Creative Coding 2 (15 credits)
  • Interactive Fiction (15 credits)


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Excited by the role of mathematics in securing the modern electronics and communications that we all rely on? This intensive MSc programme explores the mathematics behind secure information and communications systems, in a department that is world renowned for research in the field. Read more

Excited by the role of mathematics in securing the modern electronics and communications that we all rely on? This intensive MSc programme explores the mathematics behind secure information and communications systems, in a department that is world renowned for research in the field.

You will learn to apply advanced mathematical ideas to cryptography, coding theory and information theory, by studying the relevant functions of algebra, number theory and combinatorial complexity theory and algorithms. In the process you will develop a critical appreciation of the challenges that mathematicians face in facilitating secure information transmission, data compression and encryption. You will learn to use advanced cypher systems, correcting codes and modern public key crypto-systems. As part of your studies you will have the opportunity to complete a supervised dissertation in an area of your choice, under the guidance of experts in the field who regularly publish in internationally competitive journals and work closely with partners in industry.

We are a lively, collaborative and supportive community of mathematicians and information security specialists, and thanks to our relatively compact scale we will take the time to get to know you as an individual. You will be assigned a personal advisor to guide you through your studies.

Mathematicians who can push the boundaries and stay ahead when it comes to cryptography and information security are in demand, and the skills you gain will open up a range of career options and provide a solid foundation if you wish to progress to a PhD. These include transferable skills such as familiarity with a computer-based algebra package, experience of carrying out independent research and managing the writing of a dissertation.

  • Learn from internationally renowned mathematicians, cryptographers and communications specialists.
  • Complete a cutting-edge research project under the supervision of cryptography and communications experts.
  • Enjoy the flexibility to tailor your degree to your interests and specialisms.
  • Join a mathematics department that ranks second in the UK for research impact and fourth for world leading or internationally excellent research output (Research Excellence Framework 2014).
  • Feel at home in a friendly department where you will be known as an individual.

Course structure

Core modules

  • Main Project
  • Advanced Cipher Systems
  • Channels
  • Theory of Error-Correcting Codes
  • Public Key Cryptography

Optional modules

In addition to these mandatory course units there are a number of optional course units available during your degree studies. The following is a selection of optional course units that are likely to be available. Please note that although the College will keep changes to a minimum, new units may be offered or existing units may be withdrawn, for example, in response to a change in staff. Applicants will be informed if any significant changes need to be made.

  • Applications of Field Theory
  • Quantum Information and Coding
  • Principles of Algorithm Design
  • Advanced Financial Mathematics
  • Combinatorics
  • Computational Number Theory
  • Complexity Theory
  • Inference
  • Topology
  • Applied Probability

Teaching & assessment

You will initially choose 8 courses from the list of available options, of which you specify 6 courses during the second term that will count towards your final award. You will also complete a core research project under the supervision of one of our academic staff.There is a strong focus on small group teaching throughout the programme.

Assessment is carried out through a variety of methods, including coursework, examinations and the main project. End-of-year examinations in May or June will count for 66.7% of your final award, while the dissertation will make up the remaining 33.3% and has to be submitted by September.

Your future career

By the end of this programme you will have an advanced knowledge and understanding of all the key mathematical principles and applications that underpin modern cryptography and communications. You will have advanced skills in coding, algebra and number theory, and be able to synthesise and interpret information from multiple sources with insight and critical awareness. You will have learnt to formulate problems clearly, to undertake independent research and to express your technical work and conclusions clearly in writing. You will also have valuable transferable skills such as advanced numeracy and IT skills, time management, adaptability and self-motivation.

Graduates from this programme have gone on to carry out cutting-edge research in the fields of communication theory and cryptography, as well as to successful careers in industries such as: information security, IT consultancy, banking and finance, higher education and telecommunications. Our mathematics postgraduates have taken up roles such as: Principal Information Security Consultant at Abbey National PLC; Senior Manager at Enterprise Risk Services, Deloitte & Touche; Global IT Security Director at Reuters; and Information Security Manager at London Underground.

The campus Careers team will be on hand to offer advice and guidance on your chosen career. The University of London Careers Advisory Service runs regular, tailored sessions for mathematics students, on finding summer internships or vacation employment and getting into employment.

  • Open doors to a range of exciting opportunities in academic research or professional employment.
  • Our strong ties with industry mean we understand the needs of employers and we have a strong track record of helping graduates into successful, high-level careers.
  • 90% of our graduates are in work or undertaking further study within six months of leaving (Unistats 2015).


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The MSc in Computational and Data Journalism is a cutting-edge programme based at the UK’s leading Journalism School (Guardian’s University Guide 2016). Read more
The MSc in Computational and Data Journalism is a cutting-edge programme based at the UK’s leading Journalism School (Guardian’s University Guide 2016). It is jointly delivered by the School of Journalism, Media and Cultural Studies and the School of Computer Science and Informatics.

This programme provides the perfect vantage point from which to succeed in digital journalist and allows you to develops skills in both data journalism and newsroom development. No previous knowledge of computing is necessary and the programme is open to graduates from any discipline.

This MSc is ideal for recent graduates looking for specialist skills in digital journalism and coding that are proven to be in demand by leading organisations. We also work with working journalists looking to develop their skills in this growing area of the industry.

As a hands-on programme, it focuses on the development of knowledge and skills through research-informed practical learning in journalism, data science, computer coding and digital development.

During this one-year, full-time Master's degree, you will benefit from a combination of lectures, seminars and workshops to develop your skills in an open, discussion-driven environment.

You will develop a solid foundation in journalism and computing, before specialising in your areas of interest and finally completing a practical and research-based dissertation project using the unique skills that you have acquired.

This programme is the perfect foundation for a career at the forefront of digital journalism. It has been designed to respond to a shortage in skills reported by employers and built to develop professional writing and editorial skills. In addition, it delivers specialist training to understanding data, coding and web application development.

Distinctive features

• This innovative programme is the first of its kind in the UK and is supported by leading industry bodies such as the Financial Times, the BBC and the Office for National Statistics

• Specialist modules include science reporting, sport, business journalism, crisis reporting, visual communication and information design

• The course has a strong focus on practical application of the skills acquired

Structure

This is a year-long, full-time course. It is taught through a mix of formal lectures, demonstrations, and practical exercises as well as individual and team projects but always with a focus on applying the skills in the real world.

The course is structured in three phases – foundation, application and specialisation, dissertation - to support you in the development of skills and knowledge in the key aspects of the course.

You will initially gain a solid foundation in journalism and computing before specialising in your areas of interest and finally, completing a practical and research-based dissertation project using the unique skills that you have acquired.

Core modules:

Information Processing in Python
Web Application Development
Reporters and the Reported
Digital Investigation
Data Journalism
Data Journalism
Dissertation Project

Optional modules:

Computer Science Topic 1: Web and Social Computing
Human Centric Computing
Visual Communication and Information Design
Reporting Business, Finance & Economics
Global Crisis Reporting
Reporting Health and Science
Managing Print Media in a Digital World
Motoring Journalism
Business and Financial Journalism
Lifestyle & Consumer Journalism
Political Reporting
Sports Journalism
Data Journalism
Yr Agenda Cymreig

Teaching

You will be taught through a variety of formal lectures, practical exercises, and individual or group projects which replicate an industry environment.

You will benefit from a dedicated programme of seminars to complement your skills and understanding across the two different disciplines and to bring together the issues arising from the existing teaching modules.

You will also attend a cross-computing/journalism set of workshops and seminars, which support early application and development of the skills developed through each of the subject areas.

Assessment

You will be assessed through a wide range of formative and summative assessments throughout the course. These range from practical class room activities to academic essays and examinations.

Career prospects

The skills taught by this MSc are in demand with employers. Students from the course have gone on to work as data journalists with national news organisations. Students on this programme have also included working journalists looking to specialise in this important area of growth within the media.

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Mathematics is at the heart of advances in science, engineering and technology, as well as being an indispensable problem-solving and decision-making tool in many other areas of life. Read more
Mathematics is at the heart of advances in science, engineering and technology, as well as being an indispensable problem-solving and decision-making tool in many other areas of life. This MSc course enables you to delve deeply into particular aspects of pure and applied mathematics, through a wide choice of modules in fascinating areas such as fractal geometry, coding theory and analytic theory. You’ll complete your MSc with a piece of independent study, exploring the history of modern geometry, advances in approximation theory, variational methods applied to eigenvalue problems, or algebraic graph theory and culminating in a dissertation on the topic of your choice.

Key features of the course

•Ideal for mathematically inclined scientists and engineers as well as mathematicians
•Extends your knowledge and refines your abilities to process information accurately, and critically analyse and communicate complex ideas
•Develops an enhanced skill set that will put you at an advantage in careers as diverse as mathematics, education, computer science, economics, engineering and finance.
•The most popular MSc in mathematics in the UK.
This qualification is eligible for a Postgraduate Loan available from Student Finance England. For more information, see Fees and funding

Course details

You can take a number of different routes towards your qualification - see the full module list for all options.

Modules

The modules in this qualification are categorised as entry, intermediate and dissertation. Check our website for start dates as some modules are not available for study every year.

Entry:

• Calculus of variations and advanced calculus (M820)
• Analytic number theory I (M823)

Intermediate:

• Nonlinear ordinary differential equations (M821)
• Applied complex variables (M828) - next available in October 2017 and following alternate years
• Analytic number theory II (M829) - next available in October 2018 and following alternate years
• Approximation theory (M832) - next available in October 2018 and following alternate years
• Advanced mathematical methods (M833) - next available in October 2017 and following alternate years
• Fractal geometry (M835) - next available in October 2017 and following alternate years
• Coding theory (M836) - next available in October 2018 and following alternate years
• Dissertation: Dissertation in mathematics (M840)

Module study order:

•You must normally pass at least one entry level module before studying an intermediate module.
•You must pass Analytic number theory I (M823) before studying Analytic number theory II (M829).
•You must normally pass four modules before studying the Dissertation in mathematics (M840).
•Some topics for the dissertation have prerequisite modules

Otherwise within each category modules may be studied in any order, and you may register for a module while studying a pre-requisite for that module (i.e. before you know whether you have passed the pre-requisite module or not).

To gain this qualification, you need 180 credits as follows:

150 credits from this list:

Optional modules

• Advanced mathematical methods (M833)
• Analytic number theory I (M823)
• Analytic number theory II (M829)
• Applied complex variables (M828)
• Approximation theory (M832)
• Calculus of variations and advanced calculus (M820)
• Coding theory (M836)
• Fractal geometry (M835)
• Nonlinear ordinary differential equations (M821)

Plus

Compulsory module

Dissertation in mathematics (M840)

The modules quoted in this description are currently available for study. However, as we review the curriculum on a regular basis, the exact selection may change over time.

Credit transfer

For this qualification, we do not allow you to count credit for study you have already done elsewhere.

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In what way does society influence the way that we use language? And conversely, how far does the way we use language influence society? Can language use impact the class system? Sexism? Mental health?. Read more
In what way does society influence the way that we use language? And conversely, how far does the way we use language influence society? Can language use impact the class system? Sexism? Mental health?

On our MA Sociolinguistics, you address questions like these through exploration of the stylistic, cognitive and functional aspects of language variation and change. We familiarise you with the foundations of contemporary sociolinguistics, including:
-Language variation and change
-Ethnography of speaking
-Multilingualism
-Discourse

We additionally offer modules in some of the most prominent sub-disciplines in linguistics such as variation theory, socio-pragmatics, conversation analysis, language contact, language and gender, and language rights.

You also gain first-hand experience of interview, questionnaire and observation data and learn quantitative and qualitative methodologies for coding and analysing sociolinguistic interview and questionnaire data.

We are one of the largest and most prestigious language and linguistics departments in the world, a place where talented students become part of an academic community in which the majority of research is rated ‘world-leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’ (REF 2014), placing us firmly within the top 10 departments in the UK and ranked among the top 150 departments on the planet according to the QS World [University] Rankings [2016] for linguistics.

If you want a global outlook, are interested in human communication, and want to study for a degree with real-world practical value in a world-class department, welcome to Essex.

Our expert staff

Our staff maintain excellent student-staff ratios with capped language-specific seminars.

In sociolinguistics, Peter Patrick, Rebecca Clift, Enam Al Wer and Vineeta Chand all work on different aspects of how language varies, and investigate which factors cause such variation. Peter is also involved in language rights, and offers expert opinions in asylum cases where language is used to determine origin.

Specialist facilities

-An exciting programme of research seminars and other events
-Our Languages for All programme offers you the opportunity to study an additional language alongside your course at no extra cost
-Our ‘Visual World’ Experimental Lab records response times and eye movements when individuals are presented with pictures and videos
-Our Eye-Tracking Lab monitors eye movement of individuals performing tasks
-Our Psycholinguistics Lab measures how long it takes individuals to react to words, texts and sounds
-Our Linguistics Lab has specialist equipment to analyse sound
-Our Albert Sloman Library houses a strong collection of books, journals, electronic resources and major archives

Your future

Our course can lead to careers in areas such as academic research, publishing, journalism, administration, public service and teaching. You develop key employability skills including research design, data analysis, thinking analytically, report writing and public speaking.

We work with the University’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Within our Department of Language and Linguistics, we also offer supervision for PhD and MPhil. We offer supervision in areas including language acquisition, language learning and language teaching, culture and communication, psycholinguistics, language disorders, sociolinguistics, and theoretical and descriptive linguistics.

Our graduates are successful in a wide variety of career paths. They leave Essex with a unique set of skills and experience that are in demand by employers.

Example structure

-Variationist Sociolinguistic Theory
-Sociolinguistic Methods 1: Data Collection
-Sociolinguistic Methods: Data Coding and Analysis
-MA Dissertation
-Assignment Writing and Dissertation Preparation
-Sociocultural Linguistics
-Advanced Phonology (optional)
-First Language Acquisition (optional)
-Phonological Development (optional)
-Second Language Acquisition and Linguistics Theory (optional)
-American Languages (optional)
-Varieties of English (optional)
-Sentence Processing (optional)
-Language Rights (optional)
-Semantics (optional)
-Language Learning (optional)
-English Syntax 1 (optional)
-Individual Differences in L2 Learning (optional)
-Syntactic Theory I (optional)
-Experimental Design and Analysis (optional)
-Research Methods I (optional)
-English Syntax 2 (optional)
-Syntactic Theory II (optional)
-The Role of Age in Bilingual Development (optional)
-Variation in English II (optional)
-Research Methods II (optional)
-Graduate Research Assignment (optional)
-Language Attrition (optional)
-Language in Context: From Pragmatics to Conversation Analysis (optional)
-Intercultural Communication: communicating across languages and cultures (optional)

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Modern information systems continue to transform and progress the ease with which information can be accessed across the globe and to underpin the digital society and economy. Read more
Modern information systems continue to transform and progress the ease with which information can be accessed across the globe and to underpin the digital society and economy.

They depend fundamentally on digital systems of communication, and this programme provides thorough coverage of the speciality to meet the high and increasing demand for digital communications engineers who can manage and develop the technologies of today’s data-driven lifestyle.

This programme is aimed at recent engineering, physics and computer science graduates and/or those with a number of years industry experience in the communications industry, who wish to acquire in-depth knowledge of this key specialism in order to progress their careers.

Core study areas include fundamentals of digital signal processing and information theory and coding, and a research project.

Optional study areas include communication networks, personal radio communications, communication channels, digital signal processing for software defined radio, multimedia over networks, mobile network technologies and intelligent signal processing.

See the website http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/eese/digital-communication-systems/

Programme modules

Compulsory Modules:
Semester 1
- Fundamentals of Digital Signal Processing
- Information Theory and Coding

Semester 2
- Research project
- Advanced individual project

Optional Modules:
Semester 1
- Communication Networks
- Personal Radio Communications
- Communication Channels

Semester 2
- Digital Signal Processing for Software Defined Radio
- Communication Network Security and e-Commerce
- Mobile Network Technologies
- Intelligent Signal Processing

How you will learn

The course is designed to give both deep understanding of the core technologies which underpin the industry and which are driving the latest advances in performance and capability. It allows you to develop your personal interests via a range of specialised optional modules. The individual research project is often undertaken as part of the School’s internationally respected research portfolio.

- Assessment
Examinations are held in January and May, with coursework and group work throughout the programme. The individual research project is assessed by written report and viva voce in September.

Facilities

Students on the programme have access to laboratories, industry standard software and hardware including equipment provided by Texas Instruments. There is a range of anechoic chambers including the largest microwave chamber at any UK university.

Careers and further study

Job opportunities include both senior technical and managerial activities in the fields of communications engineering including high speed digital design, communication systems engineering, software/firmware engineering, algorithm development and signal processing engineering.

Why choose electronic, electrical and systems engineering at Loughborough?

We develop and nurture the world’s top engineering talent to meet the challenges of an increasingly complex world. All of our Masters programmes are accredited by one or more of the following professional bodies: the IET, IMechE, InstMC, Royal Aeronautical Society and the Energy Institute.

We carefully integrate our research and education programmes in order to support the technical and commercial needs of society and to extend the boundaries of current knowledge.

Consequently, our graduates are highly sought after by industry and commerce worldwide, and our programmes are consistently ranked as excellent in student surveys, including the National Student Survey, and independent assessments.

- Facilities
Our facilities are flexible and serve to enable our research and teaching as well as modest preproduction testing for industry.
Our extensive laboratories allow you the opportunity to gain crucial practical skills and experience in some of the latest electrical and electronic experimental facilities and using industry standard software.

- Research
We are passionate about our research and continually strive to strengthen and stimulate our portfolio. We have traditionally built our expertise around the themes of communications, energy and systems, critical areas where technology and engineering impact on modern life.

- Career prospects
90% of our graduates were in employment and/or further study six months after graduating. They go on to work with companies such as Accenture, BAE Systems, E.ON, ESB International, Hewlett Packard, Mitsubishi, Renewable Energy Systems Ltd, Rolls Royce and Siemens AG.

Find out how to apply here http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/eese/digital-communication-systems/

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This course in Digital Humanities brings digital theory and practice to the study of human culture. from history, English and music to museums, digital publishing and beyond. Read more

This course in Digital Humanities brings digital theory and practice to the study of human culture: from history, English and music to museums, digital publishing and beyond.

Digital technology provides many new opportunities and challenges to those working with textual, visual or multimedia content and this course studies the history and current state of the digital humanities, exploring their role in modelling, curating, analysing and interpreting digital representations of human culture in all its forms.

Key benefits

  • This world-leading course is highly multidisciplinary and draws on a wide range of expertise in web technologies, digital publishing, open software and content creation, digital cultural heritage, coding in humanities/cultural contexts and maps, apps and the Geoweb.
  • The course provides opportunities to scope, build and critique practical experiments in digital research with an arts, humanities and cultural sector focus.
  • Through the optional internship module students can have direct access to some of the world’s most important culture and media institutions.
  • The MA can lead to further research or to careers in cultural heritage institutions (such as museums, libraries, and archives), in multimedia and new media companies, in internet companies, in publishing houses, and in web based businesses in London and overseas.

Description

In an age where so much of what we do is mobile, networked and mediated by digital culture and technology, digital humanities play an important role in exploring how we create and share knowledge. On this course, we will develop and enhance your awareness and understanding of a range of subjects that are relevant to the digitally mediated study of human culture, including:

  • How we model human culture using computers and how we can create memory and knowledge environments which facilitate new insights or new ways of working with the human record.
  • How the ethos of openness that the internet encourages – open access, open data – influences the knowledge economy.
  • The role of digital culture in changing concepts of authorship, editing and publication.
  • The potential application and limitations of big data techniques to further the study of human culture in an era of information overload.
  • The place of coding in our digital interactions with culture and cultural heritage.

We will give you a broad understanding of the most important applications of digital methods and technologies to humanities research questions and what they do and don’t allow us to do. You will be able to scope, build and critique practical experiments in digital research with an arts, humanities and cultural sector focus, and you will learn to provide critical commentary on the relationship between creativity, digital technology and the study of human culture.

Course purpose

The MA in Digital Humanities is designed to develop your understanding of digital theory and practice in studying human culture, from the perspectives of academic scholarship, cultural heritage and the commercial world.

Digital technology provides many new opportunities and challenges to those working with textual, visual or multimedia content and this course studies the history and current state of the digital humanities, exploring their role in modelling, curating, analysing and interpreting digital representations of human culture in all its forms.

The MA course is aimed at a diverse range of participants and aims to equip students with a variety of strategic, technical and analytical skills to provide direction and leadership in these areas.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

If you are a full-time student, we will provide 120 to 180 hours of teaching through lectures and seminars, and we will expect you to undertake 1674 hours of independent study.

If you are a part-time student, we will provide 90 hours of teaching through lectures and seminars in your first year, and 50 hours in your second. We will expect you to undertake 720 hours of independent study in your first year and 954 hours in your second.

Assessment

We will assess our modules entirely through coursework, which will mostly take the form of essays, with some project work.

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Study a degree which develops your arts practice through the expressive world of creative computation. The Masters provides you with the historical foundations, frameworks and critical skills to produce a series of projects for public exhibition. Read more

Study a degree which develops your arts practice through the expressive world of creative computation. The Masters provides you with the historical foundations, frameworks and critical skills to produce a series of projects for public exhibition.

What is computational art?

Computation consists of all the changes brought about by digital technology. Art is an open set of ways of acting inventively in culture. Mixing the two together in a systematic way gives us computational art. This is a very open field, and one that is set to expand enormously in the coming years. It is where the most exciting developments in technology and in culture can already be found. This degree will place you in the middle of this fast-evolving context.

What will I learn?

This degree develops your arts practice through the expressive world of creative computation. Over a two years (full-time) or four years (part-time) you will develop your artistic work and thinking through the challenge of developing a series of projects for public exhibition which will explore the technological and cultural ramifications of computation. 

You will learn the fundamentals of programming and how to apply this knowledge expressively. You will work with popular open source programming environments such as Processing, OpenFrameworks, P5.js and Arduino, and will learn how to program in languages such as Java, Javascript and C++. 

Since computational artworks don’t necessarily involve computers and screens, we also encourage students to produce works across a diverse range of media. Supported by studio technicians in state-of-the-art facilities, our students are producing works using tools such as 3D printers, laser cutters, robotics, wearable technologies, paint, sculpture and textiles. 

You will also study contextual modules on computational art and the socio-political effects of technology. Modules provide students with the historical foundations, frameworks, critical skills and confidence to express their ideas effectively. You will have the opportunity to learn the cultural histories of technology, to reflect on computation in terms of its wider cultural effects, and to understand the way in which art provides rigorous ways of thinking. 

Through our masterclass series, we regularly invite world-class artists and curators to explain their work and engage in critical dialogue with the students. This allows you to develop a wider understanding of the contemporary art scene and how your work sits within the professional art world.

Should I study the MFA or MA Computational Arts?

As well as the MFA, we also offer an MA in Computational Arts. The MA is 1 year (full-time), the MFA 2 years (full-time).

The first year of the MFA is identical to the MA. You take the same classes and you learn the same things. The differences between the two courses is that in the MFA you get a 2nd year in which you take additional courses which help you develop your arts practice further. These courses mean that you get a space to work under a tutor's supervision.

Modules & structure

Year 1

Year 1 shares the same core learning as our MA in Computational Arts programme: 

The follwing are core modules:

You may then pick modules of your own choice from the optional modules listed below: 

In year 2 you will study the following: 

Assessment  

In Year 2 you will be assessed by: self-evaluation report of 2,500 words; essay of up to 6,000 words; viva voce; exhibition of final work.

Skills & careers

The programme will equip you with a broad training in the use of creative computing systems that are currently most important in artistic, design and cultural practices and the creative industries, as well as technologies that are yet to emerge.

Find out more about employability at Goldsmiths



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With an industry-informed curriculum, this future-focused MA combines computing and media and communications to reflect digital journalism at its most current. Read more

With an industry-informed curriculum, this future-focused MA combines computing and media and communications to reflect digital journalism at its most current.

Imagine getting your work recognised by Tim Berners Lee, having your project featured in the The New York Times, or winning the Guardian’s student digital journalist awards. These are the kinds of things that happen on this dynamic programme. 

The questions we ask

From delivering news on wearables, to the latest developments in live reporting, the questions we ask are informed by an industry panel featuring the heads of digital at organisations including The Guardianthe Financial Times, and the BBC. We want to define the transformative nature of digital journalism so we explore critical and entrepreneurial approaches and get hands-on, experimenting with the latest journalistic innovations. 

The processes we use

It’s really important for us that you graduate with a set of core digital journalism skills so half of the degree focuses on the computing side of the discipline and half on media and communications. This means you get a holistic MA, where you study the foundations of digital journalism and practise it in its most current forms.

You’ll have the chance to study multimedia and interactive journalism, look at interactive documentaries, digital reporting, and video journalism. You’ll also learn coding, so you can get to grips with using algorithms and data sets, and do social network analysis to monitor what’s going on behind the screens.

The approach we take

Through our partnerships with BBC news labs and The Times’ development team, we make sure we’re keeping up with industry but also working with it. 

We want you to reimagine the medium while you’re here, so you get the chance to specialise in your own area of interest for your final project. This could be anything from an interactive website to a video production using interactive story telling and text. We offer a lot of support when it comes to the coding side of the course. A boot camp before the start of the programme gives you an introduction to some of the techniques and languages. 

What you go away with are the core skills for news writing, video, and computational techniques and some amazing industry contacts.

Modules & structure

Students without a technical background will be encouraged to take our pre-session Digital Bootcamp in September to gain a basic literacy in digital fundamentals, and to get to know fellow students. 

The degree consists of modules taught by both departments in a truly interdisciplinary and collaborative style.

You will study the following core modules:

Assessment

You are required to undertake and pass every element of the programme. Each module is individually assessed using a variety of provisions including digital projects, written work, and exam.

Skills & careers

Our graduates have gone on to work within diverse roles from delivering communications for UNICEF in Bangladesh, to creating content for Rolling Stone magazine in New York.

Find out more about skills and careers at Goldsmiths



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About the course. Study the key design aspects of a modern wireless communication system, in particular cellular mobile radio systems. Read more

About the course

Study the key design aspects of a modern wireless communication system, in particular cellular mobile radio systems.

There is a current shortage of communications engineers with a comprehensive appreciation of wireless system design from RF through baseband to packet protocols.

Our graduates are in demand

Many go to work in industry as engineers for large national and international companies, including ARUP, Ericsson Communications, HSBC, Rolls-Royce, Jaguar Land Rover and Intel Asia Pacific.

Real-world applications

This is a research environment. What we teach is based on the latest ideas. The work you do on your course is directly connected to real-world applications.

We work with government research laboratories, industrial companies and other prestigious universities. Significant funding from UK research councils, the European Union and industry means you have access to the best facilities.

How we teach

You’ll be taught by academics who are leaders in their field. The 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) puts us among the UK top five for this subject. Our courses are centred around finding solutions to problems, in lectures, seminars, exercises and through project work.

First-class facilities

Semiconductor Materials and Devices

LED, laser photodetectors and transistor design, a high-tech field-emission gun transmission electron microscope (FEGTEM), a focused ion beam (FIB) milling facility, and electron beam lithographic equipment.

Our state-of-the-art semiconductor growth and processing equipment is housed in an extensive clean room complex as part of the EPSRC’s National Centre for III-V Technologies.

Our investment in semiconductor research equipment in the last 12 months totals £6million.

Electrical Machines and Drives

Specialist facilities for the design and manufacture of electromagnetic machines, dynamometer test cells, a high-speed motor test pit, environmental test chambers, electronic packaging and EMC testing facilities, Rolls-Royce University Technology Centre for Advanced Electrical Machines and Drives.

Communications

Advanced anechoic chambers for antenna design and materials characterisation, a lab for calibrated RF dosimetry of tissue to assess pathogenic effects of electromagnetic radiation from mobile phones, extensive CAD electromagnetic analysis tools.

Core modules

  • Advanced Signal Processing
  • Advanced Communication Principles
  • Antennas, Propagation and Satellite Systems
  • Mobile Networks and Physical Layer Protocols
  • Broadband Wireless Techniques
  • Wireless Packet Data Networks and Protocols
  • Major Research Project

Examples of optional modules

  • Data Coding Techniques for Communication and Storage
  • Optical Communication Devices and Systems
  • Computer Vision
  • Electronic Communication Technologies
  • Data Coding Techniques for Communication and Storage

Teaching and assessment

Research-led teaching and an individual research project. Assessment is by examinations, coursework and a project dissertation with poster presentation.



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This is a creative, project-based course focusing on the practical and theoretical study of product design and its relationship to interaction. Read more
This is a creative, project-based course focusing on the practical and theoretical study of product design and its relationship to interaction. As an advanced product designer, this course supports your continued development and will refine your practice in interaction and user-centred product design.

The course explores academic theories as well as industry practice within interactive media, digital arts, entertainment and product design; and is a combination of two separate fields: product design and interactive media.

In Interactive Product Futures you will focus on user-centred design processes and research and analyse “user interaction” as your primary focus. The emphasis is on technology-mediated communication between humans and objects or spaces, allowing you to apply design and apply technological solutions to people’s infinite needs. You will also examine how technology gives personality to objects, and thereby how to ensure technology and design are more empathetic to people and their behaviours.

In the early units of the course you will be given short project briefs in which to design, implement, test and evaluate solutions in the form of an interactive product. Each project brief may take the form of an online or offline product; for example: an online quiz, an e-commerce type application, a toy. This is also an opportunity to produce a series of creative works within the specialisation of rapid prototyping (3D printing), animation, game design, web design, installation art, projection mapping, creative coding, computation design and entertainment media. The aim is to provide you with the opportunity to develop a software solution to a given problem, or aspect of a larger problem.

You will be encouraged to experiment with new ways of working with objects/scenarios and their integration with technology both creatively and collaboratively, and to apply emerging and existing technological solutions through personal fabrication, research and the experimental application of technology.

The course promotes cross disciplinary thinking as an approach to product design, so that the relationship between interactivity, artefacts, environments and the systems and organisations in which they operate can be re-examined.

By studying the course you will develop your creative design skills to innovate and influence product and interaction design practice and realise the commercial potential of your design proposals.

- Collaborative project
'The Digital Gym' project, which allowed students to research how emerging technologies are applied and user behaviour enhanced to provide a distinct, immersive gym experience on the Greenwich Peninsula.

Study units

- Technology Issues
- Business and Innovation
- Research Process
- Concept and Prototyping
- Major project

Through the Business and Innovation unit you will have the opportunity to explore the generation of innovative new business models that will help to shape your emerging project concept.

The Technology Issues unit encourages you to engage and explore emerging new technologies as well as skills in scripting and coding, first within a group, then as a cross-disciplinary, and finally in an individual project.

Through the Research Process unit, you will explore academic theoretical frameworks and research methodologies and their application within industry practice.

In both the Technology Issues and Concept and Prototyping units, youwill explore the dialogue between product and user, the function, usability and forms, flow and creativity and user experiences.

The course will culminate in your final Major Project.

Programme Aims

All postgraduate courses at Ravensbourne provide students with the opportunity to develop advanced skills in the conceptualisation and practical realisation of innovative creative projects in their discipline area and provide them with the entrepreneurial skills to realise their commercial potential. These courses share the following common aims:

- to develop advanced creative practitioners with the potential to originate, innovate or influence practice in their discipline area;

- to equip students with a comprehensive understanding of the core principles and technology underpinning their creative project and the theoretical frameworks within which to locate it;

- to underpin students’ creative practice with the entrepreneurial skills and business awareness necessary to turn concepts into commercially viable realities;

- to develop students’ skills in independent learning, self-reflection and research skills necessary to sustain advanced creative practice and scholarship;

- to offer a stimulating environment for postgraduate students which is both supportive and flexible in relation to their learning needs and a creative space in which to incubate their ideas.

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The Communication Systems master's programme offers a broad curriculum on communication technology focusing on both the fundamental principles of systems engineering and the practical design of digital and wireless communication systems. Read more

The Communication Systems master's programme offers a broad curriculum on communication technology focusing on both the fundamental principles of systems engineering and the practical design of digital and wireless communication systems.

We are living in an increasingly networked society. The number of mobile phone users is rising by 50 million per month, while video streaming and social networking are pushing data volume demands. New applications for the internet-of-things are set to revolutionise the coming decades by creating a new paradigm in which not only humans but also machines communicate with each other. The exponential growth in the use of communication devices requires skilled engineers to drive technological development and inspire new inventions.

The Communication Systems master’s programme has a solid theoretical base in communication systems engineering. Topics covered include communication theory, coding, modulation, signal processing, and the design and optimisation of communication systems and networks. This programme is highly competitive. Applicants must have advanced skills in mathematics and a strong sense of dedication.

Mandatory and elective courses

The first year comprises mandatory courses in communication systems engineering, such as digital communication, wireless communication, information networks, and image and audio coding. The third semester offers elective courses in electrical and computer engineering, mathematics and physics. It also includes a compulsory project, during which students learn project management, apply their knowledge to build a communication system, and work in teams with other students. The final semester is devoted to your thesis, which may be carried out in collaboration with a tech company, such as Ericsson or Saab, or as an internal project at the university.

5G research

Most courses have traditional lectures and tutorials, and all courses include practical laboratory work. Linköping University is at the forefront of research into 5G, the next-generation of cellular network technology. Our seminal, award-winning research on the Massive MIMO multi-antenna technology is conducted in collaboration with Lund University, Ericsson Research, Nokia Bell Labs, and other prominent partners. You will thus get the opportunity to learn 5G-related topics from renowned experts.



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This course provides you with comprehensive training in the essential elements of information engineering and communications. Module options are topical and relevant, encompassing the design of application-specific integrated circuits, micro-electromechanical systems and optical engineering. Read more
This course provides you with comprehensive training in the essential elements of information engineering and communications. Module options are topical and relevant, encompassing the design of application-specific integrated circuits, micro-electromechanical systems and optical engineering.

You’ll also have the opportunity to tap into the world of Computer Science and explore ‘big data’, covering themes such as digital multimedia storage and communications technologies, data analytics and data mining in terms of algorithms, and goals in real-world problems. You’ll also pick up transferable skills for any future study or career, such as project planning and management, ethics, health and safety, report writing, library skills and career management.

Our recent graduates now occupy positions in industries ranging from core network provision through to logistics and software support, in addition to opportunities in data communication equipment and services.

Course description

The MSc degree (totalling 180 credits) comprises eight taught modules (15 credits each), five core modules and three optional modules (see below), along with a research project worth 60 credits (see below).

Core modules

-Advanced Wireless Systems and Networks
-Information Theory and Coding
-Antenna, Propagation and Wireless Communications Theory
-Optical Communication Systems
-Signal & Image Processing

Optional modules

ASICs, MEMS and Smart Devices
Optical Engineering
Data Mining (from Computer Science)
Foundations of Data Analytics (from Computer Science)
Multimedia Processing, Communications and Storage (from Computer Science)

Individual research project

The individual research project is an in-depth experimental, theoretical or computational investigation of a topic chosen by you in conjunction with your academic supervisor. Typical project titles include:
-Network coding for underwater communications.
-Nanoscale communication networks.
-Forward Error Correction for Spectrally Sliced Transmission.
-Routing Algorithm Design for Mobile Ad Hoc Networks.
-Logical Stochastic Resonance.
-Design of Radio Devices using Metamaterials.
-Nonlinear Effects in Optical Fibre Transmission.

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