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The PGCE course in Modern Foreign Languages prepares students to teach their main target language to pupils aged 11-18 and, where applicable, their subsidiary language to pupils aged 11-14. Read more
The PGCE course in Modern Foreign Languages prepares students to teach their main target language to pupils aged 11-18 and, where applicable, their subsidiary language to pupils aged 11-14. The emphasis is on interaction, critical reflection, high linguistic levels, imagination and hard work.

There has never been a more pressing time to teach languages and we aim to promote and extend pupils' experiences so that they are ready to be citizens of our globalised world. We want to prepare passionate linguists who will encourage more pupils into language learning and who are ready to meet the challenges set out by the Welsh Government's Global Futures strategic document.

The South West Wales Centre of Teacher Education has excellent graduate employment rates with 99% of graduates going into employment or further study (DLHE 14/15).

Course Overview

The course includes interactive seminars, lectures and workshops. These provide students with key principles, practical ideas and resources that equip them to teach modern foreign languages. 12 weeks of the course are spent in university and 24 in schools. There is an emphasis on developing subject knowledge using ICT, as well as opportunities for group work with native speakers.

During the year the students submit coursework assignments with the possibility of gaining credits towards a Master’s degree. During school placements practising teachers and tutors formally observe and assess a number of lessons. At the end of each term the students receive written reports which summarises their progress towards meeting the standards for the award of QTS.

You can choose from the following language options:
-French (UCAS course code: 2X6B)
-French and German (UCAS course code 2X67)
-French with Spanish (UCAS course code 2X6C)
-Spanish with French (UCAS course code 2X6F)

Key Features

-Induction course for foreign nationals
-Language enhancement sessions
-Field trips
-Financial incentives (training grant)
-Placements in either English or Welsh medium schools
-We are geographically well placed to serve the whole of South Wales
-Our programme is the largest provider of Secondary PGCE training in Wales
-Long established English and Welsh medium partnership schools and very experienced school /college mentors
-Excellent subject and ICT resources available for students
-Post-course CPD opportunities
-We have the best employment rate in Wales

Career Opportunities

The South West Wales Centre of Teacher Education has excellent graduate employment rates with 99% of graduates going into employment or further study (DLHE 14/15).

Many school and college departments, both locally and nationally, are staffed with several of our teachers and many of our trainees have gone on to forge successful teaching careers at strategic, professional and management levels at home and abroad.

Our PGCE graduates usually remain in close touch with us as they make their careers in the teaching profession and they often become Subject Mentors on the programme. This creates a very strong, sustainable professional network of teachers which is a rich source of continuing professional development.

Recently our PGCE Modern Foreign Language graduates have gone on to work as Secondary teachers in many independent and state schools in Wales, England and abroad including (but not limited) to: Builth Wells High School, Monmouthshire Comprehensive (Newport), Dylan Thomas Community School (Swansea), The Royal Alexandra and Albert Co-ed Boarding School (Reigate), Cymer Afan Comprehensive School (Neath Port Talbot) and Fitzalan High School (Cardiff)

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Designed for graduates who wish to develop the knowledge and skills to pursue a career in the rapidly evolving area of Building Information Modelling (BIM)… Read more
Designed for graduates who wish to develop the knowledge and skills to pursue a career in the rapidly evolving area of Building Information Modelling (BIM), used throughout the construction project and the property life cycle, this course is ideal for those currently employed in the industry who wish to develop new skills and adapt their professional abilities in line with the government’s proposal. It has been accredited by the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS).

The MSc Building Information Modelling and Sustainability emphasises the importance of sustainability, in line with the current environmental agenda. It addresses the use of the Code for Sustainable Homes and the Building Research Establishment’s Environmental Assessment Method (BREEAM) within BIM technologies, along with the RICS Property Life Cycle, and Civil Engineering Environmental Quality Assessment and Awards Scheme (CEEQUAL).

The government’s chief construction adviser has indicated that BIM will become compulsory on publicly-procured projects in the UK from 2016. In future, there will be a demand for bidders and contractors on public building projects who can deliver and manage projects in this framework. This follows the international trend for large clients and government agencies that endorse the use of BIM.

See the website http://courses.southwales.ac.uk/courses/924-msc-building-information-modelling-and-sustainability

What you will study

You will study the following modules:

- Research Methods and Professional Development
This module will enable you to become competent in recognising the strengths and weaknesses of various quantitative and qualitative methods appropriate to relevant research projects; and in collecting, presenting, analysing, and interpreting information.

- Environmental Management
This module will broaden your awareness of current and established environmental and waste management issues and practice, and enable you to critically evaluate strategies for business improvements.

- Project Management and Techniques
You will obtain a critical appreciation of the latest methodologies and techniques for project management, and evaluate the processes associated with controlling, executing and commissioning a specific project.

- 3D Building Information Modelling
On this module you will critically evaluate the importance of BIM and collaboration, and understand the legal implications of data sharing. Furthermore, this module will give you an opportunity to use several 3D BIM packages to generate 3D, 4D and 5D models.

- Beyond the Three Dimensions
This module will enable you to critically evaluate the legal implications of data sharing and develop a comprehensive understanding of the interoperability between different software packages to produce 4D, 5D, 6D, 7D and 8D designs.

- Sustainable by Design and Applications (Project)
On this module you will use your knowledge to develop a BIM model based on an existing project from our industry partners. This will incorporate the relevant information to generate all documents including plans and schedules from 3D to 8D. The module will also give you a critical awareness of BREEAM, Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED), Code for Sustainable Homes, CEEQUAL and Passivhaus.

- Dissertation
This module enables you to undertake a major piece of investigative research over an extended period of time, and to demonstrate an ability to gather, analyse and report the products of your research with academic rigor.

Learning and teaching methods

Tuition combines traditional lectures and tutorials with problem-based learning, through workshops and site visits. You will get the chance to use a series of design and BIM applications such as REVIT, ArchiCAD, Navisworks, CostX and FM:Systems to produce 4D, 5D, 6D and 7D designs, and incorporate BREEAM, Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED), the Code for Sustainable Homes, and CEEQUAL.

If you study full-time, you will need to attend the University two days a week (usually Monday and Wednesday). For part-time students, the commitment is one day a week (usually either Monday or Wednesday). This is subject to change, please contact the University for the most up-to-date information.

Work Experience and Employment Prospects

The government’s chief construction adviser, Paul Morrell, indicated that Building Information Modelling (BIM) will become compulsory on publicly procured projects from 2016. This means bidders and contractors on future public building projects would be required to use BIM.

Our strong industrial and commercial links help us tailor our courses to meet employer’s needs, and ensure you graduate with the right skills to develop an exciting, dynamic career in construction. This industry relationship has been formalised into the Built Environment Strategic Forum (BESF). The mutual benefits arising from this university/industry partnership are significant and guarantee enhanced employability potential to our students and graduates.

According to an article published by RICS, "recent experience indicates a trend in large clients and government agencies across the globe to mandate the use of BIM, not only for delivery of the building, but also as a tool to manage operationally. BIM has the potential to impact every aspect of the building profession. BIM is not going to go away, and so we must, therefore, learn to adapt and embrace or risk the threat of losing ground to others.

MSc Building Information Modelling and Sustainability graduates will be equipped to become BIM Managers. They will also have strong knowledge of how to achieve sustainability, which is valuable for any role within the construction industry.

Assessment methods

Assessment methods vary and include written projects, coursework, project work, presentations and examinations. The course culminates with a dissertation, which requires a substantial research project.

Part-time students have the option of a fast-track route by completing their dissertation over the summer at the end of their second year.

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Learning how to design high-level software that guarantees safety and correctness while still being in control of its complexity. Read more
Learning how to design high-level software that guarantees safety and correctness while still being in control of its complexity.

Software plays a role in almost every aspect of our daily lives and in every organisation anywhere in the world. It can often be a crucial key to their success. Well-structured software that is attuned to an organisation’s needs and future plans can be cost effective, improve efficiency, offer better services and be innovative. Many companies, in every branch out there, are therefore looking for highly skilled software specialists. Graduates of the Master’s specialisation in Software Science will have no trouble finding a job.

Producing software is not merely a technological enterprise but a deeply scientific and creative one as well. Modern cars drive on 20 million lines of code. How do we develop all this software and control its complexity? How do we ensure correctness of software on which the lives in a speeding car literally depend on? This specialisation goes far beyond basic code writing. It’s about analysing and testing code in order to improve it as well as simplify it.

Why study Software Science at Radboud University?

- Although not the only focus, our programme puts a lot of emphasis on embedded software and functional programming.
- We teach a unique range of software analysis techniques and application down to practical/commercial use in industry.
- This specialisation builds on the strong international reputation of the Institute for Computing and Information Sciences (iCIS) in areas such as model based and virtual product development, advanced programming, and domain specific languages. We also closely collaborate with the Embedded Systems Institute.
- Our approach is pragmatic as well as theoretical. As an academic, we don’t just expect you to understand and make use of the appropriate tools, but also to program and develop your own.
- For your Master’s research we have a large number of companies like Philips, ASML and NXP offering projects. There are always more projects than students.
- Thanks to free electives students can branch out to other Computing Science domain at Radboud University such as security, machine learning or more in-depth mathematical foundations of computer science.
- The job opportunities are excellent: some of our students get offered jobs before they’ve even graduated and almost all of our graduates have positions within six months after graduating.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/softwarescience

Admission requirements for international students

1. A completed Bachelor's degree in Computing Science or related area
In order to get admission to this Master’s you will need a completed Bachelor’s degree in Computing Sciences or a related discipline.
2. A proficiency in English
In order to take part in the programme, you need to have fluency in English, both written and spoken. Non-native speakers of English without a Dutch Bachelor's degree or VWO diploma need one of the following:
- TOEFL score of >575 (paper based) or >232 (computer based) or >90 (internet based)
- IELTS score of >6.5
- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE) or Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE), with a mark of C or higher

Career prospects

Writing good software is a highly creative process, which requires the ability to approach problems in entirely novel ways through computational thinking. Besides creativity, a professional software scientist also has fine problem-solving, analytical, programming, and communication skills. By combining software programming, model-checking techniques and human intellect, software scientists can make a real difference to help and improve the devices that govern such a large part of our lives.

The job perspective for our graduates is excellent. Industry desperately needs software science specialists at an academic level, and thus our graduates have no difficulty in find an interesting and challenging job. Several of our graduates decide to go for a PhD and stay at a university, but most of our students go for a career in industry. They then typically either find a job at a larger company as consultant or programmer, or they start up their own software company.

Examples of companies where our graduates end up include the big Dutch high-tech companies such as Océ, ASML, Vanderlande and Philips, ICT service providers such as Topicus and Info Support and companies started by Radboud graduates, like AIA and GX.

Our research in this field

The Master’s programme in Computing Sciences is offered in close collaboration with the research Institute for Computing and Information Sciences (iCIS). Research at iCIS is organised in three different research sections:
- Model Based System Development
- Digital Security
- Intelligent Systems

The Software Science specialisation builds on the strong international reputation of iCIS in areas such model based and virtual product development, advanced programming, and domain specific languages.

Research project and internship

For your research project, you may choose to do your internship at:
- A company
---- SME, such as as Océ, Vanderlande, Clarity or GX
---- multinational, such as the Philips, ASML, NXP, Logica or Reed Business Media
- A governmental institute, such as the (Dutch) Tax Authorities or the European Space Agency.
- Any department at Radboud University or another university with issues regarding software, like studying new techniques for loop bound analysis, the relation between classical logic and computational systems, or e-mail extension for iTasks.
- One of the iCIS departments, specialising on different aspects of Software Science.
- Abroad, under supervision of researchers from other universities that we collaborate with. For instance, exploring a new technique for automata learning at Uppsala University in Sweden, or verifying the correctness of Erlang refactoring transformations at the Eötvös Loránd University (ELTE) in Budapest, Hungary.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/softwarescience

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This two-year Research Master's programma covers Classical Antiquity, the Middle Ages and Early Modernity. You will explore the similarities and differences between these periods. Read more
This two-year Research Master's programma covers Classical Antiquity, the Middle Ages and Early Modernity. You will explore the similarities and differences between these periods. In addition, you will gain fundamental insights into the cultural changes that preceded the modern period.

The programme offers three different specializations: in History (croho code 60139), in Literary Studies (croho code 60814), and in Classics and Ancient Civilizations (croho code 60039). Classical, Medieval and Renaissance Studies offers a multidisciplinary environment. Depending on your background and research interests, you will decide on your main subject. You can focus on history and choose between Ancient, Medieval or Early Modern History. You can also focus on literature. Then your options are Latin, Greek, English or Dutch Literature.

You can design your own programme to fit your interests. You will take specialist tutorials and courses on theory and method, and finish the programme by writing a thesis.

Degree: MA in Classics & Ancient Civilizations (research), MA in History (research), MA in Literary Studies (research)

Why in Groningen?

- Intensive supervision by high-quality researchers in small groups
- Unique approach that allows you to embed your chosen discipline in wider diachronic or synchronic fields
- Research Assistantship Programmes and Talent Grants for excellent students

The programme, which is offered by the Graduate School for the Humanities, is linked to excellent, multidisciplinary research which is carried out at the Groningen Research Institute for the Study of Culture (ICOG) and the national research schools OIKOS (Netherlands Research School for Classical Studies) and Medieval Studies.

Research MA students are required to participate in seminars, courses and summer schools organized by the Dutch national research schools. These 'schools' are organized for the training of PhD students, but some activities are open to or specially set up for you. These events give you, as a Research MA student, the opportunity to deepen your disciplinary profile and to become acquainted with top researchers in your field.

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The MSc Information Technology is an intensive, practically-oriented course. It provides an opportunity for graduates of non-computing subjects to develop key specialist skills for a career in Computing. Read more

Introduction

The MSc Information Technology is an intensive, practically-oriented course. It provides an opportunity for graduates of non-computing subjects to develop key specialist skills for a career in Computing. It is ideal for complementing your expertise with core computing skills.
Computing Science at Stirling has strong links with industry. Students can get a first-hand industrial experience through placements and internships with local enterprises and organisations. More specifically, we offer company-based MSc projects to our students where our students can work with an employer to gain valuable commercial experience. We usually place more than 50% of our students with a company for the MSc project duration. We also regularly invite industry experts to share their expertise with students through seminars and talks.
You will also get prepared for finding and securing a great job after completing this course through an integrated structured personal and professional development programme. This programme covers crucial topics such as self-image, body language, interview techniques, assessment centre strategies, conflict resolution as well as CV preparation and job targeting techniques.

Accreditation

The BCS, the Chartered Institute for IT, is the foremost professional and learned society in the field of computers and information systems in the UK. The Division of Computing Science and Mathematics is an Educational Affiliate of the BCS.
The MSc in Information Technology course is accredited by the BCS as partially meeting the educational requirements for Chartered Information Technology Professional (CITP) registration. CITP is the professional member level of the BCS ('partially meeting' is the normal level of accreditation for such MSc courses, and does not indicate a shortcoming! Additional training/experience is required for full registration.)

Key information

- Degree type: Postgraduate Diploma, MSc
- Study methods: Full-time, Part-time
- Start date: September
- Course Director: Dr Simon Jones

Course objectives

This is an intensive 12-month course which provides an opportunity for non-computing graduates to develop key specialist skills suitable for a career in Computing. It is ideal for those who wish to complement their knowledge and expertise with core computing skills in order to apply them to a new career. Our company sponsored MSc projects will provide an ideal pathway into the industry.
The MSc Information Technology is an intensive, practically-oriented course.
By studying this course students will study in depth key topics including:
- software development
- enterprise database systems
- web technologies
- benefit from research-led teaching
- demonstrate acquired research and development skills by undertaking a substantial piece of software project work
- prepare for positions in the IT industry

English language requirements

If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills:
- IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill
- Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C
- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C
- Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component
- IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17

For more information go to English language requirements https://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/entry-requirements/english/

If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View the range of pre-sessional courses http://www.intohigher.com/uk/en-gb/our-centres/into-university-of-stirling/studying/our-courses/course-list/pre-sessional-english.aspx .

Career opportunities

The MSc in Information Technology will greatly enhance the employment prospects of students. As a graduate of Information Technology, you will be in demand in a range of sectors including health, IT software organisations, service enterprises, engineering and construction firms as well as in the retail sector.
Previous students have been very successful in obtaining suitable employment in the Information Technology field in aconsiderable diversity of posts - some with small companies, others with major UK organisations, with Local Authority and Government bodies as well as in the field of Higher Education.
Here are some recent posts that IT students have taken up:
- IBM, Perth: Junior IT Specialist
- CAP-GEMINI, Glasgow
- AIT, Henley-on-Thames: Graduate Trainee Database Administrator
- Bank of Scotland, Edinburgh: MVS Team (Mainframe Support)
- British Airways, Hounslow: Programmer
- Ark Computing Solutions Ltd, Perth: Programmer/Developer
- Lancaster University, English Dept: Java programmer
- Rothes Infographics, Livingston: Trainee Software Developer

More generally, common job profiles of our graduates are:
- As a Systems Analyst, you will work on solving computer problems. This might involve adapting existing systems or using new technologies designing a new software solution In doing so, you will design software, write code, and test and fix software applications. You might also be involved in providing documentation for users. Typically, you would work as part of a larger team.

- IT Consultants closely work with clients (often at the clients premises) and advise them on how to use computer technology and applications to best meet their business needs. You will work with clients to improve their efficiency of using computer systems. This may involve the adaptation/customisation of software applications, or the development of custom applications for the specific needs of the customer. As well as technical duties, you may be involved in project management.

- Applications Developers translate software requirements into programming code, and will usually specialise in a specific area, such as computer games or web technology. Often developers work as part of a larger team. You may be in charge of developing a certain component or part of a larger application.

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This is a two-year programme designed for postgraduates who wish to become social work practitioners. The initial qualification for social work is generic, preparing you to work in a range of settings and with a wide range of user groups. Read more
This is a two-year programme designed for postgraduates who wish to become social work practitioners. The initial qualification for social work is generic, preparing you to work in a range of settings and with a wide range of user groups. The curriculum framework, based on the Professional Capabilities Framework (PCF), ensures the development of specific skills, common to all kinds of social work intervention.

You will get experience of working with two different service user groups in two different practice settings.

The academic and practice curriculum, associated learning outcomes and the award of MA/Postgraduate Diploma in Social Work will enable you to apply for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) as ready and safe to practice social work. On successful completion, you will be able to enter employment as newly qualified social workers with a range of statutory and voluntary agencies and service user groups. At the end of the programme, you will have your own Professional Development Portfolio, which you can take forward into your Assessed and Supported Year in Employment (ASYE), which is the next step for a newly qualified social worker.

The MA in Social Work will:
- provide you with challenging academic and practice learning opportunities that will enable you to critically evaluate, apply and integrate knowledge, understanding and skills in core areas specified by QAA subject benchmarks, the nine capabilities outlined in the Professional Capabilities Framework (at qualifying level) and the HCPC Standards of Proficiency for Social Workers.
- equip you to understand critique and contribute to the political, social and moral debate about the contested nature, scope and purpose of social work while practising competently in the context of contested knowledge and uncertainty.
- equip you to think and work creatively in collaboration with other professionals and agencies and to negotiate different professional values, areas of knowledge and skills and critically evaluate how these may contribute to inter-disciplinary assessment, intervention and service provision.
- enable you to understand and critically reflect on the relationship between social work values, ethical and legal imperatives and their code of practice in responding positively to cultural diversity and the relationship between social inequality/discrimination, changes through the life course and social context as this impacts upon people's lives.
- enable you to understand and critically reflect on the relationship between social work values, ethical and legal imperatives and their code of practice in responding positively to service users' rights to (re)gain and maintain their autonomy, via a process of complex analysis and evaluation of the relative rights, needs, risks to self and others and respect for service users' autonomy.
- enable you to develop and practice high level transferable skills in critical reasoning and complex problem-solving as well as more generic skills such as time-management, written and verbal communication, IT skills and collaborative problem-solving and planning.
- enable you to develop and refine their research, analytical and intellectual skills and their understanding of the relationship between methodological issues and the creation and interpretation of knowledge, through undertaking a limited piece of research with a focus on social work policy and/or practice.
- develop your abilities to organise and critically discuss complex information and argument and provide an opportunity for students to think in creative and original ways about their area of research, within the parameters of reasoned argument and relevant evidence sources.
- develop your confidence and ability to take responsibility for their learning and work-load management, while making appropriate use of supervision to support, challenge and debate their work using high developed critical reasoning and discursive skills.

At initial qualifying level, graduates will be at the start of their journey through the Professional Capabilities Framework, which will be used to guide them as they progress through different stages of their career.

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This programme looks at language from a sociocultural perspective. It's designed for anyone with an interest in the relationship between language, culture and society but also provides a solid understanding of English language and linguistics- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-sociocultural-linguistics/. Read more
This programme looks at language from a sociocultural perspective. It's designed for anyone with an interest in the relationship between language, culture and society but also provides a solid understanding of English language and linguistics- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-sociocultural-linguistics/

The MA develops your understanding of historical and contemporary debates in (socio)linguistics and discourse analysis and enhances your analytic and linguistic skills by introducing different approaches to the analysis of written and spoken language use from a range of everyday and institutional contexts.

Topics covered include:

language and ideology
linguistic performances of identity (particularly language and gender, sexuality, ethnicity and social class)
language and the media
talk at work
English in a multilingual world
intercultural communication
multilingualism and code-switching
varieties of English
You're encouraged to engage with these topics by drawing on your own social, cultural and occupational backgrounds in class discussions and in your written work.

You're also encouraged to collect your own samples of written and spoken language use and learn to subject those to in-depth critical analysis.

This MA will draw on findings, theories and methodologies from: sociolinguistics, semantics, pragmatics, spoken and written discourse analysis, ethnography, semiotics, feminist stylistics; multimodal analysis; interactional sociolinguistics, conversational analysis, membership categorisation analysis, performativity and narrative analysis.

The programme’s distinct interdisciplinary ethos is also reflected in your opportunity to choose from a selection of relevant option modules in other departments in Goldsmiths.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Maria Macdonald.

Modules & Structure

On this programme you will complete two core modules, two option modules and one dissertation.

Core modules:
Core Issues in English Language & Linguistics- 30 credits
Language in its Sociocultural Context- 30 credits

Option modules:
You may choose two linguistic options or one linguistic option and one option from other MA programmes within the College, where specifically approved by the Programme Co-ordinator.

Option modules from other departments:
You may also choose one non-linguistics module, either from our own department (English and Comparative Literature) or from another department. Please note that availability of options across the College varies, but typically you can choose from the following selection. Please note that your choice of option module from another deparment needs to be discussed with the Programme Co-ordinator of the MA Sociocultural Linguistics in advance.

Dissertation:
You also produce a dissertation. Dissertation topics in the past have included:

discursive construction of religious identities in interviews with British Muslim converts
code-switching practices in a Tunisian family
discourse and identities in the SLA classroom
language and gender in dream narratives
pauses and silences on Talk Radio
attitudes towards bilingual signs in Thailand
representations of parenthood in UK parenting magazines
political debates on Irish TV
lifetime narratives of older Asian immigrants in the UK
the language of text messaging
language and literacy practices on Facebook
attitudes to non-standard language use
discursive analysis of EFL textbooks
gendered speech style in an all-female group of Iranian friends
The best (UG or MA) linguistics dissertation is rewarded every year with the Hayley Davis Prize.

Approach to teaching

Our lecture/seminar sessions are designed to combine discussions of preparatory reading materials with tutor-led input and hands-on analyses of data/texts by students. We also tend to invite guest lectures for our option modules and introduce you to a number of linguistics talk series across the University of London.

Our MA group is usually very tight-knit, students and student reps organise study/revision groups, online discussion forums, outings to lectures across London, and a number of social events.

Assessment

Coursework; essays; examinations; dissertation.

Skills

Transferable skills, including enhanced communication and discussion skills in written and oral contexts; the ability to analyse and evaluate a wide variety of spoken and written texts from informal as well as institutional settings; an understanding of the concept of communicative competence; the ability to organise information, and to assimilate and evaluate competing arguments.

Careers

Publishing, journalism, british council roles, public relations, teaching, research, translation, advertising, the civil service, business, industry, the media.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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The MA in Archaeology can be studied on a full-time and part-time basis. Read more
The MA in Archaeology can be studied on a full-time and part-time basis. Through sets of specialist modules, skills-oriented classes and workshops, and dissertation research it provides the opportunity to advance your skills and knowledge in archaeology with a view to progressing to doctoral level research, or to pick up vital transferable skills ready for working in commercial archaeology or in the wider employment market.

A unique feature of our MA is the provision of specialist strands within which students study, allowing them to gain breadth and depth in their understanding of particular periods, areas and topics. The current strands are:
-Prehistory
-Egypt / Ancient India / Near East (EAINE)
-The Classical World
-Medieval and Post Medieval Archaeology

By the end of this course, students will have had a chance to engage in advanced collection, management and analysis of archaeological data and materials; to develop a sound understanding of current archaeological approaches, concepts and practice; and to acquire specialist skills and knowledge related to their strand from our team of leading experts in the field.

Course Structure

The MA in Archaeology is a 180 credit course composed of several modules including two 15 credit modules aimed at imparting skills in archaeological research and practice, and two 30 credit specialist modules relating to the strands (usually one each, per term). A 20,000 word dissertation worth 90 credits is developed over the course of the second and third terms, and the summer, in consultation with an appointed supervisor, usually in the student’s strand.

In discussion with the department, students can take a 20 credit language module from the Centre for Foreign Language Study in lieu of the practical skills module. There is also the option of substituting a strand specialist module with another MA module on offer in the department, and in some instances, one offered by another department in the University. For example, in recent years students have substituted a strand specialist module with a full 30 credit course on Biomolecular and Isotopic Archaeology run by the department; and The Anglo-Saxon World, an interdisciplinary course run by English, History and Archaeology. The options available vary from year to year; students should consult with the department to check for updates periodically.

Part-time students are expected to complete the course in 2 years. Typically part time students complete the two 15 credit and two 30 credit modules in the first year and the dissertation in the second year.

Module Details

Research and Study Skills in Social Archaeology (RSSSA) – 15 credits
This module runs in Term 1 and aims to provide you with information and skills relevant to pursuing archaeological research for your MA dissertation and beyond. It combines thematic classes/seminars on key topics in archaeology with lectures and workshops introducing fundamental datasets and software applications for archaeology, and assisting the development of advanced visual and written communication skills.

Practical Research and Study Skills (PRSS) – 15 credits
This module runs in Term 2. Students select two from a range of options in hands-on ‘Master Classes’ led by professionals and academic experts, typically taught through short blocks of workshops. These classes provide the opportunity to develop professional capacity skills, assessed through ‘authentic’ assignments, such as reports one would be expected to produce as a professional in the fields of archaeology, museums and galleries or cultural heritage.

As noted above, it is possible to substitute PRSS with a 20 credit language module from the Centre for Foreign Language Study.

Research Topics – 30 credits
Research Topics are detailed courses focussing on particular periods, areas or themes, and are taught by the Department’s leading experts on their specialist topics. Teaching is typically delivered through a series of lectures and small group seminars/tutorials, usually over one term with sessions each week, but sometimes over the year with biweekly sessions.

Students typically chose two modules relevant to their strands, although in consultation with their academic advisor they may opt for a course which is not directly related to their strand. It is possible, as noted above, to substitute one of the Research Topic modules for another MA module run by the department. In consultation with the Department, it may also be possible to substitute a Research Topic for an MA module run by another department, or for a multi-departmental module.

Recent Research Topics can be found on the website: https://www.dur.ac.uk/courses/info/?id=8407&title=Archaeology&code=F4K007&type=MA&year=2016#coursecontent

Dissertation
The dissertation (90 credits, c. 20,000 words) allows students to develop their own line of inquiry and in depth exploration of a topic of interest to them, with the guidance of a supervisor who is usually in their strand. This may be on a topic related to a Research Topic course they have followed, but may be drawn from previous or other interests. Support is available to guide students in designing their research projects and acquiring the skills necessary for carrying out research and analysis, both through the RSSSA programme and through academic advisors and dissertation supervisors

Learning and Teaching

A full summary of the programme's learning and teaching methods can be found on the website: https://www.dur.ac.uk/courses/info/?id=8407&title=Archaeology&code=F4K007&type=MA&year=2016#learning

Other admission requirements

Applicants are requested to indicate their interest in the strand they wish to follow in the personal statement of their application. Prior knowledge of strand specific areas is not mandatory, but an ability to prove previous interest or experience in the strand area would be an advantage for your application.

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The LLM in Advanced Legislative Studies offers a unique opportunity to drafters, legal officers, policy makers, and those interested in the process of lawmaking and in drafting to study the legislative environment and legislation as a tool for regulation. Read more
The LLM in Advanced Legislative Studies offers a unique opportunity to drafters, legal officers, policy makers, and those interested in the process of lawmaking and in drafting to study the legislative environment and legislation as a tool for regulation. The programme aims to promote an understanding of the principles of legislative studies, and an in-depth awareness of what constitutes legislative quality and how this can be achieved. The programme is not prescriptive and allows participants to naturalize their knowledge and apply it in their own national environments. Capped class numbers allow individualized tuition. Alumni are usually employed by governments and international organizations.

Legislative drafting is often perceived as a technical skill, which one learns on the job. The view of the Sir William Dale Centre, as eloquently put by its founder and its staff in numerous publications, has always been that legislative drafting is a phronetic discipline requiring awareness of the theoretical principles of drafting along with experience on the job. Legislative drafting has evolved to become the bedrock of political, economic and social transformation. It is still, however, relatively unexplored as an academic discipline. The LLM examines issues related to the policy process, the legislative process, and the drafting process. Legislation is viewed as a tool for regulation. Effectiveness of regulatory aims is the scope and aim of the drafting process.

LLM in Advanced Legislative Studies is also offered via distance learning (DL).

The LLM in ALS via DL includes a compulsory week-long intensive residential course in London. This gives students a chance to meet the tutors and other students, and to start their studies with the maximum level of support.

Teaching methods for the remainder of the course include extensive online materials per session, such as PowerPoint presentations, hand-outs, and a number of academic sources for essential and further reading; online discussions with tutors and fellow students on the traditional LLM and the LLM via DL; private reading and independent research; individual tuition and support via email for coursework and dissertation for which a dissertation supervisor is assigned.

Structure

LLM in ALS - Degree code: JTALS | Credit value: 180

LLM in ALS via DL - Degree code: JTDIL | Credit value: 180

The LLM is divided into two pathways: the Common Law direction and the EU direction.

The Common Law direction core modules:

Comparative Legislative Studies 1 and 2
Legislative Drafting 1 and 2
Themes of Legislative Studies 1 and 2
The EU direction core modules:

EU Legislative Studies 1 and 2
The Jean Monnet Module ‘Legislating for EU Membership and Accession’
The Jean Monnet module ‘Theories of European Integration’
Themes of Legislative Studies 1 and 2
Plus a dissertation of 10,000-15,000 words

Students take all modules from the selected pathway and the dissertation.

Assessment

Assessment is by coursework, namely by two written essays of 3,500 words each for each of the courses of the LLM. For the two modules students are assessed by one essay of 5,000 words. The pass mark for all examinations and the dissertation will be fifty per cent (50%), the Merit Award will be between 65 and 69% and the mark for Distinction will be seventy per cent (70%), as required by Regulation 10.25 of the Regulations for Taught Masters Degrees.

Mode of study

12 months full-time or 24 months part-time.

Part-time students take four modules in the first year of study, and two modules and the dissertation in the second year of study.

LLM via distance learning: 24 months part-time only. Part-time students take four modules in the first year of study, and two modules and the dissertation in the second year of study.

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This course covers the application and development of computer technologies as used in banking and financial systems, as well as financial and economic principles. Read more

Introduction

This course covers the application and development of computer technologies as used in banking and financial systems, as well as financial and economic principles.
This course provides knowledge in key areas involving three subjects: Computing, Economics, and Finance. Together they offer a unique combination of expertise required for a successful career in the financial sector. This MSc offers a choice of computing modules so that the student can adapt the course to their previous computing experience.
The course has a distinct international dimension as financial markets today are international in scope: trading in equities, bonds, derivatives and other securities occurs across borders and on a global scale. It emphasises the key characteristics of today's globalised financial world.
Computing Science at Stirling has strong links with industry. Students can get a first-hand industrial experience through placements and internships with local enterprises and organisations. More specifically, we offer company-based MSc projects to our students where our students can work with an employer to gain valuable commercial experience. We also regularly invite industry experts to share their expertise with students through seminars and talks.
You will also get prepared to find and secure a great job after completing this course through an integrated structured personal and professional development programme called ‘Lift-Off’. This course covers crucial topics such as self-image, body language, interview techniques, assessment centre startegies, conflict resolution as well as CV preparation and job targeting techniques.

Key information

- Degree type: Postgraduate Diploma, MSc
- Study methods: Full-time, Part-time
- Start date: September
- Course Director: Dr Mario Kolberg

Course objectives

The course is aimed at students from a variety of backgrounds, especially those that do not have any previous training in computing, economics or finance. The course is designed to complement and extend a student’s previous education, training and experience. Appropriate module choices facilitate adjusting the course of study according to a student’s preferences and prior expertise.
The MSc in Computing for Financial Markets will greatly enhance the employment prospects of students. On completion of this course, you will be ideally placed to embark on an IT career in the financial sector. Our company sponsored MSc projects will provide an ideal pathway into the industry.

English language requirements

If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills:
- IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill
- Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C
- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C
- Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component
- IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17

For more information go to English language requirements https://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/entry-requirements/english/

If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View the range of pre-sessional courses http://www.intohigher.com/uk/en-gb/our-centres/into-university-of-stirling/studying/our-courses/course-list/pre-sessional-english.aspx .

Structure and content

This course comprises two 15-week semesters of taught modules, a winter programming assignment over three weeks in January, and the MSc project over three months at the end. Semester 1 concentrates on fundamental techniques. Semester 2 integrates, develops and applies these skills.
Practical work is a key component in this course. It builds from self contained tasks in the first semester, over the larger Winter programming assignment, to a group project in Semester 2. Finally, the dissertation project (possibly with a company) is the largest piece of work leading to your MSc dissertation. We usually place more than 50% of our students with a company for the MSc project duration.

Why Stirling?

REF2014
In REF2014 Stirling was placed 6th in Scotland and 45th in the UK with almost three quarters of research activity rated either world-leading or internationally excellent.

Career opportunities

The MSc in Computing for Financial Markets will greatly enhance the employment prospects of students. As a graduate of Computing for Financial Markets, you will be in demand in a range of sectors including banks, insurance business, IT software organisations, and service enterprises.
Previous postgraduate students have been very successful in obtaining suitable employment in the computing field in a considerable diversity of posts - some with small companies, others with major organisations such as HBOS, Prudential and RBS, with Local Authority and Government bodies. A number of graduates of the MSc Computing for Financial Markets have continued their studies towards a PhD.
Common job profiles of our graduates are:
- As a Systems Analyst, you will work on solving computer problems. This might involve adapting existing systems or using new technologies designing a new software solution In doing so, you will design software, write code, and test and fix software applications. You might also be involved in providing documentation for users. Typically you would work as part of a larger team.

- IT Consultants closely work with clients (often at the clients premises) and advise them on how to use computer technology and applications to best meet their business needs. You will work with clients to improve their efficiency of using computer systems. This may involve the adaptation/customisation of software applications, or the development of custom applications for the specific needs of the customer. As well as technical duties, you may be involved in project management.

- Applications Developers translate software requirements into programming code, and will usually specialise in a specific area, such as computer games or web technology. Often developers work as part of a larger team. You may be in charge of developing a certain component or part of a larger application.

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Still accepting applications for 2016/17. The MFA (Master of Fine Arts) at West Dean College is a two-year full-time programme of study designed to further advance students' capacities in practical, theoretical and professional domains, with an emphasis on specialist studio practice. Read more
Still accepting applications for 2016/17

The MFA (Master of Fine Arts) at West Dean College is a two-year full-time programme of study designed to further advance students' capacities in practical, theoretical and professional domains, with an emphasis on specialist studio practice. The two-year structure provides students with sustained periods of studio-based activity, with dissertation requirements coming early in the second year of study. The emphasis on practice is nonetheless informed and supported by theoretical and professional Study Units throughout the academic year. Whether specialising in a single discipline or working across media, MFA students will have time to develop and expand their studio work to the highest standards, bringing in relevant historical, theoretical and professional perspectives.

::MFA students can expect::

- Support in consolidating studio practice to a level appropriate for accomplished practitioners
- Access to facilities, workshops and expertise for the fabrication of artworks relating to the individual student's ambitions
- Opportunities to employ innovative approaches to studio practice through which conceptual ideas are tested and informed by use of selected media
- To gain a comprehensive understanding of techniques applicable to their own research and scholarship
- To develop originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of how established techniques of research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in the Visual Arts
- To consolidate a systematic understanding and critical awareness of current debates in contemporary art practice
- To further develop aptitude for professional practice, independent research or employment, including opportunities for public exhibition
- To possess independence, self-reliance, as well as promotional enterprise skills, motivated toward professional practice or employment

::Learning Environment::

- Large individual studio spaces
- An excellent staff-to-student ratio with the possibility for weekly tutorial support
- A specialised programme of lectures, seminars and workshops
- Input from regular Visiting Lecturers and artists
- Expert support for a dedicated team of workshop technicians
- Professional development provision for gallery visits and other external events
- Contact with a regular series of professional Artists-in-Residence based in the Visual Arts studios throughout the academic year
- An immersive environment with rich connections to art history, particularly Surrealism, through the legacy of college founder Edward James

Programme Aims

The MFA programme Aims and Learning Outcomes are consistent with the descriptors for a
qualification at QAA Level 7, as defined in the QAA Quality Code for Higher Education (Part A,
Chapter 1).

The programme aims are to provide:

Practical:

1. Provide a stimulating and supportive learning environment for students to develop their
creative, intellectual and material practices

2. Provide facilities and support through which students can further develop their skills and fluency
to an advanced level as accomplished practitioners, gaining a comprehensive understanding of
techniques applicable to their own research or advanced scholarship

3. Enable students to achieve a comprehensive understanding and detailed knowledge of key
aspects of their field of study, as well as creative originality in their application

4. Encourage and support advanced experimental, creative approaches to studio work, much of
which is at, or informed by, the forefront of academic discipline, field of study or area of
professional practice (QAA Quality Code Part A, Chapter A1, p12)

Theoretical:

1. Provide a stimulating environment where advanced research methods and critical practices can
be articulated and where a comprehensive understanding of techniques applicable to personal
research and advanced scholarship can flourish

2. Increase student’s ability to deploy accurately advanced techniques of analysis and inquiry within
their chosen discipline

3. Enable students to articulate an advanced critical understanding of studio practice and its
contexts within contemporary visual art culture, much of which is informed by the forefront of
art practice and theory

Professional:

1. Provide support for personal and professional development, including development and
application of transferable skills such as self-management, decision-making, communication,
collaboration, problem solving, IT and research skills

2. Educate students to possess independence, self-understanding, self-reliance motivated toward
future learning, practice or employment

Facilities

All full-time Visual Arts students are provided with a large individual workspace in the Edward James Studios. In addition to specialist spaces dedicated to Painting and Drawing, Sculpture and Tapestry and Textile-based work, the studios also include Seminar Room, a materials and tool store, a small photographic darkroom, bookable exhibition and research spaces, plus an IT suite with digital editing software. A self-contained Print Room offers specialist facilities for etching, aquatint, monoprinting, woodblock and linocut. Students can work on a large-scale in the Sculpture Courtyard, which is also suitable for work in stone carving.

Students are encouraged to collaborate with other College departments - particularly the full-time programmes in the School of Conservation - making the most of the wide range of specialist knowledge, materials and equipment that is available. The Short Course programme also allows students to access a wide range of visiting tutors and specialist techniques that can further enhance their studies.

West Dean House and Estate offers students access to ambitious exhibition opportunities and unique research material. Students are able to submit site-specific proposals throughout the year and are encouraged to take part in the annual Open House event. The Edward James Collection is an outstanding resource for full-time students, given them access to a range of significant, even iconic, works of art as an ongoing source of inspiration and research.

The College's Arts and Conservation Library gives students access to thousands of specialist books, journals and databases to support their studies.

The Main House also contains West Dean Tapestry Studio, one of the world's leading producers of hand-woven tapestry. As well as having close contact with the expertise of Master Weavers and designers, students have access to the studio's Dye Rooms, a specialist facility for the dyeing of yarn. Find out more about the professional Tapestry Studio here - https://www.westdean.org.uk/study/school-of-creative-arts/tapestry-studio

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- LLM Full Time Law and Economics Programme Code. M2Q3. - LLM Part Time Law and Economics Programme Code M2Q4. The LLM Law and Economics programme is a joint programme offered by the Centre for Commercial Law Studies and the School of Economics and Finance at Queen Mary University of London. Read more

LLM (Master of Laws) Law and Economics

- LLM Full Time Law and Economics Programme Code: M2Q3
- LLM Part Time Law and Economics Programme Code M2Q4

The LLM Law and Economics programme is a joint programme offered by the Centre for Commercial Law Studies and the School of Economics and Finance at Queen Mary University of London. It is a specialist programme which aims to provide rigorous training in theoretical and applied economic analysis as a means of analysing law and the legal framework. It is designed for students with a strong academic background in Law or Economics.

Aims of Programme

Graduates of the programme will possess a solid grounding in Legal theory and modern Economics that will enable them to conduct, assess, and supervise both theoretical and applied research in the field. Students who perform well on the programme are encouraged to apply for a joint doctoral study in the School of Economics and Finance and the Centre for Commercial Law Studies. For those seeking to develop or start their careers outside of academia, the new LLM programme will include a number of practical and knowledge transfer components that will allow a better transition to work outside the higher education sector. Students will, for example, have the opportunity to engage in an academic year-long Investment Club. During this time, students will be gaining hands on experience in trading and portfolio analysis alongside their studies.

Who is the course aimed at?

Such interdisciplinary skills make this LLM ideal for those already in, or planning a career in law or economics in academia, the public sector, international institutions, financial or legal industry or management consulting.

Structure of Programme

The LLM in Law and Economics is available to study full-time for one year or part-time over two years.

The programme of study provides a flexible mix of classroom based teaching (assessed by formal examinations and/or coursework) through:
◦An introductory pre-sessional in mathematics and statistics
◦Two compulsory taught modules which lay a foundation to Law and Economics theories
◦A 15,000 word dissertation
◦Choice of optional law and/or economic modules

Modules

Modules

For the LLM in Law and Economics you take a total of 180 credits. The two compulsory modules and the dissertation have a value of 90 credits. The remaining 90 credits are going to be selected from the range of law or economics modules.

You may study on one of two pathways: Jurisprudence, if you have a legal background or an undergraduate degree in law; or Economics, if you have an economic/finance background or have an undergraduate degree in economics or finance.

If you want to review concepts such as statistical distributions and matrix algebra, you also have the option to attend pre-sessional modules during induction week (week zero) and week one of the first term within the School of Economics and Finance. You will be also presented with basic statistics and statistical software during the first term.

You are required to balance your taught modules equally across the two teaching semesters – a full explanation of this process will be available during induction and before module selection.

Jurisprudence Pathway:
◦Pre-sessional course in mathematics and statistics (optional)

Compulsory modules
◦Law and Economics I (for Lawyers) - 22.5 credits
◦Law and Economics II - 22.5 credits
◦Dissertation – 45 credits

Optional modules

A further 90 credits from the optional law and/or economic modules:
◦90 law credits. Or,
◦90 economic credits. Or,
◦Combination of 45 credits in law and 45 credits in economic modules

Economics Pathway:
◦Pre-sessional course in mathematics and statistics (optional)

Compulsory modules
◦Law and Economics I (for Economists) - 22.5 credits
◦Law and Economics II - 22.5 credits
◦Dissertation - 45 credits

Optional modules

A further 90 credits from the optional law and/or economic modules:
◦90 law credits. Or,
◦90 economic credits. Or,
◦Combination of 45 credits in law and 45 credits in economic modules.

Visit the LLM in Law and Economics module page to see the full list of modules available on this course. Please note that not all options will be available every year.

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This two-year, full-time course is for graduates wishing to train and qualify as social workers. The course meets current Department of Health and GSCC requirements for social work training and integrates academic and practice learning. Read more
This two-year, full-time course is for graduates wishing to train and qualify as social workers.

The course meets current Department of Health and GSCC requirements for social work training and integrates academic and practice learning. There is a focus on the applied social science knowledge base of social work and on the development of social work knowledge, skills and values. Further, the course reflects the multidisciplinary practice context, with opportunities for shared, inter-professional learning with education, nursing, medical and occupational therapy students.
The course runs in partnership with local agencies providing social and caring services and with users of services and carers.

UCAS code L508 please note that applications should be made via UCAS, http://www.ucas.com

Professional accreditation
Information from GSCC
Social work is a regulated profession. As a social work student you will be expected to register with the GSCC, the social work profession's regulator, and adhere to the standards set out in the Code of Practice for Social Workers.
As well as regulating individual social workers and students, the GSCC also regulate the performance of social work courses, the reports of which are published on their website, so you can check to see how each university is performing.

Course structure
Year 1 introduces core skills, theories and approaches for social work practice in its inter-professional context and fosters a critical understanding of key law, policy and human growth across the lifespan. Year 2 focuses on more complex and accountable practice together with the development of more specialised skills and knowledge. There is also a focus on research in social work and the critical use of evidence to underpin own practice.
Learning in practice is supported by periods of study at the university, by directed study (with a range of learning materials) and by small group practice tutorials facilitated by social work-qualified university staff.
Students are required by the General Social Care Council (GSCC) to spend at least 200 days engaged in practice learning. Each student will experience at least two practice settings, statutory social work tasks involving legal interventions and provide services to at least two user groups.

Areas of study
The course includes learning on the following areas:
- social work theories and methods
- core social work skills
- social work values, ethics and anti-oppressive practice
- legal and policy frameworks
- applied social science (social policy, psychology and sociology) for social work practice
- inter-professional learning and practice
- approaches to working with risk, assessment and safeguarding
- contemporary developments and issues in social work
- research methods and the place of research evidence in social work practice.

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Combine business and management skills with computing expertise. Gain specialist, up-to-date computing, business and management knowledge with this intensive MSc. Read more

Introduction

Combine business and management skills with computing expertise. Gain specialist, up-to-date computing, business and management knowledge with this intensive MSc. The course covers the application and development of key computer technologies, as well as business management principles. You will be offered a choice of computing modules, so that you can adapt the course to your previous computing experience.
Computing Science at Stirling has strong links with industry. Students can get a first hand industrial experience through placements and internships with local enterprises and organisations. More specifically, we offer company-based MSc projects to our students where our students can work with an employer to gain valuable commercial experience. We usually place more than 50% of our students with a company for the MSc project duration. We also regularly invite industry experts to share their expertise with students through seminars and talks.
The course is designed to complement and extend a student’s previous education and experience. As such the course offers a high degree of flexibility.
You will also get prepared for finding and securing a great job after completing this course through an integrated structured personal and professional development programme. This course covers crucial topics such as self-image, body language, interview techniques, assessment centre strategies, conflict resolution as well as CV preparation and job targeting techniques.

Key information

- Degree type: MSc, Postgraduate Diploma, Postgraduate Certificate
- Study methods: Full-time
- Start date: September
- Course Director: Dr Mario Kolberg

Course objectives

The course is aimed at students from a variety of backgrounds, especially those that do not have any previous training in computing or management.
This MSc will equip you with required knowledge in management and computing to embark on a successful career in the management of IT systems and teams. Our company sponsored MSc projects will provide an ideal pathway into the industry.

English language requirements

If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills:
- IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill
- Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C
- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C
- Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component
- IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17

For more information go to English language requirements https://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/entry-requirements/english/

If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View the range of pre-sessional courses http://www.intohigher.com/uk/en-gb/our-centres/into-university-of-stirling/studying/our-courses/course-list/pre-sessional-english.aspx .

Structure and content

This course comprises two 15-week semesters of taught modules, a winter programming assignment over three weeks in January, and the MSc dissertation project over three months at the end.
Practical work is a key component in this course. It builds from self contained tasks in the first semester, over the larger winter programming assignment, to a group project in Semester 2. Finally, the dissertation project (possibly with a company) is the largest piece of work leading to your MSc dissertation. We usually place more than 50% of our students with a company for the MSc project duration.

Study method

Full-time This course may also be taken on a part-time basis over a period of up to 27 months following a course of study agreed with the Programme Director.

Why Stirling?

REF2014
In REF2014 Stirling was placed 6th in Scotland and 45th in the UK with almost three quarters of research activity rated either world-leading or internationally excellent.

Career opportunities

The MSc in Computing for Business will greatly enhance the employment prospects of students. As a graduate of Computing for Business, you will be in demand to manage and lead IT projects in a range of sectors including IT software organisations, service enterprises, large corporates, financial institutions.
Previous postgraduate students in the department have been very successful in obtaining suitable employment in the computing field in a considerable diversity of posts - with small companies, with major international organisations including Accenture, IBM, HP, Yammer, Google, Microsoft, Reuters and major financial institutions such as HBOS, as well as with Local Authority and Government bodies. A number of graduates of the MSc Advanced Computing have continued their studies towards a PhD.
More generally, common job profiles of our graduates are:
- As a Systems Analyst, you will work on solving computer problems. This might involve adapting existing systems or using new technologies designing a new software solution. In doing so, you will design software, write code, and test and fix software applications. You might also be involved in providing documentation for users. Typically, you would work as part of a larger team.

- IT Consultants closely work with clients (often at the clients premises) and advise them on how to use computer technology and applications to best meet their business needs. You will work with clients to improve their efficiency of using computer systems. This may involve the adaptation/customisation of software applications or the development of custom applications for the specific needs of the customer. As well as technical duties, you may be involved in project management.

- Applications Developers translate software requirements into programming code and will usually specialise in a specific area, such as computer games or web technology. Often developers work as part of a larger team. You may be in charge of developing a certain component or part of a larger application.

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1. Big Challenges being addressed by this programme – motivation. Globally, there is a reported shortage of data analytics talent, particularly of individuals with the required deep technical and analytical skills. Read more

About the Course

1. Big Challenges being addressed by this programme – motivation

• Globally, there is a reported shortage of data analytics talent, particularly of individuals with the required deep technical and analytical skills.
• Accenture, Gartner and McKinsey have all identified Data Analytics as one of the fastest growing employment areas in computing and one most likely to make an impact in the future.
• The Irish Government’s policy is for Ireland to become a leading country in Europe for big data and analytics, which would result in 21,000 potential new employment opportunities in Ireland alone.
• CNN has listed jobs in this area in their Top 10 best new jobs in America.

2. Programme objectives & purpose

This is an advanced programme that provides Computing graduates with advanced knowledge and skills in the emerging growth area of Data Analytics. It includes advanced topics such as Large-Scale Data Analytics, Information Retrieval, Advanced Topics in Machine Learning and Data Mining, Natural Language Processing, Data Visualisation and Web-Mining. It also includes foundational modules in topics such as Statistics, Regression Analysis and Programming for Data Analytics. Students on the programme further deepen their knowledge of Data Analytics by working on a project either in conjunction with a research group or with an industry partner.

Graduates will be excellently qualified to pursue careers in national and multinational industries in a wide range of areas. Our graduates currently work for companies as diverse as IBM, SAP, Cisco, Avaya, Google, Fujitsu and Merck Pharmaceuticals as well as many specialised companies and startups. Opportunities will be found in:
• Multinational companies, in Ireland and elsewhere, that provide services and solutions for analytics and big data or whose business depend on analytics and big data technologies;
• Innovative small to medium-sized companies and leading-edge start-ups who provide analytics solutions, services and products or use data analytics to develop competitive advantage
• Companies looking to extend their research and development units with highly trained data analytic specialists
• PhD-level research in NUI Galway, elsewhere in Ireland, or abroad

3. What’s special about CoEI/NUIG in this area:

• The MSc in Computer Science (Data Analytics) is being delivered by the Discipline of Information Technology in collaboration with the Insight Centre for Data Analytics (http://insight-centre.org) and with input from the School of Mathematics, Statistics and Applied Mathematics in NUI Galway
• The Discipline of Information Technology at NUI Galway has 25-year track record of education, academic research, and industry collaboration in the field of Computer Science
• The Insight centre at NUI Galway is Europe’s largest research centre for Data Analytics

4. Programme Structure – ECTS weights and split over semester; core/elective, etc.:

• 90ECTS programme
• one full year in duration, beginning September and finishing August
• comprises:
- Foundational taught modules (20 ECTS)
- Advanced taught modules (40 ECTS)
- Research/Industry Project (30 ECTS).

5. Programme Content – module names

Sample Foundational Modules:

• Tools and Techniques for Large Scale Data Analytics
• Programming for Data Analytics
• Machine Learning and Data Mining
• Modern Information Management
• Probability and Statistics
• Discrete Mathematics
• Applied Regression Models
• Digital Signal Processing

Sample Advanced Modules:

• Advanced Topics in Machine Learning and Information Retrieval
• Web Mining and Analytics
• Systems Modelling and Simulation
• Natural Language Processing
• Data Visualisation
• Linked Data Analytics
• Case Studies in Data Analytics
• Embedded Signal Analysis and Processing

6. Testimonials

Ms. Gofran Shukair, MSc, Research Engineer at ZenDesk, Ireland

After graduating with an MSc at NUI Galway, Gofran worked with Fujitsu’s Irish Research Lab as a research engineer before moving to a software engineering position at Zendesk, Ireland.

“The mix of technical and soft skills I gained through my Masters studies at NUI Galway is invaluable. I had the chance to work with great people and to apply my work on real world problems. With the data management and analysis skills I gained, I am currently pursuing my research in an international research project with one of the leading IT companies. I will be always thankful for studying at NUI Galway, a great historic place based in a culturally-rich vibrant city with an international mix of young and ambitious students that made me eager to learn and contribute back the moment I graduated.”

For further details

visit http://www.nuigalway.ie/courses/taught-postgraduate-courses/msc-in-computer-science-data-analytics.html

How to Apply:

Applications are made online via the Postgraduate Applications Centre (PAC) https://www.pac.ie
Please use the following PAC application code for your programme:

M.Sc. Computer Science – Data Analytics - PAC code GYE06

Scholarships :

Please visit our website for more information on scholarships: http://www.nuigalway.ie/engineering-informatics/internationalpostgraduatestudents/feesandscholarships/

Visit the M.Sc. Computer Science – Data Analytics page on the National University of Ireland, Galway web site for more details!

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