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Masters Degrees (Clinical And Translational Research)

We have 113 Masters Degrees (Clinical And Translational Research)

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Our MRes Experimental Cancer Medicine master's course will give nurses, doctors and clinical researchers the skills needed to work in early phase clinical studies. Read more

Our MRes Experimental Cancer Medicine master's course will give nurses, doctors and clinical researchers the skills needed to work in early phase clinical studies.

You will learn how to master experimental cancer through a combination of traditional teaching and hands-on learning, spending a year as a member of the Experimental Cancer Medicine Team at The Christie while also taking four structured taught units.

The taught units will see you learn the details of designing and delivering Phase 1 clinical studies, understanding the pre-clinical data required before a clinical programme can commence, and how to optimise early clinical studies to provide evidence for progressing a promising drug into Phase II/III clinical testing.

Alongside the taught elements, you will be allocated to one or more clinical trials that are being conducted by The Christie experimental cancer medicine team. You will have a named trainer and be exposed to tasks required in the setup, delivery, interpretation and audit of a clinical study.

Nursing and physician students will be expected to participate in patient care, including new and follow-on patient clinics, treatment and care-giving episodes with patients.

For clinical trials coordinators, no direct patient contact is envisaged and duties will involve clinical trial setup, protocol amendments, database setup, data entry, costing and billing for clinical research.

You will be able to choose two aspects of your direct clinical trial research experience to write up for your two research projects in a dissertation format. This will give you the skills and knowledge required to critically report medical, scientific and clinically related sciences for peer review.

Aims

The primary purpose of the MRes in Experimental Cancer Medicine is to provide you with the opportunity to work within a premier UK Phase 1 cancer clinical trials unit and, through a mix of taught and experiential learning, master the discipline of Experimental Cancer Medicine.

Special features

Extensive practical experience

You will spend most of your time gaining hands-on experience within The Christie's Experimental Cancer Medicine Team.

Additional course information

Meet the course team

Dr Natalie Cook is a Senior Clinical Lecturer in Experimental Cancer Medicine at the University and Honorary Consultant in Medical Oncology at The Christie. She completed a PhD at Cambridge, investigating translational therapeutics and biomarker assay design in pancreatic cancer.

Professor Hughes is Chair of Experimental Cancer Medicine at the University and Strategic Director of the Experimental Cancer Medicine team at The Christie. He is a member of the research strategy group for Manchester Cancer Research Centre. He serves on the Biomarker evaluation review panel for CRUK grant applications.

Professor Hughes was previously Global Vice-President for early clinical development at AstraZeneca, overseeing around 100 Phase 0/1/2 clinical studies. He was previously Global Vice-President for early phase clinical oncology, having been involved in over 200 early phase clinical studies.

Dr Matthew Krebs is a Clinical Senior Lecturer in Experimental Cancer Medicine at the University and Honorary Consultant in Medical Oncology at The Christie.

He has a PhD in circulating biomarkers and postdoctoral experience in single cell and ctDNA molecular profiling. He is Principal Investigator on a portfolio of phase 1 clinical trials and has research interests in clinical development of novel drugs for lung cancer and integration of biomarkers with experimental drug development.

Teaching and learning

Our course is structured around a 2:1 split between clinical-based research projects and taught elements respectively.

Taught course units will predominantly use lectures and workshops.

For the research projects, teaching and learning will take place through one-to-one mentoring from a member of the Experimental Cancer Medicine team.

The clinical and academic experience of contributors to this course will provide you with an exceptional teaching and learning experience.

Coursework and assessment

You will be assessed through oral presentations, single best answer exams, written reports and dissertation.

For each research project, you will write a dissertation of 10,000 to 15,000 words. Examples of suitable practical projects include the following.

Research proposal

  • Compilation of a research proposal to research council/charity
  • Writing a protocol and trial costings for sponsor
  • Research and write a successful expression of interest selected by grant funder for full development

Publication-based/dissertation by publication

  • Writing a clinical study report
  • Authoring a peer-review journal review/original article

Service development/professional report/ report based dissertation

  • Public health report/outbreak report/health needs assessment/health impact assessment
  • Proposal for service development/organisational change
  • Audit/evaluate service delivery/policy
  • Implement recommended change from audit report

Adapted systematic review (qualitative data)

  • Compiling the platform of scientific evidence for a new drug indication from literature
  • Review of alternative research methodologies from literature

Full systematic review that includes data collection (quantitative data)

  • Referral patterns for Phase 1 patients

Qualitative or quantitative empirical research

  • Design, conduct, analyse and report an experiment

Qualitative secondary data analysis/analysis of existing quantitative data

  • Compilation, mining and analysis of existing clinical data sets

Quantitative secondary data analysis/analysis of existing qualitative data/theoretical study/narrative review

  • Policy analysis or discourse analysis/content analysis
  • A critical review of policy using framework analysis

Facilities

Teaching will take place within The Christie NHS Foundation Trust , Withington.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

This course is relevant to physician, nursing and clinical research students who are considering a career in Phase 1 clinical studies.

The course provides a theoretical and experiential learning experience and offers a foundation for roles within other experimental cancer medicine centres within the UK and EU, as well as careers in academia, the pharmaceutical industry, clinical trials management and medicine.

The MRes is ideal for high-calibre graduates and professionals wishing to undertake directly channelled research training in the clinical and medical oncology field.



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This programme aims to provide you with a firm foundation in biomedical research methodology, focused on translational cardiovascular medicine, by enhancing your knowledge, understanding, critical awareness and practical research experience in this area. Read more

Programme overview

This programme aims to provide you with a firm foundation in biomedical research methodology, focused on translational cardiovascular medicine, by enhancing your knowledge, understanding, critical awareness and practical research experience in this area. The programme provides a firm theoretical grounding in the scientific principles and clinical applications of translational cardiovascular medicine, as well as intensive training in research methodology, experimental design, statistical analyses, data interpretation and science communication.

The core of the programme is a six-month research project, conducted within one of the University of Bristol's internationally recognised translational cardiovascular medicine research groups. Opportunities will be available in laboratory or clinical-based investigations.

The programme is suitable for clinical and bioscience graduates who wish to develop their research skills within this exciting field. It is also suitable for clinical students interested in pursuing a research-intensive intercalation option after three years of study.

Programme structure

This programme is delivered by research scientists and clinicians through lectures, tutorials, seminars, research clubs and practical classes. In addition to four mandatory units relating to research methodology, students choose two units on aspects of cardiovascular science.

Mandatory units

- Introduction to Research Methods in Health Sciences (10 credits)
This unit introduces a variety of research methods used in basic and applied clinical research including: finding and reading relevant research information; presenting research results; basic statistical analysis; data interpretation; ethics.
- Further Research Methods in Health Sciences (20 credits)
This unit aims to develop further knowledge and practical experience in statistical analyses, experimental design and laboratory methods and includes training in the use of a statistical software package and practical experience in several laboratory techniques.
- Research Club in Health Sciences (10 credits)
This unit aims to develop your ability to present, critically evaluate and discuss scientific findings by contributing to journal clubs, attending and summarising research seminars and presenting your own research.
- Research Project in Translational Cardiovascular Medicine (100 credits)
During this unit you will gain extensive experience in scientific/clinical research by conducting an independent project. You will write up your research in the form of a thesis, present and discuss your work in a viva and research symposium.

Plus a choice of two of the following units:

- Coronary Artery Disease I (20 credits)
- Coronary Artery Disease II (20 credits)
- Heart and Valve Disease (20 credits)
- Paediatric Heart Disease (20 credits)
- Aneurysm, Peripheral Vascular Disease and Stroke (20 credits)

Careers

This programme is suitable for those with a bioscience or clinical background who wish to develop their research skills before embarking on a research/clinical career in academia or the pharmaceutical industry. It provides the ideal foundation for further studies leading to a PhD.

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This unique two-year international programme is offered in collaboration with Yale University. There is a focus on developmental psychopathology drawing on multidisciplinary perspectives, with a specific emphasis on neuroscience. Read more

This unique two-year international programme is offered in collaboration with Yale University. There is a focus on developmental psychopathology drawing on multidisciplinary perspectives, with a specific emphasis on neuroscience. Students spend year one in London, primarily based at the Anna Freud National Centre for Children and Families and year two at Yale.

About this degree

The programme provides students with an excellent foundation in developmental psychopathology and neuroscience, with a focus on:

  • The emergence of childhood clinical disorders (e.g. autism, depression and PTSD)
  • Multiple theoretical frameworks of disorder
  • Research practice, including science communication
  • The translational issues around research and psychological treatments

This two-year MRes has a total value of 330 credits. 135 credits of taught modules are taken in the first year and in the second year, the research portfolio, comprising an oral presentation, proposal, dissertation and research poster, comprises a total of 195 credits.

Year one core modules

  • An Introduction to Psychoanalytic Theory
  • The Clinical Theory of Psychoanalysis
  • Research Methods I: Research Skills
  • Research Methods II: Introduction to Statistical Analysis
  • Research Methods III: Evaluating Research Literature (formative)
  • Introduction to Neuroscience Methods
  • Affective Neuroscience
  • Multiple Perspectives on Development and Psychopathology I
  • Multiple Perspectives on Development and Psychopathology II

Year two core modules

  • Series of formative workshops (e.g. fMRI; EEG; Advanced Research Design; Integrating Cross-disciplinary Models)
  • Research Portfolio (see below)

Dissertation/research project

The research portfolio comprises a project presentation – made up of an oral presentation, slides and a written proposal, a written dissertation and a research poster. All students undertake a research project supervised by a faculty member while at Yale, completing a dissertation of 15,000–17,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme comprises lectures, research classes, tutorials, small-group seminars, and computer-based practical classes. Assessment is predominantly through essays, statistical assignments, a piece of science communication and unseen examinations. In the second year assessment will be based on the research portfolio - comprising an oral presentation, written research proposal, the dissertation and a poster. Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology MRes

Careers

Typically our students are interested in pursuing a research or clinical career. Of students who graduated within the last two years, 23% are now enrolled on PhD programmes; 38% are employed as research associates, 23% are undertaking further training and the remaining 16% are undertaking clinical work.

Employability

The two-year structure allows students to not only develop in-depth theoretical knowledge and research skills but also provides the opportunity to undertake a substantial piece of research under the mentorship of a leading Yale academic and their research lab. A grounding in quantitative analysis and fMRI/EEG skills combined with a focus on clinical disorders during childhood make students particularly attractive as prospective PhD candidates and doctoral Clinical Psychology applicants. Students are encouraged to publish their research where possible.

Some students seek voluntary clinically relevant experience across both years, which is particularly helpful for those considering applications to Clinical Psychology doctoral programmes.

Why study this degree at UCL?

Students acquire excellent research skills in statistical analysis and a grounding in neuroimaging methods, including fMRI and EEG, and expertise in critical evaluation of research.

The programme is based at the Anna Freud National Centre for Children and Families in London, a world-renowned centre for research, training and clinical practice in the field of child mental health. Please note: during the course of the academic year 2018/19, the centre will relocate from Hampstead to a new, purpose-built campus near King's Cross Station.

UCL Psychology & Language Sciences undertakes world-leading research and teaching in mind, behaviour, and language. The division has excellent links with other universities including Yale, providing unique research and networking opportunities for postgraduate students.

Our work attracts staff and students from around the world. Together they create an outstanding and vibrant environment, taking advantage of cutting-edge resources, including state-of-the art neuroimaging equipment.

The division offers an extremely supportive environment with opportunities to attend numerous specialist seminars, workshops, and guest lectures.

You can view video testimonials from previous students on The Anna Freud National Centre for Children and Families webpage

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Division of Psychology & Language Sciences

83% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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This new and innovative course builds upon the integrated nature of the School of Dentistry’s clinical and basic science divisions, and aims to prepare future researchers, from scientific or clinical backgrounds for research careers based in addressing oral health needs. Read more

This new and innovative course builds upon the integrated nature of the School of Dentistry’s clinical and basic science divisions, and aims to prepare future researchers, from scientific or clinical backgrounds for research careers based in addressing oral health needs. You’ll gain a thorough background in oral sciences, the investigative, cutting edge technologies that enable oral scientific discovery and the necessary training in research governance and rigour. All areas of translational research pathways will be addressed, including aspects of commercialisation which will be taught through the Leeds University Business School (LUBS). Disease focused modules provide opportunities for in-depth exploration with research experts in the fields of Cancer, Musculoskeletal and Oral and systemic disease links.

Our teaching staff includes world leading experts with track records in translating research discoveries into novel healthcare products and practices. Student integration within the wider Dental school will be facilitated by undertaking recently updated modules shared with students from other MSc programmes.

Aimed at dental and biosciences graduates, the course will facilitate a career path focussed on oral research and its translation into positive impacts on health.

Course content

The programme will:

  • provide structured individualised learning and training in a research environment of international excellence.
  • be delivered by academics at the forefront of knowledge generation ranging from molecular discovery to translational application
  • engage students in research projects using the latest technologies that generate results with scientific impact and potential for improving patient health
  • equip students for the full process of translational oral research, which will be relevant for a range of biomedical scientific careers, providing the skills and insight to excel in multidisciplinary research.

For more information on typical modules, read Translational Research in Oral Sciences MSc in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

Teaching will be split between the Dental school on the main campus and the Wellcome Trust Brenner Building (WTBB) at the St James’s University Hospital. The WTBB is a modern purpose built research facility, housing cutting edge facilities in imaging, tissue and microbiological culture and next generation sequencing technologies. On the main campus students can benefit from all the expertise, facilities (such as the Leeds Dental Translational and Clinical Research Unit) and support provided by the Dental school.

Our course emphasises student directed and multidisciplinary learning. Teaching methods include lectures, seminars and workshops, complemented by e-learning and will be delivered by research active scientists and clinicians with additional input from industrial partners and Leeds University Business School (LUBS) academics.

Assessment

Summative assessment will provide you with on-going feedback on your depth of subject knowledge and skills. Assessment methods for formative and summative assessment will include oral and poster presentations, unseen examinations and literature reviews. Exercises to identify research questions formulate research plans and prepare mock applications for funding and ethical/ governance approvals will also contribute to assessment.

Career opportunities

You will gain insight into all stages of translational research, preparing you for a career working across multi-disciplinary teams within research and innovation management. The course aims to enhance your career prospects of securing PhD studentship positions, whether that be in pre-clinical or clinical research.

The innovation management in practice module enables you to learn about the commercial aspects of translational research. It may be that you want to go into the oral healthcare industry, so knowledge of business skills will be a useful transferable skill.

You may want to go into academic teaching positions within your own country; this MSc will provide the knowledge required to teach oral biology at undergraduate level. 



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Our MRes Reproduction and Pregnancy course is designed to train those who wish to pursue a research career in reproductive medicine or pregnancy, or to work in associated areas in health or science. Read more

Our MRes Reproduction and Pregnancy course is designed to train those who wish to pursue a research career in reproductive medicine or pregnancy, or to work in associated areas in health or science.

You will undertake two interrelated research projects on a specific topic in reproduction and pregnancy, alongside taught units providing up-to-date knowledge of reproduction and pregnancy and training in research skills. You do not need any prior research experience before starting the course.

Our course will give you hands-on experience of cutting-edge technologies applicable to reproduction and pregnancy, and transferable to other areas of medical research.

You will also gain training and experience in scientific writing and developing a research proposal and receive a grounding in a wide range of reproductive medicine and pregnancy-related issues by attending seminars in the Maternal and Fetal Health Research Centre.

We also give you the opportunity to contribute to public domain research output. Most of our students do so either during or after the course, with output including conference presentations (national and international conferences), published abstracts, published papers (first or co-authored papers), and awards such as RCOG oral presentation and essay prizes and travel grants.

You will graduate with an in-depth knowledge of clinically relevant reproduction and pregnancy research from bench to bedside, as well as advanced research skills and experience of running your own research project.

You will also have a strong understanding of the ethical issues and social implications of research in reproduction and pregnancy and a strong CV for your future research or medical career.

Special features

Manchester Maternal and Fetal Health Research Centre

You will be based in the Manchester Maternal and Fetal Health Research Centre, the largest pregnancy research group in Europe, and Tommy's Stillbirth Research Centre, working alongside internationally renowned researchers in IVF/early pregnancy, placental biology, pregnancy complications and stillbirth.

You will be an active part of the research centre, together with researchers (with basic science and clinical backgrounds) undertaking research as part of their degrees or training (from undergraduate to PhD and postdoctoral research).

Through the MRes and by attending the MFHRC seminar series, you will learn about our interdisciplinary translational research - 'from bench to bedside' - from embryo implantation to pregnancy pathologies and developmental programming in the offspring.

You will able be exposed to our pioneering research antenatal clinics for high risk pregnancies. Integration of the research clinics and the research laboratories provides rich opportunities for translation from clinic to laboratory and application of research findings to the clinic.

Additional course information

Our MRes in Reproduction and Pregnancy addresses the causes, diagnosis and treatments of fertility and pregnancy disorders.

Fertility and pregnancy problems are very common. In the UK:

  • infertility affects one in seven couples;
  • miscarriage affects 15% to 20% of recognised pregnancies;
  • fetal growth restriction (FGR) affects 5% to 8% of pregnancies;
  • pre-eclampsia affects 3% to 5% of pregnancies;
  • stillbirth affects one in 250 pregnancies, or around 4,000 per year;
  • pre-term labour affects 8% of pregnancies.

There is also growing recognition that the health of the fetus dictates adult health. Research into solving pregnancy problems therefore has the potential to reduce the lifelong disease burden.

Diseases of pregnancy are major causes of mortality and morbidity in mothers and infants. Knowledge of causative mechanisms is poor, while treatments are conspicuously lacking.

The Maternal and Fetal Health Research Centre aims to find solutions to problems like these through a holistic approach to understanding, managing and treating diseases affecting mothers and babies, and through training the next generation of researchers in an interdisciplinary research environment.

Teaching and learning

You will benefit from individual and small group supervision by experienced academic staff with scientific and clinical backgrounds. Our staff include internationally renowned experts in reproduction and pregnancy.

Coursework and assessment

Assessment is conducted through coursework, including a dissertation and final thesis, marked by the supervisors and an independent MHFRC staff member under the scrutiny of an expert external examiner.

Facilities

The course is delivered from a world class integrated laboratory and clinical research and teaching facility in the women's hospital on campus. 

You will also have access to a dedicated study area equipped with Wi-Fi and adjacent staff tea room, where lively informal interaction occurs with academic and research staff.

The University of Manchester offers extensive library and online services to help you get the most out of your studies.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

CPD opportunities

This course can be taken by qualified and experienced professionals to update your knowledge of current developments in reproduction and pregnancy, and acquire research skills.

We are developing more CPD opportunities for NHS staff, ranging from one-hour lectures to PGCert and PGDip-level courses. Please contact us for more information.

Career opportunities

Our MRes graduates have continued their scientific or medical careers in the following areas.

  • PhD research - 70% of home science graduates and 40% of our international graduates go on to conduct further research.
  • Clinical training - Through the O&G and Academic pathways (Academic Foundation and Academic Clinical Fellows (ACF)).
  • Other clinical/science professions - eg MBChB, midwifery, journal publishing, biotechnology, NHS STP and HIV Clinical Mentor.

Many of our students have stayed in the Maternal and Fetal Health Research Centre to undertake further research training.

We keep in contact with our MRes alumni and invite all past students to our annual welcome event for the new intake each October.



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Our MRes Oncology course will enable you to develop the skills and knowledge you need to prepare for a career in cancer research. Read more

Our MRes Oncology course will enable you to develop the skills and knowledge you need to prepare for a career in cancer research.

Cancer is a major cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Approximately 300,000 people develop the disease each year in the UK.

Understanding the basis of tumourigenesis and developing new therapies are high priority areas for investment, especially since the economic burden of cancer is increasing. The field of oncology encompasses a wide variety of biological and physical sciences.

You will learn from renowned basic, translational and clinical scientists at the Manchester Cancer Research Centre, the Cancer Research UK (CRUK) Manchester Institute and The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, with a focus on developing practical research skills.

Our course covers the clinical and research aspects of cancer care, and you will have access to an exceptionally wide range of research projects in basic cancer biology, translational areas and clinical cancer care and imaging.

This MRes has both taught and research components and is suitable for those with little or no previous research experience.

Aims

Our MRes course aims to provide postgraduate level training that will equip you with the specialist knowledge and research skills to pursue a research career in the fields of medical and clinical oncology.

You will gain an understanding of the scientific basis of cancer and its treatments, as well as the skills needed to evaluate the potential efficacy of new treatments.

This course also offers the potential to:

  • gain hands-on research experience;
  • work with world-renowned experts;
  • use state-of-the-art research equipment;
  • publish your work and attend national and international conferences;
  • be taught by speakers at the forefront of national and international cancer research;
  • undertake laboratory or clinical-based research projects at the Christie Hospital site, the largest cancer centre in Europe with some of the UK's leading cancer researchers;
  • enhance your research skills and gain confidence in your research abilities.

Special features

Clinical and research components

This is one of only a handful of MRes Oncology courses in the UK. Unlike many other oncology courses, ours has both clinical and research elements, making it suitable for both medical undergraduates and graduates, as well as biomedical science graduates.

Teaching and learning

Our MRes is structured around a 2:1 split between laboratory/clinical-based research projects and taught elements.

Laboratory and clinical research experience is gained through two research placements, one lasting approximately ten weeks (October to December) and the second lasting approximately 25 weeks (January to August).

You may choose to carry out one project for both placements, which most students do, or separate projects for each placement.

Most research placements are based at the Christie site, either within the hospital, the Manchester Cancer Research Centre or CRUK Manchester Institute premises. Projects are also available on the Central Manchester University Hospitals and University Hospital of South Manchester sites.

A list of available projects will be provided to offer holders in August.

Coursework and assessment

Students are assessed through oral presentations, single best answer exams, written reports and a dissertation.

Course unit details

The course features the following components:

  • Research Methods course unit - 15 credits
  • Clinical Masterclass course unit - 15 credits
  • Lecture Series course unit - 15 credits
  • Tutorial course unit - 15 credits
  • Two research placements (1 x 10 week - 30 credits; 1 x 25 week - 90 credits)

The  Research Methods  course unit covers topics relating to:

  • Critical analysis of scientific/medical research and literature
  • Information management
  • Study design
  • Basic statistical analysis
  • Ethics, fraud, plagiarism and medical and academic misconduct
  • Presentation skills
  • Scientific writing and publishing skills

The  Clinical Masterclass  course unit provides a truly multidisciplinary foundation in the key issues in oncology. Delivery is by lectures and site tours and these classes will offer the student the chance to debate with internationally recognised experts in their field. Areas covered include: 

  • Cancer epidemiology, screening and prevention
  • Diagnosis
  • Chemotherapy
  • Radiotherapy
  • Hormonal therapy
  • Surgery

Following attendance at these classes, you will be able to understand how cancer is diagnosed and the principles of cancer surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy.

The  Lecture Series  course unit comprises two intensive one-week courses, one in November and the other in February. The November course covers the biological basis of chemotherapy, pharmacology and cancer biology. The February course covers the biological basis of radiotherapy and translational aspects of cancer research, including biomarkers and new technologies.

The  Tutorial  course unit allows students to choose from a selection of clinical and academic oncology topics. The unit aims to improve ability to interpret and criticise literature as well as improve verbal communication skills in a small group setting. 



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The MPhil degree offered by the Department of Oncology is a 12 month full time programme and involves minimal formal teaching; students are integrated into the research culture of the Department and the Institute in which they are based. Read more
The MPhil degree offered by the Department of Oncology is a 12 month full time programme and involves minimal formal teaching; students are integrated into the research culture of the Department and the Institute in which they are based.

Each student conducts their MPhil project under the direction of their Principal Supervisor, with additional teaching and guidance provided by a Second Supervisor and often a Practical Supervisor. The role of each Supervisor is:

- Principal Supervisor: takes responsibility for experimental oversight of the student's research project and provides day-to-day supervision.
- Second Supervisor: acts as a mentor to the student and is someone who can who can offer impartial advice. The Second Supervisor is a Group Leader or equivalent who is independent from the student's research group and is appointed by the Principal Supervisor before the student arrives.
- Practical Supervisor: provides day-to-day experimental supervision when the Principal Supervisor is unavailable, i.e. during very busy periods. The Practical Supervisor is a senior member of the student's research team and is appointed by the Principal Supervisor before the student arrives. For those Principal Supervisors who are unable to monitor their students on a daily basis, we would expect that they meet semi-formally with their student at least once a month.

The subject of the research project is determined during the application process and is influenced by the research interests of the student’s Principal Supervisor, i.e. students should apply to study with a Group Leader whose area of research most appeals to them. The Department of Oncology’s research interests focus on the prevention, diagnosis and treatments of cancer. This involves using a wide variety of research methods and techniques, encompassing basic laboratory science, translational research and clinical trials. Our students therefore have the opportunity to choose from an extensive range of cancer related research projects. In addition, being based on the Cambridge Biomedical Research Campus, our students also have access world leading scientists and state-of-the-art equipment.

To broaden their knowledge of their chosen field, students are strongly encouraged to attend relevant seminars, lectures and training courses. The Cambridge Cancer Cluster, of which we are a member department, provides the 'Lectures in Cancer Biology' seminar series, which is specifically designed to equip graduate students with a solid background in all major aspects of cancer biology. Students may also attend undergraduate lectures in their chosen field of research, if their Principal Supervisor considers this to be appropriate. We also require our students to attend their research group’s ‘research in progress/laboratory meetings’, at which they are expected to regularly present their ongoing work.

At the end of the course, examination for the MPhil degree involves submission of a written dissertation (of 20,000 words or less), followed by an oral examination based on both the dissertation and a broader knowledge of the chosen area of research.

Course objectives

The structure of the MPhil course is designed to produce graduates with rigorous research and analytical skills, who are exceptionally well-equipped to go onto doctoral research, or employment in industry and the public service.

The MPhil course provides:

- a period of sustained in-depth study of a specific topic;
- an environment that encourages the student’s originality and creativity in their research;
- skills to enable the student to critically examine the background literature relevant to their specific research area;
- the opportunity to develop skills in making and testing hypotheses, in developing new theories, and in planning and conducting experiments;
- the opportunity to expand the student’s knowledge of their research area, including its theoretical foundations and the specific techniques used to study it;
- the opportunity to gain knowledge of the broader field of cancer research;
- an environment in which to develop skills in written work, oral presentation and publishing the results of their research in high-profile scientific journals, through constructive feedback of written work and oral presentations.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/cvocmpmsc

Format

The MPhil course is a full time research course. Most research training provided within the structure of the student’s research group and is overseen by their Principal Supervisor. However, informal opportunities to develop research skills also exist through mentoring by fellow students and members of staff. To enhance their research, students are expected to attend seminars and graduate courses relevant to their area of interest. Students are also encouraged to undertake transferable skills training provided by the Graduate School of Life Sciences. At the end of the course, examination for the MPhil degree involves submission of a written dissertation, followed by an oral examination based on both the dissertation and a broader knowledge of the chosen area of research.

Learning Outcomes

At the end of their MPhil course, students should:

- have a thorough knowledge of the literature and a comprehensive understanding of scientific methods and techniques applicable to their own research;
- be able to demonstrate originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of how research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in their field;
- the ability to critically evaluate current research and research techniques and methodologies;
- demonstrate self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems;
- be able to act autonomously in the planning and implementation of research; and
- have developed skills in oral presentation, scientific writing and publishing the results of their research.

Assessment

Examination for the MPhil degree involves submission of a written dissertation of not more than 20,000 words in length, excluding figures, tables, footnotes, appendices and bibliography, on a subject approved by the Degree Committee for the Faculties of Clinical Medicine and Veterinary Medicine. This is followed by an oral examination based on both the dissertation and a broader knowledge of the chosen area of research.

Continuing

The MPhil Medical Sciences degree is designed to accommodate the needs of those students who have only one year available to them or, who have only managed to obtain funding for one year, i.e. it is not intended to be a probationary year for a three-year PhD degree. However, it is possible to continue from the MPhil to the PhD in Oncology (Basic Science) course via the following 2 options:

(i) Complete the MPhil then continue to the three-year PhD course:

If the student has time and funding for a further THREE years, after completion of their MPhil they may apply to be admitted to the PhD course as a continuing student. The student would be formally examined for the MPhil and if successful, they would then continue onto the three year PhD course as a probationary PhD student, i.e. the MPhil is not counted as the first year of the PhD degree; or

(ii) Transfer from the MPhil to the PhD course:

If the student has time and funding for only TWO more years, they can apply for permission to change their registration from the MPhil to probationary PhD; note, transfer must be approved before completion of the MPhil. If granted permission to change registration, the student will undergo a formal probationary PhD assessment (submission of a written report and an oral examination) towards the end of their first year and if successful, will then be registered for the PhD, i.e. the first year would count as the first year of the PhD degree.

Please note that continuation from the MPhil to the PhD, or changing registration is not automatic; all cases are judged on their own merits based on a number of factors including: evidence of progress and research potential; a sound research proposal; the availability of a suitable supervisor and of resources required for the research; acceptance by the Head of Department and Degree Committee.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

The Department of Oncology does not have specific funds for MPhil courses. However, applicants are encouraged to apply to University funding competitions: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding and the Cambridge Cancer Centre: http://www.cambridgecancercentre.org.uk/education-and-training

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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We invite postgraduate research proposals in a number of disease areas that impact significantly on patient care. We focus on exploring the mechanisms of disease, understanding the ways disease impacts patients’ lives, utilising new diagnostic and therapeutic techniques and developing new treatments. Read more

We invite postgraduate research proposals in a number of disease areas that impact significantly on patient care. We focus on exploring the mechanisms of disease, understanding the ways disease impacts patients’ lives, utilising new diagnostic and therapeutic techniques and developing new treatments.

As a student you will be registered with a University research institute, for many this is the Institute for Cellular Medicine (ICM). You will be supported in your studies through a structured programme of supervision and training via our Faculty of Medical Sciences Graduate School.

We undertake the following areas of research and offer MPhil, PhD and MD supervision in:

Applied immunobiology (including organ and haematogenous stem cell transplantation)

Newcastle hosts one of the most comprehensive organ transplant programmes in the world. This clinical expertise has developed in parallel with the applied immunobiology and transplantation research group. We are investigating aspects of the immunology of autoimmune diseases and cancer therapy, in addition to transplant rejection. We have themes to understand the interplay of the inflammatory and anti-inflammatory responses by a variety of pathways, and how these can be manipulated for therapeutic purposes. Further research theme focusses on primary immunodeficiency diseases.

Dermatology

There is strong emphasis on the integration of clinical investigation with basic science. Our research include:

  • cell signalling in normal and diseased skin including mechanotransduction and response to ultraviolet radiation
  • dermatopharmacology including mechanisms of psoriatic plaque resolution in response to therapy
  • stem cell biology and gene therapy
  • regulation of apoptosis/autophagy
  • non-melanoma skin cancer/melanoma biology and therapy.

We also research the effects of UVR on the skin including mitochondrial DNA damage as a UV biomarker.

Diabetes

This area emphasises on translational research, linking clinical- and laboratory-based science. Key research include:

  • mechanisms of insulin action and glucose homeostasis
  • insulin secretion and pancreatic beta-cell function
  • diabetic complications
  • stem cell therapies
  • genetics and epidemiology of diabetes.

Diagnostic and therapeutic technologies

Focus is on applied research and aims to underpin future clinical applications. Technology-oriented and demand-driven research is conducted which relates directly to health priority areas such as:

  • bacterial infection
  • chronic liver failure
  • cardiovascular and degenerative diseases.

This research is sustained through extensive internal and external collaborations with leading UK and European academic and industrial groups, and has the ultimate goal of deploying next-generation diagnostic and therapeutic systems in the hospital and health-care environment.

Kidney disease

There is a number of research programmes into the genetics, immunology and physiology of kidney disease and kidney transplantation. We maintain close links between basic scientists and clinicians with many translational programmes of work, from the laboratory to first-in-man and phase III clinical trials. Specific areas:

  • haemolytic uraemic syndrome
  • renal inflammation and fibrosis
  • the immunology of transplant rejection
  • tubular disease
  • cystic kidney disease.

The liver

We have particular interests in:

  • primary biliary cirrhosis (epidemiology, immunobiology and genetics)
  • alcoholic and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease
  • fibrosis
  • the genetics of other autoimmune and viral liver diseases

Magnetic Resonance (MR), spectroscopy and imaging in clinical research

Novel non-invasive methodologies using magnetic resonance are developed and applied to clinical research. Our research falls into two categories:

  • MR physics projects involve development and testing of new MR techniques that make quantitative measurements of physiological properties using a safe, repeatable MR scan.
  • Clinical research projects involve the application of these novel biomarkers to investigation of human health and disease.

Our studies cover a broad range of topics (including diabetes, dementia, neuroscience, hepatology, cardiovascular, neuromuscular disease, metabolism, and respiratory research projects), but have a common theme of MR technical development and its application to clinical research.

Musculoskeletal disease (including auto-immune arthritis)

We focus on connective tissue diseases in three, overlapping research programmes. These programmes aim to understand:

  • what causes the destruction of joints (cell signalling, injury and repair)
  • how cells in the joints respond when tissue is lost (cellular interactions)
  • whether we can alter the immune system and ‘switch off’ auto-immune disease (targeted therapies and diagnostics)

This research theme links with other local, national and international centres of excellence and has close integration of basic and clinical researchers and hosts the only immunotherapy centre in the UK.

Pharmacogenomics (including complex disease genetics)

Genetic approaches to the individualisation of drug therapy, including anticoagulants and anti-cancer drugs, and in the genetics of diverse non-Mendelian diseases, from diabetes to periodontal disease, are a focus. A wide range of knowledge and experience in both genetics and clinical sciences is utilised, with access to high-throughput genotyping platforms.

Reproductive and vascular biology

Our scientists and clinicians use in situ cellular technologies and large-scale gene expression profiling to study the normal and pathophysiological remodelling of vascular and uteroplacental tissues. Novel approaches to cellular interactions have been developed using a unique human tissue resource. Our research themes include:

  • the regulation of trophoblast and uNk cells
  • transcriptional and post-translational features of uterine function
  • cardiac and vascular remodelling in pregnancy

We also have preclinical molecular biology projects in breast cancer research.

Respiratory disease

We conduct a broad range of research activities into acute and chronic lung diseases. As well as scientific studies into disease mechanisms, there is particular interest in translational medicine approaches to lung disease, studying human lung tissue and cells to explore potential for new treatments. Our current areas of research include:

  • acute lung injury - lung infections
  • chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
  • fibrotic disease of the lung, both before and after lung transplantation.

Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics

Our research projects are concerned with the harmful effects of chemicals, including prescribed drugs, and finding ways to prevent and minimise these effects. We are attempting to measure the effects of fairly small amounts of chemicals, to provide ways of giving early warning of the start of harmful effects. We also study the adverse side-effects of medicines, including how conditions such as liver disease and heart disease can develop in people taking medicines for completely different medical conditions. Our current interests include: environmental chemicals and organophosphate pesticides, warfarin, psychiatric drugs and anti-cancer drugs.

Pharmacy

Our new School of Pharmacy has scientists and clinicians working together on all aspects of pharmaceutical sciences and clinical pharmacy.



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Our Professional Doctorate in Clinical Research (DClinRes) has been designed to meet the challenge of providing high quality clinical research training for Allied Health Professionals (AHPs), including those in leadership roles. Read more
Our Professional Doctorate in Clinical Research (DClinRes) has been designed to meet the challenge of providing high quality clinical research training for Allied Health Professionals (AHPs), including those in leadership roles. It is a unique collaboration between Clinical Education Development and Research ( CEDAR, http://cedar.exeter.ac.uk/programmes/), Psychology and the University of Exeter Medical School.

Delivered by leading academics and practitioners, the programme aims to educate Allied Health Professionals to shift the major focus of their research activities from a tradition characterised by work which is predominantly descriptive, cross-sectional and introspective, to one which is translational, experimental, longitudinal, generalisable and implementation focussed.

The programme includes advanced training in clinical research leadership skills and organisational practice, and is underpinned by the Medical Research Council’s mixed methods Complex Interventions Research Framework. The Doctorate offers participants the opportunity to complete a Service Related Research Project linked to their area of practice allowing them to evaluate their local clinical service. In addition, participants undertake a Major Clinical Research Project related to their area of practice and aligned with the strategic aims within their local service and organisation.

The programme is based on the latest guidance for research which investigates how to develop and determine the components, efficacy, effectiveness, applicability and translational utility of complex healthcare interventions for complex interventions in medicine. It integrates investigative methods for complex interventions through a mixed methodological process of development, feasibility/piloting, evaluation and implementation.

Responding to a challenge

Our Doctorate in Clinical Research has been developed in response to a need, identified by training commissioners and professional organisations, for specific skills training within this area of the healthcare workforce.

Allied Health Professionals (AHPs) such as nurses, physiotherapists, psychologists, radiographers and occupational therapists have a critical role to play in meeting health and social care challenges at the fore of global health concerns.
These include an
• aging population,
• chronic diseases,
• and new endemics

AHPs engage in an ever widening range of activities, many of which are highly complex and take place in multiple care environments including acute medicine, chronic care facilities, community and residential care homes. Example activities include patient education programmes, the coordination and delivery of packages of psychosocial care, and support for patient self-care.

Changes in healthcare organisation internationally (e.g. short hospital periods and growing responsibility for patient self-care) are placing more healthcare in the hands of AHPs, increasing the scope and the overall need for an underpinning evidence base.

The relevance of a Complex Interventions Research Framework

The care provided by AHPs to patients is an increasingly complicated activity and can be seen as the quintessential ‘complex intervention’ – defined as an activity that contains a number of component parts with the potential for interactions between them which, when applied to the intended target population, produces a range of possible and variable outcomes (Medical Research Council, 2008).

Complex interventions are widespread throughout all of health and social care, from the apparently simple example of pharmacological treatment with its combination of biochemical, social and psychological factors influencing patient concordance and physiological response, to more obviously complex educational or psychological interventions where a multi-layered set of dynamic features have great bearing on ultimate effectiveness.

Our programmes are underpinned by the Medical Research Council’s mixed methods Complex Interventions Research Framework, which emphasises our commitment to applied research in a healthcare context.

Programme structure

Our Doctorate in Clinical Research is run part-time over four years. The taught component of the programme has been re-structured to better enable both national and international attendance. The course commences with a 5 day block of teaching in February, with the remaining pre-thesis teaching components taking place over the next 18 months in smaller block delivery. Please see the website for up to date information at http://cedar.exeter.ac.uk/programmes/dclinres/structure/.

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This course has run since 2011, previously being integrated with the MPhil TMAT courses and taken part-time over two years. It is being re-launched in 2015 as a full-time one year course, based in the Cambridge Institute of Public Health’s Department of Public Health and Primary Care. Read more
This course has run since 2011, previously being integrated with the MPhil TMAT courses and taken part-time over two years. It is being re-launched in 2015 as a full-time one year course, based in the Cambridge Institute of Public Health’s Department of Public Health and Primary Care. More than half of the curriculum is shared with the MPhils in Public Health and Epidemiology. The aim of the course is to provide students with theoretical knowledge and skills as well as practical research experience to launch an academic clinical career in primary care.

The course draws on local strengths in working with large databases, primary care-based clinical trials and a wide range of other appropriate methods of quantitative and qualitative data collection and analyses. Throughout the course students are able to draw on the research expertise within the Institute of Public Health and wider expertise in the University.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/cvphmppcr

Course detail

The aim of the course is to provide students with theoretical knowledge and skills as well as practical research experience to launch an academic clinical career in primary care. Specifically, the course aims to:

1. Contribute to the commitment of the Cambridge University Hospital’s NHS Foundation Trust (CUHNHSFT), Cambridgeshire Primary Care Trust/ Clinical Commissioning Group and the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) to continuing professional development of NHS staff in an integrated academic and clinical environment;
2. Develop a cadre of primary care clinical research leaders who will pursue clinical Academic careers within academia, the NHS and industry;
3. Contribute to the commitment of the Health Education East of England to continuing professional development of GP Specialty Trainees in an integrated academic and clinical environment;
4. Expand critical and current knowledge of research methodologies through an academically vigorous education programme offered in a world-leading primary care clinical research environment;
5. Equip clinical researchers with knowledge about the complex issues associated with conducting sound translational research in general practice and community settings.

Learning Outcomes

Students who complete this programme successfully will have gained an understanding of the primary care research context, including the distinctive nature and contribution of primary care research, and the contribution of key underpinning methods. Specifically, graduates will possess a grounding in primary care-relevant epidemiological, psychological, sociological and health services research methods, statistical methods and data analyses including surveys, trials and evidence synthesis. Upon successful completion each student will be able to apply contemporary research tools to clinically relevant areas of investigation in primary care.

Successful completion of the MPhil will also equip students with the skills and knowledge defined by the Academy of Medical Sciences’ Supplementary Guidelines for the Annual Review of Competence Progression (ARCP) for Specialty Registrars undertaking joint clinical and academic training programmes (September 2011).

Michaelmas Term

This term focuses on epidemiological and biostatistical principles and procedures. Teaching sessions during this term will be shared with students from the MPhils in Epidemiology and Public Health course. The teaching in this term also includes training in basic data handling and analysis using the statistical package Stata.

The three modules are:

- Epidemiology
- Biostatistics
- Data handling and appraisal

During this term you will also complete an essay on the epidemiology of a chosen condition in a primary care population. This essay is a formal part of the MPhil examination and will contribute to your final mark. You should also begin to research an appropriate topic for your MPhil thesis. You should discuss this proposal with you Course Supervisor to assess the suitability of the topic and the availability of relevant data.

There will also be an assessment based on the epidemiological component of the first term. This assessment is informal and does not count towards your degree. The assessment provides your Course Supervisor and Course Directors with a guide to your progress. A guideline answer sheet will be provided at the end of the assessment.

Lent Term

This term includes modular-based lectures and seminars in more advanced aspects of epidemiological research and public health which are shared with students from the MPhils in Epidemiology and Public Health, and specific modules on Primary Care Research not shared with other MPhil students.

Modules shared with the MPhils in Epidemiology and Public Health:

- Health Policy
- Social Science
- Chronic disease epidemiology
- Genetic epidemiology and Public health genomics
- Health Promotion

Primary Care Research modules:

- Introduction to Primary Care Research
- Use of routine data in Primary Care
- Designing, delivering and analysing surveys in primary care
- Qualitative research

Please note some modules may move from term to term.

During this term you will also complete a second essay which should take the form of a protocol for your thesis research. This essay is a formal part of the MPhil examination and will contribute to your final mark. Before starting your protocol, the title of your thesis should be agreed with you Course and Thesis Supervisor. Both you Course and Thesis Supervisor should sign the thesis title form confirming the title. All students must have a designated Thesis Supervisor (in some cases this individual may also be the Course Supervisor).

Easter Term

This term includes a small number of modular-based lectures and seminars again shared with students from the MPhils in Epidemiology and Publich Health.

- Clinical Trials
- Health Economics
- Ethics and Law

The remainder of the term is dedicated to revision for the written examinations in June and thesis work. The term ends on the last business day of July 2016 with the hand-in of the thesis. If you leave the UK, you must be prepared to travel back to Cambridge for an oral examination, if required.

Assessment

A thesis not exceeding 20,000 words in length, including footnotes, but excluding tables, appendices, and bibliography, on a subject approved by the Degree Committee for the Faculties of Clinical Medicine and Veterinary Medicine.

Two essays, each not exceeding 3,000 words in length, on subjects approved by the Degree Committee

Two written papers, each of which may cover all the areas of study prescribed in the syllabus.

The course components are completed by the end of July. However, to complete the course, students will be required to attend a viva in person on a date (to be announced) in late August or early September.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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The language and concepts of infection and immunity, from basic science to translational clinical research, are taught by our world-class investigators. Read more

The language and concepts of infection and immunity, from basic science to translational clinical research, are taught by our world-class investigators. The programme emphasises data interpretation, critical analysis of current literature and culminates in a full-time research project: excellent preparation for a research career.

About this degree

The programme provides insight into state-of-the-art infection and immunity research, current issues in the biology of infectious agents, the pathogenesis, prevention and control of infectious diseases, and immunity and immune dysfunction. 

Students learn from UCL scientists about their research and are trained in the art of research by carrying out a full-time research project in a UCL laboratory.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of five core modules (75 credits), three optional modules (45 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma comprising four core modules and four optional modules (120 credits, full-time nine months, part-time, flexible study two to five years) is offered.

A Postgraduate Certificate comprising four core modules (60 credits, full-time three months, and flexible study up to two years) is offered.

Core modules

  • Laboratory Introduction to Basic Bacteriology
  • Molecular Virology
  • Immunology in Health and Disease
  • Epidemiology and Infectious Diseases
  • Data Interpretation

Optional modules

  • Microbial Pathogenesis
  • Tropical Microbiology
  • Advanced Virology
  • HIV Frontiers from Research to Clinic
  • Immunological Basis of Disease
  • Immunodeficiency and Therapeutics
  • Infectious Diseases Epidemiology and Global Health Policy
  • Global eradication of viruses

Dissertation/report

All MSc students undertake independent research which culminates in a 4,000-word dissertation.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, tutorials, paper review sessions, laboratory practicals, an independent research project and self-directed learning. A diverse range of assessment methods is used; coursework may be in the form of presentations, essays, data interpretation exercises, poster preparation, and group working. Many modules also have unseen written examination.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Infection and Immunity MSc

Careers

The programme produces graduates who are equipped to embark on research careers. Immersion in the superb research and teaching environment provided by UCL and the Division of Infection & Immunity, gives our graduates a unique understanding of the cutting edge of infection and immunity research and how world-class research is carried out. 

Opportunities for networking with UCL senior investigators with international reputations and their worldwide collaborators can provide the inside track for career development. Graduates are well placed to move onto PhD programmes, research positions in diverse biomedical fields, clinical research positions, further training and positions in associated professions.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • PhD Student, Universitホ catholique de Louvain
  • Research Assistant, Imperial College London
  • Research Assistant, UCL
  • PhD in Molecular Immunology, UCL

Employability

Graduates are exceptionally well prepared for a career in research. The combination of research-informed teaching and practical research training provides an ideal preparation for a PhD and is equally applicable for clinicians seeking specialist training or wishing to pursue the clinical academic career track.

More broadly, a rigorous grounding in scientific method, critical analysis, data interpretation and independent thinking provides a pallet of marketable and transferable skills applicable to many professional career paths.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Division of Infection & Immunity is a vibrant and world-class research community. Students are embedded in this superb training environment which provides a challenging and stimulating academic experience. 

Programme content reflects the research and clinical excellence within the division as well as cross-disciplinary research from all over UCL. First-class teaching and research supervision is provided by UCL academics, many of whom have international reputations.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Division of Infection & Immunity

80% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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With our world-class reputation, renowned experts and new research facilities, we are well placed to offer dentistry and dental research opportunities of the highest international standard. Read more
With our world-class reputation, renowned experts and new research facilities, we are well placed to offer dentistry and dental research opportunities of the highest international standard.

As a postgraduate research student studying for a Dental Sciences MPhil or PhD, you will be based within the Faculty of Medical Sciences.

The programme is delivered in the School of Dental Sciences, the Centre for Oral Health Research (COHR) and the Faculty in addition to the relevant Biomedical Research Institutes for:
-Ageing
-Cell and Molecular Biosciences
-Cellular Medicine
-Health and Society
-Genetic Medicine
-Neurosciences
-Cancer

If your research involves clinical components there may be a partnership with the NHS.

The School of Dental Sciences and COHR

You will spend most of your time within the School of Dental Sciences and the COHR, working within research teams led by experts in their field in a friendly and supportive atmosphere.

We combine world-class clinical and research facilities with an open environment where scholars, clinicians and researchers benefit from working side-by-side. Our focus is on multidisciplinary translational research, work that is relevant to real life.

COHR has a particular focus on understanding molecular and cellular mechanisms and translating these into clinical settings. Evaluation of clinical, community and economic strategies to improve public health and inform a wider health agenda is a central research theme. Within COHR there is a Collaborating Centre for the World Health Organization for Nutrition and Oral Health. Research projects are strongly aligned to the Centre's main research themes:
-Translational oral biosciences
-Oral healthcare and epidemiology
-Biomaterials and biological interfaces

COHR is involved in a number of industrial collaborations. We also work together with the Newcastle Clinical Trials Unit to provide planning, design and implementation of clinical trials in oral health.

Delivery

Certain taught elements of the programme are compulsory, eg laboratory safety. Other taught components are agreed between you and your supervisors depending on your skills and the requirements of the research project.

You are expected to work 40 hours per week with an annual holiday entitlement of 35 days, which includes statutory and bank holidays.

Laboratory work needing to be undertaken outside of normal working hours can be arranged with prior agreement. All our research students are encouraged to attend research seminars and events held within COHR, the Faculty of Medical Sciences Graduate School and your relevant Biomedical Research Institute.

Facilities

The School of Dental Sciences at Newcastle is one of the most modern and best equipped in the country, occupying a spacious, purpose-built facility. The School is in the same building as the Dental Hospital, adjacent to the Medical School and Royal Victoria Infirmary teaching hospital, forming one of the largest integrated teaching and hospital complexes in the country.

Our facilities include:
-In-house production laboratories providing excellent learning opportunities around clinician-technician communication
-Excellent library and computing facilities on-site
-A dedicated clinical research facility offering clinical training and research opportunities of the highest international standard

The Centre for Oral Health Research (COHR) offers a range of research laboratories, undertaking work in oral biology, fluoride research and dental materials science. The research laboratory facilities include:
-Cell and molecular biosciences laboratory
-Dental Clinical Research Facility (CRF)
-Dental materials laboratory
-Fluoride laboratory
-Hard tissue laboratory

Together, the School and COHR offer the highest international standard in clinical training and research opportunities.

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Recognising the need for the development of a cohort of appropriately qualified scientific, medical/dental and veterinary graduates, we are offering a research intensive, student-oriented MRes in Translational Medicine. Read more
Recognising the need for the development of a cohort of appropriately qualified scientific, medical/dental and veterinary graduates, we are offering a research intensive, student-oriented MRes in Translational Medicine. The MRes in Translational Medicine provides high quality graduates with the research rigour, the innovation culture and the leadership skills to be at the forefront of this translational revolution and so develop a cohort of appropriately qualified scientific medical/dental and veterinary graduates.

Translational Medicine allows experimental findings in the research laboratory to be converted into real benefit for the health and well-being of the patient, through the development of new innovative diagnostic tools and therapeutic approaches.

The main objective of the MRes Programme in Translational Medicine is to provide high quality candidates with the research rigour, innovation culture and the leadership skills to be at the forefront of this translational revolution. Students will receive expert training in all aspects of translational medicine including how new experimental findings are translated into treatments for patients; the experimental steps in the process, the development of innovative solutions, management and leadership skills and an appreciation of marketing and financial aspects of translational medicine through interaction with business leaders and scientists from Biotech and Pharmacy

This research intensive programme incorporates a 38 week research project in an area selected by the student in consultation with the research project co-ordinator. student selected area.

QUB has an international reputation in translational medicine, achieved through the recognised metrics of high impact peer review publications, significant international research funding, the generation of exploitable novel intellectual property and the establishment of successful spin-out biotech companies. This ethos of innovation was recently recognised with the award of the Times Higher Education Entrepreneurial University of the Year.

This unique course offers students the chance to choose one of these three research streams with the indicated specialist modules:

-

Precision Cancer Medicine

This stream provides students with a unique opportunity to study cancer biology and perform innovative cancer research within the Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology (CCRCB). Prospective students are immersed in this precision medicine milieu from Day 1, providing for them the opportunity to understand the key principles in discovery cancer biology and how these research advances are translated for the benefit of cancer patients. The strong connectivity with both the biotech and biopharmaceutical sectors provides a stimulating translational environment, while also opening up potential doors for the student's future career.

-

Cardiovascular Medicine

This stream contains two complementary modules which significantly build on the foundation provided by undergraduate medicine or biomedical science to provide students with an advanced insight into current understanding of cardiovascular pathobiology and an appreciation of how this knowledge is being applied in the search for novel diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic approaches for the clinical management of cardiovascular disease, which remains the leading cause of death worldwide. Students who select the Cardiovascular Medicine Stream will be taught and mentored within the Centre for Experimental Medicine which is a brand new, purpose-built institute (~7400m2) at the heart of the Health Sciences Campus. This building represents a significant investment (~£32m) by the University and boasts state-of-the-art research facilities which are supported by a world-leading research-intensive faculty, ensuring that all of our postgraduate students are exposed to a top quality training experience.

-

Inflammation, infection and Immunity

This stream exposes students to exciting concepts and their application in the field of infection biology, inflammatory processes and the role of immunity in health and disease. There will be detailed consideration of the role of the immune system in host defence and in disease. There is a strong emphasis is on current developments in this rapidly progressing field of translational medicine. Students learn how to manipulate the inflammatory/immune response and their interaction with microbes to identify, modify and prevent disease. Students will also be introduced to the concepts of clinical trials for new therapeutics, and the basic approach to designing a trial to test novel methods to diagnose/prevent or treat illness.

Read less
Recognising the need for the development of a cohort of appropriately qualified scientific, medical/dental and veterinary graduates, we are offering a research intensive, student-oriented MRes in Translational Medicine. Read more
Recognising the need for the development of a cohort of appropriately qualified scientific, medical/dental and veterinary graduates, we are offering a research intensive, student-oriented MRes in Translational Medicine. The MRes in Translational Medicine provides high quality graduates with the research rigour, the innovation culture and the leadership skills to be at the forefront of this translational revolution and so develop a cohort of appropriately qualified scientific medical/dental and veterinary graduates.

Translational Medicine allows experimental findings in the research laboratory to be converted into real benefit for the health and well-being of the patient, through the development of new innovative diagnostic tools and therapeutic approaches.

The main objective of the MRes Programme in Translational Medicine is to provide high quality candidates with the research rigour, innovation culture and the leadership skills to be at the forefront of this translational revolution. Students will receive expert training in all aspects of translational medicine including how new experimental findings are translated into treatments for patients; the experimental steps in the process, the development of innovative solutions, management and leadership skills and an appreciation of marketing and financial aspects of translational medicine through interaction with business leaders and scientists from Biotech and Pharma

This research intensive programme incorporates a 38 week research project in an area selected by the student in consultation with the research project co-ordinator. student selected area.

QUB has an international reputation in translational medicine, achieved through the recognised metrics of high impact peer review publications, significant international research funding, the generation of exploitable novel intellectual property and the establishment of successful spin-out biotech companies. This ethos of innovation was recently recognised with the award of the Times Higher Education Entrepreneurial University of the Year.

This unique course offers students the chance to choose one of these three research streams with the indicated specialist modules:

-

Precision Cancer Medicine

This stream provides students with a unique opportunity to study cancer biology and perform innovative cancer research within the Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology (CCRCB). Prospective students are immersed in this precision medicine milieu from Day 1, providing for them the opportunity to understand the key principles in discovery cancer biology and how these research advances are translated for the benefit of cancer patients. The strong connectivity with both the biotech and biopharmaceutical sectors provides a stimulating translational environment, while also opening up potential doors for the student's future career.

-

Cardiovascular Medicine

This stream contains two complementary modules which significantly build on the foundation provided by undergraduate medicine or biomedical science to provide students with an advanced insight into current understanding of cardiovascular pathobiology and an appreciation of how this knowledge is being applied in the search for novel diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic approaches for the clinical management of cardiovascular disease, which remains the leading cause of death worldwide. Students who select the Cardiovascular Medicine Stream will be taught and mentored within the Centre for Experimental Medicine which is a brand new, purpose-built institute (~7400m2) at the heart of the Health Sciences Campus. This building represents a significant investment (~£32m) by the University and boasts state-of-the-art research facilities which are supported by a world-leading research-intensive faculty, ensuring that all of our postgraduate students are exposed to a top quality training experience.

-

Inflammation, infection and Immunity

This stream exposes students to exciting concepts and their application in the field of infection biology, inflammatory processes and the role of immunity in health and disease. There will be detailed consideration of the role of the immune system in host defence and in disease. There is a strong emphasis is on current developments in this rapidly progressing field of translational medicine. Students learn how to manipulate the inflammatory/immune response and their interaction with microbes to identify, modify and prevent disease. Students will also be introduced to the concepts of clinical trials for new therapeutics, and the basic approach to designing a trial to test novel methods to diagnose/prevent or treat illness.

Read less
Recognising the need for the development of a cohort of appropriately qualified scientific, medical/dental and veterinary graduates, we are offering a research intensive, student-oriented MRes in Translational Medicine. Read more
Recognising the need for the development of a cohort of appropriately qualified scientific, medical/dental and veterinary graduates, we are offering a research intensive, student-oriented MRes in Translational Medicine. The MRes in Translational Medicine provides high quality graduates with the research rigour, the innovation culture and the leadership skills to be at the forefront of this translational revolution and so develop a cohort of appropriately qualified scientific medical/dental and veterinary graduates.

Translational Medicine allows experimental findings in the research laboratory to be converted into real benefit for the health and well-being of the patient, through the development of new innovative diagnostic tools and therapeutic approaches.

The main objective of the MRes Programme in Translational Medicine is to provide high quality candidates with the research rigour, innovation culture and the leadership skills to be at the forefront of this translational revolution. Students will receive expert training in all aspects of translational medicine including how new experimental findings are translated into treatments for patients; the experimental steps in the process, the development of innovative solutions, management and leadership skills and an appreciation of marketing and financial aspects of translational medicine through interaction with business leaders and scientists from Biotech and Pharmacy

This research intensive programme incorporates a 38 week research project in an area selected by the student in consultation with the research project co-ordinator. student selected area.

QUB has an international reputation in translational medicine, achieved through the recognised metrics of high impact peer review publications, significant international research funding, the generation of exploitable novel intellectual property and the establishment of successful spin-out biotech companies. This ethos of innovation was recently recognised with the award of the Times Higher Education Entrepreneurial University of the Year.

This unique course offers students the chance to choose one of these three research streams with the indicated specialist modules:

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Precision Cancer Medicine

This stream provides students with a unique opportunity to study cancer biology and perform innovative cancer research within the Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology (CCRCB). Prospective students are immersed in this precision medicine milieu from Day 1, providing for them the opportunity to understand the key principles in discovery cancer biology and how these research advances are translated for the benefit of cancer patients. The strong connectivity with both the biotech and biopharmaceutical sectors provides a stimulating translational environment, while also opening up potential doors for the student's future career.

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Cardiovascular Medicine

This stream contains two complementary modules which significantly build on the foundation provided by undergraduate medicine or biomedical science to provide students with an advanced insight into current understanding of cardiovascular pathobiology and an appreciation of how this knowledge is being applied in the search for novel diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic approaches for the clinical management of cardiovascular disease, which remains the leading cause of death worldwide. Students who select the Cardiovascular Medicine Stream will be taught and mentored within the Centre for Experimental Medicine which is a brand new, purpose-built institute (~7400m2) at the heart of the Health Sciences Campus. This building represents a significant investment (~£32m) by the University and boasts state-of-the-art research facilities which are supported by a world-leading research-intensive faculty, ensuring that all of our postgraduate students are exposed to a top quality training experience.

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Inflammation, infection and Immunity

This stream exposes students to exciting concepts and their application in the field of infection biology, inflammatory processes and the role of immunity in health and disease. There will be detailed consideration of the role of the immune system in host defence and in disease. There is a strong emphasis is on current developments in this rapidly progressing field of translational medicine. Students learn how to manipulate the inflammatory/immune response and their interaction with microbes to identify, modify and prevent disease. Students will also be introduced to the concepts of clinical trials for new therapeutics, and the basic approach to designing a trial to test novel methods to diagnose/prevent or treat illness.

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