• Northumbria University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Bristol Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Leeds Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Derby Online Learning Featured Masters Courses
  • Aberystwyth University Featured Masters Courses
  • Jacobs University Bremen gGmbH Featured Masters Courses

Postgrad LIVE! Study Fair

Birmingham | Bristol | Sheffield | Liverpool | Edinburgh

Nottingham Trent University Featured Masters Courses
FindA University Ltd Featured Masters Courses
University of Reading Featured Masters Courses
Cranfield University Featured Masters Courses
University of Leeds Featured Masters Courses
"climate" AND "risk"×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Climate Risk)

We have 173 Masters Degrees (Climate Risk)

  • "climate" AND "risk" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 173
Order by 
This MA degree programme is designed for students who wish to explore the social dimensions of risk and resilience. Read more

This MA degree programme is designed for students who wish to explore the social dimensions of risk and resilience. The Department of Geography is especially well-suited to examine these in relation to environmental hazards, climate change and security-related risk, but students are encouraged to develop their thinking in relation to any aspect of risk research, including broader environmental change, disaster risk reduction, financial risk, risk and insurance, risk and health, risk and migration, risk and social policy, risk and governance, borders and terrorism. The MA programme foregrounds the existence of multiple ways of understanding risk, from risk as an objective phenomenon managed through scientific tools (e.g. in the case of environmental hazards) to risk as a social construct and a political technique (e.g. in the case of risk and security).

For students interested in security-related risk, the MA programme offers in-depth and advanced understanding of geo-political security challenges and politics, including the ways in which society is governed increasingly through the prism of risk. Dealing with risks as a function of both the natural and social environments we live in, the course responds to the growing realisation that many risks are being created through social processes bound to questions of security, including the ways that risk techniques are emerging and being employed as a means of securing uncertain futures.

Course Structure

Students take the following core modules, and a selection of elective modules, which, when combined, add up to 180 credits:

Core Modules: 

  • Understanding Risk (30 Credits)
  • Social Dimensions of Risk and Resilience (30 Credits)
  • Risk Frontiers (15 Credits)
  • Using Geographical Skills and Techniques (15 Credits)
  • Dissertation by Research (or) Vocational Dissertation (60 Credits)

Elective Modules available in previous years include:

  • Hydrological Hazards (30 Credits)
  • Risk, Science and Communication (15 Credits)
  • Spatial and Temporal Dimensions of Hazard (30 Credits)
  • International Relations and Security in the Middle East (15 Credits)
  • Strategic Asia: Policy and Analysis (15 Credits)
  • European Security (15 Credits)
  • Social Policy and Society (30 Credits). 

Course Learning and Teaching

Understanding and managing risk is ultimately about choice. All elements of society, from individuals to governments, must make decisions – conscious or not – about the ways in which they perceive, interpret, balance, and mitigate risk. Risk permeates our day-to-day lives in ways that are now recognised to be much more complex than the hazard-vulnerability paradigm, which dominated risk research until the 1990s, recognised. A deeper understanding of the nature of risk, its emergence, and its interface and position within societies, has emphasised the need to take a much more complex view in which a general understanding of the ways in which risk is generated, experienced and managed needs to be combined with a specific understanding of particular science or policy areas.

The primary aim of this Masters programme is to equip students with a general understanding of risk; whilst simultaneously providing specific training in elements of risk-related research. The MA supports students in developing a strong social science perspective on risk. This will be achieved through an interdisciplinary framework for understanding risk from a variety of perspectives. Students will learn theoretical and practical approaches to identifying and framing risk, as well as the underlying physical and social mechanisms that generate it. They will also examine the relationship of risk to knowledge and policy, and will be made aware of the array of advanced tools and techniques to assess the physical and social dimensions of risk under conditions of uncertainty. They will also be trained in the substance and methods associated with a range of science, social science and policy areas, and be expected to demonstrate that they can combine their general training in risk with their specific understanding of the substance and method associated with the chosen area, through either a research-based or a vocational dissertation.

All students will undertake a suite of core modules (150 credits) which provide students with a range of skills and knowledge which result in a unique focus in risk combined with training in interdisciplinary research methods. These modules are: Understanding Risk, Using Geographical Skills and Techniques, Risk Frontiers, Social Dimensions of Risk and Resilience, and the Dissertation.

Students then also select a suite of elective modules (another 30 credits). Students can choose to receive specialised scientific training in:

  • international relations, geopolitics and security, and/or
  • scientific perspectives on environmental hazards
  • a combination of approaches to risk.

Electives can be selected from: Strategic Asia, European Security, International Relations in the Middle East, Social Policy and Society and Risk, Science and Communication. 

The Risk Masters (both in its MA and MSc forms) is taught jointly between Durham University’s Geography Department, the School of Government & International Affairs, and the School of Applied Social Sciences. The programme’s interdisciplinary approach encourages students to combine science and social science perspectives. Students have a broad range of modules to choose from, and in this way develop an individualized set of professional skills that, depending on the student’s preferences, speak more to either the natural sciences (e.g. via scientific modelling, GIS or science and communication) or the social sciences (e.g. via social science research methodologies and engagements with social policy and international relations). The programme is delivered in close collaboration with Durham University’s Institute of Hazard, Risk and Resilience (IHRR), and through IHRR’s activities students get permanent exposure to both practitioner and academic perspectives at the forefront of risk thinking and practice.



Read less
Despite the phenomenal technological progress of the 20th century, most people still live with the acute and chronic consequences of age-old hazards such as floods and earthquakes. Read more

Despite the phenomenal technological progress of the 20th century, most people still live with the acute and chronic consequences of age-old hazards such as floods and earthquakes. This MSc is aimed at students interested in engaging with the natural and social dimensions of environmental hazards, including disasters and climate related risk. Students receive specialised scientific training in the physical hazards that pose large risks to communities living throughout the world, from climate change and meteorological risks to flooding, earthquakes and landslides. Students on this programme will receive theoretical and practical training for understanding and quantifying risks and hazards. They will learn about how hazards persist over long periods of time instead of merely as single events, but are composed of many smaller sub-events or how their effects are widespread. 

Course Structure 

Students take the following core modules, and a selection of elective modules, which, when combined, add up to 180 credits:

Core Modules:

  • Understanding Risk (30 credits)
  • Risk Frontiers (15 credits)
  • Risk, Science and Communication (15 credits)
  • Dissertation by Research (or) Vocational Dissertation (60 credits)

Elective Modules available in previous years include:

  • Hydrological Hazards (30 credits)
  • Spatial and Temporal Dimensions of Hazard (30 credits)
  • Social Dimensions of Risk and Resilience (30 credits)
  • International Relations and Security in the Middle East (15 credits)
  • Strategic Asia: Policy and Analysis (15 credits)
  • European Security (15 credits)
  • Social Policy and Society (30 credits) 

Course Learning and Teaching

Understanding and managing risk is ultimately about choice. All elements of society, from individuals to governments, must make decisions – conscious or not – about the ways in which they perceive, interpret, balance, and mitigate risk. Risk permeates our day-to-day lives in ways that are now recognised to be much more complex than the hazard-vulnerability paradigm, which dominated risk research until the 1990s, recognised. A deeper understanding of the nature of risk, its emergence, and its interface and position within societies, has emphasised the need to take a much more complex view in which a general understanding of the ways in which risk is generated, experienced and managed needs to be combined with a specific understanding of particular science or policy areas.

The primary aim of this Masters programme is to equip students with a general understanding of risk, whilst simultaneously providing specific training in elements of risk-related research. The MSc supports students in developing a strong social science perspective on risk. This will be achieved through an interdisciplinary framework for understanding risk from a variety of perspectives. Students will learn theoretical and practical approaches to identifying and framing risk, as well as the underlying physical and social mechanisms that generate it. They will also examine the relationship of risk to knowledge and policy, and will be made aware of the array of advanced tools and techniques to assess the physical and social dimensions of risk under conditions of uncertainty. They will also be trained in the substance and methods associated with a range of science and policy areas, and be expected to demonstrate that they can combine their general training in risk with their specific understanding of the substance and method associated with the chosen area, through either a research-based or a vocational dissertation.

All students will undertake a suite of core modules (120 credits) which provide students with a range of skills and knowledge which result in a unique focus in risk combined with training in interdisciplinary research methods. These modules are Understanding Risk, Risk, Science and Communication, Risk Frontiers and the Dissertation.

Students then also select a suite of elective modules (another 60 credits). Students can choose to receive specialised scientific training in:

  • the social dimensions of risk and resilience, and/or
  • a combination of approaches to risk.

Electives can be selected from: Hydrological Hazards, Spatial Temporal Dimensions of Hazards, Social Dimensions of Risk and Resilience. 

The Risk Masters (both in its MA and MSc forms) is taught jointly between Durham University’s Geography Department, the School of Government & International Affairs, and the School of Applied Social Sciences. The programme’s interdisciplinary approach encourages students to combine science and social science perspectives. Students have a broad range of modules to choose from, and in this way develop an individualized set of professional skills that, depending on the student’s preferences, speak more to either the natural sciences (e.g. via scientific modelling, GIS or science and communication) or the social sciences (e.g. via social science research methodologies and engagements with social policy and international relations). The programme is delivered in close collaboration with Durham University’s Institute of Hazard, Risk and Resilience (IHRR), and through IHRR’s activities students get permanent exposure to both practitioner and academic perspectives at the forefront of risk thinking and practice.



Read less
The MSc Global Energy and Climate Policy (GECP) is the first Masters programme to jointly address the issues of climate and energy policy in an interdisciplinary fashion. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The MSc Global Energy and Climate Policy (GECP) is the first Masters programme to jointly address the issues of climate and energy policy in an interdisciplinary fashion. It tackles policy and regulatory change, the historical and technological evolution of energy sources, energy markets and their participants, the global governance of climate change as well as the challenges associated with transitioning to a low-carbon economy.

The programme specifically addresses the requirements of those wishing to deepen their theoretical and practical understanding of how energy and climate policies are designed, shaped, advocated and implemented and by whom across a multitude of cases drawn from the Global North and South and across multiple levels of political organisation from global to local arenas.

The MSc is designed for those engaged with or planning a career in professional contexts relating to energy and/or climate policy. It prepares for a multitude of careers in public and private contexts, including in public administration and government departments, strategic policy and risk advisory, government relations and public affairs, policy advocacy, think tanks and academia.

Guest speakers on the programme's modules have included Angus Miller (Energy Advisor, UK Foreign Office), Tom Burke (Founding Director, E3G and Environmental Policy Advisor, Rio Tinto), Jonathan Grant (Asst. Director Sustainability and Climate Change, PwC), Kash Burchett (European Energy Analyst, IHS Global Insight), Chris Dodwell (AEA Technology, former Head of International Climate Policy, UK Department of Energy and Climate Change) and Andrew Pendleton (Head of Campaigns, Friends of the Earth).

The programme draws on the teaching and research strengths of CISD and of the SOAS departments of International Politics, Law, Economics and area studies (especially of Asia, Africa and the Middle East) as well as a wide range of languages. In particular, students will be able to benefit from the expertise located at the Centre for Environment, Development and Policy (CEDEP), the Law School's Law, Environment and Development Centre (LEDC), the Centre on the Politics of Energy Security (CEPES), the Centre for Water and Development, and the SOAS Food Studies Centre.

In addition to the three core modules of Global Energy and Climate Policy (1 unit), Applied Energy and Climate Studies (0.5 units) and Global Public Policy (0.5 units) students choose a fourth module to meet their specific professional needs and personal interests.

Students on this course will have the opportunity to participate in CISD's Study Tour of Paris and Brussels.

Programme objectives

- Excellent understanding of the nature and development of global energy and climate policy, drawing on a variety of contributing disciplines

- Excellent knowledge of regulatory challenges and their impact on public and private stakeholders in both the Global South and North

- Ability to critically contribute to contemporary policy debates about reforms of international energy and climate governance architectures and their interaction with national and sub-national policy and regulatory frameworks

- Development of practical skills including policy analysis and policy advocacy, risk analysis, strategic communication and media

We welcome applications from a wide variety of fields and backgrounds. It is not necessary to have a degree in a discipline directly related to global energy and climate policy.

Each application is assessed on its individual merits and entry requirements may be modified in light of relevant professional experience and where the applicant can demonstrate a sustained practical interest in the international field.

Listen to the MSc Global Energy and Climate Policy and CISD's 1st Annual Energy and Climate Change Conference (May 2011) podcast (http://www.4shared.com/mp3/EdRUc-qq/CISD_Energy_and_Climate_Change.html), organised by students.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/cisd/programmes/msc-global-energy-and-climate-policy/

Programme Specification

Programme Specification 2015/2016 (pdf; 172kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/cisd/programmes/msc-global-energy-and-climate-policy/file80890.pdf

Teaching & Learning

The programme may be taken in one year (full time) or in two or three years part time with the schedule designed to allow participation by those in full time employment. Participants may choose a combination of courses to meet their professional needs and personal interests. The programme is convened on a multi-disciplinary basis, and teaching is through lectures, tutorials and workshops conducted by SOAS faculty and visiting specialists.

The Centre endeavours to make as many of the courses for Global Energy and Climate Policy (GECP) accessible to part time students. The majority of CISD lectures are at 18.00 where possible however lecture times will be rotated on a yearly basis for some courses (between evening and daytime slots) so that part time students will have access to as many courses as possible over the duration of their degree. Associated tutorials are repeated in hourly slots with the latest taking place at 20.00. Students sign up for tutorial groups at the start of term and stay in the same group throughout the academic year. There is a minimum of two and a half hours formal teaching a week (lecture and tutorial) for each GECP course taken. Practical exercises may take place at weekends.

Teaching includes:

- Theory and practice of global energy and climate change policy as intertwined global issues

- Practical toolkit including policy analysis and planning, risk analysis, strategic communication, policy advocacy and negotiation skills

- Interaction with policymakers and government officials, energy industry and NGO representatives, and other practitioners

- An elective from a wide range: International Relations, International Law, International Economics, International Security, Multinational Enterprises in a Globalising World or a course offered by other SOAS departments (e.g. Development Studies, Politics, Economics, Law)

Further activities:

Also included in the degree programme:

- Week-long study trip to energy and climate change related organisations in Brussels and Paris
- Advanced media and communication skills training by current and former BBC staff
- Participation in workshops attended by public and private sector stakeholders
- Opportunity to organize and run the Centre’s annual Energy and Climate Policy conference
- Guest lectures by leading scholars and senior practitioners (visit the CISD website (http://www.cisd.soas.ac.uk/all-audios/1) to listen to the podcasts)

This course is also available online and is designed for those engaged with or planning a career in professional contexts relating to energy and/or climate policy and who wish to study in a flexible way. Please click here to view more information http://www.soas.ac.uk/cisd/programmes/msc-global-energy-and-climate-policy-online/

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

Read less
Risk and disaster reduction, particularly within the contexts of dealing with uncertainty and increasing resilience, are high on local, national and international agendas. Read more

Risk and disaster reduction, particularly within the contexts of dealing with uncertainty and increasing resilience, are high on local, national and international agendas. Academic study can underpin much needed professionalisation and application of evidence and research-based theory to this area. This MSc programme aims to meet the growing need for experts trained to analyse and provide solutions to complex risk and disaster resilience issues.

About this degree

Students will learn about and explore the characterisation, quantification, management and reduction of risk, disasters, and their associated impacts, from a broad range of scientific, technical, socio-economic, political, environmental, ethical and cultural perspectives. Through this multidisciplinary approach, students gain expertise in analysing complex challenges, enabling them to become future leaders who drive policy change and innovation. 

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of six core modules (90 credits), two optional modules (to the combined value of 30 credits) and an independent research project (60 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits, six core modules and two optional modules, but no independent project), full-time nine months, part-time two years, is also offered.

Core modules

All 6 core modules must be taken.

  • Integrating Science into Risk and Disaster Reduction
  • Natural and Anthropogenic Hazards and Vulnerability
  • Emergency and Crisis Planning
  • Emergency and Crisis Management
  • Risk and Disaster Reduction Research Tools
  • Research Proposal and Appraisal

Optional modules

Choose two options (to the combined value of 30 credits) from a list which may include the following:

  • Conflict, Humanitarianism and Disaster Risk Reduction
  • Post Disaster Recovery
  • Adapting Cities to Climate Change
  • Disaster Risk Reduction in Cities
  • Earthquake Seismology and Earthquake Hazards
  • Decision and Risk (Statistics)
  • Risk and Contingency Planning (Security and Crime Science)
  • Risk Power and Uncertainty (Anthropology)
  • The Variable Sun: Space Weather and You
  • Climate Risks to Hydro-Ecological Systems
  • Perspectives on Terrorism (Security and Crime Science)

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project of 10,000-12,000 words which culminates in a research project and poster presentation.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, directed reading and practical problem-solving exercises and a real-time disaster scenario event, with an emphasis on hands-on learning and tutorial-style dialogue between students and lecturers. Assessment is by independent and group oral presentations, written examination, coursework essays, and the independent project. Practical applications of critical and creative problem-solving will be encouraged and assessed throughout.

Fieldwork

A series of one-day UK-based field trips are available.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Risk, Disaster and Resilience MSc

Funding

For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website.

Careers

This programme provides excellent training towards careers in fields including research, public policy, business continuity, (re)insurance, catastrophe modelling, finance, risk management, international development, emergency services, consultancy, and humanitarian assistance. The IRDR runs a careers and opportunities fair for students, which is attended by insurance companies, catastrophe modelling firms, NGOs, academic institutions, policy and local government bodies, and head hunters in the field of risk and disaster reduction. Several students have found opportunities through contacts made and positions advertised during this event.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Disaster Management Administrator, Plan International
  • Project Officer, University of Hong Kong

Employability

Whether you wish to start a new career in risk and disaster reduction or you already have experience in this sector, we are here to support you. With an MSc in Risk, Disaster and Resilience, you will have excellent academic credibility coupled with practical and analytical skills.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Institute for Risk and Disaster Reduction (IRDR), where teaching for this programme is based, leads and co-ordinates multidisciplinary research, knowledge exchange and advanced teaching in risk and disaster reduction across UCL.

UCL is uniquely well placed to lead research and teaching in this field; in addition to at least 70 academics across 12 departments and seven faculties involved in world-class research, the IRDR has established links with non-governmental organisations, industry and government departments based in and around London.

Teaching and project supervision will be provided by active researchers, practitioners and policy-makers, all of whom are leaders in their respective fields.



Read less
The importance of science in understanding disaster risks and the need for science-based strategies at local, national and international levels in the private, public, and third sectors are now widely recognised. Read more

The importance of science in understanding disaster risks and the need for science-based strategies at local, national and international levels in the private, public, and third sectors are now widely recognised. The Risk and Disaster Science MSc aims to meet the growing need for experts trained in disaster science in sectors ranging from finance to humanitarian response.

About this degree

In a science-led programme, students will explore the characterisation of risk from a fundamental understanding of hazard, statistical modelling, appreciation of causes of vulnerability, and quantifying exposure to the management and reduction of disaster risks. There is an emphasis on scientific analysis and statistical methods. Students will enjoy a wide range of taught modules covering scientific, technical, socio-economic, political, environmental, ethical and cultural perspectives.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of six core modules (90 credits), optional modules (to the combined value of 30 credits) and an independent research project (60 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits, six core modules and two optional modules), full-time nine months, part-time two years, is also offered.

Core modules

  • Catastrophe Risk Modelling
  • Earthquake Risks
  • Emergency and Crisis Management
  • Integrating Science into Risk and Disaster Reduction
  • Risk and Disaster Reduction Research Tools
  • Research Appraisal and Proposal

Optional modules

Choose options (to the combined value of 30 credits) from a list which may include the following:

  • Climate Risks to Hydro-ecological Systems
  • Emergency and Crisis Planning
  • Decision and Risk Statistics
  • Seismic Risk Assessment
  • Conflict, Humanitarianism, and Disaster Risk Reduction
  • Digital Public Health: Epidemics and Emergencies in the Era of Big Data
  • Natural and Anthropogenic Hazards and Vulnerability
  • The Variable Sun: Space Weather and You

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project of 10,000-12,000 words which culminates in a research project and poster presentation.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, practicals, field visits, directed reading and problem-solving exercises and a real-time disaster scenario event, with an emphasis on hands-on learning and tutorial-style dialogue between students and lecturers. Assessment is by independent and group oral presentations, written examination, coursework essays, and the independent project. Practical applications of critical and creative problem-solving will be encouraged and assessed throughout.

Fieldwork

Students are responsible for their subsistence and travel costs within London when on fieldwork. All other travel and fees will be paid for or reimbursed by the IRDR

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Risk and Disaster Science MSc

Funding

For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website.

Careers

This programme provides excellent training towards careers in industry and commerce, research, research communication and public policy including insurance, catastrophe modelling, finance, risk management, business continuity, humanitarian assistance, engineering, electricity distribution and many other fields. It supports the career development of professionals already working in risk and disaster reduction, as well as those who intend to go into this field. 

Employability

This programme will equip students with scientific and analytical skills to better understand and assess disaster risks and to identify solutions to reduce those risks. These skills are highly sought after in the private, public and NGO sector, and in specific fields such as catastrophe modelling, risk management, and public policy.

Career destinations of IRDR graduates include: an international economic consultancy in the field of micro-finance; a consultancy role in disaster risk for an insurance company; the World Food Programme; Rescue Global – a London based NGO; and a PhD studentship. 

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Institute for Risk and Disaster Reduction (IRDR), where teaching for this programme is based, leads and co-ordinates multidisciplinary research, knowledge exchange and advanced teaching in risk and disaster reduction across UCL.

UCL is uniquely well placed to lead research and teaching in this field; in addition to academics across seven faculties involved in world-class research, UCL IRDR has established links with scientific leaders in NGOs, industry and government departments based in and around London, who contribute to teaching and project supervision.

As a student, you will be encouraged to join our active seminar series, high-profile public discussion meetings and networking events.

The IRDR runs a careers and opportunities forum for students; this has been attended by insurance companies, catastrophe modelling firms, NGOs, academic institutions, and headhunters in the field of risk and disaster reduction.



Read less
It is now recognised that the level of greenhouse gas emissions that have already accumulated in the atmosphere means some climate change is inevitable, meaning that effectiveness in dealing with climate impacts is critical for the prospects of development. Read more

It is now recognised that the level of greenhouse gas emissions that have already accumulated in the atmosphere means some climate change is inevitable, meaning that effectiveness in dealing with climate impacts is critical for the prospects of development. Climate change is the foremost challenge of the 21st century and is now being prioritised by governments, donor/development agencies and NGOs around the world. As such, the people working in them need a thorough grounding in the conceptual and practical dimensions both of adaptation to and mitigation of climate change, as well as the interlinkages between them.

The Climate Change and Development programme is designed to meet these needs so that organisations can be more effective in their efforts towards change. The modules in this programme draw from a wide range of disciplinary perspectives, concepts and methods including economics, environmental science, human geography, social development, political economy and environmental law. The programmes cover key issues within climate change and development such as gender, social justice, energy access, poverty and social protection.

The core aims of this programme are to:

  • Offer critical insight into how current development models produce environmental problems, like (but not limited to) climate change, which themselves threaten the objectives of development
  • Pose the question of what magnitude of change is required to confront the problems of climate change: do we need reform or revolution?
  • Help you develop the analytical skills to solve adaptation problems and identify low carbon development options
  • Contribute to producing the next generation of environment and development professionals working on climate policy and practice
  • Provide the most academically gifted students with a route into PhD studies on climate change and development.

Teaching & Learning

Virtual Learning Environment (VLE)

This programme is taught 100% online through our VLE. In the VLE you will have access to learning materials and module resources anytime so you can fit your studies around your existing commitments. For each module, students will be provided with access, through the online Library, to all necessary materials from a range of appropriate sources.

Developed by subject experts, the module materials are designed to meet all your study requirements. We encourage you to follow up further interests and explore other information more widely, but the material we provide is comprehensive and sufficient for the required elements of each module.

The details will vary from module to module, but a typical set of materials will include:

  1. A detailed study guide:
  • All of our modules use a core text which is specially written and this will take you through your self-directed study. Exercises, assignments and other activities, such as self-assessment questions, film clips and animations are included to help you with learning.
  1. E-books and key readings
  • Most modules also draw upon textbooks, key extracts and articles, which accompany the core text, to be accessed via the online library. A wide range of sources are provided as required readings. Information is also supplied suggesting sources of further reading as well as links to relevant web pages.
  1. Supplementary study materials
  • These are included where appropriate, and include items such as computer software.

Tutoring

Each module has a dedicated tutor who is a subject specialist . The tutor will guide the students through the units of the module and prepare them for the examination, using the module discussion forum and other learning activities, depending on the module, on the virtual learning environment. Tutors are also in email contact with their students.

When can I study?

You can begin your studies in April or October. Students take one module per study session. Study sessions are 16 weeks in duration.

How many hours a week?

Each module runs over a 16-week study term, and we recommend studying, on average, 15 hours per week during this time. These hours can be broken down into three main tasks:

Reading the unit materials and key readings on each of the 15 topics covered in the unit

Preparing for and submitting the written assignment, worth 40-50% of the module mark

Contributing to online discussion and activities.

Additional time is then required for exam revision, which happens after the 16-week study term is completed.

Assessment

Each module will be assessed on one written assignment (40-50 % of the module mark), a hand-written examination (40-50 % of the module mark), and in some modules, online participation in regular learning and discussion exercises (10-20% of the module mark).

Employment

This programme is designed to assist both existing professionals working within environment and development spheres, and people moving into these fields.

For existing professionals, the programme provides the opportunity to upgrade and update their expertise, and to reflect systematically and in depth on their accumulated experience in the light of up-to-date theory and literature.

Graduates of Climate Change and Development will be prepared for roles in the public sector, international organisations, NGO's, consultancies and development projects involved in:

  • policy analysis and implementation for disaster risk reduction
  • climate and broader environmental issues
  • local and national climate change strategies
  • energy and development
  • poverty reduction.

You will also be prepared for roles within social enterprise and corporate social responsibility organisations and departments whose area of focus encompasses environment and development.



Read less
MSc Climate Change, Management & Finance. is a challenging programme based on the increasing range of issues faced by business leaders. Read more

MSc Climate Change, Management & Finance is a challenging programme based on the increasing range of issues faced by business leaders. The programme focuses on the area of climate change and sustainability, such as energy efficiency, risk management and insurance, financing future ventures and innovation or reducing carbon emissions.

You will gain technical expertise in finance, economics, innovation, management, marketing and strategy to help you develop an understanding of the challenges and opportunities raised by climate change and the interrelations between these two areas. Armed with deep quantitative and technical knowledge, you will be an asset for successful organisations from a wide variety of sectors, whether large corporations or SMEs, established industrial firms or technological ventures, either in sustainability focused roles or broader business management roles.

The Programme

The programme comprises core modules from a range of subject areas. Given the need to understand the relationship between its two components, the programme has been designed to embed within each module both the business and the sustainability/climate change/ carbon aspect of a topic.

These core modules include:

• Business Economics, Climate Change and the Environment

• Change Management and Leadership

• Clean Tech Innovation and Investment

• Climate Change and Governance

• Climate Finance

• Corporate Finance and Carbon Finance

• Energy Economics and Strategy

• Financial and Carbon Accounting and Reporting

• Impacts and Adaptation to Climate Change

• Marketing and Sustainability

• Mitigating Climate Change

• Quantitative Methods

• Risk Management and Climate Change

• Sustainable Strategic Management

• The Science of Climate Change

These modules are taught over three academic terms, and you will benefit from a balance between teaching and learning through a mix of lectures, seminars, external speakers, discussions group exercises and case studies. Assessment will combine examination, group and individual reports and presentations.

In addition to the core modules, you will have the choice during the summer to undertake either a Group Consultancy Project for a real client or a Work Placement. In both cases, you may also choose to do your project or work placement abroad.

Your final assessment will consist of a 5,000 word Capstone Individual Report. This report will help you put the theory taught in the programme modules into practice, linking your experience on the Group Consulting Project or Work Placement.



Read less
This Master's of Public Administration prepares the next generation of climate and energy leaders and decision makers to tackle complex challenges, from mitigating climate change to developing sustainable and renewable energy. Read more

This Master's of Public Administration prepares the next generation of climate and energy leaders and decision makers to tackle complex challenges, from mitigating climate change to developing sustainable and renewable energy. Graduates gain the tools, practical skills and knowledge to leverage technology and innovate climate and energy policy and gain insights from practising experts.

About this degree

Students are taught the conceptual frameworks, policy analysis tools and analytical methods to develop energy and climate policies. Students also study how energy and climate policies are implemented, evaluated and revised in policy cycles. A focus on leadership and the development of professional skills is emphasised throughout. 

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four core modules (105 credits), one optional module (15 credits), an elective module (15 credits), and a major group project module (45 credits) of around 12,000 words.

Core modules

Students undertake three core modules with students from sister MPA programmes, and a specialist module focusing on their degree topic.

  • Introduction to Science, Technology, Engineering and Public Policy
  • Analytical Methods for Policy
  • Energy, Technology and Climate Policy
  • Evidence, Institutions and Power

Optional modules

Students select one optional STEaPP module from the following:

  • Science, Technology and Engineering Advice in Practice
  • Risk Assessment and Governance
  • Communicating Science for Policy
  • Negotiation, Mediation and Diplomacy

Students will then also select one further 15-credit graduate module which is relevant to their degree of study. This module can be selected from any UCL department.

MPA Group Policy Project

In the group project, students work with an external client on a relevant policy challenge. With the support of STEaPP academic staff, the multidiscipinary student groups work together to produce an analysis that meets their clients' needs.

Teaching and learning

The programme combines innovative classroom teaching methods with unique scenario-based learning, enabling students to dynamically engage with real-world policy challenges. Scenarios are designed to help students consolidate knowledge and develop essential practical skills and their understanding of principles. During the programme, students acquire a comprehensive range of relevant skills.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Energy, Technology and Climate Policy MPA

Careers

Graduates of this Master's of Public Administration acquire skills to work in a range of sectors involved in analysis and/or policy-making concerning energy and climate change. Career destinations might include national and local government; international agencies such as the World Bank, United Nations and other global organisations; technology companies focused on sustainable energy; government offices of energy, innovation or development; environment agencies; consultancies and think tanks.

Employability

Throughout the MPA programme, students will:

  • gain a greater awareness of current issues and developments in energy and climate policy and technology
  • develop an understanding of the knowledge systems underpinning successful policy-making processes
  • learn how to communicate with scientists and engineers, policymakers and technology experts
  • develop the skills to mobilise public policy, and science and engineering knowledge and expertise, to address societal challenges relating to energy and climate policy.

Why study this degree at UCL?

A rapidly changing energy landscape and the impacts of climate change are providing opportunities for policy strategy and leadership in almost every country and industry sector. This practical programme offers experiential learning for skills needed in energy and climate policy-making.

Students undertake a week-long scenario activity on the policy-making process where they engage with external experts and UCL academics. Students go on to undertake a nine-month major project for a real-world client. Example policy problems include renewable energy sources, carbon capture and storage, or emerging energy technologies.

Students will gain the opportunity to network with UCL STEaPP's broad range of international partners, expert staff and a diverse range of academics and professionals from across the department's MPA and doctoral programmes.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



Read less
Sustainable development, defined as "development which meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs"1, is now one of the key policy drivers in many societies. Read more

A growing global concern

Sustainable development, defined as "development which meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs"1, is now one of the key policy drivers in many societies. Sustainability pervades decision making at the global, national, regional and local levels and is becoming embedded politically in all layers of government. Both public agencies and private organisations need to appreciate the sustainability agenda and what it means for them and their employees.

The MSc Sustainable Development (Climate Change and Environment) is designed to respond to this emerging agenda, approaching the subject from a holistic and multi-disciplinary perspective. This approach is critical: sustainable development covers inter-related economic, environmental and social issues. Understanding the connections between issues is key to tackling complex sustainability challenges and developing the joined-up thinking required in today’s policy environment.

Relevant, research-informed foundations and practical applications

This Masters provides a practical and problem-based approach to learning focused on both the study of sustainable development and its implementation in a range of professional contexts. Taught by experts in the field, staff who are active researchers in sustainability, you will gain insight into the latest research findings plus training in research methods for sustainability. You will develop a thorough grounding in the principles that underlie sustainability and the means by which to implement these in a range of settings across the globe.

We cover the outcomes of recent policy making, eg, the Rio+20 United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development; specific policy areas such as biodiversity, climate change and forests; and social enterprise and sustainability. In addition, a range of option modules allow you to specialise in key aspects of sustainable development, climate change and environment.

A perfect environment in which to study sustainable development

This Masters is based on the Cornwall Campus, home to the University's Environment and Sustainability Institute (ESI, http://www.exeter.ac.uk/esi/) – a £30 million centre leading cutting-edge, interdisciplinary research into solutions to problems of environmental change and enhancing people’s lives by improving their relationship with the environment. As a student you will benefit from the programme’s close relationship with the Institute and exposure to its cutting-edge research.

Cornwall is an exceptional place in which to study issues related to the environment and sustainability. The county is a perfect living laboratory which offers a diverse range of marine and terrestrial habitats, a wealth of natural resources and creative and resilient communities.

We also offer MSc Sustainable Development(http://www.exeter.ac.uk/postgraduate/taught/geography/sustdev/).

Programme structure

The programme is made up of compulsory and optional modules, which may be updated, deleted or replaced as a consequence of the annual programme review of this programme. The modules listed here provide examples of what you can expect to learn on this degree course based on recent academic teaching

Compulsory modules

The compulsory modules could include the following; Dissertation; Understanding Environmental Change; Themes in Climate Change and Key Skills

Optional modules

Some examples of optional modules are as follows; Statistical Modelling; Environmental Sustainability in Practice; Independent Study; Independent Work-based Learning; Introduction to Energy Policy and Sustainability; Climate, Hazards and Risk Assessment; Governing Sustainability; Nature, Health and Wellbeing and Research Methods for Practice.

Read less
The. Master's specialisation in Cities, Water and Climate Change. discusses the relationship between city planning and development, climate mitigation and adaptation. Read more

The Master's specialisation in Cities, Water and Climate Change discusses the relationship between city planning and development, climate mitigation and adaptation. Cities, because of high levels of energy consumption and mobility, are the main contributors to climate change. At the same time, cities, because of their population density, are most vulnerable to the impacts of climate change. Questions that will be addressed in this specialisation are: How can city planners contribute to a reduction of CO2 emissions, and how can cities adapt to the consequences of climate change?

A broad perspective

This Master's specialisation prepares students for working on the nexus between urban planning, water and environmental management. Students develop a broad and detailed view on the societal context of spatial and environmental issues is developed into an institutional approach. 

Possibilities for mainstreaming climate change into urban planning are discussed as well as examples of carbon free cities and transition towns. It is expected that in 2050 more than 70% of the world’s population lives in delta areas. Because of the rapidly urbanizing delta areas, special attention will be paid to issues of flood risk management and multi-layered water safety. Which infrastructure is needed to protect delta areas, what is the potential of ecosystem engineering (‘building with nature’), and what are possibilities for flood proofing urban areas?

Learn from case studies

To learn more about these strategies, students will study case studies from the Netherlands (Delta programme, Rotterdam, and Nijmegen) as well as international cases (New Orleans, Miami, New York, Jakarta, Hamburg). Students will learn more about both strategies to enhance cities’ adaptive capacity (the capacity to adapt to changing climate conditions), and cities’ resilience (the capacity to respond to shocks, such as floods).

Why study Spatial Planning at Radboud University?

  • We’re a small, almost ‘family-like’ department that covers a broad range of topics with a strong track record in related research. This means that you’ll have the advantage of enjoying plenty of one-on-one contact with expert supervisors while pursuing a topic that is of personal interest to you.
  • While English is the main language of communication and all lectures are in English, you have the choice to complete assignments, exams and your thesis in either Dutch or English.
  • You're trained to think outside given boxes, by combining well-established core courses with electives providing state of the art specialist knowledge.
  • Together with lecturers and practitioners, you'll develop smart and sustainable solutions for actual and future planning problems.
  • Best Master’s programme according to the Elsevier magazine’s survey Beste studies 2017.

Career prospects

Our Spatial Planning graduates are greatly valued by their employers for their analytical skills, critical perspective and sound academic understanding of the relationship between human activities, their spatial environment, and relevant spatial interventions enhancing their living environment.

Upon completion students will have knowledge of:

  • Interfaces between different planning concepts, sectors and interests
  • Synergies that are found and trade-offs that are made along these interfaces
  • Paths through which integrative planning is manifested in policy formulation, decision-making and projects at different geographical and institutional levels

Spatial planners from Nijmegen work as policy maker, consultant or project manager for government, consulting firms, project developers, housing corporations or research institutes. Also, more and more of our alumni are working in international projects.

Find out more on our website http://www.ru.nl/masters/cwcc

Radboud University Master's Open Day 10 March 2018



Read less
Building people’s resilience to disasters and conflict. One of the key development challenges of our time is the increasing number of people placed at risk of crises and disasters; people's vulnerability increases due to shocks and trends as a result of natural and man-made hazards. Read more

Building people’s resilience to disasters and conflict

One of the key development challenges of our time is the increasing number of people placed at risk of crises and disasters; people's vulnerability increases due to shocks and trends as a result of natural and man-made hazards.

The number, complexity and impact of disasters are increasing which heightens the need for better disaster management. Disaster Risk Management (DRM) has become one of the cornerstones of international development: there is urgency to reduce disaster losses and a need to minimize the impact of disasters on sustainable development. 

Disasters are, in essence, the result of poorly managed risk and human failure to introduce appropriate risk reduction measures. Effective crises and disaster responses therefore demand a shift away from reactive Emergency Relief to pro-active Disaster Risk Reduction. DRM therefore combines the concept of response and recovery (in the post-disaster phase) with the concept of prevention, mitigation and preparedness (the pre-disaster phase). 

Graduates of DRM will be better able to respond to natural and man-made disasters in increasingly complex and dynamic environments. In the context of increasing climate variability and climate change (slow-onset disasters), this specialization pays attention to linking Disaster Risk Reduction with Climate Change Adaptation. The DRM specialisation also touches on conflict, making the course also relevant for those working in tense and conflict affected regions. 

Central to the DRM specialisation is the focus on reducing the negative impacts of disasters and conflict on peoples’ lives and livelihoods and to build people’s resilience to disasters, crises and conflict.

Competences

At graduation, you will have developed the ability to:

  •  To apply disaster and conflict theories to real-life crises and disaster settings;
  • To understand the changing roles, responsibilities and modes of operations of key DRM actors;
  • To design and conduct risk and context analyses aimed to identify appropriate disaster response strategies and options;
  • To analyse and strengthen local risk governance;
  • To apply emerging good-practice integrated approaches to address crucial issues in building community resilience;
  • To address challenges faced by agencies and staff in responding to crises, including safety and security concerns; 

Career opportunities

Within an increasingly complex and dynamic context, graduates are trained and equipped to enhance community resilience of communities and reduce the impact of crises and disasters on sustainable development. 

Graduates have acquired new insights and know how to use innovative approaches, which have proved their potential to build community resilience to better manage risks as required by the nature of today’s crises and disasters. By looking through a disaster and conflict lens, graduates can make an important contribution to sustainable development.  



Read less
How can we prevent another financial crisis? Is it by better understanding risk in financial securities? Can improving the way we measure and manage risk create stability in the financial world?. Read more
How can we prevent another financial crisis? Is it by better understanding risk in financial securities? Can improving the way we measure and manage risk create stability in the financial world?

The after effects of the 2008 financial meltdown are still being felt across the globe. We need knowledgeable financial professionals who can evaluate risk, act rationally and understand the economic impact of their actions in order to find solutions. If you can rise to the challenge of making ethical, sound financial decisions in pressurised environments, MSc Financial Engineering and Risk Management is for you.

You follow advanced, contemporary study in financial engineering and risk management and develop a deeper understanding of the risks within modern financial securities. You also become skilled in the design of robust management systems to measure risk. Upon graduation, you should possess the skills and knowledge for a successful career in commercial, investment and central banks, hedge funds, regulatory authorities and rating agencies.

You master areas including:
-Asset pricing
-Derivative securities
-Financial modelling
-Mathematical research techniques using Matlab

MSc Financial Engineering and Risk Management is taught at Essex Business School, home to one of the largest, and most respected, finance groups in the UK. Our teaching is grounded in contemporary issues and professional practice, supported by industry-standard facilities, such as our Bloomberg virtual trading floor.

We’re ranked in the top 25 in the UK for research excellence (REF 2014) and are home to an international community of scholars, practitioners and academics; our current Masters students join us from more than 40 countries.

This course is also available to study part-time and you may be able to apply for scholarships and discounts offered by the University of Essex. Essex Business School also offers a limited number of scholarships for the CFA level one exam and IMC level one and two exams to exceptional Masters students.

Essex Business School is an IMC Advantage Partner and a Recognised Partner of the CFA.

Postgraduate loans for Masters courses are now available from the Student Loans Company, worth up to £10,000, for students from the UK and EU.

Our expert staff

We’re home to Essex Finance Centre, which produces research at the cutting-edge of financial debate.

Work by our expert staff has been discussed in the Bank of England, the European Central Bank and the Federal Reserve, so you join a business school that seeks to make a real difference to solving financial challenges around the world.

We combine academic experience with industry expertise and are renowned for research into:
-Business ethics and corporate social responsibility
-Organisation studies
-Leadership and strategy
-Finance and banking
-Risk management
-International management

Specialist facilities

You’re based at our Colchester Campus, in our landmark zero carbon building.

Our Colchester home is an example of our dedication to sustainable and ethical business practices. Its design is both environmentally friendly and architecturally stunning, with a winter garden and sun terrace contributing to the building’s own micro-climate and providing a tranquil environment for group working and socialising. Our Bonds café is located on site, making a great space for reviewing course notes before lectures.

Our virtual trading floor, complete with Bloomberg Financial Market Labs, enables you to practice dealing stocks and securities using industry-standard equipment. You can also benefit from our study skills workshops, designed to help you excel in your academic work.

Our building is also located on the University’s Knowledge Gateway, providing potential opportunities to network with inspiring SMEs who locate their businesses on our Colchester Campus.

Your future

An Essex Business School education is founded on creativity, innovation and ethical awareness to prepare you for the challenges of the global marketplace. In 2015, 78% of our postgraduate taught students were in work or further study (DLHE).

Our course provides you with the opportunity to develop a career in financial analysis, management, public administration and accountancy, as well as fostering your entrepreneurial spirit.

We provide plenty of support along the way to help you secure your dream job. Our dedicated employability team work closely with the University’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Example structure

-MSc Finance and Investment: Dissertation
-Finance Research Techniques Using Matlab
-Research Methods in Finance: Empirical Methods in Finance
-Postgraduate Mathematics Preparation
-Risk Management
-Financial Modelling
-Asset Pricing
-Derivative Securities
-Trading Global Financial Markets (optional)

Read less
All countries face a wide range of hazards, both natural and man-made, that have the potential to result in catastrophic damage. Despite actions taken… Read more

All countries face a wide range of hazards, both natural and man-made, that have the potential to result in catastrophic damage. Despite actions taken by local emergency management professionals, international trends show that the economic and social impact of disaster has increased around the world. This is especially true in the developing world, where large-scale disasters can result in enormous loss of life as well as considerable economic damage.

The MSc in International Disaster Management is designed for participants who are interested in enhancing resilience to disasters through prevention, preparedness, response and recovery from disaster events.

Within the HCRI, this will take place through multidisciplinary study focusing on the critical analysis of current trends in academic research and policies, particularly those related to international disaster risk reduction, sustainable development, and humanitarian action tools commonly used by disaster risk reduction professionals. To this end, the core curriculum brings together the realms of disaster risk reduction, sustainable development, and humanitarian action. The interdisciplinary team of researchers at the HCRI will also support the critical exploration of disaster resilience, prevention, mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery in order to equip students to work professionally in the fields of disaster risk reduction and sustainable development.

The MSc in International Disaster Management is unique as it incorporates a wide variety of available course units from history, politics, development studies, the arts and medicine. This results in a course that is suitable as a way to develop initial skills in disaster risk reduction or support continuing education for disaster risk reduction professionals.

Aims

On completion of the course, you should be able to show a critical understanding of:

  1. Key issues and debates related to the theory and practices of disaster risk reduction. Students will show familiarity with different theoretical approaches, practical problems and an appreciation of the diversity of polices at international and national levels, including the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction, Sustainable Development Goals, 21 st Conference of Parties on Climate Change (COP21) and the outcomes of the World Humanitarian Summit.
  2. The range of environmental, health and social science topics which influence disaster risk reduction and management (including political, historical, anthropological understandings). Students will become familiar with the methodological and normative underpinnings of these disciplines.
  3. The analytical and policy literature concerning the related issues of disaster risk reduction including environmental/geological studies, emergency management structures and institutions, the role and perspectives of the state, multilateral and bilateral agencies, international and domestic NGO's and other civil institutions.
  4. An understanding of common approaches to disaster risk reduction (i.e. risk matrices, disaster typologies), including an awareness of the problems and critiques associated with disaster prevention, mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery in both industrialized and developing countries.
  5. The development of a range of academic and professional/transferable skills through both independent and group-based work.
  6. A detailed understanding of a specific conceptual and/or policy-related area of disaster risk reduction along with implications and limitations of research findings on this subject, and of how to produce an original piece of academic research. Delivered via a dissertation.

Special features

HCRI also offers bespoke training in International Disaster Management and Continuing Professional Development courses. Please contact Dr Billy Haworth (  ) for details

HCRI at The University of Manchester is inspired by the need to conduct rigorous research and to support postgraduate training on the impact and outcomes of contemporary and historical crises. Directed by Dr Rony Brauman (former President of MSF France, Associate Professor at L'Institut d'Études Politiques, Paris, and Director of Research at the MSF Foundation, Paris), HCRI is widely recognised as being a leading international research institute focusing on the study of humanitarianism, conflict response and peacebuilding.

Our work is driven by a desire to inform and support policy and decision makers, to optimise joint working between partner organisations, and to foster increased understanding and debate within the field. Bringing together the disciplines of medicine and the humanities (including international relations and political science) to achieve these goals, HCRI aims to facilitate improvements in crisis response on a global scale whilst providing a centre of excellence for all concerned with emergencies, conflicts and peace. In offering a range of postgraduate courses we embrace this opportunity to develop a scholarly and professional agenda for humanitarians and peacebuilders around the world.

Teaching and learning

Delivery of the course will be done through face-to-face teaching at the University of Manchester. This will be supported by streamed lectures, discussion boards and other e-learning elements.

Coursework and assessment

Graduation requirements will be the completion of 180 credits. A total of 120 credits of module coursework will be required for students to move on to dissertation writing. A passing dissertation will lead to the final 60 credits needed for MA completion.

Course unit details

All core modules are convened by existing HCRI staff. A small number of elective modules will be taught from the School of Environment and Development, the School of Social Sciences and the School of Nursing.

Course units may include:

  • Introduction to disaster management
  • Risk management
  • Research & evaluation methods
  • Reconstruction and development
  • Emergency humanitarian assistance
  • Water sanitation planning & policy in the developing world
  • Global health
  • Fundamentals of epidemiology
  • History of humanitarian aid
  • Climate change, poverty and disaster management

Course units may vary from year to year.

Course collaborators

A selection of elective modules are being offered from the School on Environment and Development.

Facilities

Appropriate facilities will be verified through the School of Arts, Languages and Cultures. The course has been developed in close co-operation with the Faculty's e-learning team which will offer on-going support for the programme.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 



Read less
The MSc in Risk Management and Insurance offers you a unique blend of insurance, risk management and financial services content. These areas are becoming increasingly interconnected and the prominence of risk management as a specialised profession has continued to grow in a complex and volatile economic environment. Read more
The MSc in Risk Management and Insurance offers you a unique blend of insurance, risk management and financial services content. These areas are becoming increasingly interconnected and the prominence of risk management as a specialised profession has continued to grow in a complex and volatile economic environment. Ireland is a key location for insurance and reinsurance services and is establishing itself as a location for research and development in the insurance of emerging industries and technologies.

The MSc in Risk Management and Insurance has been designed to:
Develop students with the technical capacity, objective reasoning and contextual overview for roles within the growth areas of risk management and insurance.
Enable students' comprehension of the prominent risk exposure models used and their regulatory context.
Facilitate the development of specialised technical and analytical skills with a strong appreciation of underpinning assumptions.
Promote the development of self-managed learning skills including time management, prioritisation, critical thinking and reflection

Our future graduates could expect to gain employment in many types of businesses including international insurance, reinsurance and insurance broking firms, risk management departments of major corporations, investment and retail banks, regulatory authorities, climate change planning and many other fields

Read less
Uniting emergency response, disaster risk reduction and space technology this programme is designed to prepare students to work in the fields of satellite technology and disaster response to explore the management of risk and disaster losses from a range of perspectives, focusing on emerging risks posed to modern technology by space weather and the monitoring of hazards on Earth from outer space. Read more

Uniting emergency response, disaster risk reduction and space technology this programme is designed to prepare students to work in the fields of satellite technology and disaster response to explore the management of risk and disaster losses from a range of perspectives, focusing on emerging risks posed to modern technology by space weather and the monitoring of hazards on Earth from outer space.

About this degree

Students will learn about a wide variety of natural hazards, how to prepare and plan for emergencies and disasters and how to respond. Students will also learn practical aspects of designing, building and operating satellites and spacecraft including the challenges and risks posed by the environment of outer space.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of six core modules (90 credits), two optional modules (30 credits) and a dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules

  • Integrating Science into Risk and Disaster Reduction
  • Emergency and Crisis Management
  • Research Appraisal and Proposal
  • The Variable Sun: Space Weather Risks
  • Space Science, Environment and Satellite Missions
  • Space Systems Engineering

Optional modules

Students choose two 15-credit optional modules from the following:

  • Decision and Risk Statistics
  • Emergency and Crisis Planning
  • Global Monitoring and Security
  • Mechanical Design of Spacecraft
  • Natural and Anthropogenic Hazards and Vulnerability
  • Risk and Disaster Research Tools
  • Space-Based Communication Systems
  • Space Instrumentation and Applications
  • Spacecraft Design - Electronic Sub-systems

Optional modules are subject to availability of places.

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent project culminating in a report of between 10,000 and 12,000 words.

Teaching and learning

Teaching is delivered by lectures, seminars and interactive problem sessions. Assessment is by examination, poster, presentation and written essay coursework.

Funding

For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website.

Careers

This programme aims to prepare students for careers in space research, space and defence industries as well as most industries with risk management requirements.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The unique selling point of the programme is the direct access to key government and business drivers in the field of space weather, with invited seminars and reserch projects supported by the UK Met Office, EDF, Atkins and other institutions interested in the hazards of space. 

The natural hazard of space weather is a "new" hazard which has only recently been identified as a significant risk to human society. As the first generation of researchers, practitioners and engineers in this field, students will be at the forefront of major new issues in an expanding sector of the economy. As disaster response comes to rely on more advanced technology aid, relief and disaster response agencies require experts trained in the technological infrastructure to innovate, explain, operate and understand the limitations of these novel systems and the help they can provide before, during and after disasters.

The programme will also provide students will advanced training in many transferable skills, such as computor programming, technical writing, oral and written presentation, the use of engineering design tools and graphic visualisation software.



Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page



Cookie Policy    X