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Masters Degrees (Climate Model)

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he contribution of mathematical and computational modelling to the understanding of biological systems has rapidly grown in recent years. Read more
he contribution of mathematical and computational modelling to the understanding of biological systems has rapidly grown in recent years. This discipline encompasses a wide range of life science areas, including ecology (e.g. population dynamics), epidemiology (e.g. spread of diseases), medicine (e.g. modelling cancer growth and treatment) and developmental biology.

This programme aims to equip students with the necessary technical skills to develop, analyse and interpret models applied to biological systems. Course work is supported by an extended and supervised project in life science modelling.

Students will take a total of 8 courses, 4 in each of the 1st and 2nd Semesters followed by a 3-month Project in the summer. A typical distribution for this programme is as follows:

Core courses

Modelling and Tools;
Mathematical Ecology;
Dynamical Systems;
Mathematical Biology and Medicine.

Optional Courses

Optimization;
Numerical Analysis of ODEs;
Applied Mathematics;
Statistical Methods;
Stochastic Simulation;
Partial Differential Equations;
Numerical Analysis;
Geometry;
Climate Change: Causes and Impacts;
Biologically Inspired Computation;
Climate Change: Mitigation and Adaptation Measures.

Typical project subjects

Population Cycles of Forest Insects;
Modelling Invasive Tumour Growth;
The replacement of Red Squirrels by Grey Squirrels in the UK;
Wiring of Nervous System;
Vegetation Patterning in Semi-arid Environments;
Daisyworld: A Simple Land Surface Climate Model.

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Climate change is recognised as having potentially huge impacts on the environment and on human society. Read more
Climate change is recognised as having potentially huge impacts on the environment and on human society. This programme aims to provide an understanding of climate change causes, impacts, mitigation and adaptation measures from a life science perspective in conjunction with developing a wide variety of mathematical modelling skills that can be used to investigate the impacts of climate change.

The programme closely follows the structure of our Applied Mathematical Sciences MSc. Two of the mandatory courses will specifically focus on understanding the issues related to climate change and are taught by the School of Life Sciences.

Students will take a total of 8 courses, 4 in each of the 1st and 2nd Semesters followed by a 3-month Project in the summer. A typical distribution for this programme is as follows:

Core courses

Modelling and Tools;
Mathematical Ecology;
Climate Change: Causes and Impacts;
Climate Change: Mitigation and Adaptation Measures;
Dynamical Systems (recommended);
Stochastic Simulation (recommended)

Optional Courses

Optimization;
Mathematical Biology and Medicine;
Numerical Analysis of ODEs;
Applied Mathematics;
Statistical Methods;
Applied Linear Algebra;
Partial Differential Equations;
Numerical Analysis;
Geometry;
Bayesian Inference.

Typical project subjects

Population Cycles of Forest Insects;
Climate Change Impact;
The replacement of Red Squirrels by Grey Squirrels in the UK;
Vegetation Patterns in Semi-arid Environments;
Daisyworld: A Simple Land Surface Climate Model.

The final part of the MSc is an extended project in mathematical modelling the impacts of climate change on environmental systems, giving the opportunity to investigate a topic in some depth guided by leading research academics.

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Goal of the pro­gramme. Society urgently needs experts with a multidisciplinary education in atmospheric and Earth System sciences. Read more

Goal of the pro­gramme

Society urgently needs experts with a multidisciplinary education in atmospheric and Earth System sciences. Climate change and issues of air quality and extreme weather are matters of global concern, but which are inadequately understood from the scientific point of view. Not only must further research be done, but industry and business also need environmental specialists with a strong background in natural sciences. As new regulations and European Union directives are adopted in practice, people with knowledge of recent scientific research are required.

Upon graduating from the Programme you will have competence in

  • Applying experimental, computational and statistical methods to obtain and analyse atmospheric and environmental data
  • Knowledge applicable to solving global challenges such as climate change, air pollution, deforestation and issues related to water resources and eutrophication
  • Making systematic and innovative use of investigation or experimentation to discover new knowledge
  • Reporting results in a clear and logical manner

Further information about the studies on the Master's programme website.

Pro­gramme con­tents

The six study lines are as follows:

Aer­o­sol phys­ics

Aerosol particles are tiny liquid or solid particles floating in the air. Aerosol physics is essential for our understanding of air quality, climate change and production of nanomaterials. Aerosol scientists investigate a large variety of phenomena associated with atmospheric aerosol particles and related gas-to-particle conversion using constantly improving experimental, theoretical, model-based and data analysis methods.

Geo­phys­ics of the hy­dro­sphere

Hydrospheric geophysics studies water in all of its forms using physical methods. It includes hydrology, cryology, and physical oceanography. Hydrology includes the study of surface waters such as lakes and rivers, global and local hydrological cycles as well as water resources and geohydrology, the study of groundwater. Cryology focuses on snow and ice phenomena including glacier mass balance and dynamics, sea ice physics, snow cover effects and ground frost. Physical oceanography covers saline water bodies, focusing on describing their dynamics, both large scale circulation and water masses, and local phenomena such as surface waves, upwelling, tides, and ocean acoustics. Scientists study the hydrosphere through field measurements, large and small scale modelling, and formulating mathematical descriptions of the processes. 

Met­eor­o­logy

Meteorology is the physics of the atmosphere. Its best-known application is weather forecasting, but meteorological knowledge is also essential for understanding, predicting and mitigating climate change. Meteorologists study atmospheric phenomena across a wide range of space and time scales using theory, model simulations and observations. The field of meteorology is a forerunner in computing: the development of chaos theory, for example, was triggered by the unexpected behaviour of a meteorological computer model. Meteorology in ATM-MP is further divided into dynamic meteorology and biometeorology. Dynamic meteorology is about large-scale atmospheric dynamics, modelling and observation techniques, whereas biometeorology focuses on interactions between the atmosphere and the underlying surface by combining observations and modelling to study the flows of greenhouse gases and energy with links to biogeochemical cycles, for example.

Biogeo­chem­ical cycles

Biogeochemistry studies the processes involved in cycling of elements in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems by integrating physics, meteorology, geophysics, chemistry, geology and biology. Besides natural ecosystems, it also studies systems altered by human activity such as forests under different management regimes, drained peatlands, lakes loaded by excess nutrients and urban environments. The most important elements and substances studied are carbon, nitrogen, sulphur, water and phosphorus, which are vital for ecosystem functioning and processes such as photosynthesis. Biogeochemistry often focuses on the interphases of scientific disciplines and by doing so, it also combines different research methods. It treats ecosystems as open entities which are closely connected to the atmosphere and lithosphere. You will thus get versatile training in environmental issues and research techniques. As a graduate of this line you will be an expert in the functioning of ecosystems and the interactions between ecosystems and the atmosphere/hydrosphere/lithosphere in the context of global change. You will have knowledge applicable for solving global challenges such as climate change, air pollution, deforestation and issues related to water resources and eutrophication.

Re­mote sens­ing

Remote sensing allows the collection of information about the atmosphere, oceans and land surfaces. Various techniques are applied for monitoring the state and dynamics of the Earth system from the ground, aircraft or satellites. While Lidar and radar scan from the surface or mounted on aircraft, instruments on polar orbiting or geostationary satellites permit measurements worldwide. In atmospheric sciences remote sensing has found numerous applications such as observations of greenhouse and other trace gases, aerosols, water vapour, clouds and precipitation, as well as surface observations, for example of vegetation, fire activity, snow cover, sea ice and oceanic parameters such as phytoplankton. Synergistic satellite data analysis enables the study of important processes and feedback in the climate system. Remote sensing advances climate research, weather forecasting, air quality studies, aviation safety and the renewable energy industry.

At­mo­spheric chem­istry and ana­lysis

Atmospheric chemistry studies the composition and reactions of the molecules that make up the atmosphere, including atmospheric trace constituents and their role in chemical, geological and biological processes, including human influence. The low concentrations and high reactivity of these trace molecules place stringent requirements on the measurement and modelling methods used to study them. Analytical chemistry is the science of obtaining, processing, and communicating information about the composition and structure of matter and plays an essential role in the development of science. Environmental analysis consists of the most recent procedures for sampling, sample preparation and sample analysis and learning how to choose the best analytical methods for different environmental samples. Physical atmospheric chemistry studies focus on the reaction types and reaction mechanisms occurring in the atmosphere, with emphasis on reaction kinetics, thermodynamics and modelling methods.



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There is a growing need for qualified professionals with expertise in environmental modelling. The UCL Environmental Modelling MSc is a cross-disciplinary degree that provides rigorous technical and scientific training for the next generation of environmental modelling professionals. Read more

There is a growing need for qualified professionals with expertise in environmental modelling. The UCL Environmental Modelling MSc is a cross-disciplinary degree that provides rigorous technical and scientific training for the next generation of environmental modelling professionals.

About this degree

You will gain a well-rounded training in the role, implementation and application of models in environmental science. Core modules provide a critical perspective on model-based science, and introduce essential computational and numerical methods. The programme is contextualised with reference to the challenges of understanding both natural and human-induced changes to a variety of environmental systems.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four core modules (60 credits), optional modules (60 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits, full-time nine months, part-time two years) is offered.

A Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits, full-time 12 weeks, part-time one year) is offered.

Core modules

  • Models in Environmental Science
  • Global Environmental Change
  • Scientific Computing
  • Analytical and Numerical Methods

Optional modules

Options may include:

  • Climate Modelling
  • Coastal Change
  • Environmental GIS
  • Impacts of Climate Change on Hydro-Ecological Systems
  • Lakes
  • Ocean Circulation and Climate Change
  • Surface Water Modelling
  • Terrestrial Carbon: Monitoring and Modelling

Other MSc modules offered across UCL may be taken at the discretion of the MSc convenor

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project, culminating in a dissertation of approximately 12,000 words and an oral presentation.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, tutorials, and laboratory and computer-based practical classes. Assessment is through independent project work, practical-based and written coursework, written examinations and the dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Environmental Modelling MSc

Careers

The programme has been designed to provide an ideal foundation for PhD research, or for employment with environmental monitoring and protection agencies, industry and environmental consultancies. Graduates have gone on to careers as management consultants, business analysts and university researchers.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Risk Analyst, Canopius
  • Research Fellow, University of Girona and studying PhD Sanitas, Universitat de Girona (University of Girona)

Employability

Modelling was identified as the highest priority UK skills gap in a government review of the environmental sector. This MSc programme exposes students to the full range of environmental modelling which places graduates in a strong position to find employment. We anticipate that graduates of this MSc are either employed in the private environmental consulting sector or undertake a PhD.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The Environmental Modelling MSc is run by UCL Geography which enjoys an outstanding international reputation for its research and teaching. Research groups contributing to the MSc include those concerned with environmental modelling and observation, past climates, and recent environmental change and biodiversity.

The programme draws on the unrivalled strengths of UCL in environment modelling. Our expertise encompasses state-of-the-art global climate models, regional ocean models, advanced hydrodynamic and hydrological simulations, palaeoclimate reconstruction over geological to recent historical timescales, earth observation-derived vegetation and carbon cycle modelling, and model-based assessment of climate change impacts on coastal, estuarine and freshwater systems.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Geography

81% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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The. Master in Advanced European and International Studies - Mediterranean studies (MAEIS). provides an overarching and extensive view of the political, social, economic and cultural issues of the globalised world. Read more

The Master in Advanced European and International Studies - Mediterranean studies (MAEIS) provides an overarching and extensive view of the political, social, economic and cultural issues of the globalised world. The MAEIS is an international, interdisciplinary and itinerant programme which aims to educate the next generation of Euro-Mediterranean decision-makers. Following the slogan "Learning and living the Mediterranean", the participants rotate each trimester, moving their place of studies from Nice to Tunis and then Istanbul including a workshop in Rome. The programme is structured into three terms and is taught in English and French.

Programme

Nice

The first term (October to January) starts in the European Union, in Nice, France. It encompasses classes on the basics of the five modules (Conflict Management and Peace Making, Sustainable Development and Globalisation, Regional Integration and Transformation, Mediterranean Politics and Societies as well as Professional Skills Workshops). Studying in France helps the students to analyse the Mediterranean region and Euro-Mediterranean relations from an EU perspective. Courses will introduce to the institutional architecture of the EU and its neighbourhood policy. They will also discuss the shared risks of populism, terrorism and climate change. Mid-term exams will take place in December. The trimester concludes with a simulation exercise.

Tunis

The second term (January to April) starts off in Tunis, Tunisia. Our cooperation partner, the Université Internationale de Tunis, is famous for its integration of international students in Tunisia. Thanks to our partner, the Institut de Recherche sur le Maghreb Contemporain (IRMC), students will have access to the expertise and the library of one of the most renowned think tanks in the Maghreb. Researchers from the region will analyse transformation processes in the Southern and Eastern Mediterranean in times of globalisation. Studying in Tunisia will provide the students with a unique experience of a historic democratisation process that turns the nobelpeace-prize winning country into a role model throughout the MENA region. For non-Arab speakers an Arab language course is compulsory.

A study trip to Rome will take place during the 2nd or the 3rd term. Here, a special focus will be given to Foreign Policy Analysis (EU, Russia, US, Iran), as well as migration, poverty and food security, including visits of relevant UN institutions and conférences at our Partner, the renowned think tank, Istituto Affari INternazionali (IAI).

Istanbul

The programme concludes in Istanbul, Turkey (April to July) where the courses are organised in cooperation with our long-term partner, the Istanbul Bilgi University. Courses will deal with the changing EU-Turkey relations. Students will have the opportunity to advance in their research work, as they are free of obligations from mid-May to mid-June to work on their thesis. The programme concludes with the defence of the thesis and oral exams. With their graduation on the Bosphorus, students become part of CIFE’s worldwide Alumni network.

Teaching Modules

Conflict Management and Peace Making

The Mediterranean is a case study par excellence for Peace and Conflict Studies. Understanding and explaining questions of war and peace has been at the heart of „International Relations“ as an academic discipline – from its very beginning, after the First World War. In the last two decades Mediterranean societies have been significantly affected by inter-group violence and inter-state conflicts: from the Western Balkans to Cyprus, from Israel to Palestine, from Syria to Lybia. Mediterranean conflicts are partly characterised by external interventions. The module will focus at causes and dynamics of escalation and de-escalation, including international law and peace-making in a multiperspective approach. Theories on violence and peace will help to analyse the case studies proposed.

Sustainable development and Globalisation

The Mediterranean in the 21st century faces unprecedented economic, environmental and social challenges. As economic development exercises increased pressure on limited resources, deteriorates the environment and creates growing inequalities, Mediterranean economies struggle to find their way through these challenges. An introduction into economics as an academic discipline will set the ground for a regional analysis of sustainable development, energy policies, climate action and demographic dynamics.

Regional integration and transformation

The European Union became a model of regional integration. Nation states agreed to transform their sovereignity into a multi-level governance system sui generis to keep regional peace, increase welfare and economic power. How is the dynamic architecture of European institutions functioning – in times of both Europeanisation and Euroscepticism? And to what extent are the Arab League or the Union for the Mediterranean comparable models of regional integration?

Regional integration is primarily an elite-driven, government-sponsored transformation process. However, socio-economic and political change can be triggered by civil society and social movements, as the „Arab Spring“ has shown transregionally in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA). Change and continuity differ significantly in the MENA-region. Why? And which repercussions for the Union for the Mediterranean?

Mediterranean Politics and Societies

Mediterranean Politics are shaped by an interplay of different policy fields and policy actors. Theories of International Relations (i.e. Foreign Policy Analysis, Migration Theories) will help to understand the dynamics of policy making towards and in the Mediterranean region. Migration constitutes a challenging and complex policy field throughout the Mediterranean.

In a second part of this module we will approach Mediterranean societies with a generational focus upon „youth“. The current number of youth in the Mediterranean is unprecedented. Meanwhile, youth unemployment is a phenomenon that nearly all Mediterranean societies have in common. At the crossroads of theory and practice this module will identify solutions to the challenges the young generation faces in the Mediterranean.

Professional Skills Workshops

The participants will take part in negotiation and mediation trainings, simulation games and follow career workshops as well as workshops on project cycle management and intercultural communication.

Applications and Scholarships

Candidates can submit their application via the online application form. They should also include all the relevant documents, or send them by post or e-mail. An academic committee meets regularly in order to review complete applications.

A limited number of scholarships can be awarded to particularly qualified candidates. There are different funds available for this programme.

The application deadline is 15 May 2018.



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Change the world. Join the unique Master of Engineering Studies (Renewable Energy Systems) to tackle one of the most important issues our world faces today. Read more

Change the world

Join the unique Master of Engineering Studies (Renewable Energy Systems) to tackle one of the most important issues our world faces today.

The Master of Engineering Studies (Renewable Energy Systems) is a unique postgraduate programme in New Zealand.

Taught in conjunction with world-renowned Murdoch University in Australia, it is the only fully-focussed renewable energy postgraduate programme in New Zealand. The programme has been running for over fifteen years.

This qualification is suitable if you either have an undergraduate engineering degree and wish to specialise in renewable energy, or you have found yourself working in a renewable-energy-related role and need to upskill. You do not have to have an engineering degree to enrol.

Setting the global agenda

Let our experts help you develop your own expertise. We bring a solid base of experience to your learning from our Centre for Energy Research, established at Massey in 1997 following over 25 years of teaching and research work undertaken in the areas of renewable energy, energy efficiency and energy management. 

We also bring the most relevant and recent research to your learning. You will learn the theory and practice behind energy management, renewable energy and climate change from lecturers who have been working internationally, contributing to research and policy through panels that are setting the global agenda.

Real-world learning

You will gain an in-depth understanding of the theory of renewable energy systems, but also focus on practical information that can be applied to real-world situations. This could be through using the international Long Range Energy Alternatives Planning System (LEAP) model to assess climate change mitigation options for a country, city or community.

You will also learn how to measure renewable energy resources, and understand the challenges of providing energy efficiency or renewable energy systems in developing countries as part of sustainable development.

Your study includes examining solar radiation, wind, hydro, tidal, wave and biomass systems and their design, including economics and performance. You will look at the challenges in assessing, designing, introducing and maintaining small-scale renewable energy technologies in developing countries and study the scientific theory of global warming, climate modeling and social and technological approaches to reducing greenhouse emissions including greenhouse gas accounting principles.

The programme also covers the social issues to change human behaviour regarding the deployment of renewable energy systems and related greenhouse gas emission reductions.

Flexibility

You can study towards the Master of Engineering Studies on campus, or study via our distance learning. This gives you the flexibility to remain in full-time employment while studying. Massey University has been offering distance education for over 50 years and you will be able to take advantage of our well-developed systems for teaching and learning.

Dig deeper

The renewable energy systems major includes an optional research project, where you can either investigate a topic you are interested in, or work with us to develop an industry-relevant piece of work.

A year full time

The Master of Engineering Studies is a 120 credit qualification able to be completed in one year full-time, or part-time between 2.5 and five years..

Why postgraduate study?

Postgraduate study is hard work but hugely rewarding and empowering. The Master of Engineering Studies will push you to produce your best creative, strategic and theoretical ideas. The workload replicates the high-pressure environment of senior workplace roles.

Not just more of the same

Postgraduate study is not just ‘more of the same’ undergraduate study. Our experts are there to guide but if you have come from undergraduate study, you will find that postgraduate study demands more in-depth and independent study. It takes you to a new level in knowledge and expertise especially in planning and undertaking research.



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This specialisation will focus on the strategic and visionary elements of what might be called the ‘new’ planning enterprise. As the preparations for the New Urban Agenda by UN Habitat III signals, the agenda of urban planners in the 21st century will become tighter. Read more

This specialisation will focus on the strategic and visionary elements of what might be called the ‘new’ planning enterprise.

As the preparations for the New Urban Agenda by UN Habitat III signals, the agenda of urban planners in the 21st century will become tighter. Cities and city regions will continue growing in size and function. Challenges derive directly from ‘external’ processes like globalisation, climate change and migration. The city and city region is also inscribed as central element into the growth model of the modern society.

These challenges translate into the domain of planning, with newly emerging forms of collective plan-making and new governance arrangements taking shape. In a positive sense, urban development is negotiated and created in urban future laboratories. How can planners deal with these changing circumstances, and add value to both the bottom-up emerging local initiatives and revise the top-down approaches towards managing spatial development.

How can they safeguard common values of a shared city or regional identity, a functioning ‘spatial fabric,’ or an equitable access to public services? These and other questions are addressed in the Master's specialisation in Strategic Spatial Planning.

Master's specialisation in Strategic Spatial Planning

The Master’s specialisation in Strategic Spatial Planning is taught at Nijmegen School of Management. It has a course load of 60 EC* (one-year). The structure is as follows:

Required courses

  • Institutional Perspectives, Territorial Governance by Market, State and Civil Society
  • Urban Futures Lab - Creative Approaches Towards Vision and Strategy Building for Regional Transformation
  • Advanced Research Methods
  • Urban Innovation Space

Examples of elective courses

  • Land and Real Estate Markets: Smart Governance, Finance and Business Models
  • Cities, Water and Climate Change
  • Urban Networks: Accessibility and Mobility
  • Sustainability and Societal Transformations
  • Strategic Scenarios and Business Models
  • Group Model Building I
  • Strategic Decision Making
  • Verdieping Recht en Instituties in de Ruimtelijke Planning (in Dutch)

Master's Thesis in Strategic Spatial Planning (24 ECs)

Quality label

Radboud University holds the title for Best General University in the Netherlands in the Keuzegids Masters 2017 (Guide to Master's programmes).

Radboud University Master's Open Day 10 March 2018



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Summary. As a director or senior executive, leadership is the most important part of your role. However, in a turbulent business climate, leaders cannot model themselves on leadership approaches from the past and expect to meet the demands of today. Read more

Summary

As a director or senior executive, leadership is the most important part of your role. However, in a turbulent business climate, leaders cannot model themselves on leadership approaches from the past and expect to meet the demands of today. To support leaders to respond to these demands, we have designed a development programme that uses 21st century approaches to meet future challenges we all face.

About

The MSc Executive Leadership enables participants to explore how to develop individual and organisational leadership competence through becoming part of a global learning community. To be a strong role model is important too, so up to date approaches to ethics and governance feature throughout. However, the key to sustainable success is the capacity to lead through innovation, to outthink the competition and then to outperform it.

Attendance

The programme is structured around seven taught modules each lasting three days and one five day module delivered at the Global Leadership Institute, Boston College, USA. In addition, participants complete a Research Study (Dissertation project).

Career options

Current students occupy relevant and worthwhile careers but this programme supports continued career development whereby some students have progressed to senior executive and boardroom positions following completion of the programme. For those who wish to maintain their links with academia, there is an option to pursue further studies at PhD.

Graduates of the programme have written written research papers and have presented at a number of International and Leadership Conferences.



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The world’s aquatic ecosystems and environment are increasingly under threat. Pollution, overfishing, global climate change and many other impacts have highlighted the importance for us to understand their function at all levels, from the molecular to the global. Read more

Why take this course?

The world’s aquatic ecosystems and environment are increasingly under threat. Pollution, overfishing, global climate change and many other impacts have highlighted the importance for us to understand their function at all levels, from the molecular to the global.

This is what our course sets out to do and thanks to our close proximity to many types of temperate marine habitats and internationally protected conservation areas, we offer the perfect location for investigation.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Research at our internationally-renowned Institute of Marine Sciences or carry out microbiological work at the University’s Field Centre for Environmental Technology at Petersfield Sewage Works
Rear coldwater species for restocking programmes or trial fish food at Sparsholt College’s National Aquatics Training Centre
Study abroad through Erasmus or various other conservation and research schemes

What opportunities might it lead to?

You’ll be taught by leading international researchers and the course has been designed with strong input from outside agencies including environmental consultancies, a range of government bodies and industry. This ensures your training links directly to UK and international employment opportunities.

Here are some routes our graduates have pursued:

Consultancy work
Government-based research
Conservation
Teaching
Further study

Module Details

You will cover a variety of topics in advanced laboratory and field skills, and choose from units that cover marine ecology, aquaculture, ecotoxicology and pollution, and scientific journalism. A large amount of your time will also be spent on the research project that will enable you to apply the skills and knowledge you have gained.

Core units are:

• Research Toolkit: This covers a range of key professional skills for research methods (communication skills, ethics and report writing), advanced field skills (boat sampling, taxonomy, and marine and freshwater sampling methods), advanced laboratory skills (genomics, monitoring and pollution monitoring methods) and remote sensing technology (such as GIS).

• Research Project: Your final project allows you to select from a range of marine and freshwater projects provided by staff within the School, government research laboratories, NGOs and private research companies. During the project you will write literature reviews and develop skills in data analysis and presentation.

Then choose any three optional units from:

• Ecotoxicology and Pollution: This provides an introduction to environmental toxicology using model and non-model organisms.

• Aquaculture: This unit focuses on the principles of aquaculture production, global production and diversity of aquaculture species. It is taught by academic staff and staff from the National Aquatics Training Centre at Sparsholt College. Areas covered include larval culture, diseases and pathology, feeding and growth, reproductive manipulation, and business and management.

• Marine Policy, Planning and Conservation: Planning and Conservation: This unit explores contemporary debates on coastal and marine management with a specific focus on marine policy, planning and conservation.

• Science and the Media: Science communication is increasingly becoming an important part of science. This unit firstly addresses the skills required by scientists to effectively communicate with the media and general public and secondly, provides an understanding of the skills needed for a career in science journalism.

• Subtidal Marine Ecology: Selected topics of current interest in marine ecology, incorporating both theory and applied aspects, culminating in a week-long practical field course in the Mediterranean Sea. The unit carries an additional cost for the field trip, and requires a minimum level of training and experience in SCUBA diving to participate.

Programme Assessment

Hands-on laboratory-based work teamed with field trips means that practical learning underpins the theory learned in lectures, seminars, tutorials and workshops. You’ll also find that some aspects of your course may be taught online using our virtual learning environment.

You will be assessed using a range of methods from exams to coursework and presentations, with great opportunities to present your final-year projects to industry and researchers from other departments and organisations.

Student Destinations

Once you have completed this course, you will be particularly well placed to enter a wide range of interesting and rewarding careers in the UK and abroad. We will ensure you have all the relevant knowledge and skills that employers require, giving you the opportunity to either pursue a scientific career, enter the teaching profession, or further study should you want to continue your research.

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The two year MSc programme Biosystems Engineering is for students with an (agricultural) engineering background on bachelor level that are interested to pursue a MSc degree in a field where the interaction between technology and biology plays an important role. Read more

MSc Biosystems Engineering

The two year MSc programme Biosystems Engineering is for students with an (agricultural) engineering background on bachelor level that are interested to pursue a MSc degree in a field where the interaction between technology and biology plays an important role.

Programme summary

During the master Biosystems Engineering, students are educated in finding innovative solutions. The programme combines knowledge of technology, living systems, natural and social sciences with integrated thinking using a systems approach. Solutions can be applied to either the field of food or nonfood agricultural production. During the programme, you develop independence and creativity while acquiring skills that enable you to analyse problems and work as part of an interdisciplinary team. Biosystems Engineering is a tailor-made, thesis oriented programme based on the specific interests and competencies of the student.

Thesis tracks

Farm Technology
This topic consists of four main themes, namely automation for bioproduction, greenhouse technology, livestock technology and soil technology. All these topics have the shared goal of designing systems in which technology is applied to the demands of plants, animals, humans and the environment. Examples of such applications include precision agriculture, conservation tillage, fully automated greenhouses and environmentally friendly animal husbandry systems that also promote animal welfare.

Systems and Control
Production processes and various kinds of machinery have to be optimised to run as efficiently as possible; and with the least amount of possible environmental impact. To achieve this, computer models and simulations are developed and improved. Examples include designing control systems for a solar-powered greenhouse to include a closed water cycle and designing a tomato-harvesting robot.

Information Technology
Information and communication play a vital role in our society. It is necessary to acquire, use and store data and information to optimise production processes and quality in production chains. This requires the design and management of business information systems, software engineering, designing databases and modelling and simulation.

Environmental Technology
Environmental technology revolves around closing cycles and reusing waste products and by-products. Processes have to be designed in such a way that they either reuse waste or separate it into distinct and reusable components. Examples include the production of compost, the generation of green energy or the design of environmentally friendly animal husbandry systems and greenhouses.

AgroLogistics
The goals of agrologistics are to get the right product in the right quantity and quality at the right time and to the right place as efficiently as possible while fulfilling the requirements of the stakeholders (such as government legislation and regulations). This requires the design of effective, innovative logistics concepts in agrifood chains and networks. Examples are the design of greenhouses developed for optimal logistics or designing a dairy production process with minimal storage costs.

Biobased Technology
The importance of biobased economy is increasing. Energy savings and the use of renewable energy are directions for achieving an environmentally sustainable industrial society. Biomass of plants, organisms and biomass available can be turned into a spectrum of marketable products and energy. In this track, you learn more about process engineering, biological recycling technology, biorefinery and how to abstract a real system into a physical model and analyse the physical model using dedicated software.

Your future career

Most graduates are employed in the agrofood sector, or related sectors of industry and trade, from local to international companies. They are project leaders, product managers, technical experts, sales specialists or managers at many kinds of companies including designers of agricultural buildings (animal husbandry systems, greenhouses) and bioenergy production systems. Others find jobs with IT companies (climate control computers, automated information systems) or firms in the agro-food chain that produce, store, process, distribute and market agricultural products. In the service sector or at governments, graduates enter careers as consultants, information officers or policymakers in the fields of technology and sustainable agricultural production, while others enter research careers at institutes or universities.

Alumnus Patrick Honcoop.
"I am working as a product manager at 365 FarmNet in Germany. 365FarmNet supports farmers to manage their whole agrarian holding with just one software application. I am responsible for the content of the software. I am the link between the farmers, the agrarian holdings and the software developers. I really enjoy these dynamics and variety within my function. Just like during my studies, when we visited farmers, companies and fairs during courses and excursions organised by the study association."

Related programmes:
MSc Animal Sciences
MSc Plant Sciences
MSc Geo-information Science
MSc Geographical Information Management and Applications
MSc Organic Agriculture

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Never has there been a more important time for a new approach to economics. There is an urgent need for a radical rethink of our economic system. Read more
Never has there been a more important time for a new approach to economics.

There is an urgent need for a radical rethink of our economic system. We need new thinking and new models that recognise the challenges we face now, rather than blindly following the path that has led us into the converging crises we now face.

These models will enable us to both mitigate the impacts and adapt to these inter-locking crises – including climate change, biodiversity loss, the peaking in fossil fuel energy supplies, financial instability, food security, poverty and so on.

They will be built on an understanding of the complementarity of ecological protection and human flourishing.

For 20 years, pioneering thinkers and practitioners have been developing alternative economic ideas, models and experiments that were once considered radical and marginal.

As we turn to face a new economic dawn, these theories and practices are now moving centre stage.

"I teach at Schumacher College because of its strong link with ecological sustainability and an approach which is based on collaborative co-creation. People are not told what to do, together they co-create their ideas. It’s a fundamentally different model of education that we can learn from and apply to the economy as well as other areas of our life."
Professor Eve Mitleton-Kelly, London School of Economics

"In making the transition to a world in which we can all thrive within planetary boundaries, it is paradigm shift or bust, and nobody does paradigm shift better than Schumacher College. Its learning environment and the content of its courses make visions of a better world tangible. And, the Economics for Transition MA shows how right now we can take the first steps to get there."
Andrew Simms, Fellow of New Economics Foundation

"Schumacher College is one of the few places I know where economic questions are being asked as openly as they need to be. When I run seminars there, I learn as much as I teach."
Kate Raworth, Visiting Research Associate at Oxford University’s Environmental Change Institute

Why Schumacher College?

Since 1991, Schumacher College has been pioneering radical new thinking in economics, attracting leading teachers, practitioners and activists from across the globe. We have inspired and supported thousands of organisations and individuals from many different countries in their quest to achieve a more sustainable and equitable world.

In 2011, in response to the deepening economic and related crises, we launched our first postgraduate programme in Economics for Transition in association with the New Economics Foundation, the Transition Network and the Business School at Plymouth University.

Now in its fourth year, this partnership offers you an unparalleled opportunity to learn about the cream of radical economic thinking, activism and entrepreneurship globally.

Hosted by highly respected radical economists, completed by an unrivalled visiting faculty of teachers and practitioners from across the world, you have a unique chance to join those at the forefront of new economic thinking.

Our teachers include:

Jonathan Dawson – Schumacher College
Tim Crabtree – Schumacher College
Stephan Harding – Schumacher College
Julie Richardson – Schumacher College
Anna Coote and Tony Greenham (link is external) – New Economics Foundation
Rob Hopkins, Jay Tompt & Sophy Banks (link is external) – Transition Network
David Bollier – co-founder of the Commons Strategies Group
Gustavo Esteva – founder of the Universidad de la Tierra
Fiona Ward – REconomy Project
Pat Conaty – NEF Fellow
Tim ‘Mac’ Macartney – Founder and CEO of Embercombe
Robin Murray – Industrial and environmental economist.
Kate Raworth – Senior Visiting Research Associate at Oxford University’s Environmental Change Institute
Dr. Martin Shaw – Author, mythologist, storyteller and award winning wilderness Rites-of-Passage guide

Who is this course for?

We are delighted to receive your application whether you are coming directly from an undergraduate degree, taking time-out to study mid-career or wanting an opportunity to retrain in a subject area that is of huge importance to our global economic future and wellbeing.

We are looking for enthusiastic agents of change who are ready to co-create a new economy in practice. We are looking for those prepared to take a risk and stand on the cutting-edge of new thinking in this area.

Schumacher College welcomes students from all over the world in its diverse mix of cultural experience and age group that allows for rich peer to peer learning.

What you will learn?

The key sustainability issues facing the world today
How ecological, economic and social crises are systemically linked to the malfunctioning of today’s globalised economy
A critique of the dominant neoclassical, industrial growth model from different perspectives
A theoretical and experiential understanding of an ecological world-view
How to apply ecology and complexity science to the economy and social systems
The co-creation of a new approach to economics drawn from alternative schools of thought
The co-creation of future scenarios and pathways towards low-carbon, high wellbeing and resilient economies
Participation in current debates on the economics of transition
New economics tools, methods and policies and their application to real-world case studies
Self-evaluation to improve professional practice

You will also carry out an independent research project related to the economics of transition

Where you will go?

Are you ready to join a new generation of business leaders, entrepreneurs, policy-makers, researchers, consultants and activists?

Graduates from this programme will have the skills and knowledge to work for sustainable change in the public and private sectors as well as in civil society, or to set up their own projects or organisations that will contribute to the transition to a new economy.

Hear from some of our past and present students and find out how this programme has changed their lives and careers by reading our the Economics for Transition student profiles.

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What is the Master of Science in Sustainable Development all about?.  The Master of Science in Sustainable Development contains two different tracks. Read more

What is the Master of Science in Sustainable Development all about?

 The Master of Science in Sustainable Development contains two different tracks: the Erasmus Mundus joint Master in Sustainable Territorial Development and the ICP Master of Science in Sustainable Development. 

The Erasmus Mundus Joint Master in Sustainable Territorial Development

STeDe IJM aims to create experts in the area of sustainable territorial development. More concretely it trains professionals to be able to help organizations acting in the territory (enterprises, local communities, civil society organizations) to draft sustainable development policies for economic, social, environmental, international and intercultural management.

The Master concerns the economic competitiveness, social inclusion, environmental protection, international cooperation and intercultural relation challenges of territorial development focusing not only on local communities, but also on enterprises, non-state actors and civil society organizations. It also aims to offer an example of sustainable territory involving all local organizations, which should have human resources available and able to promote sustainable development. 

The ICP Master of Science in Sustainable Development

An active research-driven education model with five main pillars

Pillar 1 : Research based teaching courses taught by academic experts leading research in different sustainability domains and parts of the world.

Pillar 2 : Training in research stimulating critical learners, systemic thinking and creativity in the solution of complex socio-ecological problems and triggering real change.

Pillar 3 : A programme informed by and serving the needs of Global South regions facing economic, social and ecological challenges.

Pillar 4 : The active integration of fieldwork in the South, internship, thesis and portfolio development in the professional preparation of the students.

Pillar 5 : The KU Leuven Sustainability Living Lab as the itinerant platform through which the vision and goals of this Master will be tested and implemented in a real world setting. All contents and activities in the Master are connected to the priorities of the Lab, which will be in tune with international institutions agendas and contemporary sustainability debates.

In simple words, this Master programme embraces sustainable development beyond the walls of universities and classrooms to engage with real world settings and localities in their search for solutions to their most pressing problems.

The Master of Science in Sustainable Development is an initial Master's programme and can be followed on a full-time or part-time basis.

Structure

In this interuniversity programme, both European and non-European students study together. The EMLM STeDe-students study each semester at a different university. First at the Università degli Studi di Padova (30 ECTS), then at KU Leuven (30 ECTS) and then at the Université Paris 1 Panthéon - Sorbonne (30 ECTS). The fourth semester is dedicated to an internship and a Master's thesis (30 ECTS) written at the university of the student's choice from among the three aforementioned universities and the Universidade Catolica Don Bosco in Brazil. 

The students of the ICP Master of Sustainable Development study at the KU Leuven. They can choose between two specialisations: ‘Space and Society’ and ‘Ecology’.

Departments

This programme is offered by the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, collaboration with the Department of Biology. The main mission of the Department Earth and Environmental Sciences is to carry out state-of-the-art scientific research with respect to the functioning of geo- and ecosystems at different spatial and temporal scales, including the interaction between humans and the environment and the sustainable management of natural resources. The department aims at providing attractive academic training at an international level in the fields of Bio-engineering, Geology, Geography and Tourism. The department aims at making an important contribution to the scientific understanding of societal issues such as environmental pollution, food production, climate change, nature and landscape management, soil and water management, exploitation of underground resources, rural and urban development, international development collaboration and tourism.

The Department of Biology is committed to excellence in teaching and research and is comprised of four divisions with diverse research activities ranging from molecular and physiological research at the level of cells and organisms to ecological research on populations, communities, and ecosystems. Although many research groups conduct in-depth analyses on specific model organisms, as a whole the department studies an impressive diversity of lifeforms.

Our research is internationally renowned and embedded in well-established worldwide collaborations with other universities, research institutes, and companies. Our primary goal is to obtain insight into patterns and processes at different levels of biological organisation and to understand the basis and evolution of the mechanisms that allow organisms to adapt to their constantly changing environment. This knowledge often leads to applications with important economic or societal benefits. The department attracts many students and hosts approximately 250 staff members.

Career perspectives

Job opportunities for graduates may be found in all sectors where sustainable development actions should be implemented, in particular at organizations responsible for the creation of sustainable territories (communities, enterprises, non-state actors and civil society organizations, local governments), the central government and international organizations.

Potential posts include: environmental adviser; sustainable development manager in local communities, public administrations, civil society organizations & local governments; representative within local public institutions, national and international institutions, enterprises, trade unions & professional bodies.

The extensive experience, international collaboration and multidisciplinary insights gained from the Erasmus Mundus Master in Sustainable Territorial Development, will open up new perspectives on the sustainability of territorial use and organization while introducing you to various policy tools and management strategies in divergent territorial contexts. 



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Make a difference. From protecting our native biodiversity to identifying key traits to improve crop plants in an ever-changing climate, plant biology research can solve the world’s major global issues. Read more

Make a difference

From protecting our native biodiversity to identifying key traits to improve crop plants in an ever-changing climate, plant biology research can solve the world’s major global issues.

Find out more about the Master of Science parent structure.

Massey’s Master of Science (Plant Biology) will give you the knowledge and skills to understand and help solve some of the world’s most important current issues, such as the effects of climate change on our native species and crop plants, how to preserve native biodiversity, and understanding fundamental physiological aspects of plants.

You will build upon your undergraduate degree and conduct original, independent research under the guidance of a leading plant science academic.

Expertise in an area of your choice

The plant biology team at Massey have expertise in plant molecular biology, evolutionary biology, systematics and taxonomy, and plant physiology. During the course of your studies you can choose to further your knowledge and apply your learning on an exciting research project such as:

  • Evolution of plant genomes
  • Molecular development of plants
  • Population genetics and conservation genetics of native plants

Take advantage of our globally-renowned expertise

Let our experts help you develop your own expertise. You will learn from, and research with, highly-skilled internationally-recognised and active researchers in plant biology and related areas, with a huge depth of knowledge and experience. Postgraduate study and research in plant biology at Massey spans evolutionary biology to physiology. You will have the opportunity to learn about the fundamental aspects of plant growth and function, as well as the molecular evolution and classification (systematics) of plants. You might choose to conduct research focused on the native New Zealand flora or a model organism, like Arabidopsis thaliana, or even a crop species.

You will also be able to take advantage of Massey’s expertise across the sciences. We have a wide and relevant group of expertise within the university, from fundamental sciences like microbiology and biochemistry, to agriculture, engineering, horticulture and environmental management. 

This means no matter what your research interest you will have access to a broad range of experts to assist you develop your own research.

Use world-leading equipment and facilities

As a plant biology student you will have access to our world-leading equipment and facilities such as the Dame Ella Campbell Herbarium, the Palynology Laboratory, Plant Growth Unit, Seed Testing Services, Massey Genome Service and the Manawatu Microscopy and Imaging Centre.

Relevant and topical

We work to ensure that our teaching fits with the changing environment, which means that you will emerge with a relevant qualification valued by potential employers.

Making industry connections for you

Massey has strong connections with the Crown Research Institutes in Palmerston North and across New Zealand, especially AgResearch, Landcare Research, Plant and Food Research, and Scion. Some of our students are able to conduct their projects at these organisations whilst undertaking their postgraduate study, benefiting their career and gaining real-word experience in the process.

Why postgraduate study?

Postgraduate study is hard work but hugely rewarding and empowering. The Master of Science will push you to produce your best creative, strategic and theoretical ideas. The workload replicates the high-pressure environment of senior workplace roles.

Not just more of the same

Postgraduate study is not just ‘more of the same’ undergraduate study. Our experts are there to guide but if you have come from undergraduate study, you will find that postgraduate study demands more in-depth and independent study. It takes you to a new level in knowledge and expertise especially in planning and undertaking research.

Complete in 2 years

Massey University’s Master of Science is primarily a 240 credit master qualification. This is made up of 120 credits of taught courses and a 120 credit research project.

Or if you have already completed the BSc (Hons) or PGDipSc you can conduct a 120 credit thesis to achieve your MSc qualification.



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A unique programme. Gain an in-depth understanding of global energy management issues and the tools to design more effective energy programmes with the Master of Engineering Studies (Energy Management). Read more

A unique programme

Gain an in-depth understanding of global energy management issues and the tools to design more effective energy programmes with the Master of Engineering Studies (Energy Management).

Find out more about the Master of Engineering Studies parent structure.

In the energy management major of the Master of Engineering Studies, you will gain an detailed understanding of energy efficiency, looking at detail of energy use in industry and commercial settings, as well as tools for energy systems analysis and efficient building design.

A unique qualification

It is a unique postgraduate programme in New Zealand. Taught in conjunction with world-renowned Murdoch University in Australia, it is the only fully-focussed energy management postgraduate programme in New Zealand. The programme has been running for over fifteen years.

Learning in a global context

Your learning will be set in the context of global renewable energy systems and tools. You will learn the detail of contemporary renewable energy issues including greenhouse science, global energy systems, policy, economics and management. This will specifically cover renewable energy devices, resources and system design.

Setting the global agenda

Let our experts help you develop your own expertise. We bring a solid base of experience to your learning from our Centre for Energy Research, established at Massey in 1997 following over 25 years of teaching and research work undertaken in the areas of renewable energy, energy efficiency and energy management. We also bring the most relevant and recent research to your learning. You will learn the theory and practice behind energy management, renewable energy and climate change from lecturers who have been working internationally, contributing to research and policy through panels that are setting the global agenda.

Flexibility

You can study towards the Master of Engineering Studies on campus, or study via our distance learning. This gives you the flexibility to remain in full-time employment while studying. Massey University has been offering distance education for over 50 years and you will be able to take advantage of our well-developed systems for teaching and learning. Part of your study will be a real-life energy management case study.

Dig deeper

The renewable energy systems major includes an optional research project, where you can either investigate a topic you are interested in, or work with us to develop an industry-relevant piece of work.

Real-world learning

You will gain an in-depth understanding of the theory of renewable energy systems, but also focus on practical information that can be applied to real-world situations. This could be through using the international Long Range Energy Alternatives Planning System (LEAP) model to assess climate change mitigation options for a country, city or community. You will also learn how to measure renewable energy resources, and understanding the challenges of providing energy efficiency or renewable energy systems in developing countries as part of sustainable development.

The programme also covers the social issues to change human behaviour regarding the deployment of renewable energy systems and related greenhouse gas emission reductions.

Specialise

This qualification is suitable if you either have an undergraduate engineering degree and wish to specialise in energy management, or you have found yourself working in a energy management-related role and need to upskill. You do not have to have an engineering degree to enrol.

A year full time

The Master of Engineering Studies is a 120 credit qualification able to be completed in one year full-time, or part-time between 2.5 and five years..

Why postgraduate study?

Postgraduate study is hard work but hugely rewarding and empowering. The Master of Engineering Studies will push you to produce your best creative, strategic and theoretical ideas. The workload replicates the high-pressure environment of senior workplace roles.

Not just more of the same

Postgraduate study is not just ‘more of the same’ undergraduate study. Our experts are there to guide but if you have come directly from undergraduate study, you will find that postgraduate study demands more in-depth and independent study. It takes you to a new level in knowledge and expertise especially in planning and undertaking research.



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This course focuses on the physical processes that generate natural hazards through an advanced understanding of geological and environmental processes. Read more

Why take this course?

This course focuses on the physical processes that generate natural hazards through an advanced understanding of geological and environmental processes.

You will be fully trained by internationally recognised experts in hazard identification, terrain evaluation techniques as well as hazard modelling and risk assessment techniques. Providing you with the essential skills to monitor, warn and help control the consequences of natural hazards.

What opportunities might it lead to?

This course is accredited by the Geological Society of London. It offers advanced professional and scientific training providing an accelerated route for you to attain Chartered Status, such as Chartered Geologist (CGeol) and Chartered Scientist (CSci) on graduation.

Here are some routes our graduates have pursued:

Aid organisations
Environmental organisations
Offshore work
Civil sector roles
Mining
Insurance companies

Module Details

You can opt to take this course in full-time or part-time mode.

The course is divided into two parts. The first part comprises the lecture, workshop, practical and field work elements of the course, followed by a five-month independent research project. The course is a mixture of taught units and research project covering topics including site investigation, hazard modelling and mapping, soil mechanics and rock mechanics, contaminated land, flooding and slope stability.

Here are the units you will study:

Natural Hazard Processes: The topic of this unit forms the backbone of the course and give you an advanced knowledge of a broad range of geological and environmental hazards, including floods, landslides, collapsible ground, volcanoes, earthquakes, tsunamis, hydro-meteorological and anthropogenic hazards. External speakers are used to provide insights and expertise from an industry, regulatory and research perspective.

Numerical Hazard Modelling and Simulation: This forms an important part of the course, whereby you are trained in the application of computer models to the simulation of a range of geological and environmental hazards. You will develop skills in computer programming languages and use them to develop numerical models that are then used to simulate different natural hazard scenarios.

Catastrophe Modelling: On this unit you will cover the application of natural hazard modelling to better understand the insurance sector exposure to a range of geological and environmental hazards. It includes external speakers and sessions on the application of models for this type of catastrophe modelling.

Volcanology and Seismology: You will gain an in-depth knowledge of the nature of volcanism and associated hazards and seismology, associated seismo-tectonics and earthquake hazards. This unit is underpinned by a residential field course in the Mediterranean region that examines the field expression of volcanic, seismic and other natural hazards.

Flooding and Hydrological Hazards: These are a significant global problem that affect urban environments, one that is likely to increase with climate change. This unit will give you an in-depth background to these hazards and opportunities to simulate flooding in order to model the flood hazard and calculate the risk.

Hazard and Risk Assessment: This unit gives you the chance to study the techniques that are employed once a hazard has been identified and its likely impact needs to be measured. You will have advanced training in the application of qualitative and quantitative approaches to hazard and risk assessment and their use in the study of different natural hazards.

Field Reconnaissance and Geomorphological Mapping: These techniques are integral to the course and an essential skill for any graduate wishing to work in this area of natural hazard assessment. On this unit you will have fieldwork training in hazard recognition using techniques such as geomorphological mapping and walk-over surveys, combined with interpretation of remote sensing and aerial photography imagery.

Spatial Analysis and Remote Sensing: You will learn how to acquire and interpret aerial photography and satellite imagery, and the integration and analysis of spatial datasets using GIS – all key tools for hazard specialists.

Geo-mechanical Behaviour of Earth Materials: You will train in geotechnical testing and description of soils and rocks to the British and international standards used by industry.

Landslides and Slope Instability: This unit will give you an advanced understanding of landslide systems, types of slides in soils and rocks and methods for identification and numerical analysis.

Impacts and Remediation of Natural Hazards: You will cover a growing area of study, including the impact of hazardous events on society and the environment, and potential mitigation and remediation methods that can be employed.

Independent Research Project: This provides you with an opportunity to undertake an original piece of research to academic or industrial standards, typically in collaboration with research staff in the department or external industry partners. In addition to submission of a thesis report, you also present the results of your project at the annual postgraduate conference held at the end of September.

Programme Assessment

The course provides a balanced structure of lectures, seminars, tutorials and workshops. You will learn through hands-on practical sessions designed to give you the skills in laboratory, computer and field techniques. The course also includes extensive field work designed to provide field mapping and data collection skills.

Assessment is varied, aimed at developing skills relevant to a range of working environments. Here’s how we assess your work:

Poster and oral presentations
Project reports
Literature reviews
Lab reports
Essays

Student Destinations

This course provides vocational skills designed to enable you to enter this specialist environmental field. These skills include field mapping, report writing, meeting deadlines, team working, presentation skills, advanced data modelling and communication.

You will be fully equipped to gain employment in the insurance industry, government agencies and specialist geoscience companies, all of which are tasked with identifying and dealing with natural hazards. Previous destinations of our graduates have included major re-insurance companies, geological and geotechnical consultancies, local government and government agencies.

It also has strong research and analytical components, ideal if you wish to pursue further research to PhD level.

We aim to provide you with as much support as possible in finding employment through close industrial contacts, careers events, recruitment fairs and individual advice.

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