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Masters Degrees (Classical Studies)

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This fascinating course examines many different aspects of the ancient Greek and Roman worlds – their literature, history, philosophy, archaeology, languages and material cultures – through a scholarly tradition that is both fast-moving and long-standing. Read more

MA in Classical Studies

This fascinating course examines many different aspects of the ancient Greek and Roman worlds – their literature, history, philosophy, archaeology, languages and material cultures – through a scholarly tradition that is both fast-moving and long-standing. You will investigate the different disciplinary fields of Classical Studies, bringing you into direct contact with a wide range of fragmentary evidence from classical antiquity such as surviving texts and artefacts, which you’ll examine from multiple theoretical and methodological perspectives. You will also acquire and develop research skills that will enhance your knowledge of the ancient Graeco-Roman world and prepare you for independent study, culminating in a dissertation.

Key features of the course

•Explores the question of ‘how we know what we know’ about the ancient civilisations of Greece and Rome
•Takes an interdisciplinary approach to the study of ‘the ancient body’, including birth, death, ancient medicine, dress and beauty
•Draws on cutting-edge research by members of the Classical Studies department
•Concludes with a substantial piece of independent research on a topic of your choice.

This qualification is eligible for a Postgraduate Loan available from Student Finance England.

Modules

To gain this qualification you require 180 credits as follows:

Compulsory modules

• MA Classical Studies part 1 (A863)
• MA Classical Studies part 2 (A864)

The modules quoted in this description are currently available for study. However, as we review the curriculum on a regular basis, the exact selection may change over time.

Credit transfer

If you’ve successfully completed some relevant postgraduate study elsewhere, you might be able to count it towards this qualification, reducing the number of modules you need to study. You should apply for credit transfer as soon as possible, before you register for your first module. For more details and an application form, visit our Credit Transfer website.

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The MA Classical Studies concentrates on the literature and culture of the Greco-Roman world. Students have the opportunity to study some historical subjects if they so wish. Read more
The MA Classical Studies concentrates on the literature and culture of the Greco-Roman world. Students have the opportunity to study some historical subjects if they so wish. The study of ancient languages is an essential part of this degree, but no existing knowledge of either Greek or Latin is required for admission.

Course Overview

A degree in Classical Studies gives you the opportunity to study a wide range of modules from mythology to religion and all genres of ancient literature, such as epic, tragedy. As understanding texts in their original language is an essential part of further studies, the study of an ancient language is compulsory.

Modules

-Women in Ancient Myth
-Medicine in the Ancient World
-Erotic Poetry in the Ancient World
-Stories, Histories, and Ticket-Sales: Greeks and Romans on the Silver Screen
-Myth in Greek and Roman Epic

Key Features

The MA in Classical Studies will have a special appeal to those students who wish to study the ancient world with a focus on language and literature, and the interpretation of ancient texts. Providing our students with a range of learning opportunities and excellent teaching is the primary aim of the School of Classics. We employ innovative methods and approaches that enhance our students’ learning throughout their studies.

All our modules are taught by specialists and active researchers. The influence of our research on our teaching offers our students the opportunity to learn from the best in the subject and follow the latest scholarly trends and discoveries.

Our programme is designed to help learners both on campus and at a distance. Our Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) is a live forum through which students and staff can interact, through which students are better able to revise and explore difficult topics and through which students are better able to access the electronic resources available in the virtual world.

Studying Classical Studies with us here at University of Wales Trinity Saint David means research-led teaching and research-active learning in an environment that allows for both full use of the virtual world and the personal approach of expert tuition.

Assessment

An MA degree in Classical Studies involves a wide range of assessment methods. In addition to traditional essays, you will be assessed through bibliographic exercises, presentations – oral and PowerPoint-based, creation of abstracts, in-house conference papers, article reviews, creation of project plans and, of course, the dissertation. This variety of assessment helps develop skills in presenting material in a clear, professional and lucid manner, whether orally or in writing.

The assessment is on the student’s own subject of choice in relation to each module, always in consultation with the relevant tutor. Most modules are assessed by long essays, but some modules are assessed by alternative means, such as conference-style presentations.

Career Opportunities

The programme provides a broad foundation for postgraduate work, by laying particular emphasis on the methodologies and research tools needed for independent advanced study, thus acting as training for students who intend to undertake an MPhil or PhD.

The course also provides a professional qualification for teachers or others seeking Continuing Professional Development.

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The MRes Classical Studies concentrates on the literature and culture of the Greco-Roman world. The programme is divided into a 60 credit taught part and a Dissertation of 120 credits amounting to up to 30,000 words in total. Read more
The MRes Classical Studies concentrates on the literature and culture of the Greco-Roman world. The programme is divided into a 60 credit taught part and a Dissertation of 120 credits amounting to up to 30,000 words in total.

Course Overview

An MRes in Classical Studies gives you the opportunity to study a range of modules on classical literature, and aspects of everyday life in the ancient world. Students study what amounts to 3 taught modules chosen from the collection of modules on the programme, with a requirement that one of the choices be a Research Methods module. The dissertation of between 25000 to 30000 words forms the heart of this programme and allows the student to investigate in depth a topic or area of particular interest to them.

Modules

Students will choose three modules. Below is an illustrative list of modules available:
-Women in Ancient Myth
-Medicine in the Ancient World
-Erotic Poetry in the Ancient World
-Stories, Histories, and Ticket-Sales: Greeks and Romans on the Silver Screen
-Myth in Epic

Key Features

The MRes in Classical Studies will have a special appeal to those students who wish to study the ancient world with a focus on language and literature, and the interpretation of ancient texts. Providing our students with a range of learning opportunities and excellent teaching is the primary aim of the School of Classics.

All our modules, including our Dissertation supervision, are delivered by specialists and active researchers. The influence of our research on our teaching offers our students the opportunity to learn from the best in the subject and follow the latest scholarly trends and discoveries.

Our programme is designed to help learners both on campus and at a distance. Our Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) is a live forum through which students and staff can interact, through which students are able better to revise and explore difficult topics and through which students are better able to access the electronic resources available in the virtual world.

Studying Classical Studies with us here at Trinity Saint David means research-led teaching and research-active learning in an environment that allows for both full use of the virtual world and the personal approach of expert tuition.

Assessment

An MRes degree in Classical Studies involves a wide range of assessment methods. This variety of assessment helps develop skills in presenting material in clear, professional and a lucid manner, whether orally or in writing. In addition to traditional essays, you will be assessed through bibliographic exercises, presentations – oral and powerpoint based, creation of abstracts, in-house conference papers, article reviews, creation of project plans and, of course, the dissertation. The Dissertation is between 25,000 and 30,000 words.

Career Opportunities

The programme provides a broad foundation for postgraduate work, by laying particular stress on the methodologies and research tools needed for independent advanced study, thus acting as training for students who intend to undertake an MPhil or PhD.

The course also provides a professional qualification for teachers or others seeking Continuing Professional Development.

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This graduate diploma is ideal as a bridge to master’s study or beyond if you are new to the study of the classical world. Read more

This graduate diploma is ideal as a bridge to master’s study or beyond if you are new to the study of the classical world.

The Classical Studies Graduate Diploma is a multi-disciplinary study programme designed both for graduates who are looking to strengthen and expand their understanding of the classics, and also for students from other backgrounds requiring an in-depth understanding to key areas of the subject.

Perfect as a pathway to further study and as an opportunity to significantly develop your knowledge of the classics.

Key Benefits

  • One of the world's largest and most distinguished Department of Classics.
  • Unrivalled location for the study of the ancient world thanks to London's unique range of specialist libraries, museums and galleries.
  • Ideal preparation for further graduate study in all areas of Classics.
  • King's graduates enjoy one of the best employment rates and starting salaries in the UK. Ranked 6th in the UK for graduate employment (Times and Sunday Times Good Universities Guide 2016)

Description

The Graduate Diploma is a highly flexible study pathway that offers you the opportunity to customise your module choices to reflect your academic interests. You can choose from a wide range of topics to study that typically include Greek and Roman Literature, Greek and Roman History, Classical Arts and Archaeology and Late Antique and Byzantine Studies. Additionally, if you wish to study Grek or Latin language modules, tehy can be studied at a level to reflect your language abilities.

If you are studying full time you will complete the course in nine month, if you are studying part-time, you course will take 18 months to complete.

Libraries

As well as the extensive library resources at King's, you will have access to the world-leading Classics library at the Institute of Classical Studies, as well as other University of London libraries.

Research seminars

In the Department of Classics we run a research seminar series (which Graduate Diploma students are encouraged to attend), where you will learn about the current research of our academic staff and PhD students. There are also University of London research seminars organized through the Institute of Classical Studies, for example in Ancient History, Classical Archaeology and Art, Classical Literature, and Ancient Philosophy, where you will be able to listen to and meet leading scholars from around the world. There is also the Late Antique & Byzantine Studies seminar, which is organized by the Centre for Hellenic Studies.

Greek Play

Every year (since 1953), students in the Department of Classics have produced and performed a Greek play - the only production in the UK to be performed annually in the original Greek. Read more about the Greek Play (and its history) at King's: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/artshums/depts/classics/about/greek/index.aspx

Iris Project and the Inner London Latin Project

Over the past few years, students in the Department of Classics have been teaching in the capital's state primary schools, offering pupils in large, mixed-ability classes the opportunity to learn about Latin in fun, accessible and relevant ways. Read more about the Iris Project at King’s: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/artshums/depts/classics/about/collab/iris.aspx

Course purpose

The Diploma is appropriate for you if you are a graduate in a subject not closely related to Ancient History or Classics; it provides a bridge to further study at MA level or beyond, or you can take it as a self-contained programme.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

We use lectures, seminars and group tutorials to deliver most of the modules on the course. You will also be expected to undertake a significant amount of independent study. You will be assigned a personal tutor who will provide support and guidance for your studies.

If you are a full time student, we will provide you with six to eight hours of teaching through lectures and seminars across the year. We expect you to undertake around 35 hours of independent study per week.

If you are a part-time student, we will provide you with two to six hours of teaching through lectures and seminars in your first and second year. We will expect you to undertake eight to fourteen hours of independent study per week.

Typically, one credit equates to 10 hours of work.

You may also choose to complete an optional dissertation with up to five hours’ supervision and approximately 500 hours of additional self-study.

Assessment

Assessment methods will depend on the modules you have selected to study. The primary methods of assessment for this course are coursework and examinations. 

Career prospects

Our graduates go on to work in a range of professions including teaching, journalism, publishing, finance, politics, and the cultural or heritage sectors. While others choose to stay and pursue further postgraduate qualifications at King's.

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The Programme focuses on the study and research of the ancient religions, languages and great texts of China. Read more
The Programme focuses on the study and research of the ancient religions, languages and great texts of China. Students will study the ‘ancient wisdom’ of China, which is of great cultural significance and is increasingly seen as relevant to contemporary concerns, such as personal and societal well-being and sustainability.

Course Overview

This Programme will focus on advanced-level engagement with Classical Chinese Confucian texts and the spiritual, cultural and political values and practices that they embody.

Modules will focus on enhancing understanding of Classical Chinese and methodologies such as textual criticism, commentary, and textual analysis.

This will be followed by modules which are thematically organised around the study of key texts from within The Complete Library of the Four Branches Literature and The Essence Encyclopedia of the Four Branches of Literature. Textual study modules are thematically focused, and will consider issues such as the origins and content of key texts, and the history of and developments in translation and commentary.

Confucian Classics Studies (SICH7013) will explore some of the main texts of Confucianism, and interpretations of the philosophy and the cultural impact of these texts, including The Book of I Ching, The Book of History and Three Annals of Spring and Autumn.

Interpretation of The Four Books (SICH7002) will focus on the Great Learning, the Doctrine of the Mean, the Confucian Analects, and the Book of Mencius. Readings from the Governing Principles of Ancient China (SICH7003) will focus on the Exoteric traditions of the Han version of the Songs, the Sayings of Confucius and his disciples, the Six Secret Strategic Teachings, An Essay on Government by Liu Yi, Yangzi Book on Government and On the Important List of Government.

Readings from The Compilation of Books and Writings on the Important Governing Principles (SICH7010) will focus on key Confucian texts from the Compilation including, for example, Luxuriant Dew of the Spring and Autumn Annals and The Book of Discussion on Legalism.

An additional module, namely, Classical Chinese Texts in English (SICH7004), enables students to engage in a detailed study of the reception of Confucianism in the West and particularly in the English-speaking world, and to develop translation, annotation and commentary skills on Classical Chinese texts in English.

Building on the taught part of the Programme, the Dissertation (SICH7015) element allows students to complete a detailed critical commentary of a Classical Chinese text; or to complete a shorter textual commentary Project (SICH7016) and to deliver and reflect upon a ‘teaching placement’ activity derived from this textual work.

Modules

-SICH7001 Research Methodologies for the Study of Sinology
-SICH7002 Interpretation of The Four Books
-SICH7003 Readings from the Governing Principles of Ancient China
-SICH7010 Readings from The Compilation of Books and Writings on the Important Governing Principles
-SICH7013 Confucian Classical Studies
-SICH7004 Classical Chinese Texts in English
-SICH7015 Dissertation
-SICH7016 Project

Key Features

The MA in Confucian Classical Studies will have a special appeal to those students who wish to study ancient Chinese texts, to develop a rich and deep knowledge of traditional Chinese Classical texts; and to apply this knowledge to their own lives and those of others.

Students will have the opportunity to learn from the best in the subject and to study using the unique pedagogic approach derived from the 'Royal Great Learning’ (皇家太学) educational model, which relies upon intensive textual study and reflection.

Students will study at the Academy of Sinology at UWTSD, a newly established Academy in Lampeter which focuses upon training for Sage teachers, who through example will have a real impact on society via their own daily moral practices and teaching activities.

Studying at UWTSD Lampeter:
-The University’s Royal Charter is the oldest in England and Wales after the universities of Oxford and Cambridge
-His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales became our royal patron in 2011
-The university’s campus, situated in the rural town of Lampeter, has a friendly environment created by staff and students
-The region of South West Wales, where our campus is based, is a much lower cost of living than some of the larger UK cities and London.

Assessment

An MA degree in Confucian Classical Studies involves a wide range of assessment methods. Assessment will be both English medium and in the medium of Ancient Chinese, dependent on the particular module being studied.

Assessment methods include essays, translation into modern Chinese or English, translation with annotation or critical commentary, oral presentation, teaching placement portfolio and, of course, the dissertation.

This variety of assessment helps develop skills in presenting material in clear, professional and a lucid manner, whether orally or in writing.

Career Opportunities

Possible employment roles for graduates from this programme include:
-Teachers and educators in a range of settings in both China and the UK
-Academic researchers in traditional texts and ancient Chinese texts
-Translation work
-Educational administration and policy
-Ethical business and commercial ventures
-Community work and initiatives
-Voluntary and travel industries
-Heritage conservation; archive and museum work
-Corporate and personal coaches/trainers in ancient Chinese ‘wisdom’ and life skills

The expected employability skills gained by graduates from these programmes are: advanced information handling and communication skills; high levels of self and project management; the practical application of high level skills in textual analysis and interpretation.

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What are the antique roots of modern ideas on leadership, or how do you write a commentary on a classical text? This programme teaches you. Read more
What are the antique roots of modern ideas on leadership, or how do you write a commentary on a classical text? This programme teaches you.

The Master's programme in Classical Studies comprises two variants:

* Greek and Latin Language and Culture
* Classical Antiquity

The programme in Greek and Latin Language and Culture teaches you how to tackle different themes from the Classical Antiquity in a scientific way. You will learn how to critically reflect and evaluate written and material sources. You may choose a more or a less linguistic approach.

The programme in Classical Antiquity focuses on the period from Hellenism to the Late Antiquity. Besides literary sources, you will use inscriptions, papyri and archaeological sources to shed light on the world of Classical Antiquity.

Job perspectives

As a graduate, you may work in an academic library or in museums. You can also work in journalism, the cultural sector or in publishing.

You will finish your programme by writing a thesis. This Master's degree is also offered on a part-time basis.

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The MLitt in Classical Studies looks at the many aspects of the cultures of the ancient world or its reception, primarily from a literary viewpoint. Read more
The MLitt in Classical Studies looks at the many aspects of the cultures of the ancient world or its reception, primarily from a literary viewpoint. If you have no previous knowledge of Greek or Latin, you must take an intensive course in Greek or Latin language. You may study a language at a higher level if you have previous experience and wish to study the languages further.

Work in Semesters 1 and 2

All the taught programmes in classical subjects maintain very high academic rigour with maximum flexibility for you. They offer an excellent opportunity to develop research skills, and to prepare for a doctorate, by choosing from a broad range of modules.

All students take a compulsory core module which provides generic skill-based training. The two-hour seminars are held most weeks and cover a range of topics and methodologies essential to research in the relevant field. Assessment Is by written and oral presentations; there is no exam.

Careers

Many of our recent taught postgraduate students have gone on to study for a PhD in the UK or the USA, but others have used our Masters degrees as an intellectual foundation for diverse professional careers, such as teaching in schools, law, or museum curatorship.

Features

* Between 8 and 20 taught postgraduates admitted each year, with a postgraduate community numbering over 30.

* Friendly but academically challenging departmental ethos.

* The School of Classics is housed in the centre of the town, adjacent to the University Library, with views out to St Andrews Bay.

* Vibrant conference and workshop programme.

* Excellent collections in the University Library, as well as a dedicated class library in the School building.

* Beginners’ courses in Greek and Latin available if you need to acquire a classical language as part of your training for subsequent research.

All the MLitt programmes offer:

• An opportunity to develop advanced knowledge of particular aspects of the literature, history, archaeology or reception of the cultures and societies of ancient Greece and Rome.

• An excellent training in a classical discipline.

• Instruction in the skills appropriate to postgraduate study, and an introduction to research opportunities and various methodologies currently used in the field.

• Regular tutorials with a tutor who is an expert in the field and provides overall direction and guidance.

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Overview. This is a one-year programme, designed to provide graduates with in-depth study of specific topics within the field of Classics, and a set of research skills appropriate to work at this level. Read more

Overview

This is a one-year programme, designed to provide graduates with in-depth study of specific topics within the field of Classics, and a set of research skills appropriate to work at this level.

Course Structure

Candidates take a specified number of taught modules, and are also required to write a long essay of c.7,500 words representing an independent piece of research. It is not possible to take modules in Greek or Latin as part of this programme. The long essay is written on a topic approved by the Head of the Department of Ancient Classics under the supervision of a designated supervisor. The topic is agreed by the end of the first semester, and work begun during the period between the first and the second semester. The long essay is submitted by a specified date at the end of the academic year. Modules include Philosophy and Kingship in Antiquity, Ancient Cosmology, Popular Culture in Classical Athens, and Ancient History: Problems and Methods.




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This course offers advanced study of Greek and Roman art and archaeology and is an intercollegiate programme with options taught at King's, UCL and Royal Holloway, with close links to the Institute of Classical Studies. Read more

This course offers advanced study of Greek and Roman art and archaeology and is an intercollegiate programme with options taught at King's, UCL and Royal Holloway, with close links to the Institute of Classical Studies.

It gives you with the unique opportunity to acquire technical skills provided by optional modules in papyrology, epigraphy and palaeography. 

Leads to further research or careers in education, journalism, finance, politics and cultural sectors.

Key benefits

  • Study at one of the world's largest and most distinguished Departments of Classics.
  • Unrivalled location for the study of the ancient world thanks to London's unique range of specialist libraries, museums and galleries.
  • Extraordinarily wide choice of modules, drawing on the resources of the whole of the University of London.
  • King's graduates enjoy one of the best employment rates and starting salaries in the UK. King's is ranked 6th in the UK for graduate employment (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2016)

Description

Through this Classical Art & Archaeology MA you will examine painting, pottery, sculpture and mosiaics and explore the craftsmanship that produced archologically significant works. Traditionally, classical archaeology has focused on the art history of Classical Greece and Italy, but has more recently branched out geographically and chronologically. Archaeology has also become more theoretical in recent decades.

This course explores the relationship between humans and their material environment. We consider engagement in field projects as essential for the continuing health of the discipline. All trends are well represented here at King's. 

Classical Art & Archaeology at King's

Our expert staff cover wide range of specialisms including Bronze Age, Aegean, Byzantine Cyprus, Roman Britain, Persian monuments, Greek pottery and Roman mosaics, while many other staff members employ art historical and archaeological methods in their work.

London has been a centre for the collection and display of ancient art and artefacts for many centuries, a cultural engagement that has in turn had a great influence on British heritage. There is a strong commitment at King's to exploring the role that ancient art and archaeology has had and continues to have in this local context of a global capital.

MA Classical Art & Archaeology

The MA course consists of a wide range of optional modules and a research dissertation. The compulsory colloquium, Undertaking Research in Classical Archaeology, taken as preparation for writing the dissertation, provides particularly concentrated training in research techniques and methodology. Modules are taught both with texts in the original languages and with translated texts. If you intend to pursue further research in classical archaeology or art history, you may find particular value in the unique opportunities to acquire technical skills in the handling of documentary evidence provided by modules in Greek Papyrology, Greek & Roman Epigraphy, and Greek & Latin Palaeography.

As well as archaeological and art-historical topics, students can also choose modules from other MA programmes at King's, including Ancient History, Classics, and Late Antique & Byzantine Studies. Students also have the opportunity to study Latin and Ancient Greek.

The MA programme in Classical Art & Archaeology is organised on an intercollegiate basis, combining the expertise of staff in all three of the participating colleges - King's, UCL and Royal Holloway. It centres on the University's Institute of Classical Studies, which not only contains a world-class research library, but also hosts the richest programme of seminars, conferences, and occasional lectures for this subject area in the UK.

Research seminars

In the Department of Classics we run a research seminar series (which MA students are encouraged to attend), where you will learn about the current research of our academic staff and PhD students. The Department regularly hosts major research conferences with speakers from around the world. There are also University of London research seminars organized through the Institute of Classical Studies, for example in Literature, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History, where you will be able to listen to and meet leading scholars from around the world. There is also the Late Antique & Byzantine Studies seminar, which is organized by the Centre for Hellenic Studies.

Personal tutor

We will assign you a personal tutor in the Department of Classics, who will advise you and help you decide which modules to take, and can answer any questions or concerns you may have whilst at King's.

Dissertation supervision

During your first term at King's you will need to decide on your MA dissertation subject, if you have not done so before you arrive. The dissertation can be related to work you are doing for a taught module, or it can be in a completely different area. On the basis of your chosen subject area you will be assigned a supervisor within the Department of Classics who will discuss the topic with you, and oversee your work on it.

Course purpose

This programme offers advanced study of Greek and Roman archaeology and art; it is intended either as a further year's study after a first degree or as training in the technical disciplines needed to undertake doctoral research.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

We will typically provide you with six to eight hours of teaching through lectures and seminars each week, and we will expect you to undertake 35 hours of independent study. For your dissertation, we will provide five hours of supervision from a member of the Department, depending on your chosen topic, who will oversee your work on it. We will expect you to undertake 575 hours of independent study.

Assessment

We typically assess our modules through a combination of coursework and examinations, and the amount of coursework we expect you to produce will be greater for modules which are worth more credits. For your dissertation module you will write a 12,000-word thesis.

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This course gives you the opportunity to study the classical world in a world-leading Classics department, with a focus on Greek and Latin language and literature. Read more

This course gives you the opportunity to study the classical world in a world-leading Classics department, with a focus on Greek and Latin language and literature.

It is an Intercollegiate programme enabling you to take a wide range of options taught at King's, UCL and Royal Holloway, with close links to the Institute of Classical Studies.

Leads to further research or careers in education, journalism, finance, politics and cultural sectors.

Key benefits

  • One of the world's largest and most distinguished Departments of Classics.
  • Unrivalled location for the study of the ancient world thanks to London's unique range of specialist libraries, museums and galleries.
  • Extraordinarily wide choice of modules, drawing on the resources of the whole of the University of London.
  • King's graduates enjoy one of the best employment rates and starting salaries in the UK. Ranked 6th in the UK for graduate employment (Times and Sunday Times Good Universities Guide 2016)

Description

The MA programme in Classics is organised on an intercollegiate basis, so that we can combine the expertise of staff in all three of the participating colleges - King's, UCL and Royal Holloway. The course centres on the University's Institute of Classical Studies, which not only contains a world-class research library, but also hosts the richest programme of seminars, conferences, and occasional lectures for this subject area in the UK. 

To further add to the breadth of our course, you can also take appropriate modules from other MA courses at King's. You will study modules through texts in the original languages as well as through translated texts. Besides purely literary and linguistic topics, you can also take modules in Ancient History, Classical Archaeology & Art and Late Antique & Byzantine Studies, including Latin and Ancient Greek at both a beginner’s and intermediate level.

If you intend to pursue further research in Classics, you are likely to find particular value in the unique opportunities to acquire technical skills in the handling of documentary evidence, provided by modules in Greek Papyrology, Greek & Roman Epigraphy, and Greek & Latin Palaeography.

Libraries

As well as the extensive library resources at King's, you will have access to the world-leading Classics library at the Institute of Classical Studies, as well as other University of London libraries.

Research seminars

In the Department of Classics we run a research seminar series (which MA students are encouraged to attend), where you will learn about the current research of our academic staff and PhD students. Further the Department regularly hosts major research conferences with guest speakers from around the world. There are also University of London research seminars organized through the Institute of Classical Studies, for example in Literature, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History, where you will be able to listen to and meet leading scholars from around the world. There is also the Late Antique & Byzantine Studies seminar, which is organized by the Centre for Hellenic Studies.

Personal tutor

You will be assigned a personal tutor in the Department of Classics, who will advise you and help you decide which modules to take, and can answer any questions or concerns you may have whilst at King's.

Dissertation supervision

During your first term at King's you will need to decide on your MA dissertation subject, if you have not done so before you arrive. The dissertation can be related to work you are doing for a taught module, or it can be in a completely different area. On the basis of your chosen subject area you will be assigned a supervisor within the Department of Classics who will discuss the topic with you, and oversee your work on it.

Greek Play

Every year (since 1953), students in the Department of Classics have produced and performed a Greek play - the only production in the UK to be performed annually in the original Greek. Read more about the Greek Play (and its history) at King's: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/artshums/depts/classics/about/greek/index.aspx

Course purpose

This programme offers advanced study of the classical world, with special reference to Greek and Latin language and literature; it is intended either as a further year's study after a first degree or as training in the technical disciplines needed to undertake doctoral research in the field of Classics.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

If you are a full-time student we will typically provide you with six to eight hours of teaching each week through lectures and seminars, and we will expect you to undertake 35 hours of independent study.

If you are a part-time student we will typically provide you with two to six hours of teaching each week through lectures and seminars, and we will expect you to undertake 17.5 hours of independent study.

For your dissertation, we will provide five hours of supervision, and we will expect you to undertake around 575 hours of independent study.

Assessment

We typically assess our modules through a combination of coursework and examinations, and the amount of coursework we expect you to produce will be greater for modules which are worth more credits. For your dissertation module you will write a 12,000-word essay.

Career prospects

Many of our graduates use the skills and knowledge they develop with us to pursue further research in our Department, whilst others go on to excel in careers in teaching, journalism, cultural management or the financial sector.

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Our MRes offers substantial research experience, working alongside leading subject specialists. As an MRes student, you will engage with a broad range of research methods, including some of the most influential theoretical positions and methodologies in classical scholarship and academic enquiry. Read more
  • Our MRes offers substantial research experience, working alongside leading subject specialists.
  • As an MRes student, you will engage with a broad range of research methods, including some of the most influential theoretical positions and methodologies in classical scholarship and academic enquiry.
  • As part of the intensive research training on offer, you will engage critically and creatively with classical texts, objects and images, and with their reception in later periods of history.

Summary

On this course, you will gain substantial research experience, working alongside our leading subject specialists. You will engage with a broad range of research methods, including some of the most influential theoretical positions and methodologies in classical scholarship and academic enquiry. You will also improve your knowledge of ancient languages.

This research-focused programme is designed to enhance the abilities of classics and ancient history students to conduct research at a high intellectual, methodological and theoretical level. You will receive training and guidance on conducting a piece of original research and its written presentation from a specialist in your area of interest on the programme team. The course will offer focused preparation for doctoral research. It will also present specific preparation for a range of professional careers that require highly-developed research and writing skills. You will also gain experience in how to present and discuss papers and posters at conferences.

As part of the intensive research training on offer, you will engage critically and creatively with classical texts, objects and images, and with their reception in later periods of history. The knowledge and experience of working with a variety of media will underlie your own original and innovative studies of the classical past. Additionally, you will have the opportunity to receive focused instruction in relevant subject areas for example epigraphy, numismatics and material culture. To further bolster your classical research skills, we offer tuition in both Latin and Ancient Greek, knowledge of which underpins a successful career in classical academia. As well as developing your practical research skills, the course will provide a deep understanding of the theoretical concepts that inform academic enquiry in classics and ancient history. Using your improved knowledge, understanding and critical awareness of the research methods, you will be in a position to contribute to the national and international research profile of classical studies at Roehampton and to take advantage of opportunities for co-operation and collaboration in the UK and beyond.

Content

You will be introduced to some of the most important theoretical positions and methodologies in classical scholarship. While some of the theories have arisen from the work of classicists and ancient historians themselves, others have been imported from other disciplines. All of them seek to address the agenda of classical scholars not merely to describe the ancient world, but to explain it. Relevant scholarly texts and sources related to this interdisciplinary and multi-disciplinary nature will be studied, introducing you to the specialised skills you will need as a researcher.

With your grounding in the theoretical premises of classical research, you will begin your dissertation research project. This represents substantial independent research into a topic in classical studies or ancient history, and can be undertaken in a broad range of areas. The research project provides an opportunity for you to explore and train your research skills, pursuing a specific problem or topic in considerable depth. This project is a great opportunity to prepare for a three- to four-year PhD programme before committing to it.

A third important aspect of the course is the delivery of language and commentary skills in Latin and Ancient Greek. Students can take modules in one or both of the ancient languages which are prerequisites for successful study of original ancient documents. The languages are offered from beginner level to the study of an ancient author in depth.

Modules

Here are some examples of modules you may study as part of this course:

Compulsory modules

Language modules

Compulsory and Required modules

Compulsory and/or required modules may change when we review and update programmes. Above is a list of modules offered this academic year.

Optional modules

Optional modules, when offered as part of a programme, may vary from year to year and are subject to viability.

Career options

This course is preparation for a range of professional careers that require highly developed research and writing skills. They include careers in academia, museums, schools, heritage sites and specialist publishing as well as in the media, in archives and libraries or the civil service.



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Our Classical Art and Archaeology postgraduate course is designed for those who want to further their understanding of the classical world through the advanced study of the art and archaeology of the Greeks and Romans. Read more

Our Classical Art and Archaeology postgraduate course is designed for those who want to further their understanding of the classical world through the advanced study of the art and archaeology of the Greeks and Romans. This MA programme studies the Classical world through the art and every-day items the ancients left behind. It draws upon the expertise of several members of the department who have research interests in the art and archaeology of the Near East, Roman Britain, Rome and Italy as well as the architecture of Classical Greece.

Organised on an intercollegiate basis, this MA programme is jointly run with King’s College London and University College London to enable you to take full advantage of the teaching expertise of all three participating colleges. This tri-collegiate approach offers up an unparalleled range of modules to study: postgraduate units cover Greek and Latin literature and ancient philosophy, as well as key technical skills such as papyrology, epigraphy, and palaeography.

Our Classics department has an excellent track record in producing publications that advance the understanding of the ancient world. A thriving and internationally recognised centre of excellence in research and teaching, the department is home to two College Research Centres - Centre for the Reception of Greece and Rome (CRGR) and the Centre for Oratory and Rhetoric (COR). Research in the department covers the whole range of Classical Studies, from Homeric Greece to the very end of the Roman Empire with particular interests in language, literature, history, ancient philosophy as well as Greek and Roman archaeology.

In teaching Classical Art and Archaeology we are particularly well equipped to supervise dissertations on: Greek architecture, quantitative methods in archaeology, ancient water systems and management, the Roman Near East, the city of Rome, Greek architecture, the archaeology of the Roman Empire, and ancient shipping and shipsheds.

A global leader in Masters provision, Royal Holloway gives you the opportunity to take part in one of the most extensive programmes of research seminars and training programmes offered by any institution. During your time with us you will be under the careful supervision of our academic staff with access to not only the Royal Holloway library but also the word-class resources of: the Institute of Classical Studies, the Warburg Institute, the British Library, Senate House Library, and other specialised libraries in the School of Advanced Study. You will also benefit from access to the world renowned collections of the Museum of London and the British Museum.

Course structure

Core modules

  • Research Training in Classical Archaeology
  • Dissertation

Optional modules

In addition to these mandatory course units there are a number of optional course units available during your degree studies. The following is a selection of optional course units that are likely to be available. Please note that although the College will keep changes to a minimum, new units may be offered or existing units may be withdrawn, for example, in response to a change in staff. Applicants will be informed if any significant changes need to be made.

  • Who Owns the Roman Past? 
  • The Archaeology of Water
  • Greek Law and Lawcourts
  • Latin Epigraphy
  • Advanced Latin A
  • Advanced Latin B

Teaching & assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework, examinations and a dissertation.

Taught modules will normally be completed by the end of the second term, with the dissertation occupying the summer.

The Research Training in Classics module is not assessed, but attendance is compulsory.

Part time students will take two taught modules in their first year, and a third taught module plus dissertation in their second year. Each of these elements will normally be examined in the year in which it is taken.

Your future career

Graduates of classical degrees have much to offer potential employers having developed a range of transferable skills, both practical and theoretical, whilst studying with us. With up to 90% of our most recent graduates now working or in further study, according to the Complete University Guide 2015, it’s true to say our graduates are highly employable.

In recent years, PhD graduates, many of whom have progressed from our MA programmes, have taken up academic positions at Oxford, Bristol and Roehampton Universities. Outside of academia, our graduates have embarked on teaching careers in the UK and overseas, undertaken archaeological and museum work and pursued careers in journalism, finance, politics and the arts. 



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If you are curious about how modern life has been shaped by ancient Greece and Rome and are looking to advance your skills in literary, historical and archaeological analysis, then this course, taught in the . Read more

If you are curious about how modern life has been shaped by ancient Greece and Rome and are looking to advance your skills in literary, historical and archaeological analysis, then this course, taught in the Department of Classics by world-renowned experts, is for you.

The history and culture of the Classical world, its art, literature politics and culture has been passed down to us through generations of thinkers and its legacy has shaped modern thought and the way we live today. This Masters programme leads you to explore that legacy and to develop skills in research and methodology in this fascinating and growing field of intellectual history.

Intended either as a further year's study after a first degree or as training in the technical disciplines needed to undertake doctoral research, the course is structured so as to provide you with advanced training in research skills. Not only will you acquire a detailed understanding of the role the Classical world has played in shaping the modern era but you will develop skills that are much sort after outside of academia, specifically:

  • the ability to communicate views and present arguments clearly and coherently
  • the ability to critically digest, analyse and summarise content
  • organisation and research skills
  • problem-solving skills and capability
  • the ability to innovate and think creatively

Our Classics department has an excellent track record in producing publications that advance the understanding of the ancient world. A thriving and internationally recognised centre of excellence in research and teaching, the department is home to two College Research Centres - Centre for the Reception of Greece and Rome (CRGR) and the Centre for Oratory and Rhetoric (COR). The Centre for the Reception of Greece and Rome hosts a varied and world-leading body of research and research events in Classical Reception.

Research in the department covers the whole range of Classical Studies, from Homeric Greece to the very end of the Roman Empire with particular interests in language, literature, history, ancient philosophy as well as Greek and Roman archaeology. Of particular note, in relation to this course, is our departmental expertise in literary-theoretical, philosophical and political receptions of the Classical world. 

A global leader in Masters provision, Royal Holloway gives you the opportunity to take part in one of the most extensive programmes of research seminars and training programmes offered by any institution. During your time with us you will be under the careful supervision of our academic staff with access to not only the Royal Holloway library but also the word-class resources of: the Institute of Classical Studies, the Warburg Institute, the British Library, Senate House Library, and other specialised libraries in the School of Advanced Study. 

Course structures

  • Making the Classical Past - Myth, Politics, Philosophy and Poetics
  • Dissertation

Teaching & assessment

Assessment is carried out through coursework and a dissertation.

Part-time students normally take taught elements in their first year and the dissertation in their second year with preparatory work in year one.

Your future career

Graduates of classical degrees have much to offer potential employers having developed a range of transferable skills, both practical and theoretical, whilst studying with us. With up to 90% of our most recent graduates now working or in further study, according to the Complete University Guide 2015, it’s true to say our graduates are highly employable.

In recent years, PhD graduates, many of whom have progressed from our MA programmes, have taken up academic positions at Oxford, Bristol and Roehampton Universities. Outside of academia, our graduates have embarked on teaching careers in the UK and overseas, undertaken archaeological and museum work and pursued careers in journalism, finance, politics and the arts.



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The MPhil in Asian and Middle Eastern Studies (Arabic Studies) is text based. Students taking the MPhil in Asian and Middle Eastern Studies (Arabic) will be introduced to the analytical tools required for studying texts in Arabic Literary and Grammatical Tradition, Science and Religion, Qu'ran and Hadith, Islamic Law. Read more
The MPhil in Asian and Middle Eastern Studies (Arabic Studies) is text based. Students taking the MPhil in Asian and Middle Eastern Studies (Arabic) will be introduced to the analytical tools required for studying texts in Arabic Literary and Grammatical Tradition, Science and Religion, Qu'ran and Hadith, Islamic Law. Students will also be introduced to primary sources and bibliographical methods.

During the year, MPhil students attend various training courses offered by the Department in subjects such as codicology, text reading, and other skills. They are also encouraged to attend fourth-year undergraduate lectures and language courses where relevant. They must attend graduate work-in-progress seminars where they have an opportunity to present their own work to their peers for feedback in a supportive environment.

Visit the website: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/amammparb

Course detail

The one year course MPhil in Asian and Middle Eastern Studies (Arabic Studies) will have the following structure:

- (i) three modules each assessed by a written examination or a 5,000 word essay or by an Alternative Exercise.

The cumulative score of these three papers will be worth 50% of the final mark.

- (ii) a 15,000 word dissertation. The mark for the dissertation constitutes 50% of the overall mark for this course.

The following papers will be available for the MPhil pathway in Classical Arabic Studies in 2016 - 2017. You need to choose three of the following papers:

- Classical Arabic Literary Creativity
- Science and Religion in Medieval Islam
- Qur’an and Hadith
- Islamic Law
- The Arabic Grammatical Tradition
- Modes of Legitimation in the pre-modern Islamic world
- Alternative Exercise [to be arranged with specific instructors]

An individual student or a group of students sharing similar interests can arrange an 'Alternative Exercise'. Possible topics include:

- Al-Jahiz and the Ninth Century
- The Qira’at Tradition
- The Arabic Geographical Tradition
- Al-Ash’ari’s K. Maqalat al-Islamiyyin

Learning Outcomes

At the end of the MPhil programme, students will be expected to have:
- acquired the ability to read, interpret and translate primary sources in Classical Arabic;
- acquired a good knowledge of the general scholarship on Pre-Modern Middle Eastern culture(s);
- acquired an in-depth knowledge of the secondary literature relevant to the subject of their dissertation;
- developed the ability to formulate original research questions and produce a well-constructed, argument to answer them, in the form - of an independent piece of research based on the use of primary and secondary sources;
- acquired the skills to use library and internet resources independently.

Assessment

- For the MPhil in Asian and Middle Eastern Studies (Arabic Studies), students will submit a thesis of not more than 15,000 words, including footnotes and appendices but excluding bibliography on a subject approved by the Degree Committee. All MPhil dissertations must include a brief Abstract at the start of the dissertation of no more than 400 words.

- For the MPhil in Asian and Middle Eastern Studies (Arabic Studies), students may submit essays as part of their degree:
With the approval of the Degree Committee, a candidate may offer, in place of one or more of the examination papers, the same number of essays, each of not more than 5,000 words, including footnotes, but excluding bibliography, or equivalent Alternative Exercises approved by the Degree Committee.

- For the MPhil in Asian and Middle Eastern Studies (Arabic Studies), students may take examinations as part of their degree:
Three written examination papers on subjects approved by the Degree Committee, which shall fall within one of the fields specified in the Schedule to these regulations. With the approval of the Degree Committee, a candidate may offer, in place of one or more of those papers, the same number of essays, each of not more than 5,000 words, including footnotes, but excluding bibliography, or equivalent Alternative Exercises approved by the Degree Committee.

- There is no practical assessment associated with this course.

- An oral examination on the thesis and on the general field of knowledge within which it falls, but at the Degree Committee’s discretion the requirement for an oral examination may be waived.

Continuing

Applicants for the PhD will be expected to have scored at least 67% or above (or the equivalent from an overseas University) in their Master's degree which should be related to the PhD programme they wish to pursue. All applicants should submit with their GRADSAF (graduate application) a workable and interesting research proposal and demonstrate that they have the required academic knowledge and skills to carry out their project.

Admission is at the discretion of the Degree Committee, which judges each graduate applicant on his or her own merits and in accordance with its own set rules and regulations.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

- Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) -

NB: Applicants should check the Faculty's website before the academic year 2016 - 2017 is due to start to see if AHRC funding is available to apply for. Home PhD and MPhil students and EU students who satisfy home residency criteria may be eligible for a full studentship which covers the University Composition Fee and College Fees plus an annual maintenance stipend. EU students are eligible for a fees-only award.

Further information: http://www.cambridgestudents.cam.ac.uk/fees-and-funding/funding/ahrc-funded-students

- Pembroke College Graduate Studentship in Arabic and Islamic Studies -

This studentship covers the University and College fees at the UK Home rate for applicants who are applying for a PhD and MPhil in Arabic Studies, Persian Studies or Islamic Studies and who are affiliated with Pembroke College.

Further information for this studentship can be found at the following web address:
http://www.pem.cam.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduates/fees-and-financial-support/scholarships-and-bursaries/

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The aim is to equip students to carry out independent academic work, including training in how to use Japanese-language sources for research purposes, which lies at the heart of the programme. Read more
The aim is to equip students to carry out independent academic work, including training in how to use Japanese-language sources for research purposes, which lies at the heart of the programme. Our guiding principle is to ensure that each student receives the best possible education, providing a coherent course but with the flexibility to cater for individual needs.

All students in the year group attend the Theories and Methodologies in Japanese Studies Seminar, at which they meet regularly and are introduced to various disciplinary approaches in Japanese Studies. In addition they are guided through the various steps of academic research, writing, presentation and career development. They are free to choose two courses from a variety of options so that each student receives a tailor-made education. Approximately half of the time is allocated to individual research and the writing of a dissertation under the guidance of leading scholars.

Visit the website: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/amammpjps

Course detail

At the end of the MPhil programme, students will be expected to have:

- acquired the ability to read, interpret and translate primary sources in Modern and/or Classical Japanese;
- acquired a good knowledge of the general scholarship on Modern and/or Classical Japanese culture(s);
- acquired an in-depth knowledge of the secondary literature relevant to the subject of their dissertation;
- developed the ability to formulate original research questions and produce a well-constructed, argument to answer them, in the form of an independent piece of research based on the use of primary and secondary sources;
- acquired the skills to use library and internet resources independently.

Format

1: Dissertation (50 % of the grade)

In their dissertation, students will be required to demonstrate research competence using Japanese-language sources, and to conduct research that addresses contemporary and/or historical issues of relevance to Japan. Prospective students are asked to contact potential supervisors before applying to Cambridge to ensure that an appropriate supervisor is available.

2: Three papers (50% of the grade)

Each of the three papers (a paper is an exam for which teaching is provided) is assessed either by a research essay of maximum 5,000 words or an alternative exercise agreed by the Degree Committee and counts for one sixth of the total grade (i.e. 16.67 percent). Please note that papers are usually only offered if there are at least two takers.

2.1: MPhil in Japanese Studies - Theories and Methodologies in Japanese Studies

The theory and methodology seminar meets throughout the first two terms, connecting Japanese Studies to various disciplinary approaches and theories. Students will also receive training on sources and resources, library searches, academic writing, analysis and presentation skills, writing a research proposal or grant application, career planning etc., and will have opportunities to engage in peer review as they present their dissertation proposals.

2.2 Two from the following four groups of papers (A-D):

A: Graduate papers in Japanese Studies

- Historical Narratives of Ancient and Medieval Japan
- New Approaches in Early-modern Japanese Literature
- Asia in Theory
- Topics in modern Korean history: Japanese imperialism in Korea

B: Advanced research seminar papers in Japanese Studies (maximum one of these papers)

- Classical Japanese Texts
- Modern Japanese Cultural History
- Contemporary Japanese Society
- The East Asian Region

C: Language options (maximum one of these papers)

- Modern Japanese Texts
- Literary Japanese
- Classical and Literary Chinese
- Readings in Elementary Korean

D: Theory and methods, papers borrowed from other faculties (maximum one of these courses)

Papers in the discipline related to the research topic of the dissertation. These papers will be mainly borrowed from other faculties, e.g. Anthropology, Literature Studies, History, Politics, Gender Studies.

Assessment

- For the MPhil in Asian and Middle Eastern Studies (Japanese Studies), students will submit a thesis of not more than 15,000 words, including footnotes and appendices but excluding bibliography on a subject approved by the Degree Committee. All MPhil dissertations must include a brief Abstract at the start of the dissertation of no more than 400 words.

- For the MPhil in Asian and Middle Eastern Studies (Japanese Studies), students submit essays as part of their degree:

Most papers are assessed by essay, as described in Form and Conduct. Essays are not more than 5,000 words, including footnotes, but excluding bibliography. Candidates may apply to the Degree Committee for approval of an equivalent Alternative Exercise.

- For the MPhil in Asian and Middle Eastern Studies (Japanese Studies), students may take examinations as part of their degree:

Some courses may be assessed by written examination, as described in Form and Conduct. With the approval of the Degree Committee, a candidate may offer, in place of one or more of those papers, the same number of essays, each of not more than 5,000 words, or equivalent Alternative Exercises approved by the Degree Committee.

Continuing

Those who would like to apply for the PhD after the MPhil will be expected to have scored at least 67% or above (or the equivalent from an overseas University) in their Master's degree which should be related to the PhD programme they wish to pursue. All applicants should submit with their GRADSAF (graduate application) a workable and interesting research proposal and demonstrate that they have the required academic knowledge and skills to carry out their project.

Admission is at the discretion of the Degree Committee, which judges each graduate applicant on his or her own merits and in accordance with its own set rules and regulations.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

- Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) -

NB: Applicants should check the Faculty's website before the academic year 2016 - 2017 is due to start to see if AHRC funding is available to apply for. Home PhD and MPhil students and EU students who satisfy home residency criteria may be eligible for a full studentship which covers the University Composition Fee and College Fees plus an annual maintenance stipend. EU students are eligible for a fees-only award.

Further information: http://www.cambridgestudents.cam.ac.uk/fees-and-funding/funding/ahrc-funded-students

- Faculty Funding Opportunities -

Further information: http://www.ames.cam.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding/faculty

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