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Masters Degrees (Classical Art)

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This course offers advanced study of Greek and Roman art and archaeology and is an intercollegiate programme with options taught at King's, UCL and Royal Holloway, with close links to the Institute of Classical Studies. Read more

This course offers advanced study of Greek and Roman art and archaeology and is an intercollegiate programme with options taught at King's, UCL and Royal Holloway, with close links to the Institute of Classical Studies.

It gives you with the unique opportunity to acquire technical skills provided by optional modules in papyrology, epigraphy and palaeography. 

Leads to further research or careers in education, journalism, finance, politics and cultural sectors.

Key benefits

  • Study at one of the world's largest and most distinguished Departments of Classics.
  • Unrivalled location for the study of the ancient world thanks to London's unique range of specialist libraries, museums and galleries.
  • Extraordinarily wide choice of modules, drawing on the resources of the whole of the University of London.
  • King's graduates enjoy one of the best employment rates and starting salaries in the UK. King's is ranked 6th in the UK for graduate employment (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2016)

Description

Through this Classical Art & Archaeology MA you will examine painting, pottery, sculpture and mosiaics and explore the craftsmanship that produced archologically significant works. Traditionally, classical archaeology has focused on the art history of Classical Greece and Italy, but has more recently branched out geographically and chronologically. Archaeology has also become more theoretical in recent decades.

This course explores the relationship between humans and their material environment. We consider engagement in field projects as essential for the continuing health of the discipline. All trends are well represented here at King's. 

Classical Art & Archaeology at King's

Our expert staff cover wide range of specialisms including Bronze Age, Aegean, Byzantine Cyprus, Roman Britain, Persian monuments, Greek pottery and Roman mosaics, while many other staff members employ art historical and archaeological methods in their work.

London has been a centre for the collection and display of ancient art and artefacts for many centuries, a cultural engagement that has in turn had a great influence on British heritage. There is a strong commitment at King's to exploring the role that ancient art and archaeology has had and continues to have in this local context of a global capital.

MA Classical Art & Archaeology

The MA course consists of a wide range of optional modules and a research dissertation. The compulsory colloquium, Undertaking Research in Classical Archaeology, taken as preparation for writing the dissertation, provides particularly concentrated training in research techniques and methodology. Modules are taught both with texts in the original languages and with translated texts. If you intend to pursue further research in classical archaeology or art history, you may find particular value in the unique opportunities to acquire technical skills in the handling of documentary evidence provided by modules in Greek Papyrology, Greek & Roman Epigraphy, and Greek & Latin Palaeography.

As well as archaeological and art-historical topics, students can also choose modules from other MA programmes at King's, including Ancient History, Classics, and Late Antique & Byzantine Studies. Students also have the opportunity to study Latin and Ancient Greek.

The MA programme in Classical Art & Archaeology is organised on an intercollegiate basis, combining the expertise of staff in all three of the participating colleges - King's, UCL and Royal Holloway. It centres on the University's Institute of Classical Studies, which not only contains a world-class research library, but also hosts the richest programme of seminars, conferences, and occasional lectures for this subject area in the UK.

Research seminars

In the Department of Classics we run a research seminar series (which MA students are encouraged to attend), where you will learn about the current research of our academic staff and PhD students. The Department regularly hosts major research conferences with speakers from around the world. There are also University of London research seminars organized through the Institute of Classical Studies, for example in Literature, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History, where you will be able to listen to and meet leading scholars from around the world. There is also the Late Antique & Byzantine Studies seminar, which is organized by the Centre for Hellenic Studies.

Personal tutor

We will assign you a personal tutor in the Department of Classics, who will advise you and help you decide which modules to take, and can answer any questions or concerns you may have whilst at King's.

Dissertation supervision

During your first term at King's you will need to decide on your MA dissertation subject, if you have not done so before you arrive. The dissertation can be related to work you are doing for a taught module, or it can be in a completely different area. On the basis of your chosen subject area you will be assigned a supervisor within the Department of Classics who will discuss the topic with you, and oversee your work on it.

Course purpose

This programme offers advanced study of Greek and Roman archaeology and art; it is intended either as a further year's study after a first degree or as training in the technical disciplines needed to undertake doctoral research.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

We will typically provide you with six to eight hours of teaching through lectures and seminars each week, and we will expect you to undertake 35 hours of independent study. For your dissertation, we will provide five hours of supervision from a member of the Department, depending on your chosen topic, who will oversee your work on it. We will expect you to undertake 575 hours of independent study.

Assessment

We typically assess our modules through a combination of coursework and examinations, and the amount of coursework we expect you to produce will be greater for modules which are worth more credits. For your dissertation module you will write a 12,000-word thesis.



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This programme studies the ancient Greek and Roman worlds from the Iron Age to the late Roman and early Christian period through their material remains including sculpture, funerary art, topography and visual cultures. Read more

This programme studies the ancient Greek and Roman worlds from the Iron Age to the late Roman and early Christian period through their material remains including sculpture, funerary art, topography and visual cultures.

Focusing on the ancient Mediterranean world, broadly defined, you’ll explore not simply the archaeology of Greece and Rome but also the near east and north-western Europe.

Through our interdisciplinary approach, you’ll also be able to work with staff from all areas of the School. Several members of classics have ongoing excavations in Italy, Georgia and Macedonia, which students are welcome to attend.

The programme aims to familiarise you with the various methods used in the study of classics, enabling you to work in a manner that is theoretically and methodologically engaged.

Programme structure

We offer a range of courses, which has been designed to reflect the research interests of our lecturers and help you develop a particular topic of interest for your dissertation.

You will complete a compulsory course, five option courses and a 15,000 word dissertation.

The compulsory course is:

  • Skills and Methods in Classics

Option courses previously available include:

  • Early Greek Art;
  • Classical Greek Sculpture;
  • Greek Vase Painting;
  • The Topography and Monuments of Athens and Attika;
  • Hellenistic Art and Archaeology;
  • The Hellenistic City;
  • Archaeology of the Roman Economy;
  • Roman Funerary Art;
  • Roman Imperial Monuments;
  • Roman Archaeology;
  • Constantinople, the City of a World’s Desire 300–600;
  • Late Antique Visual Culture;
  • Byzantine Archaeology: The Archaeology of the Byzantine
  • Empire and its Neighbours AD 600–1000;
  • Etruscan Italy, 1000–300 BC;
  • Gallia from the Third Century BC to Augustus;
  • Bronze Age Civilisations of the Near East and Greece.

Learning outcomes

The programme aims to:

  • provide students with the intellectual background, training and support necessary for the conduct and critical assessment of research in Classical Art and Archaeology
  • provide students with advanced knowledge of and competency in a specific area of Classics
  • familiarise students with various methods used in the study of Classical Art and Archaeology and enable them to work in a manner that is theoretically and methodologically engaged
  • equip students with knowledge of Greek and/or Roman artefacts and their interpretation through study of original objects and monuments and careful analysis of secondary literature
  • develop and test the ability of students to formulate and sustain a substantial piece of research in Classical Art and Archaeology

Career opportunities

Our students view the programme and a graduate degree from Edinburgh as an advanced qualification valued and respected by many employers. Those students interested in long-term academic careers consider the programme as preparation for a PhD.

The programme provides a toolkit of transferable skills in organisation, research and analysis that will be highly prized in any field of work. This programme can form the stepping stone to many career options, such as further academic research, museum and art curation, literary translation or analysis, education or public heritage. Recent Classics graduates are now putting their skills to use as tutors, archivists, writers and conference coordinators for a range of employers including the RSPB.



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This fascinating course is designed to provide you with advanced training in the techniques of art history and archaeology. It offers opportunities for you to study an exciting range of topics, taught by leading experts in the field. Read more
This fascinating course is designed to provide you with advanced training in the techniques of art history and archaeology. It offers opportunities for you to study an exciting range of topics, taught by leading experts in the field.

As this is an intercollegiate MA, jointly run with King’s College London and University College London, you will benefit from the choice of a wide range of stimulating units on Greek and Roman art and archaeology from all parts of the Mediterranean world. You may also take elective units covering Greek and Latin language and literature, ancient history, and technical skills such as papyrology, epigraphy and palaeography.

This course is ideal if you are considering progressing to advanced research or wish to add an additional year of high level study to your undergraduate qualification.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/classics/coursefinder/maclassicalartandarchaeology.aspx

Why choose this course?

- We are an international centre of excellence in research and teaching, promoting understanding and knowledge of the ancient world and its culture.

- You will have the opportunity to take part in our departmental research seminars.

- As we are a College of the University of London, you will have the opporunity to choose intercollegiate course units at King’s College London and UCL.

- We offer units which cover not only Greek and Latin literature, the major periods of ancient history, ancient philosophy and the Greek and Latin languages, but also key technical skills such as papyrology, epigraphy, and palaeography.

- We have an excellent track record of publications that advance the understanding of antiquity.

Department research and industry highlights

- The Department is home to two College Research Centres: the Centre for the Reception of Greece and Rome and the new Centre for Oratory and Rhetoric.

- Major archaeological research projects in the Department include the.Laurentine Shore Project and the Kalaureia Research Program.

- In Classical Art and Archaeology we are particularly well equipped to supervise dissertations on: Greek architecture, quantitative methods in archaeology, Roman sculpture, the city of Rome, the archaeology of the Roman empire, and ancient shipping and shipsheds.

Course content and structure

You will study three elective course units and prepare a dissertation. At least two of the elective units should be on a classical archaeological or art-historical subject as should the dissertation. For more information about the course, please see the Department of Classics' website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/classics/informationforcurrentstudents/home.aspx .

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- a detailed knowledge and understanding of the methodologies of classical art and archaeology
- an understanding of critical methodologies and their limitations
- an understanding of advanced, current research issues relevant to the discipline
- a critical awareness of the multiplicity of material available and the strengths and weaknesses of the various forms or archaeological information.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework, examinations and a dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

Our graduates are highly employable and in recent years have entered many classics/archaeology related areas including academic positions at Oxford, Bristol, and Roehampton Universities, as well as teaching careers in the UK and overseas, archaeological and museum work, and a wide range of other roles.

This taught Master’s course will also provide you with a solid foundation for continued PhD studies.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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The Classical World is always with us. The history and culture of Classical Antiquity have passed down to us through generations of thinkers. Read more
The Classical World is always with us. The history and culture of Classical Antiquity have passed down to us through generations of thinkers: writers, artists, scholars have worried about the Classical past and the lessons that it can teach us. The Classical legacy has shaped modern thought. Consequently, the Classical has shaped the modern. This Masters by Research leads students to explore that legacy and to develop skills in research and methodology in this fascinating and growing field of intellectual history.

The Masters is structured so as to provide students with a training in research skills. These skills can be applied in further study (for a PhD) or in researching in other fields. The centre-piece of the experience is the writing of a major piece of individual research in Classical Reception. The taught course (Making the Classical Past) is taught in the first term and prepares students for the dissertation by introducing a whole range of methodological and theoretical issues in the study of Classical Reception. These are explored further in term two and three, during which students will be engaged in research work for their dissertation. Students will be guided in their dissertation through a number of seminars and presentations and supported by expert advice from the teaching team and their own designated advisor.

The Royal Holloway team has special expertise in literary-theoretical, philosophical and political receptions of the Classical world. Professor Richard Alston works in political theory and the history of the city. Professor Ahuvia Kahane and Dr Efi Spentzou work on artistic, literary and philosophical receptions, with a particular interest in literary theory.

The Masters by Research builds on recognised expertise at Royal Holloway in the Classics and Theory and the Classics and Comparative literature and is associated with a thriving research centre (The Centre for the Reception of Greece and Rome).

Core course units:

Making the Classical Past (40 credits)

You will be introduced to a range of theoretical approaches to Classical Reception organised in three inter-related themes: The Reception of Myth; Empire and City and Philosophy, Poetics and Form. You will explore issues relating to gender, post-colonialism, radical politics, political theory, urban design and theory, aesthetics, critical theory, and time. You will have the opportunity to deploy a range of material from fine art, cinema, poetry, philosophical tracts and political writings. The course provides a thorough introduction to the theories underpinning research in Classical reception studies and is assessed by three research reports (one on each strand) and an essay.

Dissertation (140 credits)
You will be guided in selecting a topic in the first term and that topic will be refined during that term. From term two onwards, the teaching focus will be on the dissertation, with individual sessions with supervisors, detailed planning and feedback, and presentations to tutors and others in the group. The support is designed to allow student to make the transition from undergraduate studies.

The dissertation will give an opportunity for the students to develop an extended research project in Classical Reception. The dissertation will be an extended study of a subject or theme in Classical reception. The subject or theme may relate to an author, a literary or philosophical genre, or an issue of political or philosophical or literary importance in which the Classical has been a significant element in the discussion. Students will be prepared for the dissertation by individual and group sessions with supervisors and through the core course, Making the Classical Past

On completion, the student will be able
- Research a project

- Present a research project in extended form according to the formats and styles appropriate to the academic discipline

- Understand, evaluate and explain methodological problems in a chosen area of Classical Reception

- Understand, evaluate and explain intellectual traditions derived from the Classical world

- Identify research issues and appropriate methodologies for the discussion of those issues.

- Discuss different approaches to Classical Reception and Intellectual history

- Explore the impact of the Classical tradition in modern intellectual life

- Exploit and use appropriate bibliographical resources

On completion of the course graduates will have:

-- a detailed understanding of the role the classical tradition has played in intellectual debates in the modern era
-- an advanced knowledge of a variety of critical approaches to the Classical Reception
-- enhanced time management and organisational skills including working to deadlines, prioritising tasks and time management
the ability to use research resources, libraries and archival materials appropriate to the field of study.

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Learning how to make new discoveries that will contribute to a better understanding of the historical and social significance of works of art, artefacts and other cultural products from classical antiquity to the present. Read more
Learning how to make new discoveries that will contribute to a better understanding of the historical and social significance of works of art, artefacts and other cultural products from classical antiquity to the present.

Art is an expression of the human spirit. The study of art deals with cultural, social, religious, political and aesthetic meaning in the time it was created, the present and the eras in between. Think of how the Greek mythology of Narcissus – who has been portrayed in countless sculptures and paintings over the ages – was used by Freud to name a psychological disorder and is today used by politicians to symbolise the flaws of modern society. And think of how the destruction of art, be it by Byzantine iconoclasts, sixteenth-century Dutch protestants, or present-day adherents of IS, teaches us that the emotional and political significance of art goes far beyond the loss of objects.

The research Master’s in Art and Visual Culture studies the relationship between art, the past and the present from various angles, including the interpretation of the cultural contexts of visual expressions and their transformations throughout the ages up to now. This programme is geared towards classical archaeologists, art historians and cultural scholars alike. You’ll gain insight into general humanities methods and theories as well as those specific for those three fields. You can then go to focus on your own topic in the field of Art-Historical, Cultural Studies and Archaeology.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/arts-culture 

Europe and ‘its worlds’

The programme welcomes students with interest in all forms of art and visual culture. Our own research primarily focuses on Europe and ‘its worlds’, including how European artefacts interact with and differ from the rest of the world. Our research studies artefacts in the broadest sense, ranging from the more traditional forms as sculptures, paintings and architecture to modern ones as film, digital art, the performing arts and even fashion. All our research is performed in collaboration with scientists from other fields within the Institute for Historical, Literary and Cultural Studies (HLCS). We are joined in thirteen themed research groups .

Why study Art and Visual Culture at Radboud University?

- We teach you to look at the physical, artistic and visual qualities of an artwork or artefact, seen from the perspectives of three different disciplines: Classical Archaeology, Cultural Studies and Art History.
- In your first year, you take several courses with students from the other HLCS research Master’s specialisations in Historical Studies, and in Literary Studies. This unique construction will allow you to view your own field from the perspective of the other humanities.
- A personal tutor will guide you throughout the entire programme. He/she will give you advice on how to tailor our programme to best suit your interests, act as a sounding board for your research ideas, and help you make the right connections in the academic arena.
- You’ll receive thorough preparation for PhD research, including the writing of a publishable scholarly article and a proposal for a PhD project.
- This programme strongly encourages you to go abroad for at least a semester. Students can use our connections to other universities (IRUN network ) and research institutes to find a place that meet their academic interests.

Our research in this field

Any research done by students of the Master’s in Art and Visual Culture will be supervised by a researcher at the Institute for Historical, Literary and Cultural Studies (HLCS) in Nijmegen. HLCS research focuses around the theme Europe and its Worlds and questions whether ‘Europe’ consists of different worlds, how it is addressed, how it differs from the rest of the world, and how it interacts with other worlds. Researchers from a variety of humanities disciplines collaborate in thirteen different thematic groups to explore the spaces, cultural practices, beliefs, texts and ideas related to Europe and its World.

Thematic research groups
There are art and cultural scientists in many of these thematic groups. Although all the groups could be of interest to an art and cultural researcher, our experience is that the following generate a lot of interest among the Art and Visual Culture students:

- Matter And Culture: Analysis, Discourse & Aesthetics of/in Material Culture
The common framework of this group is research into material culture as the bearer of meaning in the broadest sense.

- Creative Industries: Society, Culture and Aesthetics in the 21st century
This group aims to gain a socio-cultural understanding of the creative industries. The group views the creative industries as a dynamic sector of autonomous and applied arts that range from theatre, music, media, literature and museums; to gaming, film, fashion and television, as well as to design, arts education, heritage and festivals.

- Memory, Materiality and Meaning in the Age of Transnationalism
This group studies the material as well as immaterial media and forms of embodiment through which we create memory through meaning-making and performative practices.

Master’s thesis topics in Art and Visual Culture:
For their Master’s thesis research, students can work together with researchers from one of the HLCS research groups or choose a topic in a non-related area. A small sample of thesis topics that you could research in this programme:
- Understanding the Post-Pompeian Era: Wall painting in the Roman Empire (AD 79-395)
- Crime in a Nordic Space: The Production of Space in Forbrydelsen
- William Marlowe in his time: an eighteenth-century view painter rediscovered
- Unravelling the Fabrics of Time: A New Materialist Perspective on Slow Fashion Becomings
- A Pyramidal Structure along the Via Appia. Documentation and reconstruction


See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/arts-culture

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This graduate diploma is ideal as a bridge to master’s study or beyond if you are new to the study of the classical world. Read more

This graduate diploma is ideal as a bridge to master’s study or beyond if you are new to the study of the classical world.

The Classical Studies Graduate Diploma is a multi-disciplinary study programme designed both for graduates who are looking to strengthen and expand their understanding of the classics, and also for students from other backgrounds requiring an in-depth understanding to key areas of the subject.

Perfect as a pathway to further study and as an opportunity to significantly develop your knowledge of the classics.

Key Benefits

  • One of the world's largest and most distinguished Department of Classics.
  • Unrivalled location for the study of the ancient world thanks to London's unique range of specialist libraries, museums and galleries.
  • Ideal preparation for further graduate study in all areas of Classics.
  • King's graduates enjoy one of the best employment rates and starting salaries in the UK. Ranked 6th in the UK for graduate employment (Times and Sunday Times Good Universities Guide 2016)

Description

The Graduate Diploma is a highly flexible study pathway that offers you the opportunity to customise your module choices to reflect your academic interests. You can choose from a wide range of topics to study that typically include Greek and Roman Literature, Greek and Roman History, Classical Arts and Archaeology and Late Antique and Byzantine Studies. Additionally, if you wish to study Grek or Latin language modules, tehy can be studied at a level to reflect your language abilities.

If you are studying full time you will complete the course in nine month, if you are studying part-time, you course will take 18 months to complete.

Libraries

As well as the extensive library resources at King's, you will have access to the world-leading Classics library at the Institute of Classical Studies, as well as other University of London libraries.

Research seminars

In the Department of Classics we run a research seminar series (which Graduate Diploma students are encouraged to attend), where you will learn about the current research of our academic staff and PhD students. There are also University of London research seminars organized through the Institute of Classical Studies, for example in Ancient History, Classical Archaeology and Art, Classical Literature, and Ancient Philosophy, where you will be able to listen to and meet leading scholars from around the world. There is also the Late Antique & Byzantine Studies seminar, which is organized by the Centre for Hellenic Studies.

Greek Play

Every year (since 1953), students in the Department of Classics have produced and performed a Greek play - the only production in the UK to be performed annually in the original Greek. Read more about the Greek Play (and its history) at King's: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/artshums/depts/classics/about/greek/index.aspx

Iris Project and the Inner London Latin Project

Over the past few years, students in the Department of Classics have been teaching in the capital's state primary schools, offering pupils in large, mixed-ability classes the opportunity to learn about Latin in fun, accessible and relevant ways. Read more about the Iris Project at King’s: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/artshums/depts/classics/about/collab/iris.aspx

Course purpose

The Diploma is appropriate for you if you are a graduate in a subject not closely related to Ancient History or Classics; it provides a bridge to further study at MA level or beyond, or you can take it as a self-contained programme.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

We use lectures, seminars and group tutorials to deliver most of the modules on the course. You will also be expected to undertake a significant amount of independent study. You will be assigned a personal tutor who will provide support and guidance for your studies.

If you are a full time student, we will provide you with six to eight hours of teaching through lectures and seminars across the year. We expect you to undertake around 35 hours of independent study per week.

If you are a part-time student, we will provide you with two to six hours of teaching through lectures and seminars in your first and second year. We will expect you to undertake eight to fourteen hours of independent study per week.

Typically, one credit equates to 10 hours of work.

You may also choose to complete an optional dissertation with up to five hours’ supervision and approximately 500 hours of additional self-study.

Assessment

Assessment methods will depend on the modules you have selected to study. The primary methods of assessment for this course are coursework and examinations. 

Career prospects

Our graduates go on to work in a range of professions including teaching, journalism, publishing, finance, politics, and the cultural or heritage sectors. While others choose to stay and pursue further postgraduate qualifications at King's.



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Philosophy at Essex takes philosophy back to its roots in everyday existential, social and political issues. Read more
Philosophy at Essex takes philosophy back to its roots in everyday existential, social and political issues. Our radical approach cuts across traditional boundaries, fostering dialogue between different schools and disciplines, and we are one of the few universities in the world that bridges the divide between the two great traditions of Analytic and Continental philosophy.

Our MA Philosophy will provide you with a rigorous grounding in modern and contemporary European philosophy. We have leading expertise in critical theory, phenomenology, German Idealism, nineteenth Century German philosophy, aesthetics, existentialism, contemporary French philosophy, philosophy and psychoanalysis, and medical humanities.

You study modules of your choice, develop your research, writing, and employability skills through an intensive Writing Workshop, and prepare an MA dissertation in your chosen area of research.

Our department is widely regarded as among the very best in the UK, having been recognised as one of the top 10 UK universities for research excellence (REF 2014), and being placed in the top 10 in The Guardian University Guide in 2010, 2011, and 2013.

As an alternative to our more flexible MA Philosophy, you can focus your study on a more specific area by following one of the following pathways:

MA Philosophy (Continental Philosophy Pathway)
All of our academic staff work on Continental Philosophy, including classical German philosophy (Kant and German Idealism), Frankfurt School Critical Theory (Adorno, Habermas, Honneth), nineteenth-century philosophy (Kierkegaard, Marx, Nietzsche), and phenomenology (Husserl, Heidegger, Merleau-Ponty). On this pathway you choose from a range of specified topics in these areas, in addition to some outside options and a dissertation on a topic in Continental Philosophy.

MA Philosophy (Critical Social Theory Pathway)
We are the leading centre for Critical Social Theory in the UK with five members of academic staff working on the Frankfurt School (Adorno, Habermas, Honneth), contemporary French thought (Derrida, Foucault, Rancière) and issues in Critical Social Theory, such as activist political theory, theory of recognition, aesthetics and politics, deliberative democracy, and the moral limits of markets. On this pathway you study modules on the Frankfurt School and Contemporary Critical Theory, in addition to some outside options and a dissertation on a topic in Critical Social Theory.

MA Philosophy (Philosophy and Art History Pathway)
Drawing on the collaborative and interdisciplinary approach of the School, our new Philosophy and Art History pathway enables students to get a thorough grounding in philosophical aesthetics. You explore issues in aesthetics and their bearing on other areas of philosophy (such as critical theory or existentialism) and Art History (such as aesthetic practices and curating), and profit from the wide-ranging expertise of our staff in both disciplines. On this pathway you study modules on Philosophy/Aesthetics and Art History (dealing, for example, with Art & Politics, Art, Architecture and Urbanism, or Art, Science & Knowledge), in addition to some outside options and a dissertation on a topic in Philosophy and Art History.

Our expert staff

Our courses are taught by world-class academics, and over three quarters of our research is rated “world-leading” or “internationally excellent” (REF 2014), which puts us fifth in the UK for research outputs.

Our open-minded and enthusiastic staff have an exceptionally broad range of research interests, so whatever questions in philosophy catch hold of your imagination, there is certain to be someone you can approach to find out more.

Recent projects and publications include:
-Béatrice Han-Pile and Dan Watts’ major new research project, The Ethics of Powerlessness: the Theological Virtues Today
-The Essex Autonomy Project, a major interdisciplinary project funded by the AHRC (Arts and Humanities Research Council), which aims to investigate the role of autonomous judgment in many aspects of human life
-Peter Dews’ The Idea of Evil, Polity, 2007
-Béatrice Han-Pile, Foucault’s Critical Project: Between the Transcendental and the Historical, Stanford University Press, 2002
-Fiona Hughes, Kant’s Critique of Aesthetic Judgement: A Reader’s Guide, Edinburgh University Press, 2007.
-Wayne Martin, Theories of Judgement: Psychology, Logic, Phenomenology, Cambridge University Press, 2006
-Irene McMullin’s Time and the Shared World: Heidegger on Social Relations, Northwestern University Press, 2013
-Fabian Freyenhagen’s Adorno’s Practical Philosophy: Living Less Wrongly, Cambridge University Press, 2013

Specialist facilities

-Graduate students have access to desk space in the School and many students work there on a daily basis
-A dedicated German-language course for graduate students in philosophy
-Attend our Critical Theory Colloquium
-Attend the Werkstatt, where recent work on phenomenology is presented
-An exciting programme of research seminars, reading groups and mini-courses that help you expand your philosophical knowledge beyond what you learn on your course
-Access a variety of philosophy textbooks and journals in the Albert Sloman Library and in our departmental library

Your future

Many of our philosophy graduates embark on doctoral study after finishing their MA. We offer supervision for PhDs in a range of fields including:
-Continental philosophy
-Critical Social Theory
-History of philosophy
-Applied ethics

Our graduates have also gone into careers in law, the media, local administration, HM Revenue and Customs, and top jobs in the Civil Service.

We work with our university’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Example structure

-Dissertation: Continental Philosophy (optional)
-Dissertation: Critical Social Theory (optional)
-Dissertation: MA Philosophy (optional)
-Dissertation: Philosophy & Art History (optional)
-Phenomenology and Existentialism (optional)
-Kant's Revolution in Philosophy (optional)
-Hegel (optional)
-Contemporary Critical Theory (optional)
-Topics in Continental Philosophy (optional)
-MA Writing Workshop (optional)
-The Frankfurt School (optional)
-Philosophy and Aesthetics (optional)
-Collecting Art From Latin America (optional)
-Art & Politics (optional)
-Current Research in Art History (optional)
-Art, Architecture and Urbanism (optional)
-Contemporary Theories of Justice (optional)
-Environmental Politics (optional)
-Political Economy (optional)
-Political Theory (optional)
-Research Seminar in Political Theory and Methods (optional)
-Theory and Explanation in Political Science (optional)
-Ideology and Political Discourse (optional)
-The New Nature Writing (optional)
-Foundations of Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (optional)
-The Protection of Refugees and Displaced Persons in International Law (optional)
-Human Rights and Development (optional)
-International Trade, Investment and Human Rights. (optional)
-Human Rights for Women (optional)
-Transitional Justice (optional)
-Psycho Analytic Theory (optional)
-Psychoanalytic Methodology (optional)

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This course explores the way the Classical world has been reflected in the art, literature and culture of later periods, and how the ancient world has shaped the modern. Read more

This course explores the way the Classical world has been reflected in the art, literature and culture of later periods, and how the ancient world has shaped the modern.

It is taught in the Department of Classics, by experts in the field of Classical reception. The Department's research and teaching strengths stretch from the Aegean Bronze Age and the ancient Near East, through Greece and Rome to Byzantine and Modern Greek literature and culture, giving the programme a breadth unmatched anywhere in the world. 

The programme is interdisciplinary, and is open to students with no prior knowledge of ancient languages. 

Key benefits

  • One of the world's largest and most distinguished departments of Classics.
  • Unrivalled location for the study of the ancient world thanks to London's unique range of specialist libraries, museums and galleries.
  • Extraordinarily wide choice of modules, drawing on the resources of the whole of the University of London.
  • King's graduates enjoy one of the best employment rates and starting salaries in the UK. Ranked 6th in the UK for graduate employment (Times and Sunday Times Good Universities Guide 2016)

Description

Our MA course focuses on the way the classical world has influenced the culture of later periods, and how it continues to do so. With a strong focus on research the course is taught in the Department of Classics by experts in the field of classical reception. Our Department’s research and teaching strengths stretch from the Aegean Bronze Age and the ancient Near East, through Greece and Rome to Byzantine and Modern Greek literature and culture. This means we can offer you a breadth of expertise that is unmatched anywhere in the world. Through this advanced course of study, we will develop your literary, historical and archaeological analysis skills, and provide you with the opportunity to learn ancient and modern languages to extend these skills.

Research seminars

In the Department of Classics we run a research seminar series (which MA students are encouraged to attend), where you will learn about the current research of our academic staff and PhD students. Further the Department regularly hosts major research conferences with guest speakers from around the world. There are also University of London research seminars organized through the Institute of Classical Studies, for example in Literature, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History, where you will be able to listen to and meet leading scholars from around the world. There is also the Late Antique & Byzantine Studies seminar, which is organized by the Centre for Hellenic Studies.

Personal tutor

You will be assigned a personal tutor in the Department of Classics, who will advise you and help you decide which modules to take, and can answer any questions or concerns you may have whilst at King's.

Dissertation supervision

During your first term at King's you will need to decide on your MA dissertation subject, if you have not done so before you arrive. The dissertation can be related to work you are doing for a taught module, or it can be in a completely different area. On the basis of your chosen subject area you will be assigned a supervisor within the Department of Classics who will discuss the topic with you, and oversee your work on it.

Greek Play

Every year (since 1953), students in the Department of Classics have produced and performed a Greek play - the only production in the UK to be performed annually in the original Greek. Read more about the Greek Play (and its history) at King's: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/artshums/depts/classics/about/greek/index.aspx

Course format and assessment

Teaching

If you are a full-time student we will typically provide you with six to eight hours of teaching through lectures and seminars each week, and we will expect you to undertake 35 hours of independent study.

If you are a part-time student we will typically provide you with two to six hours of teaching through lectures and seminars each week, and we will expect you to undertake 17.5 hours of independent study.

For your dissertation, we will provide five hours of supervision, and we will expect you to undertake 575 hours of independent study.

Typically, one credit equates to typically 10 hours of work.

Assessment

We typically assess our modules through a combination of coursework and examinations, and the amount of coursework we expect you to produce will be greater for modules which are worth more credits. For your dissertation module you will write a 12,000-word thesis.

Regulating body

King’s College London is regulated by the Higher Education Funding Council for England

Career prospects

The advanced skills that we give you have proved very popular with employers in a wide range of professions, and many of our graduates use the skills and knowledge they develop with us to pursue further research in our Department. Others go on to excel in careers in teaching, journalism, cultural management or the financial sector.



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This postgraduate egree offers an intensive and challenging approach to the study of the Classical Mediterranean worlds across the Greek and Roman periods. Read more
This postgraduate egree offers an intensive and challenging approach to the study of the Classical Mediterranean worlds across the Greek and Roman periods. The course questions the traditional ways in which we reconstruct the classical past, and interrogates current understandings and perceptions of Greek and Roman societies across the Mediterranean.

Course Outline

A key part of the course is our interdisciplinary approach, drawing from both history and archaeology. We will equip you to work with different classical sources in combination, including literary texts, epigraphy, material culture, landscape studies, architecture, and visual art.

The course will enable you to reflect critically on the economic, social, political, cultural, artistic and religious developments and interactions between the various regions and powers of the Classical Mediterranean. You will develop a high level of competence in the cultures of the Greek, Hellenistic and Roman Mediterranean.

The School has a high concentration of relevant staff expertise and specialisms which is exceptional in Britain. Our expertise ranges across the classical world, including Italy, North Africa, the Aegean, Anatolia and Syria, offering you a coherent perspective of the whole Mediterranean.

This course will equip you with the skills needed to go on to conduct doctoral research or enhance your career prospects, whether in archaeology, related or other professions.

Course Structure

Core Modules:
Text and Material Culture
Dissertation (15,000 words)

Plus 3 option modules from a choice approximately 22.

(Please note: due to regular enhancement of the University’s courses, please refer to Leicester’s own website (http://www.le.ac.uk) or/and Terms and Conditions (http://www2.le.ac.uk/legal) for the most accurate and up-to-date course information. We recommend that you familiarise yourself with this information prior to submitting an application.)

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This innovative degree course is concerned with the visual culture of classical antiquity and modern theories of its study – Greek and Roman sculpture, architecture, mosaics, painting, urbanism. Read more
This innovative degree course is concerned with the visual culture of classical antiquity and modern theories of its study – Greek and Roman sculpture, architecture, mosaics, painting, urbanism. It brings together archaeological, art historical and historical approaches to examine how visual material was treated and understood in antiquity and reinvented for centuries to come.

As well as learning how to look at ancient visual evidence and to use it to construct art-historical and historical arguments, students also study a range of responses to and theories around it – from various periods of classicism in antiquity to modern advertising; from stylistic analysis to modern media studies.

This course will enable you to develop your understanding of the visual culture of classical antiquity. It combines iconographical, theoretical and cultural approaches to a wide range of visual material to examine both its functions and resonances in antiquity, and its restoration, decontextualisation and reinvention in the modern world. This MA is a fulfilling experience for those interested in the art and architecture of the classical past as well as excellent training for anyone considering doctoral research.

Visit http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/classics for information about the Department, programmes, and funding opportunities.

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The curriculum of the Master's Degree in Classical Archaeology is divided into three semesters that can be taken in a year and a half, at the end of which students must submit and present their master's degree thesis. Read more
The curriculum of the Master's Degree in Classical Archaeology is divided into three semesters that can be taken in a year and a half, at the end of which students must submit and present their master's degree thesis.

The course is divided into subjects with the following content:
-Introduction to methodology and content that is of general use for the discipline.
-Professional-track content. Focusing on specific research areas in the field of classical archeology.
-Chronological periods or concepts in classical history and archeology.

There are three priority areas of specialisation:
-Landscape archaeology
-Archeology of architecture
-Archaeology of cultural material

Students will be providedwith basic, methodological, technological and advanced training. Students will also do work experience that familiarises them with fieldwork, archaeological management, research or museum management.

Student Profile

This master’s degree is designed for graduates in archaeology, history, art history or classical philology. Graduates in similar fields such as anthropology, architecture and geography may also apply for admission.

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Whether it is the history of Europe, the development of modern European literature or the art of Rome that fascinates you, the Research Master's specialization are an excellent choice for talented students who want to prepare themselves for an international academic career. Read more

Overview

Whether it is the history of Europe, the development of modern European literature or the art of Rome that fascinates you, the Research Master's specialization are an excellent choice for talented students who want to prepare themselves for an international academic career. Indeed, the diversity of interests of our teaching and research staff will allow you to specialize in almost any subject, and the space we offer within the Master's specialization for research and studies at home and abroad allows you to put together a training programme that perfectly meets your wishes.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/hlcs

Specialisations

Within the Master's programme in Historical, Literary and Cultural Studies, you can choose between three English-taught Master's specializations:

1. Historical Studies
Students can specialize in any historical theme from antiquity to the present day. Many students specialize in Ancient History, Medieval History, Cultural History from 1500 to the present, the History of Dutch Catholicism, Gender studies, Modern Political History, Globalisation and Presented History. Students, working in small numbers, will pursue their own specialty and discuss developments in contemporary historiography, debate research ideas and critique other's writings and research.

2. Literary Studies
If you have completed your Bachelor's degree in one of the classical or modern languages and have strong ambitions to conduct international research, this programme is your springboard to an academic career in literary studies. The specialization admits students of various languages and literatures, including German, French, Spanish, English (both American and British), Dutch, Ancient Greek and Latin as well as other languages and literary studies. Central to this programme is the attention paid to methods of textual interpretation and New Philology. Students select courses to fit the needs of their specialism and discuss contemporary developments and research ideas. Whether you prefer ancient Greek tragedy, contemporary American literature or Dutch poetry, the new Literary Studies Research Master's is very well suited for talented students wishing to contribute to (inter)national research in this field.

3. Art and Visual Culture
If you are interested in visual and material culture from Antiquity to the present and aspire a career in international scientific research in the fields of art, visual culture or classical archaeology, Radboud University Nijmegen is pleased to offer a two-year research Master's specialisation which offers exactly that. This programme is based on the unique cooperation of the departments of Classical Archaeology, Cultural Studies and Art History, allowing a broad perspective on the visual heritage of western culture from classical antiquity to the present as well as specialist training.

The Research Master's in Art and Visual Culture is designed for highly motivated students who are interested in the art and visual culture of Europe from classical antiquity to the present, and have ambitions for an international career in these fields.

HLCS institute

The HLCS institute greatly values the close interaction between students and top researchers, which is why our courses are open only to small numbers of students working under the supervision of experienced professors. At the start of the first year, you will choose a tutor (always an excellent researcher with relevant expertise) who will personally guide your development as a specialist in your field. Regular meetings with your tutor will ensure the steady increase of your academic skills. They will also offer the opportunity to exchange research ideas at an advanced level. Your tutor will help you apply for international funding to support research trips and the attendance of conferences, as well as guide the preparation of your PhD proposal, which is an integral part of the course programme.

Career prospects

During the Master’s programme you will gain a broad perspective on the humanities in general because of the collaboration between the programmes of Historical Studies, Literary Studies, and Art and Visual Culture. Through your personal Master’s research, you will also have concentrated on a very specific phenomenon in your own field. This combination of broad and specific focus will open a lot of doors for you. Our research programme has produced graduates that are appreciated by employees for their research skills as well as their insightfulness and analytical skills, and who have not only learned how to delve into large quantity of data and master it but also how to place their results in a larger context.

In short, at the end of the programme you’ll:
- Have acquired heuristic research skills at an advanced level.
- Have gained general knowledge of leading perspectives, theories, concepts, and paradigm shifts in the humanities and advanced knowledge specifically for own field.
- Be able to engage in the public debates regarding issues in the humanities.
- Have acquired English academic writing skills and have practiced writing a publishable scholarly article and a proposal for a PhD project.
- Have started to build up a professional international network.

Academia and beyond
This programme is initially intended to prepare its students for an academic career, in particular as PhD researchers. About half of our graduates find such a position in the Netherlands or abroad. The other half also obtain academic positions with research orientated duties. Examples include:
- Researcher at a cultural or scientific organisation or research centre
- Assistant of a senior researcher
- Teacher at an institution for higher education
- Policy-making official in the fields of culture and science
- Editor in the field of historical or cultural scholarship
- Staff member of a publishing company or and text agency, usually with regard to scientific, historical or cultural journals
- Curator of a cultural heritage institution or in the museological sector
- Consultant for a political party

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/hlcs

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ABOUT MA ACTING. The MA Acting is an intensive one-year, advanced level conservatoire acting course. In keeping with Central’s tradition of innovation in actor training, it offers two specialist strands taught over an extended 42 weeks, with up to 35 hours per week of classes, rehearsals, seminars and tutorials. Read more

ABOUT MA ACTING

The MA Acting is an intensive one-year, advanced level conservatoire acting course. In keeping with Central’s tradition of innovation in actor training, it offers two specialist strands taught over an extended 42 weeks, with up to 35 hours per week of classes, rehearsals, seminars and tutorials. Successful applicants will be offered a place on one of the two strands.

CLASSICAL STRAND

The Classical strand follows the development of the theatrical art from its earliest ritual roots to the birth of naturalism:

> Greek Tragedy, Chorus and the Neutral Mask

> Clowning and Commedia dell’arte

> Shakespeare and the English Renaissance

> Stanislavski, the Method and ‘Realist’ Theatre.

The Classical strand draws on the hugely influential theories and techniques of the great French acting teacher Michel Saint-Denis, training the expressive body, voice and imagination. Working with some of the greatest dramatic texts ever written, students are asked to consider what they mean now, and how their 21st century reinterpretation and re-imagining still holds a ‘mirror up to nature’. Students are encouraged to understand the demands of both art and craft, as participants in, and practitioners of, the western theatrical tradition, through a course structure that examines, in chronological order, four key periods of innovation and transition.

INDUSTRY LINKS / COLLABORATIONS

All staff are well connected to industry. In the past few years, students have participated in a research symposium and worked on the stage

of Shakespeare’s Globe, performed at the Brighton Festival, made a film with Sir Donald Sinden at the Garrick Club, taken part in workshops with Hannah Miller (Head of Casting, Royal Shakespeare Company) and attended public lectures by Judi Dench, Vanessa

Redgrave, Michael Boyd and Declan Donnellan. Students from Canada and the USA have participated in the Conference of Drama Schools

Showcase in New York and LA, and all students participate in Central’s MA Acting showcase.

ASSESSMENT

Through a combination of practical and written assessments, including a Sustained Independent Project and research presentation.



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Deepen your understanding of the history of art and gain the skills necessary for advanced research and critical analysis. You can take advantage of local sites of art-historical interest such as. Read more
Deepen your understanding of the history of art and gain the skills necessary for advanced research and critical analysis.

You can take advantage of local sites of art-historical interest such as:
-Extensive collections in the Royal Pavilion and the museums of Brighton & Hove
-Local historic houses and collections such as Charleston and Petworth
-Contemporary art galleries along the South Coast, such as Towner (Eastbourne), the De La Warr Pavilion (Bexhill-on-Sea) and the Jerwood Gallery (Hastings)

You’ll work with the rich array of sources held in The Keep, a world-class centre for archives on our doorstep. We encourage you to take part in our regular research seminars and events involving curators, scholars and artists.

How will I study?

This MA offers you a wealth of in-depth taught modules, ranging from the classical to the contemporary, and supports you in developing a specialist dissertation on a subject of your choice.

Modules and options are assessed by term papers. You also write a 20,000-word dissertation.

Scholarships

Our aim is to ensure that every student who wants to study with us is able to despite financial barriers, so that we continue to attract talented and unique individuals.

Chancellor's International Scholarship (2017)
-25 scholarships of a 50% tuition fee waiver
-Application deadline: 1 May 2017

HESPAL Scholarship (Higher Education Scholarships Scheme for the Palestinian Territories) (2017)
-Two full fee waivers in conjuction with maintenance support from the British Council
-Application deadline: 1 January 2017

USA Friends Scholarships (2017)
-A scholarship of an amount equivalent to $10,000 for nationals or residents of the USA on a one year taught Masters degree course.
-Application deadline: 3 April 2017

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The Reception of the Classical World MA investigates the interactions of later ages with the cultures of the ancient world across a variety of media, making extensive use of London's unique resources of literary, historical and artistic study and research. Read more
The Reception of the Classical World MA investigates the interactions of later ages with the cultures of the ancient world across a variety of media, making extensive use of London's unique resources of literary, historical and artistic study and research.

Degree information

Students gain a thorough grounding in the key figures, narratives, art forms, concepts, and social, religious and political practices of the classical world that have been most put to use by later cultures. They are equipped with necessary research tools, including training in the use of digital resources online, library catalogues and archives.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of one core module (40 credits), two optional modules (80 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules
-Approaches to the Reception of the Classical World

Optional modules - dedicated reception modules have included:
-Rome on Film
-Ancient Greece on Stage
-Dionysus in Rome
-Athens in Ancient and Modern Political Thought

Students can also choose from the full menu of modules available for the Classics MA which includes:
-Sophocles
-Cicero
-Dionysus in Rome
-Greek or Latin Papyrology
-Greek or Latin Epigraphy
-Medieval Latin Literature

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project on a subject related to the reception of the classical world, which culminates in a dissertation of 12,000–15,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is taught by a combination of lectures, seminars and research visits to relevant institutions. Seminars will provide practical tuition in bibliographic searches and the use of a variety of electronic databases. Student performance will be assessed through coursework essays, unseen examination and the dissertation.

Careers

The MA is an ideal springboard for a PhD programme. Many students go on to pursue research at UCL and in other institutions; others have developed their skills in teaching, journalism, cultural management or the financial sector.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Editorial Assistant, McMillan
-Classics, The University of Oxford
-PhD Classics, Princeton University
-Classics, Royal Holloway, University of London (RHUL)
-Research Degree: Greek and Latin, University College London (UCL)

Employability
The MA in Reception offers a wide range of skills highly valued by employers, such as advanced literary, advanced oral communication, the ability to abstract and synthesise information, the ability to construct and manage arguments, independent and critical thinking on difficult issues, competence in planning and executing essays, presentations and projects, self-motivation, information technology skills (including the ability to access and evaluate electronic data), team work, cooperation, and good time management. Students go on to employment in many sectors, including advertising, publishing, education, law, finance, libraries and museums, and the culture industries (including theatre and the media).

Why study this degree at UCL?

This programme makes extensive use of the unique features of UCL: its central location, diverse international expertise and interdisciplinary outlook. Students benefit from research tours of nearby resources, such as the British Museum, the Warburg Institute and Courtauld Institutes, Sir John Soane's Museum, and the British Film Institute.

UCL Greek & Latin is recognised as one of the leading international centres for postgraduate study and research in the ancient world. Students benefit from the large range of modules offered by the department, by other departments at UCL, and by the intercollegiate Classics MA programme.

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