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The MA in Theology and Religion serves both the specific needs of students focussed on progressing towards doctoral research and those of students looking to continue relatively broad-based studies in Theology and Religion to Level four, perhaps in support of a career in teaching. Read more
The MA in Theology and Religion serves both the specific needs of students focussed on progressing towards doctoral research and those of students looking to continue relatively broad-based studies in Theology and Religion to Level four, perhaps in support of a career in teaching.

Course Structure

Choice of one of the three core modules, Three option modules, Dissertation.

Core Modules

One of the following:
-The Bible and Hermeneutics
-Classic Texts in Christian Theology
-Social Scientific Methods in the Study of Religion
AND
-Dissertation

Optional Modules

Optional Modules in previous years have included (2-3 choices from):
-Advanced Hebrew Texts
-Advanced Aramaic
-Middle Egyptian
-The Old Testament Pseudepigrapha and the New Testament
-The Bible and Hermeneutics
-Paul and his Interpreters
-Gospels and Canon
-Patristic Exegesis
-Patristic Ecclesiology
-Christian Northumbria 600-750
-Classic Texts in Christian Theology
-The Anglican Theological Vision
-Liturgy and Sacramentality
-Conceiving Change in Contemporary Catholicism
-Twentieth-Century Catholic Theology
-Christian Gender
-Principles of Theological Ethics
-Theology, Ethics and Medicine
-Social Scientific Methods in the Study of Religion
-Ritual, Symbolism and Belief in the Anthropology of Religion
-Literature and Religion
-Catholic Social Thought
-Ecclesiology and Ethnography
-Doctrine of Creation

Plus up to 1 choice from:
-Selected modules from the MA in Theology and Ministry programme
-Level 3 undergraduate module, or any Level 1 – 2 language module offered by the Department of Theology and Religion, taken in conjunction with the Extended Study in Theology & Religion module
-30 credits from another Board of Studies (including appropriate credit-bearing language modules offered by the University’s Centre for Foreign Language Study)

Learning and Teaching

Most MA teaching is delivered through small group seminars and tutorials. These exemplify and encourage the various skills and practices required for independent scholarly engagement with texts and issues. Teaching in the Department of Theology & Religion is ‘research led’ at both BA and MA levels, but particularly at MA level. Research led teaching is informed by staff research, but more importantly it aims to develop students as independent researchers themselves, able to pursue and explore their own research interests and questions. This is why the independently researched MA dissertation is the culmination of the MA programme. Such engagement with texts and issues is not only an excellent preparation for doctoral research, it also develops those skills of critical analysis, synthesis and presentation sought and required by employers.

Many MA classes will contain a ‘lecture’ element, conveying information and exemplifying an approach to the subject-matter that will enable students to develop a clear understanding of the subject and improve their own ability to analyse and evaluate information and arguments. Seminars enhance knowledge and understanding through preparation and interaction with other students and staff, promoting awareness of and respect for different viewpoints and approaches, and developing skills of articulacy, advocacy and interrogation. Through small group discussions and tutorials, feedback is provided on student work, with the opportunity to discuss specific issues in detail, enhancing student knowledge and writing skills.

The Dissertation module includes training in generic research skills, from the use of the Library to issues in referencing and bibliography. The subject specific core module introduces students to questions of interpretation and argument in the disciplines encompassed by theology and religion, and helps them to develop their own interests and questions that will issue in the MA dissertation. The latter is a piece of independent research, but it is fostered and guided through individual tutorials with a supervisor, with whom students meet throughout the academic year.

Other admission requirements

*The two principal exceptions to this rule are as follows: graduates of other disciplines who have studied at undergraduate or equivalent level in one or more of the areas in which they hope to work, through their first degrees, through training for the ministry of the churches, and so on; students from overseas universities who have successfully reached a point in their theological studies comparable with completion of a British BA at the standard noted above - for example, on the German model, passing the Zwischenprüfung or Kolloquium and two semesters at the Hauptseminar level.

When applying, please ensure that your two chosen referees send their confidential academic references (using the reference form [Word]) to us in a timely manner. Please note that we are unable to accept ‘open’ references submitted by yourself. The referees may send the references by email directly from their institutional email addresses to provided they are signed, or by post to the address provided on the reference form.

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This course involves the study of historical and systematic theology across a range of Christian perspectives. Durham has long-established strengths in both Greek and Latin patristics, the medieval Church and Reformation, contemporary Catholic and Anglican theology, theological ethics, and philosophical theology. Read more
This course involves the study of historical and systematic theology across a range of Christian perspectives. Durham has long-established strengths in both Greek and Latin patristics, the medieval Church and Reformation, contemporary Catholic and Anglican theology, theological ethics, and philosophical theology.

Course Structure

Classic Texts in Christian Theology core module, Three option modules, Dissertation.
Core Modules:
-Classic Texts in Christian Theology
-Dissertation

Optional Modules in previous years have included:
2-3 choices from:
-Paul and his Interpreters
-Gospels and Canon
-The Bible and Hermeneutics
-Patristic Exegesis
-Patristic Ecclesiology
-Christian Northumbria 600-750
-The Anglican Theological Vision
-Liturgy and Sacramentality
-Conceiving Change in Contemporary Catholicism
-Twentieth-Century Catholic Theology
-Christian Gender
-Principles of Theological Ethics
-Theology, Ethics and Medicine
-Social Scientific Methods in the Study of Religion
-Ritual, Symbolism and Belief in the Anthropology of Religion
-Literature and Religion
-Catholic Social Thought
-Ecclesiology and Ethnography
-Doctrine of Creation

Plus up to 1 choice from:
-Advanced Hebrew Texts
-Advanced Aramaic
-Middle Egyptian
-Old Testament Pseudepigrapha and the New Testament
-Selected modules from the MA in Theology and Ministry programme
-Level 3 undergraduate module, or any Level 1 – 2 language module offered by the Department of Theology and Religion, taken in conjunction with the Extended Study in Theology & Religion module
-30 credits from another Board of Studies (including appropriate credit-bearing language modules offered by the University’s Centre for Foreign Language Study)

Learning and Teaching

Most MA teaching is delivered through small group seminars and tutorials. These exemplify and encourage the various skills and practices required for independent scholarly engagement with texts and issues. Teaching in the Department of Theology & Religion is ‘research led’ at both BA and MA levels, but particularly at MA level. Research led teaching is informed by staff research, but more importantly it aims to develop students as independent researchers themselves, able to pursue and explore their own research interests and questions. This is why the independently researched MA dissertation is the culmination of the MA programme. Such engagement with texts and issues is not only an excellent preparation for doctoral research, it also develops those skills of critical analysis, synthesis and presentation sought and required by employers.

Many MA classes will contain a ‘lecture’ element, conveying information and exemplifying an approach to the subject-matter that will enable students to develop a clear understanding of the subject and improve their own ability to analyse and evaluate information and arguments. Seminars enhance knowledge and understanding through preparation and interaction with other students and staff, promoting awareness of and respect for different viewpoints and approaches, and developing skills of articulacy, advocacy and interrogation. Through small group discussions and tutorials, feedback is provided on student work, with the opportunity to discuss specific issues in detail, enhancing student knowledge and writing skills.

The Dissertation module includes training in generic research skills, from the use of the Library to issues in referencing and bibliography. The subject specific core module introduces students to questions of interpretation and argument in the disciplines encompassed by theology and religion, and helps them to develop their own interests and questions that will issue in the MA dissertation. The latter is a piece of independent research, but it is fostered and guided through individual tutorials with a supervisor, with whom students meet throughout the academic year.

Other admission requirements

*The two principal exceptions to this rule are as follows: graduates of other disciplines who have studied at undergraduate or equivalent level in one or more of the areas in which they hope to work, through their first degrees, through training for the ministry of the churches, and so on; students from overseas universities who have successfully reached a point in their theological studies comparable with completion of a British BA at the standard noted above - for example, on the German model, passing the Zwischenprüfung or Kolloquium and two semesters at the Hauptseminar level. When applying, please ensure that your two chosen referees send their confidential academic references (using the reference form [Word]) to us in a timely manner. Please note that we are unable to accept ‘open’ references submitted by yourself. The referees may send the references by email directly from their institutional email addresses to provided they are signed, or by post to the address provided on the reference form.

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Course Outline. Read more
Course Outline
If you...have a passion for children's books, love reading literature for children, have written or would love to have a go at writing children's literature, have a desire to learn what books children like reading, would love the chance to explore your own ideas about childhood and learn how different societies, histories and critics have defined it, want to learn how publishers produce children's books and produce one yourself, want to be involved in a rapidly growing area of academic study, and need to learn about different careers in writing for children...then this exciting new programme is for you.

You will have the chance to study classic and contemporary children's literature and writing and produce your own, with input from some of the most well known authors and publishers of today.


Course Content
7 taught modules plus a Dissertation:

Histories of Children's Literature
An introduction to Children's Literature You will investigate Classic British, American and International Children's literatures before choosing an individual topic on any historical selection of Children's literature to research.

Reading Crossover Fiction
You will explore contexts of crossover fiction such as age-banding, genre, education and new ways of marketing fiction in this relatively new field.

Creative Writing for Children Workshop
A chance to develop your own voice and style by producing creative writing for children in any genre, including the fairy-tale, fantasy, social realism, non-fictional prose, drama or poetry with help from established authors.

Scriptwriting for Children
Run by professionals with experience in commissioning work for children's television and in partnership with the BBC (the BBC Children's Division will shortly be moving to Salford), these workshops will show you how to write for children's television and film and how to present your work to the industry.

Reading the Child
This module will seek to understand what we mean by the "child" and "childhood" by exploring the theoretical approaches to the study and practice of writing for children over the last 100 years.

Children's Writing and Publishing
An opportunity to work in a group to produce/publish a new children's book with the help of experts. You will begin by focusing on the age ranges, educational edicts, series fiction, niche markets, "pester power" and digital and online publishing, ebooks and downloads.

Planning Your Career in Writing for Children
You will be given access to career case studies and trends in publishing, writing, teaching, academia and other areas of graduate recruitment which will enable you to produce your own action plan.

Writing for Children Dissertation
You will be able to choose between a traditional literature dissertation, a creative writing dissertation, one that combines literature and creative writing, or a work-related dissertation.

The programme uses a wide range of teaching and learning strategies. As well as interactive lectures all modules have seminar or workshop elements where you will be encouraged to engage in critical reading and writing exercises. Seminar discussion and, in some modules, formal presentations, will enable you to further develop your subject-specific knowledge and understanding, strengthen your communicative skills, and pursue research projects either independently or in teams. Tutorials enable you to discuss issues and ideas with your tutors either individually or in small groups.

Creative Writing Workshops will offer you the opportunity to give and receive peer critique and support. As an individual you will keep learning journals or logs for some modules. You will spend a substantial amount of time on independent research but you will be supported by one-to-one supervision from tutors.

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The Advanced Master in Financial Markets offers a complementary education in finance and financial markets to the curricula of classic graduate programmes in finance or economics. Read more

Programme overview

The Advanced Master in Financial Markets offers a complementary education in finance and financial markets to the curricula of classic graduate programmes in finance or economics. It focuses on creating bridges between theory and practice, as well as on the policy and strategic aspects of the current financial context.

Programme objectives

The Advanced Master in Financial Markets is designed to give students a much deeper understanding of financial markets than the one offered by graduate or classic post-graduate courses.
It examines the connections between the different aspects of finance and the financial markets, as well as the connections between theory and practice of markets and between theory and policy making.

By the end of the programme, you will be able to:

• Understand the financial markets in a way that few students or even young professionals are able to
• Make robust assessments of theoretical and policy-related issues, thanks to the sharing of experience of senior practitioners and top-level academics teaching the courses
• Be more effective and more creative in your professional environment and
• Be a more accomplished performer in the financial sector able to progress faster to senior levels

Job opportunities

Graduates of this master can look forward to job opportunities with a faster advancement potential in a broad range of companies, including:

• Banks
• Investment banks
• Asset managers & global custodians
• Hedge funds and private equity firms
• Consulting firms
• Audit firms
• Regulatory agencies
• Universities and research agencies

To successfully grow in your professional life and make the right choices for your career, it is fundamental to define your goals and have the tools to achieve them. The Solvay Brussels School’s career service will help you in building your career thanks to its strong connection with the business sector and to its dynamic team who will accompany each participant into the professional world. From self-assessment to networking opportunities, our team will assist participants to realise their full potential. Through a range of seminars, coaching sessions, workshops, events and other resources, we help our participants to discover the career path best suited to their personal fulfilment.

Interested? Visit http://am.solvay.edu/financial-markets/

Application Deadline

July 31st 2017
Non-EU citizens shall check visa procedure and length before applying.

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This course focuses on the Anglican theological tradition in particular, within the more general context of Christian theology. Read more
This course focuses on the Anglican theological tradition in particular, within the more general context of Christian theology. Durham offers unparalleled resources for the theological study of Anglicanism, a strong basis for which is given by the Department's close historical links with Durham Cathedral, the seat of numerous theologian-bishops.

Course Structure

Classic Texts in Christian Theology core module, Three option modules, Dissertation.

Core Modules:
-Classic Texts in Christian Theology
-Dissertation

Optional Modules in previous years have included:
2-3 choices from:
-The Anglican Theological Vision
-Liturgy and Sacramentality
-Ritual, Symbolism and Belief in the Anthropology of Religion
-Ecclesiology and Ethnography
-Selected modules from the MA in Theology and Ministry programme

Plus up to 1 choice from:
-Paul and his Interpreters
-Gospels and Canon
-The Bible and Hermeneutics
-Patristic Exegesis
-Patristic Ecclesiology
-Christian Northumbria 600-750
-Conceiving Change in Contemporary Catholicism
-Twentieth-Century Catholic Theology
-Christian Gender
-Principles of Theological Ethics
-Theology, Ethics and Medicine
-Social Scientific Methods in the Study of Religion
-Literature and Religion
-Advanced Hebrew Texts
-Advanced Aramaic
-Middle Egyptian
-The Old Testament Pseudepigrapha and the New Testament
-Catholic Social Thought
-Doctrine of Creation
-Selected modules from the MA in Theology and Ministry programme
-Level 3 undergraduate module, or any Level 1 – 2 language module offered by the Department of Theology and Religion, taken in conjunction with the Extended Study in Theology & Religion module
-30 credits from another Board of Studies (including appropriate credit-bearing language modules offered by the University’s Centre for Foreign Language Study)

Learning and Teaching

Most MA teaching is delivered through small group seminars and tutorials. These exemplify and encourage the various skills and practices required for independent scholarly engagement with texts and issues. Teaching in the Department of Theology & Religion is ‘research led’ at both BA and MA levels, but particularly at MA level. Research led teaching is informed by staff research, but more importantly it aims to develop students as independent researchers themselves, able to pursue and explore their own research interests and questions. This is why the independently researched MA dissertation is the culmination of the MA programme. Such engagement with texts and issues is not only an excellent preparation for doctoral research, it also develops those skills of critical analysis, synthesis and presentation sought and required by employers.

Many MA classes will contain a ‘lecture’ element, conveying information and exemplifying an approach to the subject-matter that will enable students to develop a clear understanding of the subject and improve their own ability to analyse and evaluate information and arguments. Seminars enhance knowledge and understanding through preparation and interaction with other students and staff, promoting awareness of and respect for different viewpoints and approaches, and developing skills of articulacy, advocacy and interrogation. Through small group discussions and tutorials, feedback is provided on student work, with the opportunity to discuss specific issues in detail, enhancing student knowledge and writing skills.

The Dissertation module includes training in generic research skills, from the use of the Library to issues in referencing and bibliography. The subject specific core module introduces students to questions of interpretation and argument in the disciplines encompassed by theology and religion, and helps them to develop their own interests and questions that will issue in the MA dissertation. The latter is a piece of independent research, but it is fostered and guided through individual tutorials with a supervisor, with whom students meet throughout the academic year.

Other admission requirements

*The two principal exceptions to this rule are as follows: graduates of other disciplines who have studied at undergraduate or equivalent level in one or more of the areas in which they hope to work, through their first degrees, through training for the ministry of the churches, and so on; students from overseas universities who have successfully reached a point in their theological studies comparable with completion of a British BA at the standard noted above - for example, on the German model, passing the Zwischenprüfung or Kolloquium and two semesters at the Hauptseminar level.

When applying, please ensure that your two chosen referees send their confidential academic references (using the reference form [Word]) to us in a timely manner. Please note that we are unable to accept ‘open’ references submitted by yourself. The referees may send the references by email directly from their institutional email addresses to provided they are signed, or by post to the address provided on the reference form.

Read less
This course focuses on the Catholic theological tradition in particular, within the more general context of Christian theology. Durham is developing a strong emphasis on a renewed engagement with contemporary Catholicism, and now boasts a Centre for Catholic Studies and the Bede Chair in Catholic Theology. Read more
This course focuses on the Catholic theological tradition in particular, within the more general context of Christian theology. Durham is developing a strong emphasis on a renewed engagement with contemporary Catholicism, and now boasts a Centre for Catholic Studies and the Bede Chair in Catholic Theology. For more information, please contact Professor Paul Murray ()

Course Structure

Classic Texts in Christian Theology core module, Three option modules, Dissertation.
Core Modules:
-Classic Texts in Christian Theology
-Dissertation

Optional Modules in previous years have included:
2-3 choices from:
-Twentieth-Century Catholic Theology
-Conceiving Change in Contemporary Catholicism
-Christian Gender
-Principles of Theological Ethics
-Patristic Ecclesiology
-Patristic Exegesis
-Catholic Social Thought

Plus up to 1 choice from:
-The Anglican Theological Vision
-Liturgy and Sacramentality
-Ritual, Symbolism and Belief in the Anthropology of Religion
-Paul and his Interpreters
-Gospels and Canon
-The Bible and Hermeneutics
-Christian Northumbria 600-750
-Theology, Ethics and Medicine
-Social Scientific Methods in the Study of Religion
-Literature and Religion
-Advanced Hebrew Texts
-Advanced Aramaic
-Middle Egyptian
-The Old Testament Pseudepigrapha and the New Testament
-Ecclesiology and Ethnography
-Doctrine of Creation
-Selected modules from the MA in Theology and Ministry programme
-Level 3 undergraduate module, or any Level 1 – 2 language module offered by the Department of Theology and Religion, taken in conjunction with the Extended Study in Theology & Religion module
-30 credits from another Board of Studies (including appropriate credit-bearing language modules offered by the University’s Centre for Foreign Language Study

Learning and Teaching

Most MA teaching is delivered through small group seminars and tutorials. These exemplify and encourage the various skills and practices required for independent scholarly engagement with texts and issues. Teaching in the Department of Theology &

Most MA teaching is delivered through small group seminars and tutorials. These exemplify and encourage the various skills and practices required for independent scholarly engagement with texts and issues. Teaching in the Department of Theology & Religion is ‘research led’ at both BA and MA levels, but particularly at MA level. Research led teaching is informed by staff research, but more importantly it aims to develop students as independent researchers themselves, able to pursue and explore their own research interests and questions. This is why the independently researched MA dissertation is the culmination of the MA programme. Such engagement with texts and issues is not only an excellent preparation for doctoral research, it also develops those skills of critical analysis, synthesis and presentation sought and required by employers.

Many MA classes will contain a ‘lecture’ element, conveying information and exemplifying an approach to the subject-matter that will enable students to develop a clear understanding of the subject and improve their own ability to analyse and evaluate information and arguments. Seminars enhance knowledge and understanding through preparation and interaction with other students and staff, promoting awareness of and respect for different viewpoints and approaches, and developing skills of articulacy, advocacy and interrogation. Through small group discussions and tutorials, feedback is provided on student work, with the opportunity to discuss specific issues in detail, enhancing student knowledge and writing skills.

The Dissertation module includes training in generic research skills, from the use of the Library to issues in referencing and bibliography. The subject specific core module introduces students to questions of interpretation and argument in the disciplines encompassed by theology and religion, and helps them to develop their own interests and questions that will issue in the MA dissertation. The latter is a piece of independent research, but it is fostered and guided through individual tutorials with a supervisor, with whom students meet throughout the academic year.

Other admission details

*The two principal exceptions to this rule are as follows: graduates of other disciplines who have studied at undergraduate or equivalent level in one or more of the areas in which they hope to work, through their first degrees, through training for the ministry of the churches, and so on; students from overseas universities who have successfully reached a point in their theological studies comparable with completion of a British BA at the standard noted above - for example, on the German model, passing the Zwischenprüfung or Kolloquium and two semesters at the Hauptseminar level.

When applying, please ensure that your two chosen referees send their confidential academic references (using the reference form [Word]) to us in a timely manner. Please note that we are unable to accept ‘open’ references submitted by yourself. The referees may send the references by email directly from their institutional email addresses to provided they are signed, or by post to the address provided on the reference form.

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This exciting new programme is ideal if you have an interest in the academic study of children’s literature, or work in education (e.g. Read more
This exciting new programme is ideal if you have an interest in the academic study of children’s literature, or work in education (e.g. as a teacher or librarian), publishing or children's media. It's also aimed at authors who want to create texts for children- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-childrens-literature/

Award-winning author Michael Rosen is just one of the leading teaching staff on this programme, which is taught mainly in the Department of Educational Studies at Goldsmiths, although those pursuing the Creative Writing pathway will also study modules in the Department of English and Comparative Literature.

From classic works to contemporary texts

You will deepen your familiarity with the range and diversity of genres for children from ‘classic’ works to contemporary texts and develop detailed knowledge and critical understanding of issues and debates in the field. Studying children’s literature at Goldsmiths will also involve examining how texts for children reflect contested constructions of childhood.

Creative writing opportunities

If you are already a committed writer, although you may not have experience of writing for children/young adults, the MA in children's Literature offers a Creative Writing pathway which is taught in partnership with the Department of English and Comparative Literature. You can select modules that will support creative writing practices and enable you to work with practising and published creative writing lecturers and education lecturers to study and explore the nature of writing for children/young adults, creating original texts in the genres of short story, novel and poetry (but not script/screen writing or picture books/graphic novels).

The sociopolitical contexts of children's literature

Goldsmiths' MA in Children’s Literature is unique in its focus on inclusive practices and social justice. We will question the sociopolitical contexts in which texts are produced and interpreted and you will be encouraged to explore how texts for children can challenge or reinforce dominant ideological constructions. We interrogate the power relations that determine what is published, distributed and selected to be read by children in schools.

You will explore the relationship between reader, writer, text and context, and consider the processes that underpin those interactions. We will also examine the inherent paradox that studying children’s literature will involve adults' writing, selecting and responding to texts that are normally intended for children.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Maggie Pitfield.

Careers

Graduates will be well placed to specialise in children’s literature in a range of careers:

Teaching
Publishing
Children’s media
Writing texts for children
Librarianship
Academic study
Youth and community work
Skills
You will acquire a wide-ranging understanding of the field of children’s literature and the social, political cultural processes that surround it. You will also develop your critical thinking, communication and research skills.

Additional Entry Requirement for the Creative Writing Pathway

To study on the Creative Writing Pathway as part of the MA in Children's Literature you should follow the usual application process. If offered a place on the programme, you will submit a substantial piece or pieces of original creative writing, up to a maximum of 3,000 words, prior to the beginning of the programme. This work does not have to be in the form of writing for children/young adults. It will be considered by the Moudle Leader of the Workshop in Creative and Life Writing.

Your submission should include one item from the following list: Your submission should include one item from the following list: 1 short story; 7-10 poems; 1 or 2 extracts from a novel; 1 or 2 extracts from non-fiction writing, for example, memoir.

Submissions can be emailed directly to Maggie Pitfield, Head of Programme.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Literary Translation at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Literary Translation at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

We are an established centre for research into literary translation with expertise in the following languages: Chinese, French, German, Italian, Spanish, and Welsh. We are currently leading a project on the Visualisation of Translation Variation and are particularly interested in proposals which articulate with it. See: http://www.delightedbeauty.org/vvv/Home/Project.

Key Features of MA by Research in Literary Translation

An MA by Research in Literary Translation gives you the chance to pursue a project based around your own passions and interests in Literary Translation, leading to a qualification which can open the door to an academic career or boost employment prospects outside academia (in the private sector, the Civil Service, education, or the translation industry).

The Literary Translation research programme will give you the freedom to explore a topic of your own choosing in Literary Translation and develop a methodology under the close supervision of two experienced academics but without attending regular classes as required in taught programmes.

As a student enrolled on the MA by Research in Literary Translation, you will be supervised closely by two experienced academics in your field. Typically, you will meet them fortnightly in the first term and at regular intervals thereafter. Meetings are logged and goals agreed each time.

All research students are required to attend skills and training courses at College and Institutional level. They give presentations to other research students and staff at departmental seminars and the annual departmental postgraduate symposium in June and the College of Arts and Humanities conference in October. Advanced research students may have opportunities to teach undergraduate tutorials and seminars. You have a budget (currently £200 per year) to attend conferences outside Swansea.

MA by Research in Literary Translation degree typically lasts from one year (full-time study) to two years (part-time study).

The MA by Research in Literary Translation is ideal for those who want:

-an MA qualification in niche areas where taught programmes are not offered;
- the experience of a research degree without committing to a PhD.

Research proposals are invited on any topic in Literary Translation for which staff can provide supervision. You may analyse multiple translations of a classic text, for instance, or the consistency of the translation decisions taken by a particular translator. You may like to investigate a whole genre, such as crime fiction, or you may want to try your own hand at a piece of literary translation, explaining your strategy in a detailed theoretical commentary. It is advisable to email a member of academic staff in the appropriate area before applying (see staff web pages).

For informal enquiries regarding Literary Translation please contact Professor Julian Preece ().

Research Interests

Staff research interests in Translation and Interpreting cover a range of themes, including:

• Literary Translation
• Theatre translation/adaptation
• Translation Theory (including non-Western)
• History of Translation
• Comparative Translation Studies
• Translation and Social Discourse
• Corpus-based Translation Analysis
• Translation and the Lexicon
• Computer-based Lexicography and Terminography
• Translation processes: psycholinguistics of translation, translation workflows
• Translation tools and technologies
• Translation visualisation

Research proposals are invited on any topic in Literary Translation for which staff can provide supervision. You may analyse multiple translations of a classic text, for instance, or the consistency of the translation decisions taken by a particular translator. You may like to investigate a whole genre, such as crime fiction, or you may want to try your own hand at a piece of literary translation, explaining your strategy in a detailed theoretical commentary. The Department benefits from extensive library holdings in print and online form. All postgraduate students have access to two computer-based language laboratories, an advanced Translation and Media computing lab, and a more specialised Translation Research facility housing the latest digitisation, corpus analysis and computer assisted translation tools.

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The MA in History of Art (with a Term in Rome) provides a structured introduction to postgraduate study of the history and philosophy of art. Read more
The MA in History of Art (with a Term in Rome) provides a structured introduction to postgraduate study of the history and philosophy of art.

It includes a term in Rome where we run the MA with the American University of Rome (who provide accommodation and facilities). A range of themes and approaches are considered in this MA with a particular focus on medieval, Renaissance and Baroque art in Italy. The first term is taught in Canterbury.

During the term in Rome, this MA focuses on the art of Rome with a core course that spans almost two millennia and examines the changing face of the eternal city. This core spends more time on the period 1400-1700, which is also the period from which a second course is chosen from a range of topics. You will study the art of Rome first hand, visiting relevant sites and museums, with options to study the history of Rome and specific artists. Kent staff are present for part of the spring term in Rome to ensure continuity of academic guidance and pastoral support.

The programme is intended for graduates in art history and other arts subjects. It gives you the opportunity to pursue your interest in visual art at advanced level, to develop a high level of expertise in topics in history and philosophy of art and to prepare for doctoral research in history of art.

Course structure

You take one core module and one optional module during your first term in Canterbury and your second term in Rome. Over the course of these two terms you discuss with the course director your ideas and plans for your 15,000-word dissertation. The writing of the dissertation takes place in the summer with completion in August.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation.

Term 1 (Canterbury):

Compulsory modules:

HA838 - Key Concepts and Classic Texts in History and Philosophy of Art
One option from:

HA826 - History and Theory of Curating
FI812 - Advanced Film Theory
FR872 - Theories of Art in Modern French Thought
HA826 - History and Theory of Curating
HA835 - A Matter of Taste: The Art and Aesthetics of Food and Drink
HA898 Dissertation
Term 2 (Rome):

Compulsory Module:

HA833 Discovering Rome in Rome: Arts in Rome from antiquity to the present day
One option from:

Optional modules in Rome are taken through the American University in Rome and change each year. Past options have included:

Michelangelo in Rome

This seminar on Michelangelo examines the work of the Renaissance master; his sculpture, painting, architecture and literary production. His works are investigated within their specific historical context, focusing on issues of commission, iconography, censorship, biography, historiography and aesthetics. An excursion to Florence is also planned. Beyond a complete comprehension of Michelangelo’s work, the course aims toward a mastery of art historical research skills, the evaluation of current scholarship and independent critical thought on art.

Term 3: Dissertation

HA833 - Discovering Rome in Rome: Arts in Rome from Antiquity to the Present Da (30 credits)
HA838 - Key Concepts and Classic Texts in History and Philosophy of Art (30 credits)
HA898 - History & Philosophy of Art Dissertation (60 credits)
Teaching and Assessment

Assessment is by two assignments per module and the dissertation.

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This three module course will develop your understanding of the new National Curriculum focus on reading for pleasure. Read more
This three module course will develop your understanding of the new National Curriculum focus on reading for pleasure.

You will focus on understanding how texts are constructed using a range of narrative models and how this aspect of your subject knowledge can be employed in the primary classroom to develop children's abilities to read a range of texts.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/pgcert-education-childrens-literature/

Why choose this course?

- There is a strong focus on applied classroom practice

- You will be taught by an experienced team of colleagues researching and teaching in the area of children's literature

- You will explore a variety of texts currently available, including classic texts, comics, novels in verse form, literature in translation and interactive texts.

This course in detail

The three modules are:

- Reading for pleasure in the primary classroom
(7 sessions in the Autumn term)

Grounded in reader response theory, the focus of this module is to enhance your skills as a teacher of reading in its broadest sense. With an excellent range of high quality texts at the module's heart, you will explore how to read picture books, novels, poetry and interactive texts across the primary ages. By the end of the module, you will have the tools to support children in being able to talk critically and comprehensively about texts and have the knowledge to build a community of successful, lifelong readers.

- Children's literature through the ages: from classic texts to interactive texts and their use in the classroom
(7 sessions in the Spring term)

The profile of children's books has undergone an unparalleled change compared to other fields of literature. From its early days of didactic and moralistic undertones pre-18th century, to the present day where stories are not just written for pleasure but actively encourage children to question the ideologies that surround them, this genre's journey has been fascinating and, arguably, the most diverse. This module will begin with studying some of the early classics and end with children's stories in today's multimedia world. Through a range of theoretical perspectives such as feminism, marxism and post-modernism, this module will explore a range of texts including: classics, novels in verse, literature in translation, apps, traditional tales and comics.

- Investigating practice
(3 workshops and tutorial support in the Summer term)

You will develop an inquiry related to your own practice which can then be assessed through either a report or a portfolio of work. This might include the development of pedagogical approaches or curriculum materials, or investigations into the achievement levels or the opportunities provided for particular groups of learners. It could also include the development of professional practice through shadowing others or engaging in collaborative work across organisations.

The inquiry will be supported by a personal tutor. Group seminars and workshops will provide guidance on the development of methodological tools for the inquiry and enable you to share the stages of project development with other members of the group. You will be allocated a personal tutor for this assignment who will signpost you to relevant academic theory and research and support material.

Please note: as our courses are reviewed regularly, the modules available may vary from those shown here.

Attendance pattern

This course takes place on Wednesday evenings 5.00pm - 8.00pm at the Harcourt Hill Campus.

How this course helps you develop

The PGCertificate aims to develop reflective practitioners at master's level.

Careers

Your learning on the course may lead to better prospects for career advancement and students frequently change role / direction as a result of developing new understandings and skills from their work on the course.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

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Innovation has become an imperative for most private firms but increasingly also in the public sector. Therefore, competences in innovation management are emphasised as one of today's most important competences by CEO's and governments alike. Read more
Innovation has become an imperative for most private firms but increasingly also in the public sector. Therefore, competences in innovation management are emphasised as one of today's most important competences by CEO's and governments alike.

The programme provides a general background on innovation management including

- the management of innovation from invention to commercialisation
- innovation strategies, structures, and cultures
- market forces of innovation and market-oriented new product development
- the management of intellectual property rights
- Entrepreneurship

The programme creates a unique opportunity to experience the challenges throughout the new product development process and to develop a mutual understanding about the rationales on the technology as well as on the business management side. There is a broad empirical basis that such a mutual understanding is a key prerequisite for successful cooperation between R&D and marketing and ultimately for innovation success. The aim of the programme is therefore to enhance students' understandings about strategies, structures, processes, people and cultures to develop successful innovations and to enhance the innovative capability of firms.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

PREREQUISITE COURSES

Management Research Method
The learning objective of this course is to enable you to conduct empirical business research in a valid and reliable manner. You learn how to formulate research questions and to identify an appropriate research plan and methodology for the given set of research questions. This includes methodologies how to define unit of analysis and sample as well as methodologies how to collect, analyze and interpret data.

Entrepreneurship: Shaping Entrepreneurial Thinking
This course will enable you to develop entrepreneurial thinking and behaviour and to start your own firm based on your business ideas. Students develop and evaluate business ideas and learn how to develop a compelling business case based on entrepreneurial market research. The course furthermore includes the decision on the appropriate legal form for their new venture and new venture financing.

Classic and Contemporary Readings in Innovation and Entrepreneurship
The course enables students to create two forms of competences. 1) An improved ability to read, question, and form conclusions from research-based literature, and 2) an overview of the central classic and contemporary literature in the field of innovation and entrepreneurship. Together these competencies provide students with the ability to critically evaluate and choose relevant literature in the field of innovation and entrepreneurship.

New Product Development Clinic
The learning objective is to enable you to understand and execute the crucial tasks in the new product development process from idea generation to commercialisation. The course takes a concrete development problem as point of departure. Students will generate ideas for the solution of this problem and then carry out concept testing, prototype development, market assessment and pre-launch activities. Therefore, you will experience all the challenges in the new product development process hands-on. The course will be co-taught with faculty from Aarhus BSS and Aarhus School of Engineering. The teaching method of the course is project-based.

SPECIALISATION COURSES

Appropriating innovation – Managing Intellectual property rights
In this course the aim is to develop an understanding of how intellectual property rights, particularly patents, can be used as tools for technology development. A short introduction to the history and theory of patents is followed by an examination of the use of patents as tools of technology development. The course will also consider the evidence in support of the theory that patents on significant inventions are used to control and block 'downstream' innovation. Furthermore, the course will consider the 'anti-trust'- patent so-called 'interface' and recent changes to policy in favour of patents in the US.

Organising for Innovation
In this course the aim is to develop an understanding of the firm-internal perspective and context on innovation. This includes the formulation of and decision for innovation strategies, organisational structures and designs for innovation, creativity and performance within innovation teams, cooperation between R&D and marketing in the new product development process, champions and promotors of innovation, the management of radical innovation and the measurement of innovation performance.

Open and User-Driven Innovation
Shorter product life cycles and increased technological complexity of new products and services force firms to increasingly open their innovation processes to external sources of innovation. The learning objective of this course is therefore to enable you to understand which relevant sources of innovation exist outside the firm and how a firm can systematically use these external sources as leverage for new product development and for enhancing the innovative capability of a firm. The course includes emerging forms of open and distributed innovation. Specific focus will be given to user-driven innovation, including market orientation in the new product development process, lead user innovation, user communities and user toolkits.

In the third semester you can choose elective courses within your areas of interest. The courses can either be taken at Aarhus BSS during the semester, at the Summer University or at one of our more than 200 partner universities abroad. You can also participate in internship programmes either in Denmark or abroad.

The fourth semester is devoted to the master's thesis. You may choose the topic of the thesis freely and get a chance to concentrate on and specialize in a specific field of interest. The thesis may be written in collaboration with another student or it may be the result of your individual effort. When the thesis has been submitted it is defended before the academic advisor as well as an external examiner.

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The Advanced Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) Practice programme provides you with the theory and practical skills to become a qualified and competent CBT practitioner after you accrue the required contact, clinical, and supervision hours at the end of the PgDip. Read more
The Advanced Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) Practice programme provides you with the theory and practical skills to become a qualified and competent CBT practitioner after you accrue the required contact, clinical, and supervision hours at the end of the PgDip.

The course is unique in using positive psychology principles and practice. It is an experiential course and will train you to facilitate resilience, flourishing and positive development both in yourself and your clients.

You'll have an opportunity to take part in a question-and-answer session in person with Dr Christine Padesky, and one to two online group sessions where you'll be able to discuss some client issues common to the whole group. This is a unique opportunity to learn from a master clinician.

The programme consists of 6 modules of 20 credits each (a total of 120 credits). The first 3 modules are the modules of the PgCert. These 6 modules will enable you to apply for accreditation as a Cognitive Behaviour Therapist with the British Association of Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapies (BABCP).

After successful completion of the PgDip you'll be able to progress to the MSc Advanced CBT Practice (Resilience and Positive Development) should you wish to develop your research skills.

Modules

Year 1

Module 1: Fundamentals of CBT
Module 2: Advanced CBT protocols for the assessment and treatment of anxiety
Module 3: Advanced CBT protocols for the assessment and treatment of depression, suicidality and low self esteem

Year 2

Module 4: Classic and metacognitive approaches for the treatment of complex presentations
Module 5: Introduction to positive psychology
Module 6: CBT interventions for the development of resilience and flourishing

Year 3 (MSc only)

Module 7: Research in health and social care
Module 8: Dissertation

Students who have successfully completed year one and two will not have to study module 4 (Classic and metacognitive approaches for the treatment of complex presentations), when progressing to the full MSc.

All modules are assessed by a mix of case studies, audio tapes and self-reflective essays.

Placements

You'll need to have secured a client base where you'll see depressed and anxious patients and some patients with complex presentations during the course. This can be within the NHS or within private practice. You'll need approximately 2 completed cases per module. In total you'll need 200 clinical hours of face to face contact with clients. You'll also need to organise a BABCP accredited field supervisor for one individual supervision session, equivalent to one hour, per month. As well as this throughout the course some clinical supervision will be provided by BABCP accredited supervisors at the University.

Employability

At the end of the PgDip you will be eligible to apply independently for BABCP accreditation as a Cognitive Behaviour Therapist. You'll be able to practice in the NHS and in private practice.

This course will train you to develop resilience, flourishing and positive development both in yourself and your clients. This perspective is unique, and there will be high demand for graduates who are able to offer this approach.

In addition to having already obtained or being eligible to apply for BABCP accreditation, at the end of the MSc you will have a research-practitioner degree. You will be able to practice in the NHS and in private practice. Your services will be in high demand because you will be trained to enable people to climb onto pathways of resilience and flourishing in their lives, thereby producing positive development. In addition to the above you will also be able to apply for academic positions as a lecturer and/or a researcher. You may then wish to continue your studies in the form of a PhD.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

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This is the only MA programme in History and Philosophy of Art offered by a British university in Paris and taught in English. Read more
This is the only MA programme in History and Philosophy of Art offered by a British university in Paris and taught in English.

It provides a structured introduction to the postgraduate study of the history and philosophy of art and is intended for graduates in art history, philosophy and related subjects, such as fine art. It gives you the opportunity to pursue your interest in visual art at advanced level and within an interdisciplinary context, to develop a high level of expertise in topics in history and philosophy of art and to prepare for doctoral research in history of art or philosophy of art.

You spend the entire year in the French capital, which allows you to participate in excursions to prominent cultural locations and make use of research resources that are only available in Paris. You have the unique opportunity to study the arts at postgraduate level within the context of a city that has been at the very centre of many crucial artistic and art theoretical developments in the past few centuries.

About the Department of History & Philosophy of Art

The History of Art Department within the School of Arts provides opportunities for graduate study with well-established researchers in the fields of art history, philosophy of art and aesthetics. Staff research covers contemporary art and aesthetics, modernism, the history and philosophy of portraiture, the historiography of art and the Cold War, biographical monographs, the photograph (in its historical, contemporary and critical contexts), and the historical interplay of image, theory and institutions from the Renaissance to the present (especially European and North American).

Studying art as a postgraduate at the University of Kent in Paris will give you the opportunity to experience our rich resources of academic expertise and participate in the activities of the multidisciplinary Aesthetics Research Centre and the Art History and Visual Cultures Research Centre. Our research and teaching will engage you in a dialogue with aesthetic, conceptual and historical perspectives.

Course structure

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation.

Modules

The programme will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. The core compulsory modules are:

- Key Concepts and Classic Texts in History and Philosophy of Art
- Modern Art in Paris
- Dissertation

In order to allow you to explore other subject areas that interest you will have the option to take one of the modules from other programmes that are on offer at the Paris campus:

- From the Idea of a City to Philosophies of Urban Design
- Architecture and Cities 1840s-1960s
- Modernism and Paris
- Film and Modernity
- Paris and the European Enlightenment
- Identity, Trauma and Sexuality in Modern French Literature
- Paris: Reality and Representation
- Best of Enemies: Images of Britain and France in the 19th and 20th Centuries
- Religion and European Thought

HA838 - Key Concepts and Classic Texts in History and Philosophy of Art (30 credits)
HA841 - Modern Art in Paris (30 credits)
HA898 - History & Philosophy of Art Dissertation (60 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is by coursework only.


This programme is also available at Canterbury only or split site between Canterbury and Paris.
https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/search/subject_category/Arts

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The MA in History and Philosophy of Art (with a term in Rome) provides a structured introduction to postgraduate study of the history and philosophy of art. Read more
The MA in History and Philosophy of Art (with a term in Rome) provides a structured introduction to postgraduate study of the history and philosophy of art.

It includes a term in Rome where we run the MA with the American University of Rome. A range of themes and approaches are considered in this MA with a particular focus on medieval, Renaissance and Baroque art in Italy. The first term is taught in Canterbury.

During the term in Rome you will study the art of Rome first hand, visiting relevant sites and museums, with options to study the history of Rome and specific artists. Kent staff are present for part of the spring term in Rome to ensure continuity of academic guidance and pastoral support. The campus is located in the Monteverde district of Rome, a picturesque district with a wide range of shops and amenities. From nearby Trastevere, it is a short bus-ride to the historic centre of Rome with its astonishing range of Roman sites, monuments, churches and museums.

The programme is intended for graduates in art history and other arts subjects. It gives you the opportunity to pursue your interest in visual art at advanced level, to develop a high level of expertise in topics in history and philosophy of art and to prepare for doctoral research in history of art.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/344/history-of-art-rome

About the Department of History of Art

The History of Art Department within the School of Arts, provides opportunities for graduate study with well-established researchers in the fields of art history, philosophy of art and aesthetics. Staff research covers contemporary art and aesthetics, modernism, theories of art, the historiography of art and the Cold War; biographical monographs, the photograph (in its historical, contemporary and critical contexts), and the historical interplay of image, theory and institutions from the Renaissance to the present (especially European and North American).

Postgraduates have the opportunity to participate in the activities of the multidisciplinary Aesthetics Research Centre and the Art History and Visual Cultures Research Centre. There is also a full programme of visiting speakers from across the constituent subject areas within the School of Arts, which includes Film and Drama.

Course structure

You take one core module and one optional module during your first term in Canterbury and your second term in Rome. Over the course of these two terms you discuss with the course director your ideas and plans for your 15,000-word dissertation. The writing of the dissertation takes place in the summer with completion in August.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation.

Term 1 (Canterbury):

Compulsory modules:
HA838 - Key Concepts and Classic Texts in History and Philosophy of Art

One option from:

HA826 - History and Theory of Curating
FI812 - Advanced Film Theory
FR872 - Theories of Art in Modern French Thought
HA826 - History and Theory of Curating
HA835 - A Matter of Taste: The Art and Aesthetics of Food and Drink
HA898 Dissertation

Term 2 (Rome):
Compulsory Module:
HA833 Discovering Rome in Rome: Arts in Rome from antiquity to the present day

One option from:

Optional modules in Rome are taken through the American University in Rome and change each year. Past options have included:

- Michelangelo in Rome

This seminar on Michelangelo examines the work of the Renaissance master; his sculpture, painting, architecture and literary production. His works are investigated within their specific historical context, focusing on issues of commission, iconography, censorship, biography, historiography and aesthetics. An excursion to Florence is also planned. Beyond a complete comprehension of Michelangelo’s work, the course aims toward a mastery of art historical research skills, the evaluation of current scholarship and independent critical thought on art.

Term 3: Dissertation
HA833 - Discovering Rome in Rome: Arts in Rome from Antiquity to the Present Da (30 credits)
HA838 - Key Concepts and Classic Texts in History and Philosophy of Art (30 credits)
HA898 - History & Philosophy of Art Dissertation (60 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is by two assignments per module and the dissertation.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide you with a focused programme of taught postgraduate study in history and philosophy of art; enhanced through the opportunity to study for one term in Rome

- provide you with a taught foundation for subsequent postgraduate research

- enable you to acquire or deepen your knowledge and understanding of the historical and contemporary topics within the history of art and philosophy of art

- enable you to develop your art historical and philosophical skills beyond that expected of an undergraduate; especially through study abroad and site visits

- enable you to develop, articulate and defend art historical and philosophical ideas as they relate to art

- provide access to enhanced intercultural awareness and understanding through the opportunity to study for one term in Rome

- enable you to engage with historical and contemporary theoretical thought about the arts from art historical and philosophical perspectives

- provide opportunities for the development of personal, communication and research skills and other key skills appropriate for graduate employment both in industry and in the public sector.

Research areas

The Department has a collective interest in developing interdisciplinary projects, including projects informed by art history and philosophy of art or aesthetics. Shared areas of research interest include: photography, art theory from the Renaissance to recent times and contemporary art.

Careers

Arts postgraduates have gone on to work in a range of professions, from museum positions and teaching roles to marketing and gallery assistants. Our graduates have found work with Tate Britain, the V&A, Museum of Childhood and other arts, culture and heritage-related organisations.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

Read less
This is the only MA programme in History and Philosophy of Art offered by a British university in Paris and taught in English. Read more
This is the only MA programme in History and Philosophy of Art offered by a British university in Paris and taught in English.

It provides a structured introduction to the postgraduate study of the history and philosophy of art and is intended for graduates in art history, philosophy and related subjects, such as fine art. It gives you the opportunity to pursue your interest in visual art at advanced level and within an interdisciplinary context, to develop a high level of expertise in topics in history and philosophy of art and to prepare for doctoral research in history of art or philosophy of art.

You spend the entire year in the French capital, which allows you to participate in excursions to prominent cultural locations and make use of research resources that are only available in Paris. You have the unique opportunity to study the arts at postgraduate level within the context of a city that has been at the very centre of many crucial artistic and art theoretical developments in the past few centuries.

Students interested in taking this MA as a part-time option would take two modules each year (one per term), plus the dissertation in the final year. The programme can also be studied in Canterbury only or with the year shared between Canterbury and Paris.

About the Department of History & Philosophy of Art

The History of Art Department within the School of Arts provides opportunities for graduate study with well-established researchers in the fields of art history, philosophy of art and aesthetics. Staff research covers contemporary art and aesthetics, modernism, the history and philosophy of portraiture, the historiography of art and the Cold War, biographical monographs, the photograph (in its historical, contemporary and critical contexts), and the historical interplay of image, theory and institutions from the Renaissance to the present (especially European and North American).

Studying art as a postgraduate at the University of Kent in Paris will give you the opportunity to experience our rich resources of academic expertise and participate in the activities of the multidisciplinary Aesthetics Research Centre and the Art History and Visual Cultures Research Centre. Our research and teaching will engage you in a dialogue with aesthetic, conceptual and historical perspectives.

Course Structure

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation.

The programme will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. The core compulsory modules are:

Key Concepts and Classic Texts in History and Philosophy of Art
Modern Art in Paris
Dissertation
In order to allow you to explore other subject areas that interest you will have the option to take one of the modules from other programmes that are on offer at the Paris campus:

From the Idea of a City to Philosophies of Urban Design
Architecture and Cities 1840s-1960s
Modernism and Paris
Film and Modernity
Paris and the European Enlightenment
Identity, Trauma and Sexuality in Modern French Literature
Paris: Reality and Representation
Best of Enemies: Images of Britain and France in the 19th and 20th Centuries
Religion and European Thought
Key Concepts and Classic Texts in History and Philosophy of Art
Modern Art in Paris
History & Philosophy of Art Dissertation

Careers

Arts postgraduates have gone on to work in a range of professions, from museum positions and teaching roles to marketing and gallery assistants. Our graduates have found work with Tate Britain, the V&A, Museum of Childhood and other arts, culture and heritage-related organisations.

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