• Leeds Beckett University Featured Masters Courses
  • Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of York Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Glasgow Featured Masters Courses
  • Regent’s University London Featured Masters Courses
  • Swansea University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Leeds Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
SOAS University of London Featured Masters Courses
University of Birmingham Featured Masters Courses
University of Greenwich Featured Masters Courses
Southampton Solent University Featured Masters Courses
Loughborough University Featured Masters Courses
"civilization"×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Civilization)

  • "civilization" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 23
Order by 
This degree is intended for students with a general interest in sociology who wish to update, extend and deepen their knowledge and understand current developments in the field. Read more
This degree is intended for students with a general interest in sociology who wish to update, extend and deepen their knowledge and understand current developments in the field. The programme aims to provide students with opportunities to expand their knowledge of the discipline by engaging with contemporary research and by undertaking historical and comparative study.

Compulsory modules:

The Research Process: This module introduces the main varieties of both quantitative and qualitative research in the social sciences. Principles of research design and issues of data collection and analysis are studied.

Applied Social Research: This module delivers specialist training in sociological research. It draws upon generic social science research skills and knowledge and applies them to a joint group project. In the group project, students will select the topic in which they will develop their skills as empirical researchers. It is a ‘hands on’ module and students will engage in hypothesis development, research design, data gathering, data analysis and interpretation of the results.

Optional modules:

Researching Community: This module examines the developments in the field of community research and related theoretical and policy debates surrounding the application of ideas of ‘community’ to current economic and social changes. The module focuses on four main themes:

Conceptual issues: the meaning of ‘community’ and its use as a concept in social scientific and popular discourse. This will be considered in relation to different theoretical approaches such as social constructionism, realism, and post-structuralism.
Empirical applications: an examination of classic and contemporary examples of community research and relevant case studies dealing with different forms of ‘community’.
Policy issues: relating to contemporary forms of intervention in relation to community development, regeneration, mobilisation, participation, leadership and power. This will be considered in the context of frameworks such as communitarianism, social capital, and the ‘third way’.
Community methodology: examines how ‘community’ has been researched and the tools and methods available for empirical investigation. These include ethnographic studies, large-scale surveys, ‘community profiling’ and auditing, and action research.
Nationalism and Minorities: This module will examine key issues and debates concerning the growing claims by ethnic and national minorities and indigenous peoples for distinct language, territorial and other minority rights and recognition within nation-states and beyond. The relationships between nationalism, citizenship and minority rights will be considered with reference to empirical examples. Debates and policies concerned with the management of cultural and ethnic diversity by the state will also be considered. The approach is interdisciplinary drawing on sociology, political theory, anthropology, law and education, with case study examples provided from Europe, North America, Asia and Oceania. It aims to provide students with a global and comparative understanding of individual cases, of their historical antecedents, and of the key similarities and differences between them.

Sociology of Everyday Life: The module deals with different theories of everyday life, for example those focusing on face-to face communication. Other theories emphasize how social life is “performed” in everyday contexts and its “dramaturgy”. It is discussed how individuals construct meaning out of their social lives. Some approaches reflect on the constraints of society, especially of powerful institutions, and how they affect the “lifeworld”. Empirical studies of everyday life will also be part of the module. From airports to zoos, human behaviour in different settings has been described and placed in theoretical context. The creation of social stigmas, or of social spaces can be studied. Students will be introduced to the use of different methodologies, like observation and listening to individuals telling their story.

Culture, Race and Civilization: The module explores normative and descriptive concepts of culture, the dichotomy of culture and civilization, and the dialectical tension between all of these. Culture appears in a number of different contexts: for example as promise of Enlightenment, or as social reality of the everyday. The relation between “multiculturalism” and ideas of “nation” and “race” will be part of the discussion. What is the role of the idea of “civilization” for racism and racialization? Another aspect to be covered is the relation between wealth and culture. “Cultural critique” and globalization theories provide different answers. Finally, the role of violence in relation to culture, race and civilization will be discussed.

MA Dissertation

The dissertation is undertaken on completion of the taught modules. It is valued at 60 credits (one-third of the MA degree) and will be around 20,000 words in length.

Part-time students in employment may choose a topic related to their profession and an area in which they wish to develop further expertise and specialisation. Under guidance of a dissertation tutor, students will undertake their MA dissertation work independently on a topic of their choice. This may be a piece of empirical research including primary or secondary data analysis or a theoretical dissertation.

Read less
In the Master's programme in Cultural History of Modern Europe, you will study Europe's position in the world from a cultural-historical perspective, with an emphasis on modern history. Read more

Explore Europe’s history and culture from a global perspective

In the Master's programme in Cultural History of Modern Europe, you will study Europe's position in the world from a cultural-historical perspective, with an emphasis on modern history.

Our programme offers you profound insight into the history of ideas and practices that form the identities of individuals, groups, and societies, including heritage and public history in international frameworks. The programme content focuses on theories of modern cultural history, global perspectives on European civilization, the politics of heritage and cultural memory, aspects of transnational history and postcolonial culture, global practices of citizenship, and the development of career-oriented academic competencies. We begin by looking at contemporary problems and discussions.

This programme offers an English track and a Dutch track. The modules offered in these tracks are the same – only the language of instruction differs.

Read less
The programme is tailored for students who wish to proceed to further research on the doctoral level on a topic related to the history of the Near and Middle East, South Asia, South East Asia, East Asia and Africa, but it also makes sense as a stand-alone programme for those who wish to explore a specific topic or question within a shorter period of time. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The programme is tailored for students who wish to proceed to further research on the doctoral level on a topic related to the history of the Near and Middle East, South Asia, South East Asia, East Asia and Africa, but it also makes sense as a stand-alone programme for those who wish to explore a specific topic or question within a shorter period of time.

The two-year intensive language pathway is directed at students who want to engage with a country in a professional as well as academic way, as the intensive language course would enable them to reach a near proficient knowledge of the language.

Career opportunities include:

- Further historical research (PhD)
- Research positions in government institutions, NGOs, journalism, etc.

This is the only Master-level programme in Historical Research Methods focusing on the study of Asia and Africa in the UK. It provides the unique opportunity to develop and carry out a research project under the guidance of regional specialists and thus an ideal preparation for a research degree. It can also be taken with an intensive language pathway over two years, therefore making this programme unique in Europe.

Please see the webpage for the Japanese pathway of the programme, and contact the MA convenor of that pathway for further information on the language component. Further information on entry level language requirements can be found on the programme page.

The Korean pathway is designed for beginner learners of Korean. Students with prior knowledge of Korean are advised to contact the programme convenor, Dr Anders Karlsson (). Students will take four course units in the Korean language, one of them at a Korean university during the summer after year 1.

The Arabic pathway is designed for beginner learners of Arabic. Students will take four units of Arabic, one of them at the Qasid Institute in Jordan or another partner institution during the summer after year 1. Programme convenor: Dr Mustafa Shah ()

Email:

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/history/programmes/ma-historial-research-methods-and-intensive-language/

Structure

Students take 4 course units over the period of their programme of study (i.e. 2 or 4 years). This includes the core course Sources and Research Design in Historical Research (1 unit), which is taught on a one-to-one basis by the dissertation supervisor, the compulsory course Research Methods in History with Special Reference to Asia and Africa (1 unit), a minor course or courses (to the value of 1 unit) from a list of approved options and/or a language course from the Faculty of Languages and Cultures, and a 10,000 word dissertation (1 unit).

In the intensive language pathways, students take 2 intensive language units and one history unit in their first year. During the summer, they will participate in a summer school abroad (location dependant on language). Upon their return, they will take 1 language unit and 2 history units and complete work on their dissertation (1 unit). For example, Year 1: 2 intensive language units + compulsory course Research Methods in History with Special Reference to Asia and Africa; Year 2: 1 intensive language unit + core course Sources and Research Design in Historical Research (1 unit) + minor courses to the value of 1 unit + dissertation.

Aims and Outcomes

- Knowledge of a variety of theoretical issues and methodological approaches relevant for the study of historical problems

- Practical research and writing skills, developed through the study of primary and secondary sources related to Asian and African history

- A sound grounding for further research, either in a doctoral programme or in a professional environment

- A near proficient ability in the a language.

Knowledge:
1. How to locate materials and use research resources (particularly research library catalogues, archival hand lists, and digital resources), assess data and evidence critically from manuscripts, printed, and digital sources, and solve problems of conflicting sources and conflicting interpretations.

2. How to formulate and carry out a research project, based on a thorough knowledge and understanding of the particular field of study chosen by the student, the relevant literature and current debates.
3. Language skills appropriate to chosen region of study.

Intellectual (thinking) skills:
1. Students should become precise and cautious in their assessment of evidence and understand what the different types of historical sources can and cannot tell us.

2. Students should question interpretations, however authoritative, maintain an open-minded attitude to interpretations that challenge older interpretations, and reassess evidence for themselves.

3. Students should be able to think critically about the nature of the historical discipline, its methodology, historiography, and openness for interdisciplinary approaches.

4. Students should be able to reflect about the potential of historical research on non-Western societies and civilizations for the advancement of the historical discipline and human civilization in general.

Subject-based practical skills:
1. Effective writing and referencing skills, attention to detail and accuracy in presentation.

2. Effective oral presentation of seminar papers, articulation of ideas, and constructive participation in seminar discussions.

3. Ability to retrieve, sift and select information from a variety of sources, effective note-taking, record keeping and planning of projects.

4. Effective use of relevant professional databases.

5. In the two year intensive language pathway, to acquire/develop skills in a language to Effective Operational Proficiency level, i.e., being able to communicate in written and spoken medium in a contemporary language

Transferable skills:
1. Critical thinking.

2. Ability to communicate effectively in oral and written forms.

3. Information gathering skills from conventional and electronic sources.

4. Effective time-management, writing to word limits, and meeting deadlines.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

Read less
The programme would suit students with a keen interest in learning about the historical conditions of the contemporary world, and in particular those who are prepared to look at the world from the perspective of other people and cultures. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The programme would suit students with a keen interest in learning about the historical conditions of the contemporary world, and in particular those who are prepared to look at the world from the perspective of other people and cultures. While the course is open to students from a broad range of backgrounds, the ideal applicant would have an UG degree in History (or a related discipline), some knowledge of foreign, including Asian or African languages, and preferably some relevant background in the region of specialism.

Graduates will find a wide range of career options open to them, in particular those involving inter-cultural or international contact, such as in international organizations, government institutions, non-profit organizations, and journalism, but also museums, educational institutions, or the publishing sector more generally. It would also be a suitable preparation for students considering embarking on a research degree focusing on one of the regional or topical areas of expertise represented in the department.

The two-year intensive language pathway is directed at students who want to engage with Asia, Africa and the Near and Middle East in a professional as well as academic way, as the intensive language course would enable them to reach a near proficient knowledge of the language.

This is the only Master-level programme in History focusing on the study of Asia, the Middle East and Africa in the UK, and can therefore offer an unrivalled breadth of courses on the history of these regions. The programme provides a sound training in the historical sciences.

It can also be taken with an intensive language pathway over two years, therefore making this programme unique in Europe.

Email:

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/history/programmes/ma-history-and-intensive-language/

Structure

The programme includes the following elements totalling four units: Courses totalling at least two units from List A [History courses], including a half or full unit designated as the Major course; further minor courses totalling one unit from Lists A [Major and minor history courses], B [Courses from other departments], C [Language courses] or D [Intercollegiate courses]; and a dissertation of 10,000 words written in conjunction with the Major course (one unit).

There are five regional pathways within the MA History: Africa, East Asia, Near and Middle East, South Asia and South East Asia. To meet the pathway requirement, students must choose courses from the relevant regional section in List A to the minimum value of 1.5 units, including their Major.

In the two-year intensive language pathway, students take 2 intensive language units and one discipline unit in their first year. During the summer, they will participate in a summer school abroad. Upon their return, they will take one intensive language unit in their second year and two discipline units. They would also be expected to choose a Major in which to write the dissertation. In the intensive-language pathway, the same rules apply as for the usual MA.

Please see the webpage for the Japanese pathway of the programme, and contact the MA convenor of that pathway for further information on the language component. Further information on entry level language requirements can be found on the programme page.

The Korean pathway is designed for beginner learners of Korean. Students with prior knowledge of Korean are advised to contact the programme convenor, Dr Anders Karlsson (). Students will take four course units in the Korean language, one of them at a Korean university during the summer after year 1.

The Arabic pathway is designed for beginner learners of Arabic. Students will take four units of Arabic, one of them at the Qasid Institute in Jordan or another partner institution during the summer after year 1. Programme convenor: Dr Mustafa Shah ()

MA History and Intensive Language Programme Specification (pdf; 362kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/history/programmes/ma-history-and-intensive-language/file93560.pdf

Aims and Outcomes

- An advanced understanding of the historical sciences and its various methodologies and approaches in general, and specialist knowledge of Asian and African history in particula

- Practical research and writing skills, developed through the study of primary and secondary sources related to Asian and African history

- The critical, conceptual, and analytical skills required for historical research as well as for positions of responsibility in all other professions

- In the two-year pathway, the student will also be provided with a near proficient ability in a language.

Knowledge:
1. Factual knowledge about the histories of Asian and African societies, the ways they interacted with each other and other world regions of the world, and the major historical forces that shaped our contemporary world.

2. Familiarity with a variety of different approaches to historical research and current scholarly debates, and, on that basis, the ability to formulate a valuable research question.

3. How to locate materials and use research resources (particularly research library catalogues, archival hand lists, and digital resources), assess data and evidence critically from manuscripts, printed, and digital sources, and solve problems of conflicting sources and conflicting interpretations.

4. Language skills appropriate to chosen region and field of study (recommended).

Intellectual (thinking) skills:
1. Students should be able to synthesize different kinds of information, become precise and cautious in their assessment of evidence and understand what the different types of historical sources can and cannot tell us.

2. Students should question interpretations, however authoritative, maintain an open-minded attitude to interpretations that challenge older interpretations, and analyse and reassess evidence and research questions for themselves.

3. Students should be able to think critically about the nature of the historical discipline, its methodology, historiography, and openness for interdisciplinary approaches.

4. Students should be able to reflect about the potential of historical research on non-Western societies and civilizations for the advancement of the historical discipline and human civilization in general.

Subject-based practical skills:
1. Effective writing and referencing skills, attention to detail and accuracy in presentation.

2. Effective oral presentation of seminar papers, articulation of ideas, and constructive participation in seminar discussions.

3. Ability to retrieve, sift and select information from a variety of sources, including relevant professional databases, effective note-taking, record keeping and planning of projects.

4. Ability to formulate research questions and design an independent research project, including the use of primary sources.

5. In the two year intensive language pathway, to acquire/develop skills in a language to Effective Operational Proficiency level, i.e., being able to communicate in written and spoken medium in a contemporary language

Transferable skills:
1. Critical thinking.

2. Ability to communicate effectively in oral and written forms.

3. Information gathering skills from conventional and electronic sources.

4. Effective time-management, writing to word limits, and meeting deadlines.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

Read less
A single degree program incorporates a variety of options and tracks. There are three options. the French Option, the Spanish Option, and the Romance languages Option (which combines languages). Read more
A single degree program incorporates a variety of options and tracks:
There are three options: the French Option, the Spanish Option, and the Romance languages Option (which combines languages). All three options have thesis and nonthesis tracks. The French and Spanish options also allow for an applied linguistics track (thesis or nonthesis). Regardless of the option or track, all new graduate teaching assistants must enroll for the Practicum in Applied Linguistics (either FR 512 or SP 502).

Nonthesis track of the master of arts in Romance languages (Plan II). The nonthesis track for the French, Spanish, and Romance languages options incorporates 30 hours of coursework (or 36 hours of coursework for the applied linguistics version). Included in all nonthesis tracks of the master of arts in Romance languages is a core of five courses in the five areas listed below (approximately 50 percent of the major). Twenty-one hours of the coursework must be language specific.

1. Teaching Practicum/Topics in Linguistics
2. Proseminar: Research Methodology/Critical Theory
3. Topics in Culture and Civilization
4. Graduate Seminar
5. Special Topics/Directed Readings

All nonthesis tracks require success on comprehensive exams before granting of the degree.
Thesis track of the master of arts in Romance languages (Plan I). A description of the typical configuration for the various thesis tracks of the master of arts in Romance languages follows.

* Spanish Option, standard version with thesis (Plan I). Curriculum requirements: 24 hours of coursework and a thesis. The curriculum centers on Peninsular and Spanish-American literature. Requirements include success on comprehensive written and oral examinations before granting of the degree. The written examination is based on the coursework. The oral examination is based on the coursework and on a pre-established reading list.

* Spanish Option, applied linguistics track with thesis (Plan I). Curriculum requirements: 30 hours of coursework and a thesis. In addition to the thesis, the applied linguistics track involves three components: language, linguistics, and applied linguistics. The language component consists of 15 hours of course credit in Spanish language, literature, and culture (a minimum of 6 hours must be in Peninsular literature and 6 hours in Spanish-American literature). The linguistics component is comprised of a 3-hour descriptive linguistics course (SP 556). The applied linguistics component consists of 12 hours of coursework in second language acquisition and pedagogy (SP 502, EN 613, and two of the following: SP 581, EN 610, EN 612, CIE 577, or other approved courses; for descriptions of courses bearing the EN prefix, see the Department of English section of this catalog; for a description of CIE 577, see "Curriculum and Instruction Course Descriptions" in the College of Education section). Requirements include success on comprehensive written and oral examinations before granting of the degree. All examinations are based on the coursework.

* Romance Languages Option, with thesis (Plan I). Curriculum requirements: 24-30 hours of coursework and a thesis. The curriculum requires study of French and Spanish, one as the major and one as the minor. The major includes a minimum of 18 hours. The minor includes a minimum of 12 hours. More than the minimum is recommended for both the major and the minor. Graduate courses in Italian studies are also available (see the RL prefix in course listings below). Requirements include success on comprehensive written and oral examinations before granting of the degree. All exams are based on the coursework.

Read less
The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences is a thriving center of intellectual excellence that encompasses 14 academic departments and 80 degree programs. Read more
The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences is a thriving center of intellectual excellence that encompasses 14 academic departments and 80 degree programs. Its more than 2,500 students are engaged in a wide variety of challenging courses and hands-on learning experiences that extend across all areas of the humanities and sciences – from the great philosophers and classic literature to the world economy and environmental sustainability.

At the core of each department are faculty members who have garnered national acclaim for their best-selling books, ground-breaking research and creative endeavors. Together, students and their professors explore globally significant subjects and work towards the goal of improving every aspect of the way in which human beings live. To learn more about a specific area of study, click on the left-hand navigation bar for a full listing of academic departments.

English

Through the study of English, students learn to evaluate sensibilities both past and present, acquiring a profound knowledge of their own humanity and of the human condition in general. The study of English helps develop fluency of expression, skill in logical analysis, and facility in planning, organizing, and revising.

Undergraduate and graduate programs in English with a concentration in literature offers you an opportunity to explore the world around you and enduring issues of identity, morality, spirituality, and material success through the great minds of Western civilization.

The writing concentration explores various forms of creative expression through course work in literature, creative writing and non-fiction writing. Students pursuing this concentration have the opportunity to take courses in “Academic Writing” (expository, argumentative, creative writing), “Performance Writing” (screenplays, teleplays), “Writing for the Marketplace” (business, public relations), and “Rhetorical Theory” (ancient and modern).

With deep study of great literature, development of effective writing and communication skills, and courses in logic and political science, English is an excellent, traditional pre-law major, and with appropriate introductory sequences in the sciences, English is also an excellent pre-medical or pre-dental major. With a minor in Business or Computer Science, a student who majors in English will prepare especially well for many executive positions in business and government.

M.A. in English

The English language is arguably the most flexible instrument of thought and expression in the world. From the poetic drama of the Elizabethans to the experimental pyrotechnics of the modern novel, the study of English literature offers ever-fresh insights into the human condition, while helping students improve their command of today’s most influential language.

The 36-credit Master of Arts in English curriculum combines in-depth study of the wealth of the British and American literary traditions with an examination of how the language developed over time and how it is used in everyday discourse. As a degree candidate you will take three required courses designed to strengthen your critical reading and writing skills: “Text(s) in Context,” “Research and Criticism,” and “The Critical Tradition.” A thesis is also required.

You will also choose seven electives from a rich array of options that include: “Style and Syntax” (for writers and others who need a theoretical and technical knowledge of the field); “Cultural Linguistics” (an exploration of human communication in its cultural context, including the origins of language); “Middle English Literature” (lyric, romance, tale, fable and drama in the period 1100-1500); and “20th Century American Literature” (an intensive study of writers such as Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Faulkner, Pynchon and Morrison).

Through its wide-ranging subject matter and focus on reading and writing proficiency, the study of English prepares students for the broadest variety of careers. Studies show that an ability to learn new skills and procedures is an outstanding characteristic of those who have majored in English. Many graduates of master’s programs in English go on to become elementary or secondary school teachers or pursue doctorates and become college professors, but a graduate degree in English can also be excellent preparation for a career in business, law, journalism, public relations and many other fields.

Read less
The MA in French Studies specializes in the study of the French language as well as francophone culture and literatures all around the world. Read more
The MA in French Studies specializes in the study of the French language as well as francophone culture and literatures all around the world. Our program focuses on literary history, criticism, and theory, which provide an excellent foundation for furthering French studies in a PhD program in any high profile university in Canada and abroad. The Department does its very best to tailor student programs based on their individual areas of interest for study and research. The Department has been expanding its interest areas to include a wide range of specializations, from the study of classic literatures to francophone cultures, translation studies, French Newfoundland Studies, and language acquisition. Potential candidates for the program will receive guidance and supervision from highly qualified and competent researchers and professors. Students may also have the opportunity to teach first year French courses – an invaluable university teaching experience!

MA – The MA in French Studies may take the form of the study of the French language or of francophone literature, including the study of literary history, criticism, or theory. It may also include the study of French language cinema or of other aspects of francophone civilization. The program involves courses and a thesis, and can be completed in two years of full-time study.

Read less
Founded in 1785, UNB’s Classics and Ancient History department has a long history of helping students trace the continuation and evolution of the classical tradition into modern times. Read more
Founded in 1785, UNB’s Classics and Ancient History department has a long history of helping students trace the continuation and evolution of the classical tradition into modern times. Our graduate program offers a wide range of courses, including ancient myth and civilization, language, philosophy, religion, history, art and archaeology—from the Bronze Age through to Byzantine times.

Study the oldest discipline in the humanities at UNB, a friendly campus with small class sizes and dedicated professors. Our students work closely with faculty to tailor a personalized course of study that provides a strong basis for entry into leading PhD programs and professional schools. Many Classics and Ancient History graduates go on to make history themselves.

The program in Classics benefits from the work of the Centre for Hellenic Studies, which was established in 2007 and is the first of its kind in the Atlantic region and one of a very small number across Canada. The purpose of the Centre is to foster an understanding and appreciation of the impact of Hellenic culture and language on contemporary life across such diverse areas as art, architecture, politics, philosophy, religion, social sciences, law, medicine, and the sciences.

Research Areas

-Greek Literature, Culture, and History
-Roman Literature, Culture, and History
-Greek Philosophy
-Greek and Roman Art and Archaeology
-Hellenic Culture and Language

Request More Information

You can request more information about our Graduate Programs here: http://www.unb.ca/admissions/request-information.html

Read less
Since 1993, the European Studies program has brought together a dynamic group of scholars and students interested in European languages, cultures, histories, politics and business. Read more
Since 1993, the European Studies program has brought together a dynamic group of scholars and students interested in European languages, cultures, histories, politics and business. European Studies offers an undergraduate Honours major and minor within the B.A. program. It also offers an M.A. with a focus on Exploring European Identities and participates in the Erasmus Mundus M.A. program, Crossways in Cultural Narratives, offered in collaboration with seven European partner universities.

This innovative interdisciplinary programme combines humanities and social science perspectives to the study of Europe, both past and present. It aims to provide students with a flexible, interdisciplinary approach to European Studies that allows for specialization within a core discipline and promotes expertise in European, culture, history, contemporary politics and society, and languages. The faculty for this interdisciplinary programme is drawn from several Schools and Departments, spanning two Colleges, the College of Arts and College of Social and Applied Human Sciences. Faculty members have research interests in such diverse areas as European identities (gender, minorities, national), youth cultures, literature, music and art in comparative perspective, Western philosophy, EU governance and policies, European citizenship and migration policies. Students who graduate from this programme will be equipped to pursue further study at the PhD level in an interdisciplinary or a single-discipline programme, or embark on careers in national and international organizations that focus on Europe, and in companies that do business with Europe.

Programme of Study

The programme includes a major research paper which may either concentrate on a single discipline or be interdisciplinary in its focus. In addition, students may choose to spend a semester at university in Europe for research and cultural immersion. The course requirements include two core courses. Research Methods is designed to introduce students to advanced research in European studies. European Identities is intended to familiarize students with historical and contemporary ideas of the ‘nation’ and of ‘Europe’, and relationships of these ideas to identity, from an interdisciplinary perspective. Students may select electives from other European Studies courses (e.g. Europe and the Discourse of Civilization; European Integration and the EU) or courses that focus on Europe from other programmes.

Read less
The MA in Classics is our core research training degree, suitable for anyone wishing to pursue doctoral work in a branch of Classics. Read more
The MA in Classics is our core research training degree, suitable for anyone wishing to pursue doctoral work in a branch of Classics. The programme places a strong emphasis on language training, on theoretically informed approaches to Classical texts, and on practical engagement with your chosen specialism. The course is composed of a core research training module, a module in a relevant language (ancient or modern), a 15,000 word dissertation, and two elective modules, which are offered in the areas of current research interests of members of staff.

Course Structure

For information on the structure of the course, please see our department web pages (https://www.dur.ac.uk/courses/info/?id=9532&title=Classics&code=Q8K307&type=MA&year=2016#coursecontent)
Core Modules:
-Dissertation
-Classical Research Methods and Resources
-Compulsory language module (Latin for research/Ancient Greek for research/another ancient language/modern language)

In previous years, optional modules available included:
-Forms After Plato
-Latin Text Seminar
-Greek Text Seminar
-Akkadian
-Latin Love Elegy
-Religious Life in The Roman Near East
-Monumental Architecture of The Roman East
-Vitruvius, On Architecture: The First Treatise On Architecture, Its Significance and Legacy
-Greek Sacred Regulations
-Ancient Philosophers On Necessity, Fate and Free Will
-The Classical Tradition: Art, Literature, Thought
-Comparative Approaches to Homeric Epic
-Greek Text Seminar On Homeric Epic
-Latin Text Seminar On Roman Epic
-Life and Death On Roman Sarcophagi
-Juvenal's Satires in Context
-Ancient Philosophers On Origins
-Animals in Graeco-roman Antiquity
-The Queen of The Desert: Rise and Decline of Palmyra's Civilization
-The Roman Republic: Debates and Approaches
-Rewriting empire: Eusebius of Caesarea and the First Christian History

Not all modules will be offered every year, and new modules (both elective and core) are added regularly. Students may also substitute modules offered in other departments, such as Theology, Philosophy, English, Archaeology, or History.

Learning and Teaching

The MA in Classics is principally conceived as a research training programme which aims to build on the skills in independent learning acquired in the course of the student’s first degree and enable them to undertake fully independent research at a higher level. Contact time with tutors for taught modules is typically a total of 5 hours per week (rising to 7 for someone beginning Latin or ancient Greek at this level), with an emphasis on small group teaching, and a structure that maximises the value of this time, and best encourages and focuses the student’s own independent study and preparation. On average, around 2 hours a week of other relevant academic contact (research seminars, dissertation supervision) is also available.

At the heart of the course is a module focused on the range of research methods and resources available to someone working in the field of Classics. This is run as a weekly class, with a mixture of lectures and student-led discussions. Four further elective modules deal with particular specialised subjects. Students must choose one module involving work with a relevant foreign language (ancient or modern). All those offered will form part of the current research activity of the tutor taking the module. Numbers for each module are typically very small (there are rarely more than five in a class). Typically, classes are two hours long and held fortnightly, and discussion is based on student presentations. (Modules for those beginning ancient Latin or Greek are typically more heavily subscribed, but their classes also meet more often: 3 hours per week.) All students write a 15,000-word dissertation, for which they receive an additional five hours of supervisory contact with an expert in their field of interest.

All staff teaching on the MA are available for consultation by students, and advertise office hours when their presence can be guaranteed. The MA Director acts as academic adviser to MA students, and is available as an additional point of contact, especially for matters concerning academic progress. MA students are strongly encouraged to attend the Department’s two research seminar series. Although not a formal (assessed) part of the MA, we aim to instil the message that engagement with these seminars across a range of subjects is part of the students’ development as researchers and ought to be viewed as essential to their programme. In addition, MA students are welcomed to attend and present at the ‘Junior Work-in-Progress’ seminar series organised by the PhD students in the Department. Finally, the student-run Classics Society regularly organises guest speakers – often very high-profile scholars from outside Durham.

Other admission details

*Note that this need not be 'Classics' (so named). If your plan is to specialise in ancient history, literature, or philosophy, for example, it might be perfectly natural to apply with a first degree in History, or English, or Philosophy; or you might just have taken a substantial range of Classical options along the course of your previous studies.

Read less
This is a specialist programme geared towards preparing students for higher research in ancient philosophy - partly through direct research training, and partly through modules taught by experts in their field in small-group seminars. Read more
This is a specialist programme geared towards preparing students for higher research in ancient philosophy - partly through direct research training, and partly through modules taught by experts in their field in small-group seminars. Durham has a longstanding tradition of international excellence in the field of ancient philosophy, with several recent doctoral students having gone on to take up academic positions in the UK and abroad. The programme lasts for one year (two years part-time), and centres around a core module on a topic in ancient philosophy.

Other key elements of the course include a core research training module, a 15,000 word dissertation, and one elective module, which is offered in the areas of current research interests of members of staff.

Course Structure

For information on the structure of the course, please view our website: https://www.dur.ac.uk/courses/info/?id=9536&title=Ancient+Philosophy&code=Q8K707&type=MA&year=2016#coursecontent

Core Modules:
-Dissertation
-Classical Research Methods and Resources
-Compulsory language module (Latin for research/Ancient Greek for research/another ancient language/modern language)
-Forms After Plato or Ancient Philosophers on Origins or Ancient Philosophers On Necessity, Fate and Free Will.

Optional Modules
In previous years, optional modules available included:
-Forms After Plato
-Latin Text Seminar
-Greek Text Seminar
-Akkadian
-Latin Love Elegy
-Religious Life in The Roman Near East
-Monumental Architecture of The Roman East
-Vitruvius, On Architecture: The First Treatise On Architecture, Its Significance and Legacy
-Greek Sacred Regulations
-Ancient Philosophers On Necessity, Fate and Free Will
-The Classical Tradition: Art, Literature, Thought
-Comparative Approaches to Homeric Epic
-Greek Text Seminar On Homeric Epic
-Latin Text Seminar On Roman Epic
-Life and Death On Roman Sarcophagi
-Juvenal's Satires in Context
-Ancient Philosophers On Origins
-Animals in Graeco-roman Antiquity
-The Queen of The Desert: Rise and Decline of Palmyra's Civilization
-The Roman Republic: Debates and Approaches.
-Rewriting empire: Eusebius of Caesara and the First Christian History

Not all modules will be offered every year, and new modules (both elective and core) are added regularly. Students may also be substitute modules offered in other departments such as Theology, Philosophy, English, Archaeology, or History.

Course Learning and Teaching

The MA in Ancient Philosophy is principally conceived as a research training programme which aims to build on the skills in independent learning acquired in the course of the student’s first degree and enable them to undertake fully independent research at a higher level. Contact time with tutors for taught modules is typically a total of 5 hours per week (rising to 7 for someone beginning Latin or ancient Greek at this level), with an emphasis on small group teaching, and a structure that maximises the value of this time, and best encourages and focuses the student’s own independent study and preparation. On average, around 2 hours a week of other relevant academic contact (research seminars, dissertation supervision) is also available.

At the heart of the course is a module focused on the range of research methods and resources available to someone working in the field of Classics. This is run as a weekly class, with a mixture of lectures and student-led discussions. Four further elective modules deal with particular specialised subjects. Students must choose one module involving work with a relevant foreign language (ancient or modern), and one dealing directly with research on ancient philosophy. All those offered will form part of the current research activity of the tutor taking the module. Numbers for each module are typically very small (there are rarely more than five in a class). Typically, classes are two hours long and held fortnightly, and discussion is based on student presentations. (Modules for those beginning ancient Latin or Greek are typically more heavily subscribed, but their classes also meet more often: 3 hours per week.) All students write a 15,000-word dissertation, for which they receive an additional five hours of supervisory contact with an expert in their field of interest.

All staff teaching on the MA are available for consultation by students, and advertise office hours when their presence can be guaranteed. The MA Director acts as academic adviser to MA students, and is available as an additional point of contact, especially for matters concerning academic progress. MA students are strongly encouraged to attend the Department’s two research seminar series. Although not a formal (assessed) part of the MA, we aim to instil the message that engagement with these seminars across a range of subjects is part of the students’ development as researchers and ought to be viewed as essential to their programme. In addition, MA students are welcomed to attend and present at the ‘Junior Work-in-Progress’ seminar series organised by the PhD students in the Department. Finally, the student-run Classics Society regularly organises guest speakers – often very high-profile scholars from outside Durham.

Read less
This is a programme geared towards preparing students for higher research into the interaction of the classical world with the Near East - partly through direct research training, and partly through modules taught by experts in their field in small-group seminars. Read more
This is a programme geared towards preparing students for higher research into the interaction of the classical world with the Near East - partly through direct research training, and partly through modules taught by experts in their field in small-group seminars.

The relationship between the classical world and neighbouring civilisations is among the most important and most rapidly expanding areas of classical scholarship, and we have particular strength in this field: we offer tuition in Akkadian, and can draw on the resources of the Oriental Museum in Durham and the expertise pooled in the recently inaugurated Centre for the Study of the Ancient Mediterranean and the Near East. The programme lasts for one year (two years part-time), and centres around a core module on cultural contact in the Ancient World.

Other key elements of the course include a core research training module, a 15,000 word dissertation, and one elective module, which is offered in the areas of current research interests of members of staff.

Course Structure

Information on the structure of the course.
Core Modules:
-Dissertation
-Classical Research Methods and Resources
-Compulsory language module (Latin for research/Ancient Greek for research/another ancient language/modern language)
-Religious Life in the Roman Near East or Akkadian

Optional Modules:
In previous years, optional modules available included:
-Forms After Plato
-Latin Text Seminar
-Greek Text Seminar
-Akkadian
-Latin Love Elegy
-Religious Life in The Roman Near East
-Monumental Architecture of The Roman East
-Vitruvius, On Architecture: The First Treatise On Architecture, Its Significance and Legacy
-Greek Sacred Regulations
-Ancient Philosophers On Necessity, Fate and Free Will
-The Classical Tradition: Art, Literature, Thought
-Comparative Approaches to Homeric Epic
-Greek Text Seminar On Homeric Epic
-Latin Text Seminar On Roman Epic
-Life and Death On Roman Sarcophagi
-Juvenal's Satires in Context
-Ancient Philosophers On Origins
-Animals in Graeco-roman Antiquity
-The Queen of The Desert: Rise and Decline of Palmyra's Civilization
-The Roman Republic: Debates and Approaches
-Rewriting empire: Eusebius of Caesarea and the First Christian History

Not all modules will be offered every year, and new modules (both elective and core) are added regularly. Students may also substitute modules offered in other departments, such as Theology, Philosophy, English, Archaeology, or History.

Learning and Teaching

The MA in Greece, Rome and the Near East is principally conceived as a research training programme which aims to build on the skills in independent learning acquired in the course of the student’s first degree and enable them to undertake fully independent research at a higher level. Contact time with tutors for taught modules is typically a total of 5 hours per week (rising to 7 for someone beginning Latin or ancient Greek at this level), with an emphasis on small group teaching, and a structure that maximises the value of this time, and best encourages and focuses the student’s own independent study and preparation. On average, around 2 hours a week of other relevant academic contact (research seminars, dissertation supervision) is also available.

At the heart of the course is a module focused on the range of research methods and resources available to someone working in the field of Classics. This is run as a weekly class, with a mixture of lectures and student-led discussions. Four further elective modules deal with particular specialised subjects. Students must choose one module involving work with a relevant foreign language (ancient or modern), and one dealing directly with research on interaction between the ancient Mediterranean and the ancient Near East. All those offered will form part of the current research activity of the tutor taking the module. Numbers for each module are typically very small (there are rarely more than five in a class). Typically, classes are two hours long and held fortnightly, and discussion is based on student presentations. (Modules for those beginning ancient Latin or Greek are typically more heavily subscribed, but their classes also meet more often: 3 hours per week.) All students write a 15,000-word dissertation, for which they receive an additional five hours of supervisory contact with an expert in their field of interest.

All staff teaching on the MA are available for consultation by students, and advertise office hours when their presence can be guaranteed. The MA Director acts as academic adviser to MA students, and is available as an additional point of contact, especially for matters concerning academic progress. MA students are strongly encouraged to attend the Department’s two research seminar series. Although not a formal (assessed) part of the MA, we aim to instil the message that engagement with these seminars across a range of subjects is part of the students’ development as researchers and ought to be viewed as essential to their programme. In addition, MA students are welcomed to attend and present at the ‘Junior Work-in-Progress’ seminar series organised by the PhD students in the Department. Finally, the student-run Classics Society regularly organises guest speakers – often very high-profile scholars from outside Durham.

Read less
This degree provides a coherent combination of courses in South Asian languages and their associated literatures and cultures; it leads to an advanced level of understanding of one aspect of South Asian civilization, together with a broader appreciation of the linguistic and literary culture of the subcontinent. Read more
This degree provides a coherent combination of courses in South Asian languages and their associated literatures and cultures; it leads to an advanced level of understanding of one aspect of South Asian civilization, together with a broader appreciation of the linguistic and literary culture of the subcontinent. The ‘Directed Readings’ courses, available in several modern languages, have a flexible curriculum which allows them to accommodate the interests of individual students or groups of students. The MA will provide, inter alia, an appropriate training for students wishing to proceed to postgraduate research in South Asian studies; its focus on South Asian language, culture and literature distinguishes it from the interdisciplinary perspective of the MA in South Asian Area Studies on the one hand and the MA in Comparative Literature on the other.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/southasia/programmes/malangcultsa/

Structure

Students take three taught courses, one of which is considered a major, and complete a 10,000 word dissertation related to the major.

Candidates who wish to take a language at other than introductory level will be assessed at the start of the term to determine the most appropriate level of study.

Part-time students (two years) will take two courses in the first year (normally their Minors) and the Major and dissertation in the second year; part-time students (three years) take one course per year, and their dissertation in the third year.

- Choosing the Courses
Applicants are asked to specify their preferred major subject and to give an alternative, as not all courses are available every year and practical considerations such as timetabling may limit choices.

Once enrolled, students have two weeks to finalise their choice of subjects, during which time they may sample different subjects through attending lectures etc.

Programme Specification

MA Languages and Cultures of South Asia- Programme Specifications 2012/13 (pdf; 29kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/southasia/programmes/malangcultsa/file80816.pdf

Faculty of Languages and Cultures

Six of the academic departments are devoted to teaching and research in the languages, literatures and cultures of Africa, China and Inner Asia, Japan and Korea, the Near and Middle East, South Asia, and South East Asia, with the seventh teaching and conducting research in Linguistics. The Language Centre caters to the needs of non-degree students and governmental and non-governmental organisations. It maintains a huge portfolio of courses, including year-long diploma programmes, weekly evening classes in about 40 different African and Asian languages, and tailored intensive one-to-one courses. The Language Centre also offers courses in French, Portuguese and Spanish.

Their teaching is in three main areas:
- language competence acquisition;
- textual and cultural studies - both comparative and language-specific, and covering not only 'literature' in a strict sense but also visual media, performance, folklore, translation etc.;
- language studies with linguistics at its core - including the prestigious Hans Rausing Endangered Languages Project.

The Faculty is also home to the Centre for Cultural, Literary and Postcolonial Studies (CCLPS) (http://www.soas.ac.uk/cclps/).

While SOAS as a whole represents the most substantial concentration in the Western world of expertise dedicated to African, Middle Eastern and Asian studies, the Faculty of Languages and Cultures is heavily committed to teaching and research grounded in a knowledge of the principal languages and cultures of two thirds of humankind.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

Read less
This programme allows you to explore the links between history and current affairs, and discover how the recent past has shaped today’s world. Read more

Programme description

This programme allows you to explore the links between history and current affairs, and discover how the recent past has shaped today’s world. It aims to provide excellent preparation for graduate research on most recent history in a global context.

It is designed to serve as a springboard for more graduate work at the PhD level or as a stand alone graduate degree that also benefits the individual graduate in a non-academic career.

The programme makes use of the city of Edinburgh’s unique archival and bibliographical resources (The National Archives of Scotland, The National Library of Scotland, the University’s library and archives), as well as of its role in current British politics. Contact with Scottish politicians and with foreign representatives in Scotland is envisioned as a supplementary part of the programme.

Programme structure

The programme combines methodological and substantive courses with intensive participation by the students. The analysis of diverse primary source material is essential, as is situating any research findings within an established historiographical tradition. You will also complete a substantial dissertation under expert supervision.

Compulsory courses:
Historical Methodology
Historical Research: Skills and Sources
Introduction to Contemporary History

Optional courses:
Anglo-Spanish Relations, 1936–1950
A Political Economy of Britain since 1945
Cinema and Society in Britain
Conservatism in the United States, c1930–c1990
Contemporary Scotland
Ethnicity, Class and Power in 20th Century Africa
Gender, Crime and Deviancy: Britain c1860–1960
History as Romance, Profession, Critique: Theory and Scholarship in the West, 1835–1985
Home Rule in Ireland and Britain, 1800–2000
Making War, Making Peace: European International History, 1914–1945
The British at War, 1939–1945
Themes in African Social History
Themes in Modern British and Irish Historiography
Unionism in Ireland and Britain, c1800–2000
The Civil Rights Movement
Armed Struggle: The Northern Ireland Troubles and their Origins
The Politics of Historiography in Post-Colonial South Asia
The United States and the Cold War
The United States and the Vietnam War: Origins and Repercussions
Thinking the 20th Century
Hannah Arendt and the Breakdown of European Civilization
Topics in Post-1945 European History

Career opportunities

This programme provides a suitable foundation for advanced study, or a number of careers, for example politics or journalism.

Read less
Ideal as a bridge to study at MA level or beyond if you are new to the field of Late Antique & Byzantine Studies. Compulsory modules. Read more
Ideal as a bridge to study at MA level or beyond if you are new to the field of Late Antique & Byzantine Studies. Compulsory modules: The Byzantine Empire, 600-1453 and an ancient language (Greek or Latin). Optional modules include Medicine in Western Civilization I and Constantinople: Imperial Capital - Medieval Metropolis. Leads to MA study or careers in education, journalism, finance, politics and cultural sectors.

Key benefits

- One of the world's largest and most distinguished departments of Classics.

- Unrivalled location for the study of the ancient world thanks to London's unique range of specialist libraries, museums and galleries.

- Extraordinarily wide choice of modules, drawing on the resources of the whole of the University of London.

- We were ranked 6th in the UK for graduate employment (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2016)


Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/late-antique-and-byzantine-studies-grad-dip.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

This Graduate Diploma comprises of:

- Two compulsory modules: at least one in a classical language (normally Greek, but, if you have a good knowledge of Greek, then Latin) and one in Byzantine history.

- A supporting module chosen to suit your interests and needs, which can be taken from options offered in the Department of Classics or the Department of Theology & Religious Studies. Students may choose to study a further language.

- A compulsory dissertation.

- Course purpose -

The Graduate Diploma is ideal for graduates in unrelated disciplines wishing to pursue graduate-level work in the field of Late Antique & Byzantine Studies. Though it may be taken as a free-standing qualification in its own right, most students take the Graduate Diploma as a preliminary to the MA in Late Antique & Byzantine Studies at King's.

- Course format and assessment -

Taught core and optional modules assessed by coursework and/or examination plus a compulsory dissertation which accounts for 25 per cent of the total mark. Part-time students complete two taught modules in the first year and one taught module plus the dissertation in the second year.

Student Destinations:

Most students go on to take our MA in Late Antique and Byzantine Studies, or related courses at other UK universities.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 21 universities worldwide (2016/17 QS World University Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page


Share this page:

Cookie Policy    X