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Masters Degrees (Civilisation)

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This Master’s degree in classical civilisation is a unique, interdisciplinary programme that offers graduates of subjects other than classics the opportunity to study the classical world at postgraduate level without prior knowledge or study of Latin or Greek. Read more
This Master’s degree in classical civilisation is a unique, interdisciplinary programme that offers graduates of subjects other than classics the opportunity to study the classical world at postgraduate level without prior knowledge or study of Latin or Greek. You can focus on multiple aspects of ancient Greek and Roman archaeology, history and culture from the archaic period through the classical era to late antiquity, including literary and material evidence. A particular focus of the programme is contemporary debate about the reception and interpretation of classical history and culture, particularly the meanings that have been attached to the classical past, including archaeological objects, architectural remains and literary works.

The course starts with a broad introduction to postgraduate study of the classical world, with sessions proceeding in broadly chronological order from the archaic Mediterranean to the early Christian empire. Themes considered will include politics and culture, religion, sex and sexuality, the writing of history, and the reception of classical culture in the modern world. You will also have the opportunity to study Greek or Latin from beginners’ to advanced level, while a wide range of option modules allow you to explore and expand your interests more fully. You will receive training in research methods and techniques that will give you the confidence and skills to research and write a dissertation on a subject of particular interest to you.

Key teaching staff on this programme

Course director: Dr Christy Constantakopoulou

Dr Serafina Cuomo
Professor Catharine Edwards (on leave 2015/16)
Dr Rebecca Darley
Dr Ian Goh

Why study this course at Birkbeck?

Arts and humanities courses at Birkbeck are ranked third best in London and 11th in the UK in the Times Higher Education 2015-16 World University Subject Rankings.
This Master’s degree will allow you to follow your own interests, with a wide choice of option modules, while developing your research skills and undertaking a dissertation in an area that interests you.
We are located 5 minutes' walk from the British Museum and the British Library, while the Museum of London is easily reachable. The Institute of Classical Studies and the Institute of Historical Research, the Institute of Archaeology and the Warburg Institute are all located in Bloomsbury, near the main Birkbeck campus. All 4 institutes have internationally renowned library collections and run seminars you can attend.
Our Department of History, Classics and Archaeology is ranked in the top 20 nationally and is a world-renowned centre of original, influential research.
Our academic staff are international authorities in their respective fields, delivering stimulating teaching. You will be taught by specialists engaged in cutting-edge research in the archaeology, history and culture of the ancient Mediterranean.
The department is home to thriving student societies and a number of affiliated research centres that actively run seminars, conferences and other events where some of the world's best scholars present their latest research.
Find out more about why you should study with us.
Birkbeck Library has an extensive history collection, including the major specialist journals, and access to online materials.

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This interdisciplinary programme builds on a number of fields of study, including ancient history, Middle Eastern studies and Islamic studies. Read more

This interdisciplinary programme builds on a number of fields of study, including ancient history, Middle Eastern studies and Islamic studies. It is distinctive in its breadth and diversity, drawing on the University’s extensive expertise in Iranian historical and cultural studies from the pre-Islamic Iran to the present day. You will also learn from scholars with complementary interests in the Middle East and the Mediterranean.

The programme provides a wide-ranging academic teaching and learning experience, one unique in the field of Persian studies, particularly for those who wish to combine research projects at postgraduate level with specialist methodological, theoretical, literary, and historiographical training.

Programme structure

The programme will combine seminar work, oral presentations and essays, culminating in a dissertation. You will complete one compulsory course, two research courses and three option courses over two semesters, followed by an independently researched dissertation. You may also take additional language courses in Turkish or Arabic, introductory, intermediate Persian.

Compulsory courses:

  • Critical Readings in Islamic and Middle Eastern Studies
  • Research Skills and Methods in IMES
  • Research Methods and Problems in IMES

Option courses may include:

  • Cinema and Society in the Middle East
  • Ideology and Political Practice in the Modern Middle East
  • The Qur’an – Islam’s Holy Book
  • Mystical Islam
  • Muslims in Britain: Migration, Faith and Identity
  • Of Wine, Love and Loss: Reading Iran through Classical Persian Literature
  • Modern Persian Literature and 'Modern' Iran
  • The Syrian War and the Strategic Meltdown of the Middle East
  • Gender and Media in the Arab World

Career opportunities

This unique programme will provide you with research and analytical skills within the disciplinary field of Middle Eastern Studies, which can be extended into advanced study in this discipline. You will be equipped with skills that could be valuable in a range of careers, such as politics, the arts, or the cultural or heritage sectors.

The range of transferable skills you gain, such as communication, time management, team work, and project management, will prove highly valuable to potential employers in whatever field you choose to enter.



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Classical Studies at Winchester explores the civilisation of ancient Greece and Rome, and its legacy that has fundamentally shaped all later civilisations including that of today. Read more
Classical Studies at Winchester explores the civilisation of ancient Greece and Rome, and its legacy that has fundamentally shaped all later civilisations including that of today. It is a multidisciplinary course that melds History, Archaeology, Art, Drama, Literature and Philosophy.

Programme Content

Students may wish to pursue the three year BA (Hons) Classical Studies pathway or the four year MClass (Hons) Classical Studies pathway.

Study begins by establishing a framework of Classical history, both chronologically and geographically. It introduces Classical archaeology, art and architecture (for example temples, sculpture and inscriptions); Classical drama (comedy and tragedy); literature (epics and lyrics); and philosophy (Socrates and Plato). It explores the nature of each discipline and how each is best studied as the foundation for the rest of the degree. Classical languages are introduced in Year 2.

Students take a range of modules in Years 2, 3 and 4 such as Civilisation, Theme, Depth and Comparative Studies that further develop understanding of the Classical world.

Theme Studies explore continuity and change in the Roman household or depictions in film. Civilisation Studies explore one sub-period (for example, Fifth Century Athens) in the round, covering mythology and drama, democracy and war.

Students take two Depth Studies that establish a comprehensive knowledge of a particular period through primary and secondary sources. It is the Comparative Studies that particularly explore the Classical legacy in art and literature in subsequent centuries.

The two culminations of the degree are the dissertation in Year 3 and the summative paper paving the way for more advanced research in Year 4.

See the website http://www.winchester.ac.uk/Studyhere/Pages/mclass-hons-classical-studies.aspx

Learning and Teaching

The University aims to shape 'confident learners' by enabling students to develop the skills to excel in their studies here and be transferable to further studies or the employment market. Staff and students form a community of learners who, together and independently, seek to generate and exchange knowledge. Over the duration of the course, students develop independent and critical learning, building confidence and expertise progressively through independent and collaborative research, problem solving, and analysis with the support of staff. Students take responsibility for their own learning and are encouraged to make use of the wide range of available learning resources available.

In addition to the formally scheduled contact time (ie lectures, seminars etc), students are encouraged to access academic support from staff within the course team, personal tutors and the wide range of students within the university.

Key features of the student experience are:

The opportunity to undertake the University of Winchester's Research Apprenticeship Programme (WRAP) which engages students in work with academics on a genuine research project (e.g. categorising inscriptions), so that they engage first-hand in cutting-edge scholarly activity and build vital transferable skills for the future

Established exchanges with partner institutions in the USA and Europe (including the American University in Bulgaria)

Field trips to enhance student's knowledge and understanding with practical experiences (for example, to Fishbourne Roman palace)

Variety of work and volunteer placements to both national and local institutions (for example, art galleries, the British Museum)

Assessment

At the University of Winchester validated programmes may adopt a range of means of assessing your learning. An indicative, and not necessarily comprehensive, list of assessment types you might encounter includes essays, portfolios, supervised independent work, presentations, written exams, or practical performances. The University is committed to ensuring that all students have an equal opportunity to achieve module learning outcomes. As such, where appropriate and necessary, students with recognised disabilities may have alternative assignments set that continue to test how successfully they have met the module's learning outcomes. Further details on assessment types used in the programme you are interested in can be found on the course page, by attending an Open Day/Evening, or contacting our teaching staff.

Careers

Graduates work in museums or art galleries, whilst others work in teaching, retailing, the arts, marketing and local, regional and national government.

At the University of Winchester, we are committed to ensuring all our students gain employability skills to enable you to enter graduate level jobs and pursue the profession of your choice.

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This programme will give you the opportunity to study specific periods and regions of classical civilisation, analyse the literary significance of texts, and develop your language skills in Greek and Latin. Read more

This programme will give you the opportunity to study specific periods and regions of classical civilisation, analyse the literary significance of texts, and develop your language skills in Greek and Latin.

Drawing on the diverse interests of our academic staff (which number more than 20 in this area), the programme content is highly flexible, allowing you to choose a specialised path or a more interdisciplinary approach. We have specialists in the central areas of Greek and Latin literature and thought, Greek and Roman history, and Classical art and archaeology. We also take a broad view of the discipline with, for example, expertise in late antiquity, and reception history.

We provide opportunities for you to hear from distinguished speakers in the weekly classics research seminar series and to share your research with your peers at the classics graduate seminar.

Studying Classics in Edinburgh is the perfect marriage; known as the Athens of the North, Edinburgh is a stunningly beautiful city with a worldwide reputation as a cultural and academic capital.

Programme structure

You will complete one compulsory course and select a further three skills courses and an additional two options from a wide range on offer. The modular structure of the programme allows you to concentrate on areas of particular interest while still providing breadth of coverage. Your required course equips you with the independent skills you need to complete your dissertation.

The compulsory course is:

  • Skills and Methods in Classics.

Option courses previously offered include those listed below. Option courses change from year to year and those available when you start your studies may be different from those shown in the list:

  • Elementary Latin (PG) 1
  • Elementary Greek (PG) 1
  • Elementary Latin (PG) 2
  • Elementary Greek (PG) 2
  • Intermediate Greek (PG) 1
  • Intermediate Latin (PG) 1
  • Intermediate Greek (PG) 2
  • Intermediate Latin (PG) 2
  • Latin Text Seminar 1
  • Greek Text Seminar 1
  • A Period of Ancient History 1
  • A Period of Ancient History 2
  • Byzantine Text Seminar 1
  • A Topic in Late Antique and Byzantine History 1
  • Epicurus and Epicureanism
  • Topics in Byzantine Literary History
  • The Hellenistic City
  • Constantinople: The History of a Medieval Megalopolis from Constantine the Great to Suleyman the Magnificent
  • Latin Text Seminar 2
  • Space, Place and Time: the archaeology of built environments
  • Archaeological Illustration
  • Principles of GIS for Archaeologists
  • Byzantine Archaeology: The archaeology of the Byzantine empire and its neighbours AD 500-850.
  • Classical Greek Sculpture
  • Conflict archaeology: materialities of violence
  • Bronze Age Civilisations of the Near East and Greece
  • Etruscan Italy, 1000 - 300 BC
  • Gallia from the Third Century BC to Augustus
  • Ritual and Monumentality in North-West Europe: Mid-6th to Mid-3rd Millennium BC

Learning outcomes

Students who follow this programme will gain:

  • an advanced knowledge of the archaeology/art and history of specific regions and periods of classical civilisation
  • an opportunity to study and analyse the literary significance of Greek and Latin texts and develop knowledge of current interpretation of them
  • an ability to comment in a detailed manner on passages from a selection of Greek and Latin
  • a developed knowledge of the Greek or Latin languages

Career opportunities

Our students view the programme and a graduate degree from Edinburgh as an advanced qualification valued and respected by many employers. Those students interested in long-term academic careers consider the programme as preparation for a PhD.

The programme provides a toolkit of transferable skills in organisation, research and analysis that will be highly prized in any field of work.

This programme can form the stepping stone to many career options, such as further academic research, museum and art curation, literary translation or analysis, education or public heritage. Recent graduates in Classics are now putting their skills to use as tutors, archivists, writers and conference coordinators for a range of employers including the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB).



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The Research Master’s programme in Archaeology is the most diverse in the Netherlands. Benefit from our extensive experience and reputation in archaeological research. Read more

The Research Master’s programme in Archaeology is the most diverse in the Netherlands. Benefit from our extensive experience and reputation in archaeological research.

Choose Archaeology at Leiden University:

Our research master's programme offers interesting regional and thematic specialisation possibilities. It stimulates extra-talented and motivated students by exposing them to cutting edge research and making them part of it.

The programme helps you to find your own place in the wide world of archaeological careers, and equips you with all the 21st century professional and transferable skills you need.

Our research facilities and labs, field schools and excavation projects, experimental archaeology projects and the national research schools (ARCHON, OIKOS) offer excellent opportunities for every prospective researcher.

Research possibilities in 2018-2019:

Human Origins

Australopithecus africanus, one of our many ancestors

Interdisciplinary studies of the human past

This programme provides an in-depth interdisciplinary introduction in the European Palaeolithic record and its wider setting, from the Early Pleistocene to the Late Pleistocene.

  • Study the archaeology of Prehistoric hunter-gatherers, from the earliest stone tools in East Africa, 2.6 million years old, to the end of the last ice age.
  • Focus on Neanderthal behaviour, and explore research questions, methods of analysis and theoretical perspectives in Palaeolithic archaeology.

Prehistoric Farming Communities

A view of past communities

The programme aims to develop a detailed and coherent view of past communities.

  • Focus on the later prehistory of Europe, especially on communities bordering the North Sea (Scandinavia, the Low Countries, France, Great Britain and Ireland).
  • Explore research topics such as Beaker cultures and settlements of the Bronze and Iron Ages, cultural identity, and burial ritual and (selective) deposition.

Town and Country in the Mediterranean Region and the Near East

The cradle of civilisation

This programme focuses on a region that has enormous culture-historical significance, and is a cradle of civilisation from Prehistory up to the Early Medieval period.

  • Study various key developments, such as the origins of farming and sedentary life, as well as the emergence of complex urbanised societies and writing, as they occurred first in this region and spread subsequently.
  • Participate in current research projects. These projects focus on the Near East (modern Iraq, Iran, Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, Palestine, Syria and Turkey) and Egypt, as well as the Mediterranean.

Religion and Society in Native American Cultures

Leiden Archaeology researchers used high-tech imaging to reveal rare precolonial Mexican manuscript hidden from view for 500 years

Study the past in connection to the present

The programme offers an interdisciplinary context, where archaeology, anthropology, sciences, history, linguistics, landscape and heritage studies come together.

  • Gain a broad knowledge of and deep insight into Native American cultural history, focusing on the relationships between religious worldview and social agency.
  • Participate in field schools related to long-term research projects, such as excavations in the Caribbean or Nicaragua,including studies of material culture and physical anthropology.

Bioarchaeology

Fragments of a sabre-toothed cat skull where recenty excavated

Combine archaeology with hard science

Discover our four research disciplines, together covering an extensive geographical area and time range.

  • Opt for Archaeobotany and investigate changes in vegetation and environment during the past 2.6 million years, as well as the taphonomy of plant macrofossils in lacustrine and fluvial depositional settings.
  • Focus on Archaeo/Palaeozoology and dive into Eurasia in the period from the Early Pleistocene to the Holocene. Biostratigraphical studies, palaeo-ecological studies, as well as taphonomical studies are carried out.
  • Study Human Osteoarchaeology and analyse human remains from international archaeology contexts as well as behavioural and social facets of mortuary practices in past societies.
  • Explore Isope Archaeology and work on the analysis and interpretation of stable isotopes of human and faunal remains from archaeological contexts. Learn how to carry out dating projects, including radiocarbon dating as well as other dating methods.

Archaeological Heritage in a Globalising World

A new and exciting interdisciplinary approach

The programme focuses on the role of the past in the present. Explore the various aspects of recent developments in international politics, cultural tourism, the use of social media, and the revitalisation of local traditions and regional identities.

  • Develop the practical skills to translate academic research and social knowledge into strategies for heritage management, and pursue individual initiatives.
  • Benefit from our close association with the Center for Global Heritage and Development, an interdisciplinary cooperation between three high-ranking universities: Leiden University, Erasmus University Rotterdam and Delft Technical University. This allows for a partnership between archaeology, social sciences, humanities and natural sciences.

The Transformation of the Roman World

Europe on the starting blocks

This programme offers an introduction to advanced studies of Europe and the Mediterranean in Late Roman and Post-Roman times (c. 300-900 AD).

  • Analyse the economic recovery of North-Western Europe in Merovingian and Carolingian times, exchange networks in the Mediterranean, and agrarian innovation and water management in Jordan.
  • Study burial sites, the fate of Roman towns in the early Middle Ages, and centres of Christianity.

Master of Arts or Master of Science

Students who choose the Bioarchaeology track receive a Master of Science degree in Archaeology. For the other research tracks you receive a Master of Arts degree in Archaeology.



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At Leiden University, we have one of the world's leading centres for the study of European and non-European history. The master in History is your opportunity to access this world-class expertise. Read more

At Leiden University, we have one of the world's leading centres for the study of European and non-European history. The master in History is your opportunity to access this world-class expertise.

Seven specialisations and a flexible curriculum

With such a broad curriculum, the master’s programme in History offers you the chance to specialise in niche subject areas not offered elsewhere. A flexible format also allows you to tailor your degree to suit your career goals. To help you develop a cohesive area of expertise, the programme offers seven specialisations each with their own thematic focus. Within your specialisation, you even have the added option of focusing on Maritime History, Political Debate or Economic History.

Leading scholars and an individualised approach

At Leiden University, you learn from some of the leading scholars in the field. We have a specialised faculty 'chair' in almost every area of European and non-European history, while covering almost all periods form Classical Antiquity to the present. Small-scale classes and intensive mentoring ensure you benefit from their expertise both in and outside of the classroom.

Global and comparative approach

All subjects in the master in History have a strong international orientation. Whichever your focus area, you will acquire a broad, comparative dimension to your knowledge and connect this to the latest global events. This approach to learning is not only unique to this programme but brings you a far broader understanding and an aptitude for critical thinking both of which are highly valued by employers today.

Specialisations



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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Ancient History and Classical Culture at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Ancient History and Classical Culture at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MA in Ancient History and Classical Culture offers a wide range of modules on the history and culture of ancient Greece and Rome, drawing on the expertise of internationally recognised scholars.

Key Features

Every aspect of the modern world has its roots in the civilisations of the Classical world. This MA in Ancient History and Classical Culture allows students to study a range of topics related to the history and culture of the classical world, from the Mycenaean world to the later Roman Empire. The range of options within the Ancient History and Classical Culture MA allows students to specialise in history or literature, or to combine study of the two.

Students on the Ancient History and Classical Culture MA are encouraged to develop a methodological awareness and are introduced to key concepts and interpretative techniques that shape the study of the ancient civilisations in the modern world. This programme develops research skills needed for high-level work in any field of Ancient History and Classical Civilisation.

Students have the opportunity to study ancient Greek or Latin.

Students of the MA Ancient History and Classical Culture can take advantage of the College of Arts and Humanities' Graduate Centre which fosters and supports individual and collaborative research activity of international excellence and offers a vibrant and supportive environment for students pursuing postgraduate research and taught masters study. The Centre provides postgraduate training to enhance academic and professional development and facilitates participation in seminar programmes, workshops and international conferences.

Modules

Modules on the Ancient History and Classical Culture course typically include:

• Research Methodologies in Ancient History and Classical Culture

• Ancient Greek or Latin

• Being Greek under Rome: Greek Literature and Culture in the Imperial Period

• The Army in the Roman Empire

• The City in the Greco-Roman World

• Explorers, Travel and Geography

• Saints and Sinners in Christian Late Antiquity

• Greek and Roman Magic: Exploring the Sources

• Private Life in Ancient Egypt

• Romance Refracted and novels renewed

Student Quote

"I studied the BA Ancient History and then the MA in Ancient History and Classical Culture. I chose Swansea University because of the variety of courses on offer in Classics, Ancient History and Egyptology. During my study I immersed myself in both academic and extra-curricular student life. I took up archery and I was a regular member of the University archery team. I enjoy both reading and writing fiction and in my final year of study, I was selected as one of four finalists in the “Swansea Life Young Writing Category” of the “Dylan Thomas Prize”. I held several positions of responsibility in the Society of Ancient Studies which was amazing; and I organised social events such as visits to sites such as Hadrian’s Wall, the British Museum, Caerleon, and Rome. I also had the opportunity to work on the Church Hill archaeological excavation (a suspected Roman villa) and the excavation at Oystermouth Castle organised jointly by the Glamorgan-Gwent Archaeological Trust. I thoroughly enjoyed my four years at Swansea."

Shaun Mudd



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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Classics at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Classics at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The Greek and Latin languages are the key to our knowledge of the ancient world, and the origin of many modern European languages. This MA in Classics allows students to develop advanced reading skills in the ancient languages, and to apply them to the study of a selection of some of the most important literary texts from the ancient world. In addition to developing their ability to read fluently in the ancient languages and to translate them accurately and sensitively, students are introduced to the critical and analytical methodologies that shape the study of Classical literature in the twenty-first century. Students in the MA in Classics should normally already have studied either Latin or Greek, and will have the opportunity to begin or continue the study of the other.

Key Features of MA in Classics

The MA Classics studies Greek and Latin language, literature and civilisation.

The MA in Classics allows students to develop advanced reading skills in ancient languages and to apply them to the study of a selection of some of the most important literary texts from the ancient world.

The College of Arts and Humanities has a Graduate Centre. The Graduate Centre fosters and supports individual and collaborative research activity of international excellence and offers a vibrant and supportive environment for students pursuing postgraduate research and taught masters study. The Centre provides postgraduate training to enhance academic and professional development and facilitates participation in seminar programmes, workshops and international conferences.

The full-time Classics MA is split across the year offering three modules in each academic semester (a total of six modules) and then a dissertation over the summer. The dissertation component is written on a specialist research topic of your choosing.

Part-time Classics MA students take three modules in the first year, three in the second year and write the dissertation in the third year.

MA in Classics Aims

To acquire advanced reading skills in ancient Greek and Latin.

To develop the ability to translate from ancient Greek and Latin accurately and sensitively.

To develop the theoretical and analytical skills relevant to the study of ancient texts in the original languages.

To prepare for further text-based research on any aspect of Greek or Roman history and culture.

Through the precision and awareness to detail entailed in the study of ancient languages, to acquire a range of transferable skills relevant to a range of employment opportunities, including those which involve language acquisition and translation.

Modules

Modules on the MA in Classics course typically include:

• Narrative Theory and Genres

• Ancient Greek or Latin Language

• Ancient Greek or Latin Texts

• Romance Refracted and Novels Renewed

• Explorers, Travel and Geography

• Saints and Sinners in Christian Late Antiquity

Research Interests

Staff research interests cover the core disciplines of culture, religion, language, history and archaeology.

Particular strengths include:

• Ancient Narrative Literature

• The Ancient Novel

• Plato and Platonism

• Greek Tragedy

• Ancient Technology

• The Archaeology of Roman Egypt

• Graeco-Roman Urbanisation

• Greek Social History

• The History and Archaeology of Asia Minor

• Late Antiquity

• Roman Military History

All staff in History and Classics are research active and publish books and articles in their areas of expertise. In addition, regular research seminars and lectures are run through the Research Institute for Arts and Humanities (RIAH) which students are

encouraged to attend.

Careers

Career expectations are excellent for Classics graduates. MA degree holders may move on to doctoral study or enter employment in such areas as museums, heritage and tourism; marketing, sales and advertising; business, art, design and culture; media and PR; social and welfare professions; humanitarian organisations; the civil service, and education.



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-Study at one of the largest and liveliest classical world education centres in the UK. -Work with a strong research community, supported by excellent resources. Read more
-Study at one of the largest and liveliest classical world education centres in the UK
-Work with a strong research community, supported by excellent resources
-Opportunities to begin or continue your study of Ancient Greek or Latin

The MA in Classics and Ancient History is extremely flexible and wide-ranging. In this it reflects the broad, multidisciplinary nature of the subject, which includes Latin and Greek language, the history of Greek and Roman antiquity from archaic times to the beginning of the Middle Ages, and Greek and Roman literature, philosophy, and culture. The MA is designed to introduce students to advanced study in their chosen field and to equip them with the skills required for doctoral research. The programme and most modules within it allow students to tailor their advanced study and research-preparation to their interests, needs and existing knowledge. Apart from the thesis, the only compulsory unit is that devoted to research training. We also expect all students to study Latin and/or Greek as part of their MA. (No existing knowledge of Latin or Greek is required, and we are very well-equipped to support students beginning their study of either language; it is also possible to study one or both languages at more Advanced levels). Apart from these requirements, students are able to choose freely in constructing an MA course which best suits their interests and skills.

In addition, we offer one specialist route through the MA programme: namely the 'City of Rome' route. This route involves taking a course unit at the British School at Rome, for which students prepare by studying a course on Roman social and urban history.

Aims

On successful completion of the MA in Classics and Ancient History, students will:

i. Demonstrate the enhancement of previously acquired skills at a more critical, reflective, and sophisticated level, especially skills involving synthesising information from a variety of sources, historical and/or literary interpretation, exercising independent and critical judgement.
ii. Understand and respect the `otherness' of the past by developing specialist knowledge about one or more aspect of Graeco-Roman civilisation.
iii. Be able to describe, analyse, and assess ancient sources, including (as appropriate) literary, non-literary, visual, and material evidence.
iv. Be able to design and complete a substantial piece of independent research.
v. Work effectively as autonomous scholars.
vi. Be able to understand complex problems and communicate them clearly in oral and written form, with the help, where appropriate, of visual or graphic aids.

Coursework and assessment

The MA in Classics & Ancient History is made up of a taught element (120 credits) and a dissertation (60 credits). Taught units are usually assessed by extended essay, but assessment might also include oral presentations, conference posters, commentary exercises and (particularly for language units) formal examinations.

In more detail, the structure of the course is as follows:

Research training . Our core course, 'Studying the Ancient World: Techniques and Approaches', introduces you to the key research questions and methods involved in advanced study of the discipline and, in the second semester, gives you experience in developing and presenting your own research project.

Language units. If you are a beginner, you will take one of our specially-designed `intensive' courses in Latin or Greek, which will put you in a position to start reading ancient texts in the original language before the end of your MA. If you have already studied Greek or Latin, you will continue your study of one or both languages at an appropriate level. If you are already at a very advanced stage in both languages you will take a specially-designed course unit which allows you further to develop your language skills in an area related to your research interests (for example: palaeography; papyrology; textual criticism; epigraphy).

Taught course-units . The remainder of your taught credits are selected from a range of taught units, chosen from a menu covering a range of topics in Greek and Roman history, literature, and culture. Most taught units are worth 15 credits, and usually involve 11 `classroom' hours, consisting of both student-led and tutor-led discussion, supported by additional guidance and planning sessions.

It is possible for one of these units to be an approved unit from another subject area (for example, History or Archaeology), or a Directed Reading course, in which you are free to pursue whatever avenue is of interest to you, by negotiation with a tutor and with the Postgraduate Programme Director. The usual pattern for a Directed Reading course is 6 to 8 hours of contact time, which may be individual or in a small group, or a mixture of the two.

A dissertation of between 12,000 and 15,000 words: 60 credits.

Career opportunities

This non-vocational Masters degree teaches and develops a wealth of transferable skills, and thus enables students to keep open a very wide range of career options. Recent graduates have gone on to vocational MAs (e.g. in Gallery & Museum Studies), to PhDs in Classics or Ancient History, to teaching, to contract researching, or to work in local or central government, commerce or industry.

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Ideas and patterns of thought always have been, and continue to be, subject to historical change. The ways in which they change, and the reasons why they do so, make for fascinating study. Read more

Ideas and patterns of thought always have been, and continue to be, subject to historical change. The ways in which they change, and the reasons why they do so, make for fascinating study. In this comprehensive programme, you’ll be introduced to the principal methodologies of intellectual history. You will also have the opportunity to explore particular themes in intellectual history, developing a detailed understanding of their origins, historical circumstances and implications.

By the end of the programme you will have the tools you need to appreciate the interdependence of text and context and the importance of ideas in past and present, as well as the ability to research effectively and present your work with confidence.

Programme structure

You will take a variety of seminar-style courses in small groups. Most courses are assessed by means of an extended piece of written work, while some courses may also assess non-written skills. You will complete two compulsory courses and select a further four options from a wide range on offer. You will then complete an independent research dissertation and will be assigned a supervisor from the outset.

The compulsory courses are:

  • Historical Methodology
  • Historical Research: Skills and Sources

Option courses previously offered include those listed below. Option courses change from year to year and those available when you start your studies may be different from those shown in the list:

  • Myth and the History of Scholarship in Early Modern Europe
  • The Scientific Revolution in Global Perspective
  • Citizens and Subjects: Concepts of Citizenship in Modern African Intellectual History
  • Currents of Radicalism, 1776-1848
  • Debating Marriage from Antiquity to the Middle Ages
  • History as Romance, Profession, Critique: Theory and Scholarship in the West, 1835 to 1985
  • Literature and History in Early Medieval Britain and Ireland
  • Thinking the 20th Century - Hannah Arendt and the Breakdown of European Civilisation

Learning outcomes

Students are expected to achieve several aims, which will be assessed primarily by essays and a dissertation, such as:

  • knowledge of the chief methods of practising intellectual history
  • a detailed understanding of certain major episodes in intellectual history
  • an appreciation of the interdependence of text and context, and of the importance of ideas in past and present

A wide variety of intellectual skills are promoted through seminars, discussions and advanced study, encouraging the development of the:

  • ability to develop tight and coherent arguments both orally and on the page
  • capacity to read texts critically and sensitively, evaluating their arguments as well as situating them in their practical and intellectual contexts
  • appreciation of a variety of approaches to intellectual history
  • ability to cross-disciplinary boundaries, for example, between philosophy, science and history

Career opportunities

Our students view the programme and a graduate degree from Edinburgh as an advanced qualification valued and respected by many employers, others are interested in pursuing long-term academic careers and therefore consider the MSc as preparation for a PhD. The combination of skills training courses, specialised seminars, and independent research provides you with transferable skills that will be beneficial whatever path you choose.

Graduates pursue work in related areas such as museums, policy think tanks,national and international civil services, non-governmental organisations, galleries, libraries and historic trusts while others build on the transferable skills gained and enter areas as diverse as business, media, public administration and marketing.



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Civil engineering is essential for the sustainable provision of the infrastructure used in our daily lives, from buildings, to roads, bridges and waterways, and more innovative solutions are constantly being sought as the demands of modern civilisation increase. Read more
Civil engineering is essential for the sustainable provision of the infrastructure used in our daily lives, from buildings, to roads, bridges and waterways, and more innovative solutions are constantly being sought as the demands of modern civilisation increase.

This programme brings together the latest scientific developments in a range of civil engineering disciplines to provide you with an in-depth knowledge of the subject, specifically geotechnical and structural engineering. You will learn how to analyse, design, construct and maintain infrastructure, and put the theory you learn in to practice to solve complex problems.

MSc Civil Engineering prepares graduates for a successful career in the civil engineering industry. It will equip you with the knowledge and skills to play a leading role in providing essential infrastructure for society whilst maintaining the quality of our environment.

Programme structure

This programme is modular and flexible and consists of eight core engineering modules totalling 150 credits, which includes the 60-credit Engineering MSc project, and one 15-credit option module.

Core modules

The compulsory modules can include; Mechanics of Materials; Software Modelling; Advanced Geotechnical Engineering; Computer Aided Engineering Design; Active and Passive Structural Control; Sustainable Engineering; Advanced Structural Engineering; Engineering MSc Project

Optional modules

Some examples of the optional modules in previous years are as follows; Conceptual Design of Buildings; Sustainable Buildings;

The modules we outline here provide examples of what you can expect to learn on this degree course based on recent academic teaching. The precise modules available to you in future years may vary depending on staff availability and research interests, new topics of study, timetabling and student demand. Details at any time may be obtained from the programme website.

Teaching and assessment

The programme is delivered through a mix of lectures, seminars, tutorials, industrial presentations, case studies, industry visits, computer simulations, project work and a dissertation.

The programme will have particular value in developing transferable skills development including management skills, communication skills, computational techniques, data handling and analysis, problem solving, decision making and research methodology. Many of these skills will be addressed within an industrial and commercial context.

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As a postgraduate research student of Italian studies, you will be exposed to an environment that celebrates both language and culture, through rigorous research and vibrant social events. Read more

As a postgraduate research student of Italian studies, you will be exposed to an environment that celebrates both language and culture, through rigorous research and vibrant social events.

Studied informally here at Edinburgh since the late 16th century, Italian was formally added to the curriculum in 1919. Since then it has developed into a broad area of study that engages with both contemporary culture and historical times, when Italy shaped our civilisation.

Postgraduates are an integral part of our research community. We can offer you supervision in:

  • comparative literature
  • digital philology and second language acquisition
  • film studies
  • Italian cultural studies (most areas, including literary studies from the Middle Ages to the present)
  • literary theory
  • translation studies

Training and support

Your place in our graduate school will see you taking part in a thriving research community, attending regular seminars, publishing papers, presenting your research at national and international conferences, and participating in interdisciplinary research clusters across the School of Literatures, Languages & Cultures.

Facilities

Just a few minutes away from our base in George Square is the Italian Cultural Institute, where you will receive a warm welcome and the opportunity to mix with Scotland’s wider Italian academic community.

You will also have access to its extensive library and programme of events. Also extending cultural and academic networks is the Edinburgh Journal of Gadda Studies, which is produced here at the School and offers opportunities for you to contribute to the editorial team as a research or editorial assistant. Through our membership of this network we also host the Edinburgh Gadda Prize, presented biennially.



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Kent’s MA in Roman History and Archaeology is designed for students who wish to adopt a twin-tracked approach to the past by using both historical and archaeological evidence. Read more
Kent’s MA in Roman History and Archaeology is designed for students who wish to adopt a twin-tracked approach to the past by using both historical and archaeological evidence.

Roman civilisation produced one of the largest empires of the ancient world. The Roman Empire had one of the most advanced technologies of the ancient world, producing major architectural, cultural and artistic achievements. The extensive remnants left behind enable us to recreate and understand Roman culture thousands of years later.

Our Department of Classical & Archaeological Studies (http://www.kent.ac.uk/secl/classics/index.html) contains one of the largest concentrations of experts in Roman History and Archaeology with experts in Pompeii, Rome, Egypt, as well as in the study of artefacts and of ancient medicine. You spend your first term at our beautiful campus overlooking the Roman and Medieval city of Canterbury, just one hour from London. While in Canterbury, you gain training in research skills in both Roman History and in Archaeology.

The second term is based in Rome, at the campus of the American University of Rome (http://www.aur.edu), where you study the sites and museums of ancient Rome. All teaching is in English. The experience of staying in Rome and studying the city alters brings into focus new ideas and a new perspective of the ‘Eternal City’.

Each week is structured around a series of site visits, so that you gain an in-depth knowledge of the ancient city. In the final term, you complete your MA by writing a dissertation of up to 15,000 words on a research topic defined in collaboration with your supervisor. The programme can also be studied at Canterbury only.

This is an ideal programme for graduates of history, ancient history, classics or the wider humanities, wanting to gain practical experience in applying their expertise and benefit from the experience and confidence gained from living and studying overseas.

Course structure

During the first term at Canterbury you take two core modules. Your second term is in Rome and you take one core module and one optional module. Over the course of these two terms you discuss with the course director your ideas and plans for your 15,000-word dissertation. The writing of the dissertation takes place in the summer with completion in August.

Modules

Term 1 (Canterbury):
Compulsory modules:

CL900 - Research Skills in Ancient History
CL805 - Contemporary Archaeology: Theories, Methods and Issues

Term 2 (Rome):
Compulsory Module:

CL828 - Rome: The Imperial City

One option from:

Optional modules in Rome are taken through the American University in Rome and change each year. Past options have included:

Rome: Writing the city

This upper level Classics course will examine depictions of the city of Rome in classical literature. It will examine the fabric of the city and the idea of Rome as a symbol of civilization. The buildings and public spaces of Rome were the backdrop for performance, spectacle, ceremony and daily and these activities generated meaning and symbolism. For the Romans specific locations were connected to history, myth and collective memory and were protected by the genius loci. Amongst others, the following authors will be studied: Cicero, Livy, Lucan, Ovid, Propertius, Tacitus, Virgil. All texts will be studied in translation.

Etruscan Art and Archaeology

This is an upper level course studying the art and archaeology of the Etruscans from their emergence at the beginning of the first millennium BCE until their absorption by the Romans. The course will take full advantage of the rich museum collections of Etruscan material in Rome and will include a field trip to the sites of Cerveterii and Tarquinia. The course will look at the origins of the Etruscans, their art and material culture, their interactions with other groups and their eventual absorption by the Romans.

Global Heritage

This upper level seminar course examines global heritage concerns looking in particular at how the past conditions the present and influences identity. Lectures and seminars will be built around four topics: the role of international organizations, heritage and memory, heritage and economic development and contemporary issues in global heritage. Each topic unit will be completed by a seminar where students will present case studies that illustrate the issues raised.

Term 3: Dissertation

CL897 - Dissertation
CL805 - Contemporary Archaeology: Theories, Methods and Issues (30 credits)
CL828 - Rome-The Imperial City (30 credits)
CL829 - Rome Optional Module (30 credits)
CL900 - Research Skills in Ancient History - Understanding the City in Antiquit (30 credits)
CL897 - CL Dissertation (60 credits)

Assessment

The programme is assessed by coursework for each of the modules, an examination in Latin or ancient Greek, if these modules are taken, and by the dissertation.

This programme is also available at Canterbury only.
https://www.kent.ac.uk/secl/postgraduate/taught.html

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The MA in Roman History and Archaeology is designed for students who wish to adopt a twin-tracked approach to the past by using both historical and archaeological evidence. Read more
The MA in Roman History and Archaeology is designed for students who wish to adopt a twin-tracked approach to the past by using both historical and archaeological evidence.


Visit the website: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/307/roman-history-and-archaeology#!overview

Course detail

Roman civilisation produced one of the largest empires of the ancient world. The Roman Empire had one of the most advanced technologies of the ancient world, producing major architectural, cultural and artistic achievements. The extensive remnants left behind enable us to recreate and understand Roman culture thousands of years later.

The Department of Classical and Archaeological Studies contains one of the largest concentrations of experts in Roman History and Archaeology with experts in Pompeii, Rome, Egypt, as well as in the study of artefacts and of ancient medicine. You spend your first term at our beautiful campus overlooking the Roman and Medieval city of Canterbury, just one hour from London. While in Canterbury, you gain training in research skills in both Roman History and in Archaeology.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/secl/classics/postgraduate/taught-roman-history-and-archaeology.html

*This course will be taught at the Canterbury campus*, but is also available with a term in Rome:
https://www.kent.ac.uk/secl/classics/postgraduate/taught-roman-history-and-archaeology-rome.html

Purpose

This is an ideal programme for graduates of history, ancient history, classics or the wider humanities, wanting to gain practical experience in applying their expertise.

Format and assessment

In your first term, the focus is on research skills in both Roman history and in archaeology to provide the foundation from which you may develop as a postgraduate researcher. Your second term is focussed on specialist modules that directly engage with research conducted in the Department. You also have the opportunity to engage with our postgraduate community that comes together with our staff at our research seminar series to which we invite leading speakers from across the UK and Europe.

In the summer, you write a dissertation of up to 15,000 words with advice from one of our experts to demonstrate the skills that you will have gained during your MA.

The programme is assessed by coursework for each of the modules and by the dissertation.

Careers

Our MA programmes include much scope for vocational training, skills acquisition and guided project work, often with use of our extensive facilities. These aspects of our programmes have been praised by external assessors in recent years. Recent graduates have progressed to careers in a wide range of related professional and leadership areas, including national and local museums, teaching and senior roles with archaeological organisations (national government institutions, contracting units and trusts). A large proportion of completing Master’s students have progressed onto PhD study.

How to apply: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

Postgraduate scholarships and funding

We have a scholarship fund of over £9 million to support our taught and research students with their tuition fees and living costs. Find out more: https://www.kent.ac.uk/scholarships/postgraduate/

English language learning

If you need to improve your English before and during your postgraduate studies, Kent offers a range of modules and programmes in English for Academic Purposes (EAP). Find out more here: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/international/english.html

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This unique MA is designed for students who wish to adopt a twin-tracked approach to the past by using both historical and archaeological evidence. Read more
This unique MA is designed for students who wish to adopt a twin-tracked approach to the past by using both historical and archaeological evidence. A key focus of the MA is on the cities of the Roman Empire, especially the capital, Rome. A term is spent in Rome, in which you study the monuments and artefacts of the ancient city at first hand, visiting relevant sites and museums, with options to study site conservation and museum presentation as well as the history and archaeology of Rome.

Roman civilisation produced one of the largest empires of the ancient world. The Roman Empire had one of the most advanced technologies of the ancient world, producing major architectural, cultural and artistic achievements. The extensive remnants left behind enable us to recreate and understand Roman culture thousands of years later.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/secl/classics/postgraduate/taught-roman-history-and-archaeology-rome.html

About the Department of Classical & Archaeological Studies

Our Department of Classical & Archaeological Studies contains one of the largest concentrations of experts in Roman History and Archaeology with experts in Pompeii, Rome, Egypt, as well as in the study of artefacts and of ancient medicine. You spend your first term at our beautiful campus overlooking the Roman and Medieval city of Canterbury, just one hour from London. While in Canterbury, you gain training in research skills in both Roman History and in Archaeology.

The second term is based in Rome, at the campus of the American University of Rome, where you study the sites and museums of ancient Rome. All teaching is in English. The experience of staying in Rome and studying the city brings into focus new ideas and a new perspective of the ‘Eternal City’.

Each week is structured around a series of site visits, so that you gain an in-depth knowledge of the ancient city. In the final term, you complete your MA by writing a dissertation of up to 15,000 words on a research topic defined in collaboration with your supervisor. The programme can also be studied at Canterbury only.

Course Structure

During the first term at Canterbury you take two core modules. Your second term is in Rome and you take one core module and one optional module. Over the course of these two terms you discuss with the course director your ideas and plans for your 15,000-word dissertation. The writing of the dissertation takes place in the summer with completion in August.

The programme is assessed by coursework for each of the modules, an examination in Latin or ancient Greek, if these modules are taken, and by the dissertation.

Careers

Our MA programmes include much scope for vocational training, skills acquisition and guided project work, often with use of our extensive facilities. These aspects of our programmes have been praised by external assessors in recent years.

Recent graduates have progressed to careers in a wide range of related professional and leadership areas, including national and local museums, teaching and senior roles with archaeological organisations (national government institutions, contracting units and trusts). A large proportion of completing Master’s students have progressed onto PhD study.

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