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Masters Degrees (Civic Design)

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This ground-breaking Master’s programme addresses the urban ‘data revolution’ that has transformed our understanding of the associations between ‘built form’ — buildings and how these relate to each other — and happiness, and both mental health and physical health. Read more
This ground-breaking Master’s programme addresses the urban ‘data revolution’ that has transformed our understanding of the associations between ‘built form’ — buildings and how these relate to each other — and happiness, and both mental health and physical health. Urban designers, however, have often struggled to integrate this emerging evidence into their own practice. The principal aim of this Master’s course is to help urban design professionals, civic leaders, developers or investors to better understand this recent research and to apply it to their work.

The course explores ways in which the processes of evidence gathering and community consultation can be integrated successfully into a creative design process – to blend art and science. It will also provide access to a stimulating body of scholarly literature, and to leading researchers and urban thinkers. The course offers a rich exploration of how various research methods can inform better urban design practice. Graduates will learn to be able to assess the quality of research across a range of disciplines, and understand how this evidence is to be interpreted and appropriately applied. Master’s students will achieve improved data literacy (distinguishing, for example, correlation from causation, mediator from moderator) and acquire the skills needed to utilise the insights derived from this research. The course will employ practical case studies to illuminate the process of commissioning and producing reliable and applicable evidence.

The need for applied academic study of these topics is rendered more urgent by the current British demand for a much-increased rate of house building. Given the consistently lower popularity of recently constructed urban space (as compared with most older designs), there is both a desire and a sense of necessity within government and among many involved in urban planning to improve their ability to create urban spaces and buildings that command general support. There is also added pressure to make better policy and planning decisions, reflected in the recent establishment by the UK Government of the ‘What Works Network’ — an initiative to enable government agencies and other organisations to create, share and use high quality evidence for decision-making.

Location of Seminars and Teaching

This programme is London-based and is co-directed by Nicholas Boys Smith, a Senior Research Fellow, director of Create Streets and Government advisor in urban design, Dr Jamie Anderson, a Knowledge Transfer Fellow based at University of Cambridge, and Jonathan Schifferes, an Associate Director at the Royal Society of Arts.

The Seminar Programme

There are ten seminars held in a central London location. Each will feature internationally distinguished scientists, policy-makers, property researchers and urban designers. The seminars will be held in the early evenings to permit the enrolment of working professionals, and each will be followed by a question session and a working dinner, for those who wish to attend, where there is an opportunity to continue the seminar discussion in an informal environment. Tutorials and meetings with supervisors will take place at the University of Buckingham’s London offices in Bloomsbury: 51 Gower Street, London, WC1E 6HJ.

In addition to the Course Directors, confirmed lecturers include Sir Anthony Seldon (Vice-Chancellor of the University of Buckingham and co-founder of Action for Happiness); Dr David Halpern (Chief Executive of the Behavioural Insights Team – founded by the Cabinet Office and better known as ‘The Nudge Unit’); Professor Yolande Barnes (Director of World Research at Savills and visiting professor at UCL); Professor Philip Steadman (UCL Energy Institute); Dr Kai Ruggeri (Affiliated Lecturer in Psychology, Director of Studies, Corpus Christi, Cambridge and Director of the Policy Research Group); and David Rudlin (Director of URBED and winner of the Wolfson Economic Prize).

The seminar programme will run from October to spring in the course of the academic year. Click on “Teaching & Assessment” for the seminar dates.

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Situated practice is a key development in arts and humanities, where expertise comes not from a focus on a pre-defined discipline or subject (for example art, architecture or design) but from a creative and critical position that operates beyond these categories. Read more
Situated practice is a key development in arts and humanities, where expertise comes not from a focus on a pre-defined discipline or subject (for example art, architecture or design) but from a creative and critical position that operates beyond these categories. This pioneering programme will lead students into making work that is situated physically and engages with contemporary social, cultural and political conditions.

Degree information

This MA programme has broadly two goals:
-To provide a high-quality stand-alone qualification which trains critical, innovative and transdisciplinary practitioners in the making of projects which address the specific concerns of particular sites, and develop modes of research response and propositional transformation appropriate for those sites.
-To provide high-quality practice-led research training to enable students to carry out future doctoral and action research in the field.
Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of three core modules (75 credits), one optional module (15 credits), and the 'Major Project' exhibition module (90 credits).

A Postgraduate Certificate is available as an alternative qualification for students who pass modules amounting to 60 credits or more.

Core modules
-Situated Practice: Research Methods (15 credits)
-Mediated Environments (30 credits)
-Critical Spatial Practice: Site Writing (30 credits)

Optional modules
-Open Work module (15 Credits)
-Alternatively students may choose one optional module from across UCL, with agreement of the Programme Director and relevant department.

Exhibition
This module is based around the preparation of an original piece of situated practice, first in the form of a live intervention on site, then documented through an artist’s book, and finally remade in an exhibition format.

Teaching and learning
Tutorials and seminars are the leading teaching methods, together with lectures, group-working, writing workshops, research seminars, film screenings, and reviews of student work by Bartlett School of Architecture staff and visiting researchers. There are building and gallery visits in London and further afield, and an annual fieldtrip (optional). Modules use these advanced-level teaching approaches to encourage innovative student-led work.

Fieldwork
There will be one field trip (optional) annually as part of the programme. Students will also conduct their own original spatial research into a specific site of their own choosing for their Major Project.
Maximum cost to student is £500.

Careers

Situated practice is internationally understood as encompassing activity and research in curatorship, public engagement, event design, creative regeneration, participation design and activism, site-writing, situated film and video-making, information design and new media work, communication design and publishing, online environment design and civic media, and management of associated institutes.

Employability
The combination of networks, knowledge and technical expertise makes graduates of The Bartlett some of the most sought-after in the world. Graduates of this programme will leave with the skills and expertise that relate to a rapidly expanding and evolving sector in industry, including a strong understanding of appropriate methodologies in art and design practice-led research. In addition, students will develop site-related ‘situated practice’ projects. These may vary from physical installations, to digital interventions and to site writings and will establish the foundation for their final thesis in the field.

Why study this degree at UCL?

Situated practice is a rapidly growing and highly active post-disciplinary domain; a popular example would be the 2016 winner of the Turner Prize, a street regeneration project in Liverpool by the artist and architect collective Assemble in collaboration with local residents.

Situated Practice MA graduates will be uniquely educated and highly equipped to pioneer new forms of hybrid practice between art and architecture in domains of urban design, spatial design, event design, critical and theoretical writing, performance, and craft.

Located within The Bartlett School of Architecture, the programme will examine the fertile territories where the discipline of architecture cross-pollinates with the other creative arts. The neighbourhood of Hackney Wick, where the programme will be located, is home to the greatest concentration of artists in the UK.

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This taught programme is designed for Graduates who want to practise overseas and don’t need an RTPI accredited qualification. Read more
This taught programme is designed for Graduates who want to practise overseas and don’t need an RTPI accredited qualification.

You’ll not only gain a good understanding of town and regional planning but will also be able to tailor your studies to reflect your needs and interests, in consultation with the Programme Director.

Three pathways are available for the MATRP: Pathway A (Spatial Planning), Pathway B (Urban Design) and Pathway C (Spatial Modelling).

Key Facts

REF 2014
We're 9th in UK with 30% of publications rated as 4* (world-leading), 100% 3* and 4* impact.

Housed in the Gordon Stephenson Building
The building contains lecture and seminar rooms, as well as a design studio.

Why Civic Design?

World's first planning school

As the world's first planning school we have two main roles:

as a centre of excellence for innovative and influential research and scholarship; and
as a leading provider of high quality professional education.
Excellent academic staff

We have excellent academic staff who are actively engaged with research and professional practice. This is reflected in the fact we edit two international journals

Town Planning Review
Journal of Environmental Assessment Policy and Management

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Cities are around the world are dramatically increasing in size scope and influence, and this transformation means that cities are continuously being reconfigured as global and local circumstances change. Read more
Cities are around the world are dramatically increasing in size scope and influence, and this transformation means that cities are continuously being reconfigured as global and local circumstances change.

In this course you will develop an in depth understanding as to how and why these transformations are occurring and explore the policies and practices which have been designed to manage the process of urban regeneration, renewal and transformation, that tries to address the issues of economic growth and competitiveness, ensuring that places are socially inclusive, the requirement that urban centres are resource efficient and interesting and distinctive places to be. It combines an understanding of contemporary policy with related skills in planning and management.

Key Facts

REF 2014
50% of research activity deemed world leading or internationally excellent and a further 35% internationally recognised.

Housed in the Gordon Stephenson Building
The building contains lecture and seminar rooms, as well as a design studio.

Why Civic Design?

World's first planning school

As the world's first planning school we have two main roles:

as a centre of excellence for innovative and influential research and scholarship; and
as a leading provider of high quality professional education.
Excellent academic staff

We have excellent academic staff who are actively engaged with research and professional practice. This is reflected in the fact we edit two international journals

Town Planning Review
Journal of Environmental Assessment Policy and Management

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The Liverpool School of Art and Design offers you the space to explore your creative potential and understand how its application in design can interact with, adapt and change the landscape of cities and urban spaces and our experience within them. Read more
The Liverpool School of Art and Design offers you the space to explore your creative potential and understand how its application in design can interact with, adapt and change the landscape of cities and urban spaces and our experience within them.

•Course available to study full time (1 year) and part time (2 years)
•A new programme open to applicants from a wide range of first degree disciplines such as architecture, spatial design, landscape design, environmental art, geography and planning
•Join a strong research-focused academic community
•Prestigious Susan Cotton Travel bursary and the Michael Pugh Thomas and Julia Carter Preston Legacy postgraduate study awards available
•Develop your work in state-of-the-art workspaces and facilities within the RIBA award-winning John Lennon Art and Design Building

In a world of rapidly rising and migrating urban populations, there is a palpable need for smarter, more inclusive approaches to city planning, adaptation and spatial design.

Liverpool is a creative hub with a heritage of high quality civic design and creative urban engagement. The study of Urban Design is perfectly suited to the rich infrastructure of this truly global city. Read more about the outputs from the programme by visiting the Urban Design blog.

This programme has strong links with the RIBA North and the Liverpool Biennial which, every two years, delivers an international programme of exhibitions and projects that lead to a rediscovery of the city.

Based within the School’s Architecture and Urban Design subject area, this studio-based programme is nourished by the School’s burgeoning research in Urbanism and close association with the University's European Institute for Urban Affairs.

The curriculum has creative place-making at its core and we welcome applicants from a variety of educational and professional backgrounds such as architecture, planning, landscape architecture, art and spatial design.

What you will study on this degree

Please see guidance below on core and option modules for further information on what you will study.

Research & Practice 1

An introduction to some of the common principles of research in Art and Design, tailored to help you develop the skills required to become an effective independent researcher / practitioner.

Studio Practice (Urban Design)

Upon successful completion of an urban design project, you will acquire skills to analyse contemporary urban design themes through in-depth research and the intelligent development of a critical argument. You will also be able to evaluate innovative and visionary urban design theories and precedents in the context of the project work and synthesize knowledge and skills in the production of an urban design strategy for the redevelopment of a substantial piece of cityscape.

Research & Practice 2 (Urban Design)

You will be presented with an overview of urban scale sustainable design principles and objectives. You will then explore a range of contemporary sustainable best practice case studies. These principles will then be applied in practical project work, exploring urban design sustainability benchmarks and audit methodologies. You will thereby be provided with a range of theoretical tools to support independent conceptual and critical evaluation of sustainable urban design. Tools will be explored such as to enable students to understand and evaluate the environmental impact and ecology of urban design proposals

Collaborative Practice

Here you will be given the opportunity to think through, re-situate and re-imagine how the term ‘collaboration’ can affect and develop your own developing art and design practice in the broadest sense. A framework of teaching, study and assessment that will allow the student to develop a realizable collaborative project proposal that has the capacity to be developed into a fundable/sustainable project/collaboration.

Final Major Project (Urban Design)

Through a major project you will explore and apply a contemporary urban design theme through in-depth research and intelligent development of a critical argument or creative piece of work.

Further guidance on modules

The information listed in the section entitled ‘What you will study’ is an overview of the academic content of the programme that will take the form of either core or option modules. Modules are designated as core or option in accordance with professional body requirements and internal Academic Framework review, so may be subject to change. Students will be required to undertake modules that the University designates as core and will have a choice of designated option modules. Additionally, option modules may be offered subject to meeting minimum student numbers.

Academic Framework reviews are conducted by LJMU from time to time to ensure that academic standards continue to be maintained.

Please email if you require further guidance or clarification.

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An intensive studio introducing students to the Scandinavian-Nordic context and region, focusing on the public realm with attention to the urban form analysis, social life, landscape design and processes of collaborative work in strategic planning and implementation of public space. Read more
An intensive studio introducing students to the Scandinavian-Nordic context and region, focusing on the public realm with attention to the urban form analysis, social life, landscape design and processes of collaborative work in strategic planning and implementation of public space. Students work collaboratively to produce a project that is theoretically rooted in the form of a strategic urban design public space project on the city level. This course is about rethinking the public realm and designing new public spaces - an urban square or an urban park in the urban landacape. The space should have an actuality in the local political discussion as well as the global discussions about climate and ecological issues but also the issues of human scale, enjoyment, aestethics, history and culture. Public space should be complex and contain a variety of functions and programs for all. The question that will be raised is how can we work according to long-term goals when the public’s mood, expectations and desires change so easily? The question of what should be public spaces, and what our public should be like, is highly political, since we all have different opinions of what constitutes a good life. Can we design and maintain public places for good life based on timeless principles of civic design? Can Urban Design, Landscape Architecture and Urban -Town Planning have a common language and understanding when it comes to design of urban, nature and landscape sensitive places - public realms that should be attractive, enjoyable, engaging, inclusive but also lifelong transformative. [STUDIO WILL FEATURE AND INTERNATIONAL NORDIC STUDY TRIP WITHIN THE PROJECT]

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Digital Civics is about exploring new ways in which digital technologies can promote public participation in the design and delivery of local services. Read more
Digital Civics is about exploring new ways in which digital technologies can promote public participation in the design and delivery of local services. This includes education, public health and social care and planning.

Our Digital Civics MRes combines knowledge and skills across all areas of digital civics and digital civic research. This includes:
-Human-computer interaction
-Interaction design
-Research methods
-Ubiquitous and social computing

It also forms the initial training component for the four-year (MRes plus PhD) EPSRC Centre for Doctoral Training in Digital Civics.

The course is structured so that you can specialise in one of the following strands:
-Technologies
-Local democracy
-Public health and social care
-Community learning

Industry, local government and the third sector are significantly involved on this course. They feature through:
-The delivery of case studies in your taught modules
-Seminars
-Practical classes
-Project co-supervision

Our teaching staff have international reputations for their contributions to digital civics. Some also have extensive experience as practitioners in industry.

Our experienced and helpful staff will support you in all aspects of your studies. This could range from admissions to graduation and developing your career. This course is part of a suite of courses, creating a tight-knit student cohort.

As a student on this course, you will be encouraged to play a full part in the life of the School. This includes taking part in seminars delivered by distinguished external speakers.

Careers

This course will develop your career options within the public and private sector. This could include serving local and national government. Technical roles could include:
-Interaction design, information architecture and computer security
-Domain specific roles in education, social care and planning
-Digital economy product and service research, development and consultancy

Facilities

You will have dedicated computing facilities in the School of Computing Science, including access to the latest tools for system analysis and development. For particular projects, special facilities for networking will be set up as required.

All of our students enjoy access to specialist IT facilities to support their studies including:
-Over 300 dedicated PCs running Linux and Windows
-An immersive virtual reality suite
-Motion capture facilities
-3D printing facilities

Our new £50m Science Central building currently being built will enhance the excellent facilities available to our students and academic community.

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This programme is unique within the UK in catering specifically for those working, or interested in working, in the field of children, youth and international development. Read more
This programme is unique within the UK in catering specifically for those working, or interested in working, in the field of children, youth and international development. The course will equip you with the conceptual understanding and breadth of empirical knowledge that will enable you to critically evaluate policy and practice in the area of children, youth and development and give you the skills necessary to design and undertake research relating to children, youth and development.
It aims to To equip students with:
The conceptual understanding and breadth of empirical knowledge that will enable them to critically evaluate research, policy and practice in the area of children, youth and development.
An understanding of differing disciplinary perspectives on childhood and youth, and their theoretical and empirical contributions.
The skills necessary to design and undertake research relating to children, youth and international development.
Methodological, cognitive and transferable skills and substantive knowledge that will prepare them for employment, further study and civic engagement.
SPECIAL FEATURES:
The programme is also innovative in its interdisciplinarity. Unlike other childhood studies programmes, which are almost exclusively located in a single department and taught from a single disciplinary perspective, the proposed programme allows you to select options modules that draw upon expertise and modules from a range of disciplinary traditions.

The programme is based in the School of Health Sciences and Social Care, with the core modules delivered primarily, but not exclusively, by members of the Human Geography Research Centre within that School. This Research Centre specialises in geographies of children and young people.

However, the MA programme also benefits from expertise within Brunel's Interdisciplinary Centre for Child and Youth Focused Research. This represents a concentration of over thirty academic staff from across the University whose research interests lie in the broad field of children and youth. Many of the Centre’s members conduct research with young people in the global South, from a range of disciplinary perspectives including geography, sociology, anthropology, psychology, health sciences, social work and sport sciences.

In both core and specialist option modules, students will be explicitly exposed to innovative high profile research that relates to the fields of children, youth and international development.

The programme combines four core taught modules (accounting for 90 credits) with 30 credits worth of options. The core modules focus on key issues relating to international development, children and youth, and in particular the rights and participation of young people. They also prepare students in research design and practice, in preparation for the dissertation. The option modules offer a unique opportunity to appreciate in depth how children and youth-related issues are addressed from alternative disciplinary perspectives.

The programme is intended to relate to the needs of organisations working in the field of children, youth and international development. Students will have the opportunity, should they wish, to undertake a sustained project with an external organisation as part of a placement module. This may be an organisation with which they already have links, such as a current of former employer. They may also choose to apply their 60 credit dissertation to the needs of an identified community or organisation.

A range of teaching and learning techniques are employed on the programme, most of which stress the active involvement of students in discussion and debate. The programme also emphasises reflective, independent learning, both by individuals and groups, and students are well supported to achieve this through, for instance, tutorials, workshops and seminar discussions.

Staff place a strong emphasis on tutorial support and regular tutorials are integrated into the programme. Tutorials focus on the development of study skills (critical reading and writing), careers support, exam and assignment preparation, feedback on assessments and help in developing research proposals.

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This programme is aimed at researchers and professionals who commission, coordinate and use digital research in business, policy-making and the third sector, including digital marketing and analytical services officers. Read more

Programme description

This programme is aimed at researchers and professionals who commission, coordinate and use digital research in business, policy-making and the third sector, including digital marketing and analytical services officers.

This programme comprises a suite of courses that together provide the critical understanding and skills needed to make best use of digital research findings, with a particular focus on social media research, web 2.0 data and their synergies with publicly available administrative datasets.

These skills include:

understanding the production and consumption of automatic measures of user/citizen/customer feedback online
making best use of evidence from digital data analysis to inform business and policy decision-making
organising interdisciplinary strategies for digital research groups
identifying and accessing relevant expertise to undertake digital research for business and policy
anticipating future evolution and potential use of the digital research service market
Based on the latest research into the social and economic influences on how digital research is being developed and used, this PgCert is designed both for novices and for more experienced professionals who need to maintain a critical appreciation of the fast-moving field of digital research.

Online learning

This programme is available as a part-time online offering to allow professionals to study while working.

Programme structure

The programme is designed as a carefully thought-through progression from practical skills to a more critical understanding, through a comprehensive overview of available applications of digital research.

Courses:

Managing Digital Influence
Technologies of Civic Participation
Understanding Data Visualization
The Use and Evolution of Digital Data Analysis and Collection Tools
The Social Shaping of Digital Research
Engaging with Digital Research

Learning outcomes

Students who successfully complete this PgCert will be able to:

assess evidence deriving from monitoring digitally derived internet data, recognizing its strengths and limitations in comparison to other ways of apprehending customer and citizen needs
understand the work-practices of information professionals in digital research
critically discuss the current context and the future evolution of digital research
appreciate the practical benefits and limitations of digital data for organizational decision-making and policy-making
make best use of the results of digital data analytics for service design, marketing, institutional reputation management and policy-making
assess the relevance and value of projects at the forefront of digital research
manage and coordinate an interdisciplinary digital research team where social scientists, computer scientists and domain experts work together
identify, access and commission on-line data analytics tools and services appropriate to their needs
understand when and how to procure social media data analytics services and how to combine them with their existing knowledge practice

Career opportunities

This programme is aimed at creating career opportunities in the commercial sector (such as user experience consultants, industry analysts).

By offering a critical overview of digital research applications in different fields (user analytics, influence marketing and institutional reputation management), it will introduce you to careers in marketing and design as well as policy making.

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We are living through an era of tumultuous change in how politics is conducted and communicated. The great digital disruption of the early 21st century continues to work its way through media systems around the world, forcing change, adaptation, and renewal across a whole range of areas. Read more
We are living through an era of tumultuous change in how politics is conducted and communicated. The great digital disruption of the early 21st century continues to work its way through media systems around the world, forcing change, adaptation, and renewal across a whole range of areas: political parties and campaigns, interest groups, social movements, activist organisations, news and journalism, the communication industries, governments, and international relations.

In the New Political Communication Unit at Royal Holloway, University of London, we believe the key to making sense of these chaotic developments is the idea of power—how it is generated, how it is used, and how it shapes the diverse information and communication flows that affect all our lives.

This unique new Masters degree, which replaces the MSc in New Political Communication, is for critically-minded, free-thinking individuals who want to engage with the exciting intellectual ferment that is being generated by these unprecedented times. The curriculum integrates rigorous study of the very best academic research with an emphasis on making sense of political communication as it is practiced in the real world, in both "old" and "new" media settings.

While not a practice-based course, the MSc Media, Power, and Public Affairs is perfect for those who wish to build a career in the growing range of professions that require deep and critical insight into the relationship between media and politics and public communication more generally. These include advocacy, campaign management, political communication consultancy, journalism, government communication, policy analysis, public opinion and semantic polling, and public diplomacy, to name but a few. Plus, due to its strong emphasis on scholarly rigour, the MSc in Media, Power, and Public Affairs is also the perfect foundation for a PhD in political communication.

You will study a mixture of core and elective units, including a generous choice of free options, and write a supervised dissertation over the summer. Teaching is conducted primarily in small group seminars that meet weekly for two hours, supplemented by individual tuition for the dissertation.

This course is also offered at Postgraduate Diploma level for those who do not have the academic background necessary to begin an advanced Masters degree. The structure of the Diploma is identical except that you will not write a dissertation. If you are successful on the Diploma you may transfer to the MSc, subject to academic approval.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/politicsandir/coursefinder/mscpgdipmediapowerandpublicaffairs.aspx

Why choose this course?

- be taught by internationally-leading scholars in the field of political communication

- the curriculum integrates rigorous study of the very best academic research with an emphasis on making sense of political communication as it is practiced in the real world, in both "old" and "new" media settings

- perfect for those who wish to build a career in the growing range of professions that require deep and critical insight into the relationship between media and politics and public communication more generally

- a unique focus on the question of power and influence in today’s radically networked societies.

On completion of the programme, you will have:
- advanced knowledge and critical understanding of key concepts, theoretical debates, and developments in the field of political communication

- advanced knowledge of the texts, theories, and methods used to enhance understanding of the issues, processes, and phenomena in the field of political communication

- advanced knowledge and critical understanding of research methods in the social sciences

- a solid foundation for a career in the growing range of professions that require deep and critical insight into the relationship between media and politics and public communication more generally, or for a PhD in any area of media and politics.

Department research and industry highlights

- The New Political Communication Unit’s research agenda focuses on the impact of new media and communication technologies on politics, policy and governance. Core staff include Professor Andrew Chadwick, Professor Ben O’Loughlin, Dr Alister Miskimmon, and Dr Cristian Vaccari. Recent books include Andrew Chadwick’s The Hybrid Media System: Politics and Power (Oxford University Press, 2013), Cristian Vaccari’s Digital Politics in Western Democracies: A Comparative Study (Johns Hopkins University Press), and Alister Miskimmon, Ben O’Loughlin, and Laura Roselle’s, Strategic Narratives: Communication Power and the New World Order (Routledge, 2013). Andrew Chadwick edits the Oxford University Press book series Oxford Studies in Digital Politics and Ben O’Loughlin is co-editor of the journal Media, War and Conflict. The Unit hosts a large number of PhD students working in the field of new political communication.

Course content and structure

You will study four core course units (chosen from a total of six options), two elective units, and write a dissertation over the summer. Course units include one of three disciplinary training pathway courses, a course in research design, analysing international politics, and specialist options in international relations.

Students studying for the Postgraduate Diploma do not undertake the dissertation.

Core course units:
Media, Power, and Public Affairs: You will examine the relationship between media, politics and power in contemporary political life. This unit focuses on a number of important foundational themes, including theories of media effects, the construction of political news, election campaigning, government communications and spin, media regulation, the emergence of digital media, the globalisation of media, agenda setting, and propaganda and the role of media in international affairs. The overarching rationale is that we live in an era in which the massive diversity of media, new technologies, and new methodologies demands new forms of analysis. The approach will be comparative and international.

Internet and New Media Politics:
 Drawing predominantly, though not exclusively, upon specialist academic journal literatures, this course focuses on a number of important contemporary debates about the role and influence of new technologies on the values, processes and outcomes of: global governance institutions; public bureaucracies; journalism and news production; representative institutions including political parties and legislatures; pressure groups and social movements. It also examines persistent and controversial policy problems generated by digital media, such as privacy and surveillance, the nature of contemporary media systems, and the balance of power between older and newer media logics in social and political life. By the end of the course students will have an understanding of the key issues thrown up by the internet and new media, as well as a critical perspective on what these terms actually mean. The approach will be comparative, drawing on examples from around the world, including the developing world, but the principal focus will be on the politics of the United States and Britain.

Social Media and Politics: This course addresses the various ways in which social media are changing the relationships between politicians, citizens, and the media. The course will start by laying out broad arguments and debates about the democratic implications of social media that are ongoing not just in academic circles but also in public commentary, political circles, and policy networks—do social media expand or narrow civic engagement? Do they lead to cross-cutting relationships or self-reinforcing echo chambers? Do they hinder or promote political participation? Are they useful in campaigns or just the latest fashion? Do they foster effective direct communication between politicians and citizens? Are they best understood as technologies of freedom or as surveillance tools? These debates will be addressed throughout the course by drawing on recent empirical research published in the most highly rated academic journals in the field. The course will thus enable students to understand how social media are used by citizens, politicians, and media professionals to access, distribute, and co-produce contents that are relevant to politics and public affairs and establish opportunities for political and civic engagement.

Media, War and Conflict:
The post-9/11 global security situation and the 2003 Iraq war have prompted a marked increase in interest in questions concerning media, war and conflict. This unit examines the relationships between media, governments, military, and audiences/publics, in light of old, new, and potential future security events.

Introduction to Qualitative Research Methods in Politics and International Relations:
 You will be provided with an introduction to core theories and qualitative approaches in politics and international relations. You will examine a number of explanatory/theoretical frameworks, their basic assumptions, strengths and weaknesses, and concrete research applications. You will consider the various qualitative techniques available for conducting research, the range of decisions qualitative researchers face, and the trade-offs researchers must consider when designing qualitative research.

Dissertation (MSc only): The dissertation gives you the opportunity to study an aspect of Media, Power, and Public Affairs in depth. You will be assigned a dissertation supervisor and the length of the piece will be 12,000 words.

Elective course units:
Note: not all course units are available every year, but may include:
- Politics of Democracy
- Elections and Parties
- United States Foreign Policy
- Human Rights: From Theory to Practice
- Theories and Concepts in International Public Policy
- Contemporary Anglo-American Political Theory
- Transnational Security Studies
- Conflict and Conflict Resolution in the Middle East
- The Law of Cyber Warfare
- Comparative Political Executives
- European Union Politics and Policy
- International Public Policy in Practice
- Sovereignty, Rights and Justice
- Theories of Globalisation
- Introduction to Quantitative Research Methods in Politics and International Relations

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by coursework and an individually-supervised dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

Advocacy, campaign management, political communication consultancy, journalism, government communication, policy analysis, public opinion and semantic polling, public diplomacy, PhD research.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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The Master in Regenerating Intermediate Landscapes at the Universitat Internacional de Catalunya (UIC) in Barcelona trains students in an emergent field of urbanism and regional planning devoted to the regeneration of complex contemporary landscapes. Read more
The Master in Regenerating Intermediate Landscapes at the Universitat Internacional de Catalunya (UIC) in Barcelona trains students in an emergent field of urbanism and regional planning devoted to the regeneration of complex contemporary landscapes. The studio-based program provides a unique methodology that encompasses practices from urban design to landscape architecture and works at a scale between neighborhood and region. It addresses very diverse challenges such as preserving cultural landscapes, regenerating informal settlements, retrofitting sprawl, designing waterfronts or transforming highways into civic axes, all with the aim of building a more efficient and sustainable metropolis. Visit us at http://www.intermediatelandscapes.com or http://www.uic.es/en/intermediatelandscapes

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Focusing on the interface of theories of the good society, globalisation, legitimacy and power. Political theory is the soul of political science. Read more

Master's specialisation in Political Theory

Focusing on the interface of theories of the good society, globalisation, legitimacy and power.
Political theory is the soul of political science: it’s not about determining what the facts are but about determining what they mean and what should be done with them. It’s about the genuine and the deceptive arguments used to interfere in other people’s lives and business. We need political theory anywhere where power is used both covertly and openly, where policies are made and where choices are questioned and criticised.
As a political theorist, you will ask what would be sensible instead of what people call sensible. Just a handful of questions you will be asking and seeking the answers to: Is there a moral foundation for national sovereignty or self-determination? How far should tolerance go? What can and should be our ambitions for local community building? When does a political theory become a weapon or a form of power? Can authority ever be legitimate? Do we owe anything to future generations, animals, the global poor or minority groups?
This Master’s specialisation offers students an unprecedented opportunity to learn to assess political values, aspirations and dreams in terms of their desirability and reasonability. You will also discover how political theoretical work can be introduced fruitfully in other relevant contexts. This will enable you to help civil initiatives and governmental institutions, not to mention the public at large by imagining and designing policies and ambitions that are both viable and defensible.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/pt

Why study Political Theory at Radboud University

- Our programme is consistently ranked the best Political Science/PT programme in the Netherlands
- The programme has a unique focus on justification and recognition, globalisation and their relationship with power
- Teaching takes place in a stimulating, collegial setting with small groups
- You are encouraged to critically reflect on the staff’s ongoing research in the Nijmegen Political Philosophical Workshop
- We are the conscience of real-world politics and policies and prepare you to interpret and contribute to real-world politics

Career prospects

Graduates of political theory are academics, not politicians. We believe that to be a good policy advisor, manager or administrator, you need to have good research skills. Research is what is going to make your advice be both valid and practical: both sides of the coin of policies are equally important to the political theorists.

Job positions

Our graduates find employment in a variety of settings, including in consulting, national and international diplomacy and EU institutions. They can work as policy advisors, managers and leaders in local, regional and national government, as well as in business, media, NGOs, think-tanks and civic organisations. Quite a few go on to pursue a PhD degree.

Our approach to this field

Don’t rules, laws, commands and regulations always imply a violation of human autonomy? Are they not insults to humanity? Is there a way to escape from power?

Political theory is the key to good and valid politics. It is practice-oriented and should not be confused with political philosophy. Political theory is more than a reflection on eternal truths and the essence of concepts; it makes the difference between knowing and understanding. Compared to classical political philosophy it is more concrete, more interdisciplinary in nature, and sensitive both to the workings of power and the limits of feasibility.

Political Theory at Radboud University focuses on four aspects:
1. Critical understanding of theories of the good society
Of course, just like most Political Theory programmes we take a critical look at the theories of the good society. Who is – but also who should be – included in the theories: families or individuals, distinct people or everyone, animals and environment or humans only, future or only present generations?

2. Globalisation
We focus on globalisation in the broadest sense: the globalisation of people, money, technology and values so that we address global, ecological, intergenerational justice, multiculturalism and agonism. We definitely do not limit ourselves to the dominant redistributive justice discourse.

3. Justification and legitimisation
We start off by justifying and discrediting particular policies by the standards of theories of the good society. But we go further. What values, rules, tests and mechanisms are there to help design and assess political choices? Which are appropriate and when? Are they biased? We will discuss deliberative democracy, Habermas’s domination-free discourse, Rawls’s reflective equilibrium, the agora of agonists like Mouffe and, of course, foundationalism.

4. Power
Power is the mother of all political concepts; it is a concept that is too easily taken for granted or ignored by political scientists, political philosophers and politicians. We recognise that power, ultimately the threat of violence, will always be part of politics and that there will always be a gap between what you think you can justify and what others will embrace. At Radboud University we train students to try and chart where power hides in justification practices, both in political theory and political practise.

The combination of these aspects is what makes the Political Theory Master’s specialisation at Radboud University unique.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/pt

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Demand is growing for high value data specialists across the sciences, medicine, arts and humanities. The aim of this unique, modular, online distance learning programme is to enhance existing career paths with an additional dimension in data science. Read more

Programme description

Demand is growing for high value data specialists across the sciences, medicine, arts and humanities. The aim of this unique, modular, online distance learning programme is to enhance existing career paths with an additional dimension in data science.

The programme is designed to fully equip tomorrow’s data professionals, offering different entry points into the world of data science – across the sciences, medicine, arts and humanities.

Students will develop a strong knowledge foundation of specific disciplines as well as direction in technology, concentrating on the practical application of data research in the real world.

You can study to an MSc, Postgraduate Diploma, Postgraduate Certificate or Postgraduate Professional Development level.

Online learning

Our online learning technology is fully interactive, award-winning and enables you to communicate with our highly qualified teaching staff from the comfort of your own home or workplace.

Our online students not only have access to the University of Edinburgh’s excellent resources, but also become part of a supportive online community, bringing together students and tutors from around the world.

Programme structure

You can study to an MSc, Postgraduate Diploma, Postgraduate Certificate or Postgraduate Professional Development level.

For the MSc programme, students must successfully complete a total of 180 credits: Practical Introduction to Data Science (20 credits), the Dissertation Project (60 credits) plus 100 credits from the list of courses below.

For the MSc with specialism in Medical Informatics, students must successfully complete a total of 180 credits: Medical Informatics (10 credits), Research and Evaluation in eHealth (10 credits), the Dissertation Project (60 credits) plus 100 credits from the list of courses below. Students wishing to study the MSc with specialism in Medical Informatics should apply for the standard MSc in Data Science, Technology and Innovation and contact the Programme Administrator to discuss the specialism.

For the Postgraduate Diploma (PG Dip), students must successfully complete a total of 120 credits: Practical Introduction to Data Science (20 credits) plus 100 credits from the list of courses below.

For the Postgraduate Certificate (PgCert), students must successfully complete a total of 60 credits: Practical Introduction to Data Science (20 credits) plus 40 credits from the list of courses below.

For the Postgraduate Professional Development (PPD), students may take a maximum of 50 credits from the list of courses below. These credits will be recognised in their own right for postgraduate level credits or may be put towards gaining a higher award such as a PgCert.

Option courses

Some option courses may be compulsory for a specific programme; please refer to the information above.

Advanced Vision (10 credits)
Engaging with Digital Research (10 credits)
Ethics and Governance of eHealth (10 credits)
Introduction to Clinical Trials (10 credits)
Introduction to Health Informatics 1 (10 credits)
Introduction to Health Informatics 2 (10 credits)
Introduction to Vision and Robotics (10 credits)
Machine Learning (10 credits)
Managing Digital Influence (10 credits)
Medical Informatics (10 credits)
Neuroimaging: Common Image Processing Techniques 1 (20 credits)
Neuroimaging: Common Image Processing Techniques 2 (10 credits)
Practical Introduction to Data Science (20 credits)
Practical Introduction to High Performance Computing (20 credits)
Public Health Informatics (10 credits)
Research and Evaluation in eHealth (10 credits) (restricted to the MSc and MSc with Medical Informatics programmes)
Social Shaping of Digital Research (10 credits)
Technologies of Civic Participation (10 credits)
Telemedicine and Telehealth (10 credits)
The Use and Evolution of Digital Data Analysis and Collection Tools (10 credits)
Understanding Data Visualisation (10 credits)
User Centred Design in eHealth (10 credits)
Dissertation project – all Masters

(We recommend you take Introduction to Vision and Robotics before or simultaneously taking Advanced Vision, or have some previous experience with image processing.)

Learning outcomes

The modular course structure offers broad engagement at different career stages. Individual courses provide an understanding of modern data-intensive approaches while the programme provides the knowledge base to develop a career that majors in data science in an applied domain.

Career opportunities

This programme is intended for professionals wishing to develop an awareness of applications and implications of data intensive systems. Our aim is to enhance existing career paths with an additional dimension in data science, through new technological skills and/or better ability to engage with data in target domains of application.

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Highly respected qualification in buildings archaeology. Established more than 15 years ago, this course is one of the longest-established and most respected buildings archaeology and buildings history programmes in the UK. Read more
Highly respected qualification in buildings archaeology.

Why choose this course?

Established more than 15 years ago, this course is one of the longest-established and most respected buildings archaeology and buildings history programmes in the UK. It brings together experts in buildings survey and recording, archive research, legislation and policy, conservation, theoretical interpretation and computer modelling to deliver a dynamic course, which will equip you with the specialist skills and knowledge required for a career in researching, managing and conserving historic buildings.
-Learn the specialised skills required for researching, analysing and recording historic buildings.
-Gain experience in rectified photography, photogrammetry and other 3D recording methods, CAD drawing and computer modelling of historic buildings.
-Develop the knowledge and skills essential for careers in the architectural and archaeological sectors.
-Study in the cultural heritage capital of the UK – experience buildings archaeology in action.
-Access state-of-the-art facilities, including survey support, archives and libraries.
-Receive careers advice from staff with significant experience of recruiting within the sector.

York is one of the best places to study Archaeology, Heritage or Conservation. The Department has an excellent reputation and is one of the largest Archaeology teaching centres in the UK. The historic City of York is rich in architectural and archaeological treasures and resources which you will have easy access to during your studies.

What does the course cover?

The MA in the Archaeology of Buildings is designed to train students in the systematic research, recording, analysis and interpretation of historic buildings.

Through a combination of academic studies, practical training and research projects, the course will:
-Introduce the specialised skills required for the historical research, visual analysis and archaeological recording of buildings.
-Give you a foundational knowledge of the history of architecture in the UK, from c.1000 to the present day.
-Introduce you to current intellectual and professional research priorities in the archaeology of buildings.
-Introduce you to conservation legislation, policy and practice.
-Enable you to develop excellent research and communication skills relating to the research, analysis and interpretation of historic buildings.

Who is it for?

This course is suitable for students of Archaeology, History of Art, Architectural History and related subjects, as well as for mid-career professionals seeking to develop or enhance their professional specialism in buildings archaeology.

What can it lead to?

The discipline of buildings archaeology has grown in confidence, with new theoretical and methodological developments allowing archaeologists to record, date, model and present research in exciting new ways. There is significant demand for buildings archaeology professionals in the commercial sector and in national and local heritage organisations.

Course alumni have successfully launched careers in key roles with organisations across the heritage sector, including English Heritage, National Trust, Historic Scotland and Historic Royal Palaces, as well as with local authorities and conservation bodies, conservation architects, archaeological units and commercial developers.

Placement

Work placements provide a valuable opportunity to gain practical experience of working in the professional buildings sector. Your placement will draw on and contribute to the knowledge and experience you have gained on your taught courses, while enabling you to develop new insights, understanding and expertise in buildings archaeology that will be extremely valuable in future employment.

Aims
-To provide students with experience of buildings archaeology in a professional working environment.
-To consolidate students’ knowledge and understanding of buildings archaeology procedures and issues gained from the taught modules.

Learning outcomes
Upon completing these placements you should have:
-Gained experience and knowledge of how building recording and research inform conservation and heritage practice, under the guidance of experienced professionals.
-Developed experience in practical applications, facilitating critical reflection on the theoretical and philosophical issues raised in both core modules.

Placement providers
Although the organisations offering placements change from year to year, according to availability, the following list is a good indication of the choices likely to be available:
-English Heritage
-National Trust
-Council for British Archaeology
-York Civic Trust
-West Yorkshire Archaeology Service
-The Churches Conservation Trust
-Purcell Architects
-Quercus Design
-City of York Council
-Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings
-York Archaeological Trust
-Cathedral and Church Buildings Division

Careers

The MA in the Archaeology of Buildings offers practical skills and research training that provide excellent preparation for a range of careers. By the end of the course you will be able to:
-Record and analyse structures of all types, selecting a level of record appropriate to the end use.
-Execute hand, metric and photographic surveys and present the results in hand drawings, photographs and CAD.
-Recognise and apply the principles of structural analysis to elucidate a building’s history.
-Draw on a sound knowledge of British architectural history and, where appropriate, that of other countries.
-Carry out research using a wide range of archival sources on buildings in the UK and integrate these critically and effectively into the interpretation of buildings.
-Discuss and debate current research agendas in buildings archaeology.
-Direct your own independent work, and also interact with others as a member of a recording or conservation team.
-Communicate the results of research effectively through oral, written and graphic forms of presentation.

Alumni from the course have been employed in a range of commercial and heritage organisations across the UK, including:
-Field Archaeology Specialists (FAS Heritage)
-Oxford Archaeology
-URS Corporation
-Purcell Architects
-AOC Archaeology Group
-Pre-Construct Archaeology
-Headland Archaeology
-Arc Heritage
-York Archaeological trust
-English Heritage
-National Trust
-Historic Scotland
-Historic Royal Palaces
-West Yorkshire Archaeology Service
-MOLA (Museum of London Archaeology)

Others have been employed as freelance building archaeologists, local authority conservation officers and museum professionals.

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In all its forms, heritage is crucial for the collective memories and sustainability of communities, as well as for the personal development of individuals. Read more
In all its forms, heritage is crucial for the collective memories and sustainability of communities, as well as for the personal development of individuals. It can also be a potent economic, environmental and political asset that can be utilised for various ends. There exists an extensive and growing interest in sustainable development and heritage management.

However, a major motivation of this course derives from the fact that there have been relatively few attempts to inform the concepts, approaches and practices of one with the other. The principal aim of this course will therefore be to examine some of the ways in which heritage destinations are utilised in an era of sustainable development - the ostensible ‘organising principle’ of the twenty-first century.

Why study Sustainable Heritage Practice at Shrewsbury?

In studying Sustainable Heritage Practice you will have access to a wide range of heritage resources and their collections across Shrewsbury and Shropshire. There are also strong links to a number of heritage organisations and their resources including English Heritage and the National Trust. With a focus on sustainable heritage practice, we aim to equip you with the knowledge and skills to operate within the broader heritage industry, including heritage and planning agencies, local authorities and international organisations, private enterprises and civic organisations.

Our course blends theory and practice, with plenty of opportunity to become involved in field studies, gaining ‘hands-on’ experience and to participate in research projects with real life outputs. Teaching methods draw on a mixture of lectures, seminars, tutorials, practical sessions and field visits. You will also benefit from the contribution of heritage professionals and those working in a range of professions across the built and natural environments.

Course Structure

The modules given below are the latest example of the curriculum available on this degree course. Please note that course structures and individual modules are subject to change from time to time for reasons which include curriculum enhancement, staff changes, student numbers, improvements in technology, changes to placements or regulatory or external body requirements.

What will I learn?

You will be provided with the competences needed to meet the multiple challenges of contemporary heritage management; working with cultural and natural heritage, and attending to not only the survivability and inherent qualities of sites, objects and traditions, but also to the different claims and stakes that often surround them. The Sustainable Heritage Practice course will equip you through theory and practice to work in the exciting and expanding, as well as increasingly complex, heritage field. This course will train you in a uniquely interdisciplinary environment to asses, retain and sustain heritage, and to develop, revise and innovate the future shapes of the sector.

The course modules include

Research Skills in Heritage:
This provides a heritage-specific Masters-level research skills module, providing you with the necessary tools for Masters-level research in heritage and museums.

The Built Environment:
This module provides an advanced-level introduction and assessment of current debate and practices within the built environment to equip you for Masters-level research.

Heritage Practice:
Drawing on current research in heritage studies and sustainability, this module explores sustainable heritage concepts and interpretation in the contemporary cultural, socio-economic and political climate of the British Isles.

Research Project:
This is a flexible module involving staff supervision of student-led learning in the design and execution of a research project. The project will involve data acquisition and analysis of sustainable heritage concepts and practice focusing on heritage sites. This may involve a placement at a heritage site.

Dissertation:
An essential and important aspect of the course is the dissertation. It serves to provide detailed research into your chosen area of research interest. It will involve research into heritage practice and sustainable heritage.

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