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Prestigious Scottish Funding Council Awards are available to high calibre applicants for this programme. The SFC has selected this programme in recognition of the high demand for students with these qualifications. Read more
Prestigious Scottish Funding Council Awards are available to high calibre applicants for this programme. The SFC has selected this programme in recognition of the high demand for students with these qualifications. The awards cover all tuition costs; for further information, please see: http://www.glasgow.ac.uk/postgraduate/funded/

This Masters introduces you to the study of the history of collecting, as it has been pursued by individuals and by civic, educational or national institutions. It examines cultures of collecting and various modalities for the presentation of collections as developed in Asia, Europe, and more specifically Britain, from the late 18th century onwards through to the present. You will consider a range of theoretical and ethical issues as well as financial and societal mechanisms, which have informed collecting practices historically and that continue to do so. You will explore methodological approaches and core concepts, such as connoisseurship, taste and professionalisation, and consider how international travel, the trajectory of the art market and other types of exchange have impacted upon collecting practices.

Key facts

• MLitt: 12 months full-time; 24 months part-time
• Contact: Dr. Minna Torma:

Why Glasgow

• You will learn from world-leading researchers and develop expert knowledge in this specialised area within History of Art.
• Glasgow’s civic and university collections are some of the richest and most diverse in Europe and are of international standing. The University’s own Hunterian Museum and Art Gallery is the oldest public museum in Scotland and has extensive holdings covering fine art, geology, anatomy and the history of medicine.
• Our research forum provides you with a lively and stimulating introduction to methodological debates within art history. It provides a sense of art history’s own history as well as contemporary concerns and practice, examining the beliefs and values that have informed various forms of historical and visual analysis and enquiry. It is focused around a series of seminars or workshops run by members of staff and visiting academics.

You will take five core courses and one optional course and complete a dissertation 15,000 words in length (including footnotes but excluding bibliography) which will be on a topic chosen in consultation with the tutors and the programme convenor. You will also have the opportunity to take part in a field trip.

Core courses

• Research methods in practice
• Cultures of collecting
• Collecting East Asian art
• Collecting landscapes

Optional courses

• Patterns of collecting Chinese art
• Economies of collecting contemporary art

And then you may choose
• a Humanities Advanced Technology and Information Institute (HATII) course: 2D Digitisation (Theory and Practice)
• a course from elsewhere in the College of Arts, subject to the approval of the programme convenor.

Or from these options offered by History of Art
• Independent study
• Hunterian placement
• Work placement

Background

This programme introduces you to the study of the history of collecting, as it has been pursued by individuals and by civic, educational or national institutions. It examines cultures of collecting and various modalities for the presentation of collections as developed in Europe, Asia, North America and more specifically Britain, from the late 18th century through to the present. You will consider a range of theoretical and ethical issues alongside cultural, financial and societal mechanisms that have informed collecting practices historically and which continue to do so. You will also have the opportunity to explore a range of different collections from the encyclopaedic to the concise, and to question their context and strategies of presentation and their circulation through loan.

Themes of the programme include:
• How collections have been framed by: questions of subjectivity; by the emergence of nation states or the pursuit of empire; by the emergence of exchange and circulation mechanisms such as the market; and by broader societal processes informing the collecting practices of institutions and individuals
• The significance of a range of factors to collections and their histories, including: connoisseurship, taste and travel, the operations of the market, patterns of exchange, the professionalization of the curator, specialisation of knowledge, civil society and benefactors

Through its courses and the work placements it offers, the programme seeks to offer you sustained engagement and contact with collections in context. Teaching is based partly in the classroom and partly in collections, and the University’s own Hunterian collections provide a consistent point of departure and contextualisation for the students. The programme makes use of public and private collections accessible in Glasgow, Edinburgh, Dundee and further afield in Scotland.

The programme includes a field trip to Newcastle and the Northeast.

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We are living through an era of tumultuous change in how politics is conducted and communicated. The great digital disruption of the early 21st century continues to work its way through media systems around the world, forcing change, adaptation, and renewal across a whole range of areas. Read more
We are living through an era of tumultuous change in how politics is conducted and communicated. The great digital disruption of the early 21st century continues to work its way through media systems around the world, forcing change, adaptation, and renewal across a whole range of areas: political parties and campaigns, interest groups, social movements, activist organisations, news and journalism, the communication industries, governments, and international relations.

In the New Political Communication Unit at Royal Holloway, University of London, we believe the key to making sense of these chaotic developments is the idea of power—how it is generated, how it is used, and how it shapes the diverse information and communication flows that affect all our lives.

This unique new Masters degree, which replaces the MSc in New Political Communication, is for critically-minded, free-thinking individuals who want to engage with the exciting intellectual ferment that is being generated by these unprecedented times. The curriculum integrates rigorous study of the very best academic research with an emphasis on making sense of political communication as it is practiced in the real world, in both "old" and "new" media settings.

While not a practice-based course, the MSc Media, Power, and Public Affairs is perfect for those who wish to build a career in the growing range of professions that require deep and critical insight into the relationship between media and politics and public communication more generally. These include advocacy, campaign management, political communication consultancy, journalism, government communication, policy analysis, public opinion and semantic polling, and public diplomacy, to name but a few. Plus, due to its strong emphasis on scholarly rigour, the MSc in Media, Power, and Public Affairs is also the perfect foundation for a PhD in political communication.

You will study a mixture of core and elective units, including a generous choice of free options, and write a supervised dissertation over the summer. Teaching is conducted primarily in small group seminars that meet weekly for two hours, supplemented by individual tuition for the dissertation.

This course is also offered at Postgraduate Diploma level for those who do not have the academic background necessary to begin an advanced Masters degree. The structure of the Diploma is identical except that you will not write a dissertation. If you are successful on the Diploma you may transfer to the MSc, subject to academic approval.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/politicsandir/coursefinder/mscpgdipmediapowerandpublicaffairs.aspx

Why choose this course?

- be taught by internationally-leading scholars in the field of political communication

- the curriculum integrates rigorous study of the very best academic research with an emphasis on making sense of political communication as it is practiced in the real world, in both "old" and "new" media settings

- perfect for those who wish to build a career in the growing range of professions that require deep and critical insight into the relationship between media and politics and public communication more generally

- a unique focus on the question of power and influence in today’s radically networked societies.

On completion of the programme, you will have:
- advanced knowledge and critical understanding of key concepts, theoretical debates, and developments in the field of political communication

- advanced knowledge of the texts, theories, and methods used to enhance understanding of the issues, processes, and phenomena in the field of political communication

- advanced knowledge and critical understanding of research methods in the social sciences

- a solid foundation for a career in the growing range of professions that require deep and critical insight into the relationship between media and politics and public communication more generally, or for a PhD in any area of media and politics.

Department research and industry highlights

- The New Political Communication Unit’s research agenda focuses on the impact of new media and communication technologies on politics, policy and governance. Core staff include Professor Andrew Chadwick, Professor Ben O’Loughlin, Dr Alister Miskimmon, and Dr Cristian Vaccari. Recent books include Andrew Chadwick’s The Hybrid Media System: Politics and Power (Oxford University Press, 2013), Cristian Vaccari’s Digital Politics in Western Democracies: A Comparative Study (Johns Hopkins University Press), and Alister Miskimmon, Ben O’Loughlin, and Laura Roselle’s, Strategic Narratives: Communication Power and the New World Order (Routledge, 2013). Andrew Chadwick edits the Oxford University Press book series Oxford Studies in Digital Politics and Ben O’Loughlin is co-editor of the journal Media, War and Conflict. The Unit hosts a large number of PhD students working in the field of new political communication.

Course content and structure

You will study four core course units (chosen from a total of six options), two elective units, and write a dissertation over the summer. Course units include one of three disciplinary training pathway courses, a course in research design, analysing international politics, and specialist options in international relations.

Students studying for the Postgraduate Diploma do not undertake the dissertation.

Core course units:
Media, Power, and Public Affairs: You will examine the relationship between media, politics and power in contemporary political life. This unit focuses on a number of important foundational themes, including theories of media effects, the construction of political news, election campaigning, government communications and spin, media regulation, the emergence of digital media, the globalisation of media, agenda setting, and propaganda and the role of media in international affairs. The overarching rationale is that we live in an era in which the massive diversity of media, new technologies, and new methodologies demands new forms of analysis. The approach will be comparative and international.

Internet and New Media Politics:
 Drawing predominantly, though not exclusively, upon specialist academic journal literatures, this course focuses on a number of important contemporary debates about the role and influence of new technologies on the values, processes and outcomes of: global governance institutions; public bureaucracies; journalism and news production; representative institutions including political parties and legislatures; pressure groups and social movements. It also examines persistent and controversial policy problems generated by digital media, such as privacy and surveillance, the nature of contemporary media systems, and the balance of power between older and newer media logics in social and political life. By the end of the course students will have an understanding of the key issues thrown up by the internet and new media, as well as a critical perspective on what these terms actually mean. The approach will be comparative, drawing on examples from around the world, including the developing world, but the principal focus will be on the politics of the United States and Britain.

Social Media and Politics: This course addresses the various ways in which social media are changing the relationships between politicians, citizens, and the media. The course will start by laying out broad arguments and debates about the democratic implications of social media that are ongoing not just in academic circles but also in public commentary, political circles, and policy networks—do social media expand or narrow civic engagement? Do they lead to cross-cutting relationships or self-reinforcing echo chambers? Do they hinder or promote political participation? Are they useful in campaigns or just the latest fashion? Do they foster effective direct communication between politicians and citizens? Are they best understood as technologies of freedom or as surveillance tools? These debates will be addressed throughout the course by drawing on recent empirical research published in the most highly rated academic journals in the field. The course will thus enable students to understand how social media are used by citizens, politicians, and media professionals to access, distribute, and co-produce contents that are relevant to politics and public affairs and establish opportunities for political and civic engagement.

Media, War and Conflict:
The post-9/11 global security situation and the 2003 Iraq war have prompted a marked increase in interest in questions concerning media, war and conflict. This unit examines the relationships between media, governments, military, and audiences/publics, in light of old, new, and potential future security events.

Introduction to Qualitative Research Methods in Politics and International Relations:
 You will be provided with an introduction to core theories and qualitative approaches in politics and international relations. You will examine a number of explanatory/theoretical frameworks, their basic assumptions, strengths and weaknesses, and concrete research applications. You will consider the various qualitative techniques available for conducting research, the range of decisions qualitative researchers face, and the trade-offs researchers must consider when designing qualitative research.

Dissertation (MSc only): The dissertation gives you the opportunity to study an aspect of Media, Power, and Public Affairs in depth. You will be assigned a dissertation supervisor and the length of the piece will be 12,000 words.

Elective course units:
Note: not all course units are available every year, but may include:
- Politics of Democracy
- Elections and Parties
- United States Foreign Policy
- Human Rights: From Theory to Practice
- Theories and Concepts in International Public Policy
- Contemporary Anglo-American Political Theory
- Transnational Security Studies
- Conflict and Conflict Resolution in the Middle East
- The Law of Cyber Warfare
- Comparative Political Executives
- European Union Politics and Policy
- International Public Policy in Practice
- Sovereignty, Rights and Justice
- Theories of Globalisation
- Introduction to Quantitative Research Methods in Politics and International Relations

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by coursework and an individually-supervised dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

Advocacy, campaign management, political communication consultancy, journalism, government communication, policy analysis, public opinion and semantic polling, public diplomacy, PhD research.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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This 36-credit program is designed for self-starters and independent thinkers; students who want to further their career in intercultural or international communication, including Strategic Communication, Health Communication, and Communication for Development. Read more
This 36-credit program is designed for self-starters and independent thinkers; students who want to further their career in intercultural or international communication, including Strategic Communication, Health Communication, and Communication for Development. The program is delivered by faculty with professional and practitioner industry insight, providing a functional, real-world understanding of the fundamental and advanced concepts related to intercultural and international communication issues.

The MA in Intercultural and International Communication program will give graduates the skills necessary to communicate effectively in complex circumstances, through the use of diverse media and communication genres and engaging different audiences across multiple cultural settings.

Graduates will be familiar with non-governmental, civic, and business organizations and will have an understanding of how the making and shaping of meaning is fundamental to the reproduction of culture.

Course themes include:
-Intercultural and International Communication
-Intercultural Competence
-Media Relations in a Global Context
-Public Affairs and Advocacy
-Social Marketing
-Sport for Society
-Communication for Health and Well-Being

This program is delivered in two formats: an 18-month on-campus program, or a two-year blended program incorporating online learning with one on-campus residency, with the opportunity for an internship or research course. As well, this program features an intercultural field study experience to ensure you have opportunities to apply your learning in both intercultural and international contexts.

This program is recognized as full-time by StudentAid BC, meaning B.C. residents on this program are eligible for full-time government student loan assistance.

Who It’s For

The MA in Intercultural and International Communication program is for strategic and independent-thinking communication managers looking to improve their ability to assist organizations respond to the rapidly changing global environment, as well as individuals with an arts or science undergraduate degree who want to pursue or advance their career in professional communication in the intercultural or international sphere. This program is designed to balance Intercultural Communication with International Communication to better integrate theory and practice.

There are two learning models available for this program, with each model traditionally attracting slightly different students:
-Two-Year Blended Model – The students that lean towards this option tend to have significant professional experience, and have a background as communication managers and leaders.
-18-Month On-Campus Model – Shortly after completing their bachelor degree, the students that tend to take up this model have a solid understanding of the theoretical aspects of communication, with some relevant work experience as communication specialists and liaisons.

Through our Flexible Admission process, significant professional experience in lieu of academic requirements is also considered.

Outcomes

The MA in Intercultural and International Communication prepares individuals for work in:
-International or multicultural governmental or non-governmental organizations (NGOs)
-International journalism and documentary-reporting
-Multi-ethnic and multicultural communities
-International media
-Intercultural conflict management
-International communication enterprises
-Social marketing and development aid
-International relations
-Community activism
-Sustainable international and intercultural development
-Cultural interpretation and mediation
-Further studies in any of these fields

Graduates will gain:
-Knowledge of both the fundamental and advanced concepts related to intercultural and international communication and an ability to communicate successfully through multiple modes (e.g. through written and oral discourse, visual language, multimodal media) across culturally diverse settings.
-The ability to use computer-mediated technology to manage the processes required for the production and reproduction of culture.
-Knowledge of traditional and new media and their operation across diverse audiences.
-Knowledge of government, non-government, civic, and business organizations and an understanding of how meaning-making is fundamental to the operation of these.
-An understanding of the social forces shaping the globalization of the world, combined with a practical understanding of how processes such as transnationalism, travel and tourism, global commerce, migration, diaspora, refugee movement, global identity politics, information flows, postcolonial governmental relations, and much more, shape communities worldwide.
-An understanding of the cultural dynamics underpinning the formation of local, regional and national communities with regard to issues such as the formation of cultural identities, the shaping of gender inclusion, racialization, multicultural policy and education, ritualization, language protection and cultural revival, multicultural health communication campaigns, environmental culture, political culture, indigenous governance, sustainable development, and all forms of cross-cultural interaction.
-An understanding of culture, international and intercultural communication, negotiation and conflict management. An ability to communicate ethically in diverse and difficult circumstances.

Upon successful completion of the MA Intercultural and International Communication program at Royal Roads University, you will have demonstrated your competency at a professional and international level, and that you are prepared to meet the challenges facing communication managers in today’s fast-changing cultural, socio-economic, and political environments.

Flexible Admission

Applicants who do not meet the Standard Admission requirements will be considered for Flexible Admission and assessed as follows:
-All applicants must show evidence of having sufficient knowledge, skills and abilities to complete a demanding academic course of study at a master's level and have significant professional communication experience.
-Applicants without an undergraduate degree, but more than three years (90 credits) of relevant post-secondary education, should have at least two years of relevant work experience, preferably in a leadership capacity.
-Applicants with 2-3 years (60-90 credits) of relevant post-secondary education should have at least five years of relevant international/intercultural work experience in a leadership capacity.
-Applicants with less than two years of relevant post-secondary education should have at least ten years of high-level, professional communication experience in a leadership capacity.

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This Masters is concerned with outlining and critically evaluating the concept of the ‘avant-garde’ both theoretically and in terms of its applicability to representative areas of 20th-century art. Read more
This Masters is concerned with outlining and critically evaluating the concept of the ‘avant-garde’ both theoretically and in terms of its applicability to representative areas of 20th-century art. Dealing with art from the early twentieth century to the present, you will investigate concepts such as historical avant-garde, neo-avant-garde, and post-avant-garde, paying close attention to the theorists who have elaborated these ideas.

Why this programme

◾Glasgow’s civic and university collections are some of the richest and most diverse in Europe and are of international standing. You are granted privileged access to the extensive collections in our own Hunterian Museum and Art Gallery.
◾You have the opportunity to take part in a project-based work placement, where you can explore a possible future career while meeting professional practitioners and developing your skills and experience.
◾If you want to learn from world-leading researchers and develop expert knowledge of 20th-century Avant-Gardes, this programme is for you.
◾Our research forum provides you with a lively and stimulating introduction to methodological debates within art history. It provides a sense of art history’s own history as well as contemporary concerns and practice, examining the beliefs and values that have informed various forms of historical and visual analysis and enquiry. It is focused around a series of seminars or workshops run by members of staff and visiting academics.

Programme structure

Closely focused on the visual and historical specificities of the subject, the core teaching will have you examining the politically oppositional and ‘transgressive’ impulses of the avant-garde.

You will interpret ‘transgression’ in the widest sense and in relation to a range of diverse historical contexts, including: the anti-art concerns of Dada; the political tensions arising from conflicts between nationalist and internationalist currents in European art of the early 20th century and the Nietzschian/Bataillean testing of the boundaries of conventional moral positions, particularly regarding sexual identity and the body.

The optional courses available are closely geared to the research interests of our staff. Their content will draw upon current exhibitions and debates.

You will take five core courses and one optional course. This is followed by a period of self-study towards a dissertation 15,000 words in length (including footnotes but excluding bibliography) and will be on a topic chosen in consultation with the tutors and the programme convenor.

Core courses
◾Research methods in practice
◾Theories of the Avant Garde
◾Readings in Duchamp: anti-art, blasphemy, sexuality
◾Art, embodiment, transgression
◾Dada in Switzerland and Germany.

Optional courses

You may choose from the following options in the College of Arts
◾a Humanities Advanced Technology and Information Institute (HATII) course: 2D Digitisation (Theory and Practice)
◾a course from the MLitt Modernities: Modernism, Modernity & Post-Modernity run by English Literature
◾a course from elsewhere in the College of Arts, subject to the approval of the programme convenor.

Or from courses run by History of Art
◾Art in the making: modern and Avant-Garde techniques
◾Independent study
◾Work placement.

Study trip

Students on this programme are invited to take part in an optional study trip of approximately one week, which is funded by the student. Previous destinations include Berlin and Dublin.

Career prospects

Career opportunities include positions in curation, digitisation and research within museums and other cultural and heritage institutions. The programme also provides an excellent platform for you to move onto PhD studies and an academic career.

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This programme is unique within the UK in catering specifically for those working, or interested in working, in the field of children, youth and international development. Read more

About the course

This programme is unique within the UK in catering specifically for those working, or interested in working, in the field of children, youth and international development.

The Children, Youth and International Development MA will equip you with the conceptual understanding and breadth of empirical knowledge to critically evaluate policy and practice in the area of children, youth and development.

The core modules focus on key issues relating to children, youth and international development, including the rights and participation of young people. They also prepare students in research design and practice. The optional modules offer a unique opportunity to appreciate in depth how children and youth-related issues are addressed from alternative disciplinary perspectives.

Aims

Working with and for young people in the Global South offers an exciting career full of challenges and rewards. This MA provides a varied programme with a global perspective that equips students for roles at senior levels in international development organisations, government ministries and global agencies.

The programme equips you with:

The conceptual understanding and breadth of empirical knowledge that will enable you to critically evaluate research, policy and practice in the area of children, youth and development.
An understanding of differing disciplinary perspectives on childhood and youth, and their theoretical and empirical contributions.
The skills necessary to design and undertake research relating to children, youth and international development.
Methodological, cognitive and transferable skills and substantive knowledge that will prepare you for employment, further study and civic engagement.

Course Content

The programme combines four core taught modules (accounting for 90 credits) with 30 credits worth of options.

The programme is intended to relate to the needs of organisations working in the field of children, youth and international development. Students will have the opportunity to undertake a sustained project with an external organisation as part of a placement module. This may be an organisation with which they already have links, such as a current of former employer. They may also choose to apply their 60 credit dissertation to the needs of an identified community or organisation.

Compulsory Modules:

International Development, Childhood and Youth
Young Lives in the Global South
Global Agendas on Young People, Rights and Participation
Researching Children, Childhood and Youth
Dissertation

Optional Modules:
(Please note, not all options are available every year and some have capped intakes.)

Sociology of Youth and Youth Work
Contemporary Issues in Youth and Community Work
Social Policy
Anthropology of Education and Learning
Anthropological Perspectives on War and Humanitarianism
Psychological Development
Applied Learning (via placement)

Special Features

High value placements: Students may opt for the ‘Applied Learning’ module which involves a short placement (one or two days a week for 10 weeks) with an organisation that works in the field of children, youth and international development. Through the placement, a series of workshops and coursework assignments they will examine the relevance and responsibility of their academic studies to community work, voluntary action and paid work, as well as having the opportunity to develop transferable, personal and subject specific skills to enhance their employability on completing their postgraduate degree.

Pioneering research: In both core and specialist option modules, students will be exposed to innovative high profile research in the field of children, youth and international development.

Eramus Exchange: An Erasmus agreement exists between the Brunel University’s MA in Children, Youth and International Development, and the MPhil in Childhood Studies at the Norwegian Centre for Child Research (NOSEB), Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) in Trondheim. The exchange programme has two places for students from the MA Children, Youth and International Development. The exchange period is the second term / semester (approximately January to May). Erasmus students do not pay tuition fees at NOSEB, and are entitled to an Erasmus grant (€375/month) to cover any additional costs.

Teaching

A range of teaching and learning techniques are employed on the programme, most of which stress the active involvement of students in discussion and debate. The MA also emphasises reflective, independent learning, both by individuals and groups, and students are well supported to achieve this - through tutorials, workshops and seminar discussions.

Staff place a strong emphasis on tutorial support and all students are assigned to a tutorial group. Regular tutorials focus on the development of study skills (critical reading and writing), careers support, exam and assignment preparation, feedback on assessments and help in developing research proposals.

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The Masters in Museum Studies will help you develop the knowledge, understanding and skills required of today’s versatile museum professional. Read more
The Masters in Museum Studies will help you develop the knowledge, understanding and skills required of today’s versatile museum professional. It has been designed in conjunction with employers to meet their needs for well-rounded museum professionals trained in the latest theoretical and practical approaches.

Why this programme

◾Glasgow’s civic and university collections are the richest and most diverse outside of London and are of international standing.
◾Taught alongside staff from the University's own museum and art gallery, The Hunterian, the degree programme provides a combination of academic and practitioner input.
◾If you want to develop a career in the cultural heritage sector, this programme has been developed for you.
◾Three versions of the degree allow you follow standard or specialist strands.
◾There are great opportunities for you to take practice based courses or work placements at the museums and galleries that partner the programme.
◾We welcome applicants from across the arts and sciences, current professionals or career changers, from the UK or abroad.

Programme structure

Three different strands of the MSc Museum Studies are offered.

The Theory and Practice strand is our standard Museum Studies programme where the museum itself is the primary object of study.

Two specialist strands: Collecting and Provenance; and Artefact and Material Culture, enable you to combine courses in Museum Studies with specialist courses from Masters programmes provided by Archaeology and History of Art.

Each strand will give you a different mix of core and optional courses. All students take two 20 credit common core courses in Museology and Research and Professional Skills. You also take four 20 credit courses from your strand (a combination of strand core and optional courses) and one 60 credit research project.

Career prospects

Three different strands of the MSc Museum Studies are offered.

The Theory and Practice strand is our standard Museum Studies programme where the museum itself is the primary object of study.

Two specialist strands: Collecting and Provenance; and Artefact and Material Culture, enable you to combine courses in Museum Studies with specialist courses from Masters programmes provided by Archaeology and History of Art.

Each strand will give you a different mix of core and optional courses. All students take two 20 credit common core courses in Museology and Research and Professional Skills. You also take four 20 credit courses from your strand (a combination of strand core and optional courses) and one 60 credit research project.

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Textile Conservation is a multidisciplinary subject which combines academic knowledge with cultural awareness, aesthetic sensitivity and technical skill. Read more
Textile Conservation is a multidisciplinary subject which combines academic knowledge with cultural awareness, aesthetic sensitivity and technical skill. This MPhil is both an academic programme and professional training; it will give you a framework of theoretical knowledge and a range of practical experience which will enable you to contribute to the understanding and preservation of culturally significant textile artefacts.

Why this programme

◾If you are looking to enter a career in textile conservation practice in a museum or other institution, or to pursue doctoral-level research in this field, this programme is designed for you.
◾You will take part in a project-based work placement, where you can explore a possible future career while meeting professional practitioners and developing your skills and experience.
◾You will be based in our specialist conservation laboratories. The facilities include workrooms, a wet lab, dye lab, chemistry lab and well-equipped analytical lab.
◾You will benefit from our close links with Glasgow Museums, as well as the University’s own Hunterian Museum. Glasgow’s civic and university collections are some of the richest and most diverse in Europe and are of international standing. You will have the opportunity to draw on the museums’ rich and varied textile collections.

◾This is the only programme of its kind in the UK, and one of only a few specialist textile conservation programmes in the world.

Programme structure

You will take core courses over two semesters in each year, with a work placement in the summer between the first and second years. You will write up your dissertation over the second summer and submit it at the end of August.

The core courses will develop an understanding of
◾the practical skills used in textile conservation
◾related practical skills including dyeing and photography
◾the science underpinning textile deterioration and conservation treatments
◾preventive conservation techniques
◾the technological, cultural, historic and aesthetic contexts of textile artefacts
◾the place of conservation in the wider cultural sector.

Core courses

Year 1
◾Research methods in practice
◾Principles and practice: core skills and ethics
◾Understanding textiles: technology
◾Principles and practice: developing skills
◾Preventive conservation
◾Material cultures
◾Placement

Year 2
◾Principles and practice: advanced skills
◾Conservation in practice
◾Deconstructing the artefact
◾Principles and practice: conservation projects
◾Professional development
◾Research management
◾Dissertation

Career prospects

The programme is at career-entry level and graduates are qualified to go on to a post-training internship or directly into the workplace as a textile conservator in a museum or other institution around the world, as well as to undertake further study at PhD level.

The great majority of graduates of this programme and if its predecessor, the Textile Conservation Centre’s MA Textile Conservation programme, now work in museums and other institutions. Graduates of the two programmes have an outstanding record of employment on graduation and of remaining in the sector. They now work in nearly 30 countries and are in senior positions worldwide.

MPhil graduates have been awarded Mellon Fellowships at Denver Art Museum and the National Museum of the American Indian, Smithsonian Institution, in the USA, while others now work for National Museums Scotland, Historic Royal Palaces and the National Maritime Museum in the UK and Heritage Conservation Center, Singapore, among others.

However, it is worth noting that many graduates go on to short-term contract posts initially. It is easier to find a textile conservation post if you are able to be flexible in terms of location.

Further information:
◾Institute of Conservation (ICON)
◾American Institute for Conservation

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The Master in Regenerating Intermediate Landscapes at the Universitat Internacional de Catalunya (UIC) in Barcelona trains students in an emergent field of urbanism and regional planning devoted to the regeneration of complex contemporary landscapes. Read more
The Master in Regenerating Intermediate Landscapes at the Universitat Internacional de Catalunya (UIC) in Barcelona trains students in an emergent field of urbanism and regional planning devoted to the regeneration of complex contemporary landscapes. The studio-based program provides a unique methodology that encompasses practices from urban design to landscape architecture and works at a scale between neighborhood and region. It addresses very diverse challenges such as preserving cultural landscapes, regenerating informal settlements, retrofitting sprawl, designing waterfronts or transforming highways into civic axes, all with the aim of building a more efficient and sustainable metropolis. Visit us at http://www.intermediatelandscapes.com or http://www.uic.es/en/intermediatelandscapes

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Focusing on applying social marketing principles to the key health, environmental and civic issues in contemporary society, the Social Marketing PGCert will give you the skills and confidence to plan and manage social marketing campaigns. Read more
Focusing on applying social marketing principles to the key health, environmental and civic issues in contemporary society, the Social Marketing PGCert will give you the skills and confidence to plan and manage social marketing campaigns.

This course will appeal to graduates who are looking for a career that contributes something positive or beneficial for society, or experienced professionals interested in accrediting existing social marketing skills.

The Social Marketing postgraduate certificate will develop your ability to:

• plan behavioural change programmes based on an understanding of what moves and motivates people
• apply social marketing theory and concepts to practical behavioural problems
• demonstrate a critical analysis of social marketing strategy, both in practice and policy making settings
• show competence in social marketing planning techniques and the application of behaviour theory to live projects
• apply commercial marketing and other management tools to behaviour change programmes.

This flexible course is designed to fit around your personal and professional commitments. You can choose to start in November (subject to numbers) or May.

Course structure

The course is designed to fit around your personal and professional commitments, with start dates throughout the year. You may determine the length of the course, which can vary between six months and four years, depending on your individual circumstances.

You take a Social Marketing module over four consecutive days, with additional supervision and assessment time. On completion of this module you can choose to follow one of two routes:

• the modules route
• the work-based route.

You will have the opportunity to discuss the best combination of modules and projects with your tutor.

You need 60 credits to achieve the Social Marketing PGCert. The compulsory Social Marketing module is worth 20 credits; you can earn the other 40 credits either through two 20-credit modules or a work-based project.

You can take modules one at a time. For example, you could pay for one 20-credit module, then pay for another one at a later date until you have earned the 60 credits necessary for the PGCert award.

1. Modules route

This route allows you to choose two modules in addition to the compulsory Social Marketing module.

Each module is taught in weekly blocks, not including supervision and assessment time.

Modules:

Meeting the Challenges: Public Health
Research Methods for Critical Appraisal
Behavioural Economics
The Dynamic Public Service Environment
Service Planning and Commissioning
Sustainable Joint Working
Marketing for the Not-for-Profit Sector

2. Work-based project route

The work-based project can be completed at a pace that suits you and your employer (between six months and four years). It is based around your own professional interests and carried out under the supervision of the course team.

Should you decide to take this route, you will be required to produce a coherent account of an applied social marketing initiative.

The project provides an opportunity to create strategies to overcome the barriers that social marketing professionals face when creating complex behaviour change programmes.

You will be expected to:

• identify a social marketing problem of your choice (in consultation with tutors)
• explore relevant social marketing/behaviour change models to provide insight into an audience in relation to the particular issue
• analyse the primary and secondary data, with reference to social marketing theory and literature
• draw sound conclusions from your investigation
• identify realistic and feasible social marketing recommendations, such as the development of a behavioural intervention or a review of the way a public service is provided.

Who is this course for?

This course is suitable for graduates wanting to develop social marketing skills, as well as experienced professionals interested in accrediting existing social marketing skills.

It will be of particular interest to:

• professionals with marketing or business experience interested in working in health or environment sectors
• public health, health promotion, commissioning and environmental professionals who are interested in social marketing and behavioural change
• people working internationally within the disciplines of environment, business and social science
• health and environmental professionals who have completed a basic introduction to social marketing course
• communications professionals working in local authorities and NHS organisations
• non-profit, voluntary and other public sector managers from charities and social enterprises.

Careers and employability

On completion of this course you will have an advanced understanding of social marketing strategy. You will be equipped with the skills and knowledge sought after by employers in national, regional and local government, social marketing consultancies, the NHS and not-for-profit organisations.

The course demonstrates your professional credibility to employers, clients and peers. The government’s recognition of the value of the social marketing means that a large number of relevant roles and vacancies are available in the public sector.

Links with industry:

"Our students engage with industry through work placements, projects and guest speakers. This close link with industry often provides our students with opportunities to get a job. This is what the business school is all about." - Aidan Berry, Director of Brighton Business School

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The School of Government and International Affairs has a vibrant research environment. All SGIA Masters students are welcome to the numerous events organised by the School's research centres. Read more
The School of Government and International Affairs has a vibrant research environment. All SGIA Masters students are welcome to the numerous events organised by the School's research centres. MA Politics & International Relations (Political Theory) students will particularly benefit from the activities of the Centre for Political Thought. The centre runs seminar series, workshops and reading group and actively involves Masters and PhD students in its work.

Student Profiles

Not only has the MA Politics and International Relations (Political Theory) programme allowed me to further pursue what I find to be the most interesting aspect of politics, but working so closely with such knowledgeable tutors on a weekly basis has truly opened my eyes and allowed me to delve into and examine the most fundamental concepts behind political theory. That along with the fascinating debates that I had with my classmates and the thought-provoking essays have contributed to what has been the most important step in my career in politics.” Tarek Abou-Jaoude, 2014/15

“Participating in the Politics and International Relations program at Durham University is the best academic decision I have ever made for two reasons. First, is the engaging learning environment created in the classroom by the professors who lead students in civic discussion and debate. The second reason is what makes Durham University so special, being an international student from the U.S going to school at Durham allowed me to learn international relations in the classroom, and its convenient location allowed me to travel to most places in Europe to gain practical application that cannot be taught by reading a book. You make lifelong friends from all over the world who share your core interests, and that is tailor made attribute of Durham University.” Nicholas Lennox, 2014/15

“Durham has been one of the best experiences of my life. This University teaches the meaning of community and friendship, in an environment that combines historic heritage with the latest trends. The MA in Politics and International Relations (Political Theory) was all I expected. A flexible programme that allowed me to interact both with our lecturers and fellow students of the School of Government and International Affairs. This open environment promoted what it felt a very complete learning experience.” Maria Lleras, 2014/15

Course Content

This programme provides students with systematic knowledge and the tools to critically review the complex relationships between government and society at a variety of levels and in different contexts. It also enables students to evaluate in a sophisticated and critical fashion, theories and paradigms within the broad field of politics and international relations, and to draw lessons from empirical studies involving both quantitative and qualitative investigations. It also aims to develop students' ability to deploy research strategies and methods in an appropriately advanced fashion to critically evaluate research at the current limits of theoretical understanding, and to equip students so that they have the ability to master complex political concepts and evaluate the significance of major developments in political thought in general as well as international relations theory.

Course Structure
Two core modules worth 30 credits, plus a Dissertation worth 75 credits, plus 5 optional modules to the value of 75 credits - 60 of which must be from the list A.

Core Modules:
-Methodology in the Social Sciences
-Research Methods and Dissertation Production

List A - In previous years these have included:
-Contemporary Socio-Political Issues in Muslim Religious Thought
-Issues in the Politics of Military Occupations
-International Relations Theory
-Political Ideology
-Human Rights
-Collective Identities and Political Thought in Britain since 1850
-Just War in Political Theory and Practice

List B
-European Institutions and the Policy Process
-European Security
-German Foreign Policy
-International Relations and Security in the Middle East
-Nationalism, Revolution and Reform in Contemporary China
-Political Economy and Development in Chinese Business
-The Contemporary Politics of the Middle East
-Strategic Asia: Policy and Analysis
-The European Union as a Global Actor
-The Political Economy of Development in the Middle East
-Model United Nations
-Region, Nation and Citizen in South East Asia
-A module offered by the School of Modern Languages and Cultures

Learning and Teaching

At the beginning of the academic year, students go through five-day induction events in which they are informed about University, the School, the MA/MSc programmes and the facilities available for their learning.

The 180 credits one-year MA degree programme is divided into two core and five optional modules of 15 credits each. Furthermore, students have to submit a dissertation of 75 credits of not more than 15,000 words. Most of the modules are delivered during the first two terms and students spend the remaining time to write the dissertation.

Usually a module has 18 contact hours spread over 9 weeks and 132 hours of self-directed learning. The modules are mainly delivered through weekly 2 hours sessions which can either take the form of seminars or one hour of lecture and one hour of tutorial. The form in which seminars are conducted can differ from one module to another. Typically modules would have elements of lectures, discussions, and presentations from students—the extent of each of these components would differ from one module to another.

All modules have written exercise for formative assessments. Upon getting feedback on these assignments, students can meet their lecturers to discuss their marks before then eventually completing a summative assessment. Typically summative assessments are 3000 word essays but some modules may be assessed by examination. Students can also meet their module coordinators during their weekly contact hours or by making an appointment. When students are working on their dissertations during the later half of the year, they meet their assigned supervisors for a minimum of 6 hours. Students also have access to the academic advisors whenever there is a need.

SGIA has a wide variety of resources available to students such as: computer room/work room with networked PC’s, printing facilities including scanner and photocopier, audio system, Wi-Fi and a relaxation area with satellite television system.

SGIA conducts weekly seminars and organises lectures and conferences which all postgraduate students can attend. These events provide students the opportunity to engage with, and debate, the most important issues in current political and international studies.

Towards the end of the programme students can contact the Careers Office of the University to get advice on available job prospects and get assistance on applying for these.

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This programme offers a unique approach to the study of Shakespeare’s life and work, fusing traditional scholarly approaches with the thrill of being involved in new creative work. Read more
This programme offers a unique approach to the study of Shakespeare’s life and work, fusing traditional scholarly approaches with the thrill of being involved in new creative work.

It makes the most of the unrivalled resources of Shakespeare’s Stratford and involves expert tuition from the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust and the Library of Birmingham. The programme is particularly enhanced by the Institute's collaboration with the Royal Shakespeare Company (RSC), offering unique and extensive opportunities to work on its premises with RSC artists.

This programme will attract aspiring academics, actors, writers, directors, arts administrators, as well as anyone with a lively interest in Shakespeare.

This programme brings together academic, theatrical and civic interests in Shakespeare and creativity, generating a comprehensive and forward-looking conversation about what Shakespeare is and can be in today's world.

You will produce traditional academic essays as well as creative work, all of which will explore Shakespeare’s potential in the modern world. You will make new creative work with and at the Royal Shakespeare Company (RSC) and benefit from unique and exciting access to the RSC's studio theatre, The Other Place.

You will study four core modules:

Shakespearience
Shakespeare and Theatre Practice (formerly Shakespeare and Creative Practice)
The Shakespeare Ensemble
Shakespeare and Society

You will also choose two optional modules from a range of Shakespeare Institute modules, and complete the MA with a 15,000-word dissertation. For your dissertation, you will have the chance to work intensively on an RSC project at The Other Place theatre.

Shakespearience and optional modules are each assessed by one 4,000-word essay; Shakespeare and Theatre Practice is assessed by either two performance assignments and a 2,000-word research paper, or a 4,000-word research paper; Shakespeare Ensemble and Shakespeare and Society both combine shorter written assignments with creative work.

You will also attend weekly Thursday Seminars at the Shakespeare Institute (term-time only), which feature papers presented by a range of established visiting scholars as well as Institute and University of Birmingham staff.

About the School of English, Drama and American & Canadian Studies

"Welcome to the School of English, Drama and American & Canadian Studies, in the College of Arts and Law. This is one of the largest Schools in the College, and variety is our watchword. We offer one of the most extensive ranges of undergraduate and postgraduate programmes in the country. Our research expertise is equally diverse, and we welcome students and researchers from all over the world." - Professor Andrzej Gasiorek, Head of School.

We particularly encourage creative thinking, with a range of pioneering programmes including Masters opportunities in Creative Writing, Film and Television and Shakespeare and Creativity. Our creative offerings are also strengthened by the development of our Department of Film and Creative Writing – established in 2015 – which has opened up exciting new opportunities for postgraduates to benefit from synergies between the two fields.

Our well-established Departments also provide an excellent environment for postgraduate study. The Department of Drama and Theatre Arts has a highly respected national and international reputation for excellence in teaching and research. We are also one of the leading centres for the postgraduate study of English in the UK, spanning language and literature. The Department of English Language and Applied Linguistics is a world-leading centre of excellence for both teaching and research in this field.

We are also proud to be home to the world-renowned Shakespeare Institute, based in Stratford-upon-Avon. Situated within walking distance of Shakespeare’s birthplace, school and grave, and the theatres of the Royal Shakespeare Company (RSC), the Shakespeare Institute offers postgraduate students and scholars an academic experience unrivalled by any other university.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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Giving you the opportunity to extend your knowledge of the law and develop advanced legal research skills, the taught LL.M will give your future prospects a significant boost by adding an internationally recognised postgraduate legal qualification to your existing skills and experience. Read more
Giving you the opportunity to extend your knowledge of the law and develop advanced legal research skills, the taught LL.M will give your future prospects a significant boost by adding an internationally recognised postgraduate legal qualification to your existing skills and experience.

You will develop an in-depth understanding of how and why the law is formed, how it is applied and its relationship with policy and policy-making processes at national, European and international levels.

The programme is designed to provide you with the flexibility to tailor your study to meet your own professional or academic goals. You specialise in a specific area of the law that interests you, whilst developing advanced critical, analytical and evaluative skills.

Our LL.M students tend to come from a wide range of backgrounds with varied professional and personal experience, all with intellectual drive and a dedication to their chosen area of the law.

Features and benefits of the course

Expert researchers and teaching staff
Manchester Law School’s teaching team of over 80 staff consists of academic specialists and legal practising professionals with strong working links to the Northern Circuit. The LL.M teaching team have close links with civic society, think-tanks, European institutions and policy-makers. They are recognised researchers who have been important in developing new research in areas such as equality law, medical ethics, human rights, free movement law and discrimination law.

Outstanding facilities
At Manchester Law School you will have the benefit of excellent facilities, including legal libraries, IT zones and a mock courtroom. You will have access to an award-winning Faculty building with dedicated postgraduate suite and careers hub. World-class facilities are available on our thriving campus at the heart of the UK’s second city.

Placement options

Manchester Law School offers excellent pro bono opportunities, allowing students to undertake voluntary legal work with our partner organisations. Our dedicated careers adviser will provide assistance with initiating new links to the profession. You will also receive support with careers from your tutors and you will have the opportunity to connect with a variety of members of the Northern Circuit, including direct access to practising staff, alumni as well as through guest speaker programmes.

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The Place Management and Leadership programme is an international, part-time course that is predominantly for existing practitioners in the place management sector. Read more
The Place Management and Leadership programme is an international, part-time course that is predominantly for existing practitioners in the place management sector. Place management encompasses a range of professions internationally, including town and city centre management, market management, Downtown and Mainstreet management, destination management and marketing, Business Improvement District management and city marketing and branding. It is increasingly involving civic society and the third sector, and embraces new approaches to place change such as the Transition Town movement. For this reason the course is also suitable for local politicians and local community members leading or contributing to place initiatives

The programme has been designed around the worldwide professional standards developed by the Institute of Place Management to support those that are already in, or wish to move into, a strategic role in place management. A blended learning delivery model is adopted. Each 30 credit unit is delivered through a three-day blocks of master classes, followed by distance learning and tutor support.

Delivered by a team of internationally renowned academics and practitioners, all assessments are designed to have impact on specific locations and you will be able to network with managers and leaders in a variety of places.

Features and benefits of the course

-This is a unique course. Manchester Met is the only university to offer postgraduate qualifications in Place Management
-This course is accredited by the Institute of Place Management
-The Institute of Place Management brings together long-standing streams of research that Manchester Met has international renown for and which, together, represent the more impactful areas of marketing, in terms of the reach and significance they have on society
-The course is delivered by a team of internationally renowned academics and practitioners
-All assessments are designed to have impact on specific locations
-You will be able to network with managers and leaders in a variety of places. Over 100 students have studied Place Management with us, from 22 different countries
-Manchester Met is a world-leader in the study of Place Management and launched the Journal of Place Management and Development in 2008. We actively encourage students to publish work of suitable standard

Assessment details

All assessments are designed to have impact on specific locations.

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This taught programme is designed for Graduates who want to practise overseas and don’t need an RTPI accredited qualification. Read more
This taught programme is designed for Graduates who want to practise overseas and don’t need an RTPI accredited qualification.

You’ll not only gain a good understanding of town and regional planning but will also be able to tailor your studies to reflect your needs and interests, in consultation with the Programme Director.

Three pathways are available for the MATRP: Pathway A (Spatial Planning), Pathway B (Urban Design) and Pathway C (Spatial Modelling).

Key Facts

REF 2014
We're 9th in UK with 30% of publications rated as 4* (world-leading), 100% 3* and 4* impact.

Housed in the Gordon Stephenson Building
The building contains lecture and seminar rooms, as well as a design studio.

Why Civic Design?

World's first planning school

As the world's first planning school we have two main roles:

as a centre of excellence for innovative and influential research and scholarship; and
as a leading provider of high quality professional education.
Excellent academic staff

We have excellent academic staff who are actively engaged with research and professional practice. This is reflected in the fact we edit two international journals

Town Planning Review
Journal of Environmental Assessment Policy and Management

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Cities are around the world are dramatically increasing in size scope and influence, and this transformation means that cities are continuously being reconfigured as global and local circumstances change. Read more
Cities are around the world are dramatically increasing in size scope and influence, and this transformation means that cities are continuously being reconfigured as global and local circumstances change.

In this course you will develop an in depth understanding as to how and why these transformations are occurring and explore the policies and practices which have been designed to manage the process of urban regeneration, renewal and transformation, that tries to address the issues of economic growth and competitiveness, ensuring that places are socially inclusive, the requirement that urban centres are resource efficient and interesting and distinctive places to be. It combines an understanding of contemporary policy with related skills in planning and management.

Key Facts

REF 2014
50% of research activity deemed world leading or internationally excellent and a further 35% internationally recognised.

Housed in the Gordon Stephenson Building
The building contains lecture and seminar rooms, as well as a design studio.

Why Civic Design?

World's first planning school

As the world's first planning school we have two main roles:

as a centre of excellence for innovative and influential research and scholarship; and
as a leading provider of high quality professional education.
Excellent academic staff

We have excellent academic staff who are actively engaged with research and professional practice. This is reflected in the fact we edit two international journals

Town Planning Review
Journal of Environmental Assessment Policy and Management

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