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A ground-breaking new MA delivered in partnership with the BFI to prepare students to build successful careers in film exhibition, programming, criticism or archival work. Read more
A ground-breaking new MA delivered in partnership with the BFI to prepare students to build successful careers in film exhibition, programming, criticism or archival work.

Quick Facts:

2 Year Course
Full-time
Course runs Jan-Dec each year
Next intake: January 2017
NFTS Scholarships available for UK Students

Visit the website https://nfts.co.uk/our-courses/masters/film-studies-programming-and-curation

APPLICATION DEADLINE: 08 SEP 2016

COURSE OVERVIEW

- The course is delivered in partnership with the BFI (the leading body for film in the UK) who will also provide hands-on placement opportunities across a range of curatorial and critical activities.
- The course is delivered by film professionals in film exhibition and distribution, festivals, archives and film criticism, alongside academics and film makers
- Students on the course will attend film festivals.
- Students learn how to conceptualise film work in terms of idea, form and style, as well as understanding the relationship between film and audience.
- Students will learn about the practicalities of film exhibition, distribution and preservation in the changing digital landscape.
- Students will study the practice of film criticism and comment, including reviewing and critical writing about films, filmmakers and the broader culture.
- Students have the opportunity to mount festivals, pop up screenings and other events.

This course commences at the end of January each year.

The National Film and Television School’s Film Studies Programming and Curation Masters delivered in partnership with the BFI is designed for students who wish to make a career in the wider film and media culture, whether in the fields of curation, exhibition, criticism, archives, preservation or restoration. The course provides a detailed understanding of the concepts, contexts and critical thought that have shaped the production and reception of film as a basis for engagement with rapidly changing contemporary film and moving image culture. A rigorous academic framework is combined with real world applications enabling each student to develop their own skills, knowledge and understanding to provide a strong basis for a career in film and media.

The philosophy of this course is to give students a theoretical, historical and critical understanding of film, which they will apply practically in the fields of film curating and programming, distribution and archiving.

With all the resources of the National Film and Television School available to them, students on this Master’s programme benefit from working alongside a new generation of filmmakers, encouraging creative dialogue between makers and curators/critics.

CURRICULUM

Students on this course gain a thorough understanding of the process by which a film moves from a creative idea to an audience experience. They will explore the history, theory and critical contexts of film. In addition they will look at a variety of critical writing on film, to give them access to the major ideas that inform film.

Optional units and a professional placement allow a more specialised focus on industry practices in programming, curation, archives and film criticism through project work and research portfolios.

1: Conceptualising Film: Idea, Form and Style

The unit provides an introduction to key ways of conceptualising film that underpin approaches to critical, theoretical and creative practice. The main topics include:

- The Evolution of the moving image – from scientific experiment to mass entertainment and beyond
- Ways of seeing: approaches to studying film
- The development of an industry and its audience. Film and Commerce
- Film and Realism: Cinema as a Mirror of Society?
- The Subconscious Art: Dream Cinema and the language of film
- Historical movements in Cinema: Influential developments, including the early avant-garde, Italian neo-realism, the Nouvelle Vague, Third Cinema
- Contemporary and British World Cinema: approaches development and trends
- Film Forum: the evolution of film criticism and comment
- Film and Digital Media (technology, and the impact on form and style)
- Expanded cinema: Film as a gallery experience, film as a live event

The unit draws on a wide range of illustrative film examples, and explores each concept with in-depth analysis of one or more key films. Each topic will be introduced by a film and media practitioner and/or an academic.

Students will write an essay in order to explore one of the key concepts.

2: Identifying the Audience: The Practice of Cinema from Idea to Exhibition

This unit looks at the changing sites and forms of film viewing, providing a detailed exploration of the cultural, economic and technological contexts that structure the processes and pathways by which films reach an audience. Whilst primary examples will largely be drawn from Europe and the USA, these will be considered in a global context.

- Audiences: bringing people together to watch films: who, why and how, from fairground attraction to movie palace to pop-up and online.
- The relationship between production and audiences: creativity, development journeys, film finance and funding.
- Contemporary patterns of distribution: buying and selling films in a multi-platform world; from conglomeration and globalisation to independence and self-distribution
- The business of contemporary exhibition: the ‘majors’ and the alternatives; the digital revolution
- Cultural cinema in the UK and Europe; the status of ‘specialised cinema’, including repertory and archive film
- Film Festivals and markets: cultural and economic impact; models of programming;
- Programming for diverse audiences
- Programming beyond the single screen: event cinema, alternative content, installation and on-line platforms
- Marketing and promotion: identifying, reaching and developing audiences
- Critics and criticism in the age of the internet and social media: continuity and change
- Reception: case studies

In addition to regular lectures and seminars by NFTS tutors, the teaching programme includes a wide range of talks by cinema and festival directors and programmers; industry executives working in exhibition, distribution, sales and marketing; venue and event managers; filmmakers and critics.

Students will prepare and present a case study one of the subject areas.

3: Programming Film & Cultural Events and Film Preservation and Restoration

This unit is broken into two strands with students participating in both.

Informed by the study in Parts A and B, there will be in-depth sessions on programming, including researching programme and event ideas, developing themes, selecting work to meet cultural and commercial imperatives, copywriting and devising marketing strategies. Practical issues regarding rights and availability, projection and technical presentation, producing publicity materials and on-stage introductions and Q&A hosting will all be covered.

The film preservation and restoration strand will cover understanding film materials, the impact of digitization on film preservation, and its limits; sessions will also explore issues of curatorial practice with regard both to collecting and exhibiting work and will consider the presentation and reception of archive material across a range of exhibition platforms. Students will also have the opportunity to visit archives, a specialised film collection, film laboratory or digital media centre.

During this part of the course students will attend the London Film Festival

4: Dissertation

As part of the dissertation module a number of specialised workshops will be arranged to enable students to explore a strand related to their dissertation in greater detail.

The dissertation may take the form of an extended piece of film criticism or an original exploration of aspects of film culture, genre or cinema history.

5: Graduation Project

The Graduation Project will be both a theoretical and practical exploration of their chosen subject and specialist areas. For example if a student wishes to explore sites and forms of cinema they will organise a pop-up cinema experience and deliver a written or video essay that explores the themes and concepts.

6: Professional Placement

During the process of developing the graduation portfolio each student will also undertake a 1-2 month professional placement.

7: Meet The Industry

A series of familiarisation visits to venues and projects with a variety of curatorial and critical approaches, to help provide students with a further sense of possible career options.

METHODS

In addition to a wide range of screenings and seminars, the course provides hands-on approach to teaching and learning through workshops, group projects, field trips, personal research, portfolio as well as professional placements (at Festivals, Cinemas etc). For example, students work in small groups to develop portfolios (e.g. promotional strategy for a film) and workshops (e.g. peer review in film criticism).

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

This course invites applications from students with a BA (Hons) degree (or equivalent) in arts, humanities or science. Film and media related degrees, while welcome, are not essential for admission.

Applicants without a first degree but with professional experience may also be considered for admission. In these cases an appropriate piece of written work will be required, along with details of professional qualifications. The application will then be referred to the NFTS concessions committee for consideration.

APPLY WITH

- Please submit a brief essay on either a) The preservation of film culture, through archiving, exhibition and restoration
Or b) Discuss the changing forms of cinema distribution and exhibition.

- Write a review of either: a) A contemporary film that has impressed you, or, b) an earlier film that you believe to be of artistic or historical importance. The review should not exceed 1,000 words.

- Choose a movement in cinema or one particular national cinema that is important to you. Briefly discuss your personal response to it. This should not exceed 1,000 words

- Discuss one author or film critic, or one book of critical writing on film that has influenced you. Discuss why you have found this author/book of value to you.

HOW TO APPLY

You can apply directly to us at the NFTS by clicking on the link below:

APPLY FOR FILM STUDIES PROGRAMMING & CURATION COURSE - https://nfts.co.uk/sign-me-up/apply-now/?nid=1857

You can apply online, or download a word document of the application form to submit via email
When selecting your course, please ensure that you have read the entry requirements and details of the supporting materials that should accompany your application.

TIMING YOUR APPLICATION

We are happy to receive applications 24/7 and 365 days a year up until the deadline. That said, there is no particular advantage to submitting your application very early. The important thing is that your application shows us your latest work and tell us about your most recent filmmaking experiences.

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As a Film Studies MPhil or PhD student you will form a crucial part of our research culture. Our thriving community of postgraduate students work across schools and disciplines. Read more

Course overview

As a Film Studies MPhil or PhD student you will form a crucial part of our research culture. Our thriving community of postgraduate students work across schools and disciplines. Research ranges from modern languages to English literature, English language, linguistics and arts and cultures.

We are keen to work with postgraduates in the major research projects listed below, or in the more general areas related to them. We supervise projects that span academic schools and sub-disciplines, ensuring the best fit between your interests and the expertise of our staff.

Early cinema and cinema culture in Britain and the USA (the history of film style; popular cinema culture; points of contact between literature and film; Hollywood after 1975)

Latin American cinema (cinema and memory studies; cinema and the imaginaries of post-conflict; cinema and contemporary Latin American society; cinema and the city; cinema and theatre - performance studies)

French cinema (popular film from the 1930s to the present; stardom; gender and representation; cinema audiences and theories of spectatorship)

Algerian cinema (postcolonial cinema; cinema and the representation of trauma; cinema and the Algerian War; contemporary French cinema; French horror and fantasy cinema; cinema and the work of Pierre Bourdieu)

Transnational Chinese cinema (Chinese independent films and film festivals; transnational Chinese cinema; stardom and performance; gender and sexuality; audience and reception studies; action and martial arts genres)

We organise an annual postgraduate conference for the Faculty of Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences and you can get involved in a number of film-related research seminars on campus, including: the Research Group in Film and Media series; the School of English Literature, Language and Linguistics visiting speaker series; the School of Modern Languages research seminar series.

You will benefit from the North Eastern Regional Film Seminar, which brings together film scholars from the Universities of Newcastle, Northumbria, Sunderland, Teesside, Durham and York for a one day symposium.

There is also the Film Factory, an exciting new film forum for students and staff, initiated by two PhD students from the School of Modern Languages, Gary Jenkins and Mani Sharpe. It consists of a series of film screenings followed by discussion and debate at the Culture Lab.

Training and Skills

As a research student you will receive a tailored package of academic and administrative support to ensure you maximise your research and future career. The academic information is in the programme profile and you will be supported by our doctoral training centres, Faculty Training Programme and Research Student Support Team.

For further information see http://www.ncl.ac.uk/postgraduate/courses/degrees/film-mphil-phd/#training&skills

How to Apply

For course application information see http://www.ncl.ac.uk/postgraduate/courses/degrees/film-mphil-phd/#howtoapply

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The MA in Culture and Colonialism explores literature, politics and culture from Ireland to India, from Africa to the Middle East. Read more

Multicultural, Multi-Disciplinary MA

The MA in Culture and Colonialism explores literature, politics and culture from Ireland to India, from Africa to the Middle East. Students analyse imperial ascendancies, race and racial theories, nationalist movements, postcolonial experiences, the rise of neo-colonial thought, multiculturalism and interculturalism, and the implications of globalisation and development for the modern world.

This MA allows students to combine the specialisation of postgraduate research with the adaptable skills training of a multi-disciplinary approach. Students benefit from the legacy of an MA programme established in 1994; the programme has continuously re-invented itself in changing ideological climates while maintaining its primary goal: to offer a critical education in the cultural discourses of power.

Careers

MA in Culture and Colonialism graduates have gone on to careers in development work, NGOs, law, university lecturing, publishing, media, journalism, community work, teaching (primary and secondary), film-making, advertising, and the Civil Service. The programme has a particularly strong record in research training: a high proportion of its students have proceeded to doctoral programmes in Ireland, Britain and North America, with many of them winning prestigious funding awards.

Teaching Staff

The programme's teaching staff over the years has been drawn from the disciplines of English, History, Political Science and Sociology, Economics, Irish Studies, Film Studies, Spanish, French, Archaeology, German, Italian, and Classics, and is supplemented by Irish and international guest lecturers.

Programme Outline

The full-time degree taken over a twelve-month period from September. The year is divided into two teaching semesters (September to December and January to April), with the summer period devoted to completing the dissertation. A two-year part-time option is also available. Students take six taught modules together with a (non-assessed) research training seminar, and produce a 15,000-word dissertation (30 ECTS) on a topic of their choice.

Programme Modules

Central Modules

EN541 Colonialism in Twentieth- and Twenty-First Century Cultural Theory
This module focuses on issues of identity, political agency and representation. It offers an introduction to twentieth-century theorisations of colonialism and neo-colonialism, especially in relation to cultural production, and their implications for twenty-first century socio-political thought. The distinctive position of Ireland in relation to postcolonial theory is considered, together with other national and international contexts. Some of the theorists discussed include Fanon, Said, Spivak and Ahmad.

SP544 Decolonization and Neo-Colonialism: The Politics of 'Development'
The phenomena of development and underdevelopment in those lands that have experienced colonial rule have been theorised in two broadly contrasting ways in social science: the modernisation perspective, which derives from the northern hemisphere by and large, and a series of counter-perspectives (such as structuralism, dependency, neo-Marxism and world systems theory), whose exponents hail from the southern hemisphere in the main. The module also considers the issue of how much light modernisation and counter-perspectives can shed on the Irish experience of development and underdevelopment.

HI546 Studies in the History of Colonialism and Imperialism
This module introduces students to some of the key thinkers and concepts in the writing of British imperial history. The work of scholars such as J. A. Hobson, Ronald Robinson and Jack Gallagher, Peter Cain and Tony Hopkins, Chris Bayly, Alan Lester and John Darwin will be discussed. Concepts such as finance imperialism, informal empire, the official mind, gentlemanly capitalism, colonial knowledge, imperial networks, and bridgeheads will be examined from a critical perspective. Students will be asked to read key texts, undertake wider reading and research to help put these key texts in context, comment on their readings, and present their own ideas as the basis for class discussion and debate.

Research Seminar (compulsory but not examined)
This module provides a training in research, analysis and writing techniques appropriate to the programme, as well as individual consultations on the formulation of dissertation topics. The seminar will take place throughout the year.

Option Modules (two chosen)

EN547 Literature and Colonialism
This module considers the relationship between literary modes and aesthetics and political power. It analyses literature connected to the British Empire and its former colonies, discussing English, Irish, Indian and African writers in relation to colonial power structures, nationalist movements and postcolonial developments. Genres covered include imperial adventure fiction, travel writing, late-Victorian urban Gothic, modernist and post-modernist fiction and poetry, postcolonial writing, and the twenty-first century multicultural novel.

EC535 Political Economy, Colonialism and Globalization
The aim of the module will be to identify the fundamental concepts of globalization by analysing the various ideologies, systems and structures that underpin the progression of global capitalism through the ages. Underlying philosophical theories will be linked with political, legal sociological and economic ideals that are often the driving forces behind these processes.

EN573 Travel Literature
The genre of travel writing includes a vast array of literary forms from journals to letters, ambassadorial reports, captivity narratives, historical descriptions, ethnographies, and natural histories. The appearance of such accounts explodes in the early modern period in an era of expanded travel for purposes of trade, education, exploration, and colonial settlement. This module looks at a range of documents from different historical moments to track the development of this important genre, including the emergence of travel writing by women.

EN549 Cinema and Colonialism
This module considers the relationships between colonialism and the theory and practice of cinema. Seminars may address the following themes: the Hollywood genres of the ‘Western’ and the ‘Vietnam movie’; postcolonial theories of cinema; Cuban cinema; cinema of anti-colonial revolution; neocolonialism and Irish cinema; African cinema; gender, colonialism and cinema; and Western representations of imperialism.

HI588 Studies in Regional Identities
This module introduces students to concepts of regional identities and explores various interpretative approaches to regional identity. Students will examine the role of history, language and religion in the construction and perpetuation of regional identity and will consider the relationship between regions and nation states. This is a team-taught module. While the content may vary according to the availability of staff from year to year, it will include Irish and European case studies.

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This interdisciplinary degree allows the investigation of diverse aspects of literature, cinema, history of art, and cultural history and thought. Read more
This interdisciplinary degree allows the investigation of diverse aspects of literature, cinema, history of art, and cultural history and thought. The Centre for Multidisciplinary & Intercultural Inquiry at UCL is unique in offering graduate students the opportunity to investigate Europe in its entirety, from European integration and public policy to European cinema and poetry.

Degree information

The programme aims to equip students with the skills, methods, concepts and theories essential for most fields of European culture, society and thought, ranging across the events, traditions and texts of the entire continent. Students learn how to present material effectively, to analyse texts critically and to construct coherent arguments.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. Two pathways are offered: Taught and Research. The Taught pathway consists of two core modules (60 credits) four optional modules (60 credits), and a dissertation (60 credits). The Research pathway consists of two core modules (60 credits), two optional modules (30 credits), and a dissertation (90 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma, two core modules (60 credits), four optional modules (60 credits), full-time nine months or part-time two years is offered. A Postgraduate Certificate, two core modules (60 credits), full-time three months, part-time six months, is offered.

Core modules
-Theoretical Issues in History and Literature
-Topics in Cultural Studies

Optional modules - students on the Taught pathway select four, and students on the Research pathway select two, of the following optional modules:
-Modern Literary Theory
-Comparative Literature Studies
-Social Theory
-Topics in Cultural Studies
-Graduate modules from the Faculty of Arts & Humanities
-Graduate modules from the Faculty of Social & Historical Sciences
-Graduate modules from the School of Slavonic & East European Studies (SSEES)

Dissertation/report
All MA students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 12,000-words (Taught pathway) or 18,000-words (Research pathway).

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars and tutorials. All students receive guidance on how to identify, locate and use material available in libraries and archives. Students are assessed through a combination of coursework in the form of essays, unseen written examinations and the dissertation.

Careers

MPhil and PhD degrees often follow on from a Master's programme: both the Taught and Research pathways of the MAs offered by the Centre for Multidisciplinary & Intercultural Inquiry (CMII) are intended to allow this type of progression, as well as standing as degrees in their own right.

Many graduates of the programme have gone on to further study at UCL and other institutions, including the University of Edinburgh, London Consortium, Birkbeck College and the Louvre Museum.

Employability
Graduates of this MA have used their extensive knowledge and understanding of European institutions, policies and society to obtain positions within the European Union. The high level of interdisciplinary training and research skills offered by the programme have equipped others for positions as researchers in UK and European universities, museums and non-governmental agencies. The emphasis on written and verbal communication, collation and presentation of research and analysis have provided transferable skills for the fields of accountancy, law and PR.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The Centre for Multidisciplinary & Intercultural Inquiry (CMII) at UCL is in a unique position to combine a broad programme of study that unites the arts, humanities, and social and historical sciences, with immediate and easy access to the unrivalled cultural treasures and library holdings of London.

The central London location offers easy access to the British Library, British Museum, Institute of Germanic and Romance Studies, German Historical Institute, Goethe Institut, Institut Français, and other similar research and cultural centres.

Less than three hours away from Brussels and Paris, nowhere enjoys such a range of resources and such a favourable location for the study of Europe.

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Our MA in Culture Industry will allow you to explore the interface between contemporary economics and culture, from the scale of a start-up or artwork to that of governmental policy, a city, or the global marketplace.- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-culture-industry/. Read more
Our MA in Culture Industry will allow you to explore the interface between contemporary economics and culture, from the scale of a start-up or artwork to that of governmental policy, a city, or the global marketplace.- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-culture-industry/

Taking full advantage of the UK’s leading role in the creative industries, and London’s status as a world city, this course creates opportunities for you to:

do placements
make projects
go on field trips
meet leading creative practitioners and theorists
This will give you first-hand experience of the fast moving creative economy.

Teaching team

A collaboration between the Department of Media and Communications and the Centre for Cultural Studies, the teaching team includes Professor Scott Lash, Professor Angela McRobbie, and Dr Josephine Berry.

Engage with the cultural sector

Within the accelerated climate of digital networks and globalisation, the forms and behaviour of culture are mutating, converting the workshop into the handheld device and the cinema and gallery into the bedroom. This course is aimed at creative practitioners, entrepreneurs and theorists wanting to experiment with these changes, and set them into a historically and discursively rich framework.

Through participant observation, critical theory, and playful experiment, the course will not just prepare you for a career in the cultural sector, but help you to engage with it imaginatively, critically and tactically.

Placements

Students on the Culture Industry MA have secured placements at the BBC, Stephen Graham Gallery, White Cube gallery, SHAPE Arts, Chinatown Oral History Project, Maximum Rock n Roll, the British Council, Black Dog Publishing, Resonance FM, Glasgow Biennale, London Architecture Week, Glastonbury Festival, London Film Festival, the British Museum, South Bank Centre, Grizedale Arts, the Japan Foundation, the London Anime and Gaming Con, and Sound and Music.

Students' projects

Our students’ projects are very diverse, and have included exhibitions, publications, websites, photographic projects, market stalls, travel guides, films, novels, app prototypes, ethnographies, and community resource projects.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Dr Josephine Berry.

Modules & Structure

Practices of the Culture Industry- 30 credits
Theories of the Culture Industry: work, creativity and precariousness- 30 credits
Minor Placements / Minor Projects- 30
Research Lab- tbc
MA in Culture Industry Major Placements / Major Projects / Dissertation- 60

Assessment

Essays; project report and documentation/placement report and documentation; research lab participation.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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On the MA in Film Studies. Popular Cinema you will develop a historically-informed and critically aware understanding of film as an industry, art form, and cultural product. Read more
On the MA in Film Studies: Popular Cinema you will develop a historically-informed and critically aware understanding of film as an industry, art form, and cultural product. Through this course, you will build a broad portfolio of writing and research skills by combining academic and professional writing projects. We cover the history and theory of popular cinema in the US (classical and contemporary Hollywood), Europe and East Asia (especially Japanese cinema). Through modules on story development and research methods you will sharpen your writing skills in preparation for your dissertation project.

You will develop skills central to a career in either academia or the media industries. You will be taught by a diverse team of film specialists with different national and cultural backgrounds, as well as by industry professional guest speakers.

Why choose this course?

The School of Arts offers a unified hub for the arts in the Richard Hamilton Building, with state-of-the-art technical facilities and 24-hour studio access. All Film Studies staff are active researchers publishing widely on subjects such as: Italian films and their audiences, puzzle films, film theory, film policy, film tourism, visual anthropology, and crime films.

You will have the opportunity to go on the annual field trip to the Cannes Film Festival. We have an advisory panel of film industry experts including leading directors, journalists, and producers and technical specialists who contribute to the programme and our annual series of Film Studies events, including an annual Careers Day. Research and teaching programmes linked to some of Oxford’s premier cultural organisations such as Modern Art Oxford, the Ultimate Picture Palace, Oxford Contemporary Music, and locally held Film Festivals.

You will be part of a stimulating environment where creative practitioners and writers about the arts and culture work closely together to form specialist research units and interdisciplinary research clusters in diverse areas from videogaming to modernism.

This course in detail

Compulsory modules - Students studying for the MA in Film Studies are required to complete the following two compulsory modules:
-Narration in Classical Hollywood Cinema
-Research Methods in Film

Optional modules - MA students can then choose any two of the options below:
-Popular European Cinema
-Professional Film Cultures
-Story Development
-Popular Cinema in East Asia
-Independent Study
-Dissertation

Please note: As our courses are reviewed regularly as part of our quality assurance framework, course content and module choices may change from the details given here.

Teaching and learning

Teaching is centred around film screenings, seminars, individual tutorials and, in the case of Story Development, intensive writing workshops.

Assessment activities include writing academic essays and a dissertation. Other assessments include professional writing activities - book reviews, feature articles, and screenplays.

Careers and professional development

Having a master's qualification helps you to stand out from the crowd, whether you are joining the MA straight after graduating or returning to study after a break of several years.

Our MA will provide you with the skills and knowledge to embark upon a career in the creative and media industries or to improve your current position. However, an MA in Film Studies can also lead to careers in many other sectors, including teaching, lecturing, publishing, arts administration, journalism, museum work, fundraising and higher education management.

The transferable skills you acquire through studying for an MA also open up wider opportunities in business and law. Many MA students continue onto further research and careers in academia, and our course provides the necessary research training required for doctoral work.

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UCL's Scandinavian Studies MA offers an intellectually exciting and flexible range of options focusing on Nordic culture in a global context. Read more
UCL's Scandinavian Studies MA offers an intellectually exciting and flexible range of options focusing on Nordic culture in a global context. No prior knowledge of a Nordic language is required, though students can opt to consolidate their language or translation skills, or to start Danish, Finnish, Icelandic, Norwegian or Swedish from scratch.

Degree information

Option modules include advanced translation skills, Nordic cinema, Nordic literature in global perspective, the transnational politics of the region, and material cultures as well as modules on Viking and medieval Scandinavia. Assessed modules are supplemented with workshops and a summer school providing opportunities for networking and career development in publishing, translation, filmmaking, and the heritage and creative sectors.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme offers two pathways: taught and research. Taught: one core module (30 credits), three optional modules (90 credits), dissertation (60 credits). Research: one core module (30 credits), two taught modules (60 credits), dissertation (90 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma, one core module (30 credits), three optional modules (90 credits) full-time nine months or part-time two years, is offered. A Postgraduate Certificate, one core module (30 credits), one optional module (30 credits) full-time three months, part-time six months, is offered.

Core module - Language, Culture and History. This core module permits research into two areas of major contemporary interest; for example, topics explored during the current year include the following: Trauma; Memory; Visual Culture; Queer(y)ing Sexuality

Optional modules - students take a choice of optional modules on topics such as the following:
-Advanced Scandinavian Translation
-Nordic Cinema: Contextualising Dreyer, Bergman and Dogme 95
-Introduction to Old Norse
-Crime and Small Communities in Nordic Literature
-Advanced Old Icelandic Literature
-Sources for the Viking Age

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a substantial dissertation.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of seminars, lectures and reading and language classes. Student performance is assessed through written examination, coursework, and the dissertation.

Careers

An MA in Scandinavian Studies offers prospects for employment in the private as well as in the public sector, whether in Scandinavia or in the English-speaking world. Former graduate students in the department are to be found in a range of challenging careers, which include work in IT and management, museums and university teaching.

Employability
In the UK and abroad, the Nordic countries are increasingly recognised for the success of their political and social model, and for their film, literature, food and design. Our MA graduates bring their deep understanding of Scandinavian culture to careers in which knowledge of the region is key: publishing, the arts, commerce and information management. Expertise in Nordic languages is rare in the UK, and employer demand is accordingly high. Our MA allows students to hone their Nordic language skills or to try a new language. Many of our graduates launch careers with translation companies and as freelancers.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Scandinavian Studies is the largest independent Scandinavian department in the UK. Our research and teaching encompasses the languages, literatures, cultures, histories and politics of the entire Nordic region, ranging from the Viking Middle Ages to the present day.

Facilities are excellent: UCL boasts possibly the best Scandinavian Studies library outside Scandinavia, and students also have the outstanding collections of the British Library close at hand. Excellent links with universities in mainland Scandinavia, Iceland and Finland provide further benefits.

The department is home to the Viking Society for Northern Research, a leading publisher of Old Norse texts and monographs on medieval Scandinavia.

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The Italian Studies MA is a pathway in the faculty-wide MA in Language, Culture and History, offering an extensive range of courses in Italian literature, history and literary theory. Read more
The Italian Studies MA is a pathway in the faculty-wide MA in Language, Culture and History, offering an extensive range of courses in Italian literature, history and literary theory. Students can take this flexible, interdisciplinary programme as self-contained study or as preparation for a research degree.

Degree information

The programme introduces students to texts from a variety of periods in Italian history and places them within a historical and philosophical framework. Students develop subject-specific, professional skills necessary for the pursuit of their chosen options, including sourcing material, field-work techniques, bibliographic skills and linguistic skills.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. The programme offers two pathways: taught and research.

Taught: one core module (30 credits), three optional modules (90 credits), dissertation (60 credits). Research: one core module (30 credits), two optional modules (60 credits), dissertation (90 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma, one core module (30 credits), three optional modules (90 credits) full-time nine months or part-time two years, is offered. A Postgraduate Certificate, one core module (30 credits), one optional module (30 credits) full-time three months, part-time six months, is offered.

Core module
-Language, Culture and History. This core module permits research into two areas of major contemporary interest; for example, topics explored during the current year include the following: Trauma; Memory; Visual Culture; Queer(y)ing Sexuality

Optional modules - students take a choice of optional modules on topics such as the following:
-Medieval and Renaissance Italian
-Renaissance Texts: Resources and Research Techniques
-Dante: Divina Commedia
-Genre in Italian Cinema
-Italy: A Difficult Modernity
-Advanced Translation from and into Italian
-Contemporary Italian Cultures

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 12,000 words (taught pathway) or 18,000 words (research pathway).

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of seminars, tutorials, seminar-presentations, film screenings, and visits to research libraries including the British Library, the Warburg Institute, Institute of Historical Research and Senate House. Students are assessed by a variety of methods: unseen examinations, long essays, course work and the dissertation.

Careers

The programme will be of interest both to those who wish to enhance their knowledge of Italian culture for professional purposes - in the fields, for example, of education, media, commerce and tourism - as well as to students wishing to pursue their studies to a doctoral level.

Recent first destinations of MA graduates from the department of Italian at UCL include:
-The Royal Armouries, Tower of London: Education Officer
-University of Naples: Language Coordinator
-International House: Teacher Trainer
-University of Trento: Doctoral Research in Italian Studies
-Warburg Institute: Doctoral Research in Renaissance Studies
-UCL University: Doctoral Research in Renaissance Studies

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Italian is the original home of Italian studies in Britain, and has a distinguished record in the field of graduate studies and research. Students benefit from UCL's excellent Italian resources, including the Rotton and Ogden collections, and the Castiglione and Dante collections.

UCL's central location enables easy access to London's exceptional resources including the specialist collections of Italian material in the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes. The British Film Institute Library holds major Italian film periodicals and numerous books on Italian cinema, and the nearby British Library houses the largest collection of early printed books in the world.

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Our innovative MA in Film and Television builds on its prestigious heritage as the longest running degree programme of its kind in the UK. Read more
Our innovative MA in Film and Television builds on its prestigious heritage as the longest running degree programme of its kind in the UK. We aim to equip you with wide-ranging skills, knowledge and critical awareness to meet your career aspirations in sectors in which moving images play a central role. Our curriculum incorporates an exciting variety of learning and teaching activities designed to foster your capacity for researching and rigorously analysing different aspects of film, television and moving images. You will have the opportunity to develop key skills for communicating about and with moving images across a range of contexts and platforms. You can choose to have a broad-based learning experience in film, television and moving image, or you can specialise in moving image curation and screenwriting via our suggested pathways.

The core teaching team consists of members of the University’s Westminster School of Media, Arts and Design. The course has close links with the Centre for Research and Education in Arts and Media (CREAM), the leading research centre in the UK for arts and design, whose members include internationally renowned filmmakers, film and television theorists and historians, and moving image artists and curators. We combine research-enhanced teaching with classes delivered by film and television industry and moving image art professionals, in order to make sure that you develop skill sets and the full range of critical awareness that are in demand and to deliver an exciting learning experience for you.

Course content

The course combines core and optional taught modules. The design and delivery of our taught modules draw on CREAM’s research excellence in documentary, Asian and European cinema, moving image curation, and television history. The coursework requirements for some modules are research essays or a combination of research essays and research-informed blog posts and presentations. Other modules require a broad range of research-informed professional modes of writing such as a screenplay treatment, a curatorial proposal or an exhibition review. You will also undertake a substantial piece of independent research as a major part of your MA studies. In order to provide you with the flexibility to undertake a piece of independent research suited to your career aspiration, the final project module offers you the choice between writing a traditional dissertation or completing a theoretically-informed professional project such as a curating a film programme, writing and producing a series of themed blog posts, or writing a long-form screenplay.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of what you will study on this course.

The course is taught in two modes: full-time and part-time. Full-time Postgraduate students study 180 credits per year. For the award of MA in Film and Television: Theory, Culture and Industry, you must complete two core taught modules, four optional modules and a 60-credit final project module, for a total of 180 credits. Core modules provide you with a set of key skills for the theoretical, critical and reflective understanding of moving images. Optional modules give you the freedom to choose areas of specialisation. The course leaders can advise on which modules best fit your interests. You have the choice to pursue specialised interests through your choice of optional modules and coursework assignments. If you are not sure which optional modules to choose or fit your interests best, or which types of final project work to produce to best develop your area of specialisation, you should discuss this question individually with the course leaders and you should aim to do so early on in the academic year.

The course structure includes two suggested pathways for those wishing to specialise in film programming and moving image curation, or in screenwriting.

You will be able to choose among the following modules:
-Cinema Distribution and Exhibition (option)
-Contemporary Issues in Moving Image and Screen Studies (core)
-Documentary Aesthetics, Sites and Spectatorship (option)
-Film Programming and Moving Image Curation (option)
-Final Project (core)
-Key Concepts in Film, Television and Moving Image (core)
-Introduction to Scriptwriting (option)
-Longform Screenplay Preparation and Short Documents (option)
-Modern and Contemporary European Cinema (option)
-Researching Histories in Asian Cinema (option)
-Television Art: Aesthetics and Quality (option)

Associated careers

Our graduates have found employment in small- and large-scale film and television companies as filmmakers, producers, distributors, and exhibitors. Others have gone on to organise film festivals, or to work in film-related magazines and journals as well as in international arts and culture sectors. Some of our recent graduates have gone on to pursue academic careers as researchers or doctoral students at the University of Westminster and elsewhere. As the UK’s longest-running postgraduate programme in film and television several of our alumni are pioneers of the discipline of film and television studies.

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The MLitt in Film Studies will expand your appreciation of the medium in terms of its history, formal properties, and its relationships with other art forms. Read more
The MLitt in Film Studies will expand your appreciation of the medium in terms of its history, formal properties, and its relationships with other art forms. There is a particular focus on authorship and adaptation, as well as the transition from script to screen, drawing on an extensive collection of unpublished script material.

Why study Film Studies at Dundee?

This is one of over ten degree pathways offered in the Masters Programme in Humanities with Specialisation. Students on the Programme take some common modules, and are able to draw upon the research culture of the School of Humanities.

Film has been called the art form of the Twentieth Century, and continues to be a major force in contemporary culture. However, it remains in creative interaction with older arts. Above all, literature and film have been involved in a mutually enriching relationship since the birth of cinema in 1895. Moreover, films are often derived from literary sources, and literary texts increasingly draw on the cinematic devices. Film adaptations can extend or alter our perceptions of fiction or drama, but film also has its own language and styles, which range from the avant-garde to the popular, from aesthetic experiment to pulp commodities.

Interdisciplinary studies

This programme is inherently interdisciplinary in its approach (looking at film in relation to literature, art history and music, television and popular culture). Students are encouraged to think critically about these ideas, and to appreciate the importance of relating critical close analysis of style and form to theory, context, politics and history. These analytical skills, combined with assessment that tests presentational and communication skills and problem solving abilities, are essential in the workplace.

What's so good about Film Studies at Dundee?

Research Excellence:
The School of Humanities at Dundee is a centre of research excellence. Postgraduate students join a vigorous research culture led by world-leading scholars. In the most recent RAE, a full 90% of English's research publications were rated as of international excellence in terms of their 'originality, significance and rigour' and 45% of our research output was rated in the two very highest categories of 'international excellence'.

Postgraduate Culture

The English at Dundee offers a lively postgraduate culture, including a regular postgraduate forum, visiting speakers and an annual postgraduate conference.

"The English department at the University of Dundee is worth recommending for a number of reasons ... I greatly enjoyed the fact that I was allowed a free hand with my own research; supervision being present and supportive, but not controlling or stifling in the least."
Samira Nadkarni, MLitt English Studies

Who should study this course?

As well as being a research preparation degree for students who intend to proceed to a PhD, this course also caters directly for students who wish to take their first degree to a higher level of advanced study, for either career development or merely general interest.

The start date is September each year, and lasts for 12 months on a full-time basis, or 24 months part-time

How you will be taught

All the core teaching is conducted 5.30-7.30pm to allow attendance by part-time and full-time students alike. Other classes are scheduled for the mutual convenience of staff and students. A variety of teaching methods will be used, including: small group teaching, supervised study, seminars, presentations, invited speakers and discussion groups, lectures, workshops, practical classes and demonstrations. Learning methods will include oral and written presentations, as well as research essays and a dissertation. One-to-one supervision of a dissertation is designed to promote continuity in the learning experiences provided and students with the opportunity to work on an area of film study of their own choosing (subject to approval by the tutor).

What you will study

You will study one core module, various options and a dissertation.

Approaches to Film Studies: Theory, Criticism and Archives
English Studies Dissertation
Plus optional modules, from a list such as the one below:

Approaches to Literary and Visual Culture
Approaches to Film Adaptation
The Cinema of John Huston: Adaptation and Authorship
Two British Auteurs: Ken Russell and John Boorman
The Writer-Director in American Film
Joyce and the Cinema
Comics and Film
Film and Theatre
The Literature of Hollywood

How you will be assessed

Assessment is normally by extended essays for each module. All students allowed to progress to the MLitt phrase must attempt the dissertation. Students whose dissertation fails to satisfy the examiners will be awarded the PG Diploma, provided that the taught elements of the course have been successfully completed.

Careers

Graduates will gain a high degree of knowledge and expertise about cinema, literature, art, media, and popular culture, and will explore the relationship between these fields in a highly critical and interdisciplinary way. Students taking this programme may pursue academic careers, work in the media, or in the creative industries or publishing.

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You develop a through understanding of visual culture, historical and social contexts, critically analysing film, photography, and theoretical writing. Read more
You develop a through understanding of visual culture, historical and social contexts, critically analysing film, photography, and theoretical writing.

COURSES
First Semester
Introduction to Visual Culture and Theory
Introduction to Film Theory and Analysis
Psychoanalysis and Cinema

Second Semester
Critical Analysis of Visual Culture
Diaspora and Migration in Contemporary Visual Culture
The Animate
On Documentary: History, Theory and Practice

Semester 3
Dissertation

Qualification
MLitt

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The Cinema Studies Institute offers a program leading to the ​ Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy degrees in Cinema Studies. Read more
The Cinema Studies Institute offers a program leading to the ​ Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy degrees in Cinema Studies. Our faculty have expertise in several areas, including film and media history; film and media theory; film and media analysis; and film, media, and cultural practices. The course-​based​, one-year MA program offers students the option of a professional internship or a major research paper.

Launched in September 2013, the Doctor of Philosophy program in Cinema Studies addresses the changing role of moving imag​e media within global culture. Past and present configurations of cinema are studied through a constellation of theoretical, textual, social, and historical rubrics. The core curricular offerings engage with debates and questions that persist within the scholarship while also examining how the field contends with emerging disciplinary issues and intermedial formats today and at earlier historical junctures. Throughout, the synthesis of history and theory, textual analysis, and cultural study is emphasized.

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This MA is one of the most wide-ranging programmes of its kind, offering a rich variety of modules on the region, ranging from the premodern period to the 21st century, from Russia and Poland to the Czech Republic and Croatia, and from film and philosophy to literature and cultural studies. Read more
This MA is one of the most wide-ranging programmes of its kind, offering a rich variety of modules on the region, ranging from the premodern period to the 21st century, from Russia and Poland to the Czech Republic and Croatia, and from film and philosophy to literature and cultural studies.

Degree information

Students develop an advanced knowledge and understanding of aspects of Russian and/or East European literature and culture, including art, film, philosophy, and linguistics. They gain key research skills, enabling them to solve problems of conflicting sources or interpretations, locate primary and secondary materials, and use research aids and resources effectively.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of one core module (30 credits), optional modules (90 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

Core module
-Literary and Cultural Theory

Optional modules - up to 90 credits of optional modules. Subject to approval, optional courses up to the value of 30 credits may be taken from other SSEES MA Programmes or from other UCL MA Programmes.
-All Quiet on the Eastern Front: Culture, Politics and Everyday Life in Central and Eastern Europe
-Beyond Stereotypes: The Jews in Polish Culture
-Introduction to Hermeneutics: How to Read and Interpret Texts
-Contemporary Cultural Studies: Between Post-Communism & Post-Modernism
-Freedom Death and Love: Polish Fiction 1918–2005 (language prerequisite)
-How to Read/Interpret Texts: Introduction to Hermeneutics
-Literatures of Rupture: Modernism in Russia and Eastern Europe
-The 19th-Century Russian Novel
-The Reflecting Screen: Russian and Soviet Cinema in its Cultural Context, 1896 to the Present
-The Self and the World: Theoretical Approaches to Travel Writing
-Language Modules
-Russian Monarchy: Court Ritual and Political Ideas, 1498-1917
-Comparative Literary Studies
-Translation Studies
-Comparative Literature Modules

Dissertation/report
All MA students undertake an independent research project, which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000–12,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, tutorials, presentations, film viewings and private study. Students are assessed by a variety of methods, including unseen examinations, long essays, course work and the research dissertation.

Careers

With their specialist knowledge and language skills, SSEES Master's graduates can be found in business, finance, the media, international agencies, charities, diplomacy, international security organisations, the law, and academe. Some of our graduates advise the Russian, Polish, American, and other governments, and the European Commission.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-PhD Russian Literature, University College London (UCL)
-Publishing Assistant, Sheldrake Press
-Language Producer, Unspecified Language Production Company
-Freelance Translator, Self-Employed Translator
-Business Consultant, Grit 3 Group and studying MA Russian and East European Literature and Culture, University College London (UCL)

Employability
Students who have successfully completed the programme have progressed to further academic research on the region, or have obtained employment in such organisations as the European Parliament and the Ministry of Defence, as well as roles in business, think tanks, NGOs, or similar, both in Britain and abroad. Networking is facilitated by two major collaborations led by SSEES: CEELBAS and the International Master's (IMESS). Scholarships, internship opportunities and excellent links with other universities in the region provide further benefits.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL School of Slavonic & East European Studies (SSEES) is a world-leading specialist institutions, and the largest national centre in the UK, for the study of central, Eastern and south-east Europe and Russia.

Located on the edge of Bloomsbury, SSEES offers an ideal location for scholars. The British Library, British Museum, University of London Library and other similar research centres are all close by.

The SSEES Library is unequalled in Britain for the depth and breadth of its collections, the majority of which are on open access in the SSEES building.

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This course is your chance to refine your critical skills through analysis of the literature and language of the modern period. Read more
This course is your chance to refine your critical skills through analysis of the literature and language of the modern period. During your time with us, you’ll learn in a lively research environment and benefit from the University’s links with local cultural organisations, including the International Anthony Burgess Foundation.

Your studies will focus on key aspects of literary modernity and explore the interaction between literature and theory. The interdisciplinary nature of the course encourages and stimulates debate on cultural, political and historical issues, as well as analysing the relationships between literature and other cultural forms.

Key benefits:

• Study in a dynamic interdisciplinary research and teaching environment
• Draw upon the resources and expertise of cultural and literary institutions in the region
• Share your work with peers and academic staff at our Annual MA Conference.

Visit the website: http://www.salford.ac.uk/pgt-courses/literature,-culture-and-modernity

Suitable for

Graduates in the humanities who want either a broad-based Master qualification or who are looking for a disciplined introduction to further study at a PhD level.

Programme details

MA Literature, Culture and Modernity helps you to acquire specific skills in a number of areas including critical thinking, research methods, cultural and literary theory, analysing literary and cultural texts in the context of debates on modernity.

You will develop your analytical and conceptual thinking skills and gain the expertise to focus on a specific research topic that interests you. During this course you will carry out advanced research and produce original and innovative studies.

Format

The syllabus consists of four taught modules, followed by a dissertation. You will select three option modules from a range which varies from year to year. Modules focus on nineteenth, twentieth and twenty first century literature and culture, exploring literature in relation to popular and working-class culture, analysing the interaction between literature, cinema and theory, and examining issues of identity, gender and power. You will also follow the core module Literary Research Practice which helps prepare for the dissertation and for further study.

Teaching for most modules takes place in weekly, two-hour seminars. Personal supervision is provided throughout the course and in support of the writing of the dissertation. The module Literary Research Practice is taught in three longer block sessions, with additional one-to-one supervisory sessions with a member of staff.

Semester 1

• Theory, Text and Writing
• Modernity and Cultural Form

Semester 2

• Literary Research Practise
• Anthony Burgess and his Contemporaries

Semester 3

• Dissertation

Assessment

You will be assessed through:

• Written and oral assignments (66%)
• Written dissertation(34%)

Career potential

Many graduates of this course have used it as part of their career development in areas as diverse as teaching, librarianship, media, publishing and the arts. Others use it as a means of access to PhD study or further research. You will develop a wide range of skills on this course (writing, communication, presentation and analytical skills) that are transferable to a variety of careers.

How to apply: http://www.salford.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/applying

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The MA in International Communication and Cultures aims to provide you with a theoretical and practical understanding of communication as a cultural process. Read more
The MA in International Communication and Cultures aims to provide you with a theoretical and practical understanding of communication as a cultural process.

You will discover how cultural meanings are carried within every message and what their effects are at an international level – how they are mediated, interpreted and translated. You will gain the skills required to critically explore the (trans)formation and effects of messages and their meanings in a globalised world. You will also learn how to translate and interpret the delivery of these messages to international audiences and markets, and develop the ability to negotiate and promote intended meaning.

The programme is ideal for those who have studied culture or communication (history, education, communication, social sciences, linguistics or languages) and wish to gain a more practical element with a focus on international markets, or those who have worked in the industry and would like to get a more thorough understanding of transcultural communication, which is linked to their experience.

In the first semester, you will take modules in global studies of communication and culture and in relevant research methods (textual and image analysis). You will be introduced to a range of optional modules for further specialisation, such as, Negotiation and Business Strategies, Documentary Film-making or Intercultural Rhetoric, Translation and Mediation. In the second semester, you will consolidate the knowledge, understanding and skills acquired in the previous semester in the field of international media and intercultural communication. New aspects of your learning in semester two will be an introduction to cultural practices (cultural management, innovation and creativity), but also to the role and use of languages across different cultures. You will be introduced to a range of optional modules for further specialisation, such as World literature, Global Media Events and Latin-America Cinema.

Core modules:
•Analysing transnational and intercultural meaning: Images and film/Language, texts and discourses
•Negotiation in international contexts: The use of language across cultures
•Representing intercultural meaning: Exhibition project or film festival (alternate years)
•Transnational flows, mediascapes and global meaning-making in intercultural contexts

Optional modules:
•Global cultural cities: The visual representation of Barcelona – tourism, football, architecture, festivals
•Global media events: Spectacles, festivals and conferences
•Global online communication: Self-expression and identity
•Intercultural rhetoric, translation and mediation: Promotional, educational and public communication
•Mediating distant suffering: Pity, trauma and victimhood in a transnational context
•Memory beyond borders: The transnational politics of memory and remembering
•Cinematic Representations of Latin America: Local versus global
•Representing intercultural meaning: Film project
•Theories of culture and communication
•Transcultural and transnational aesthetic practices: Cinema, magazines, fashion and museums
•Understanding multilingual contexts: Ethnic minorities and the glocal level
•World literature: Narratives, genres and networks

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