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Masters Degrees (Choice Architecture)

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The MA in Architecture and Urban Design (MAUD) is a wide-ranging mainstream Master's programme in architecture that gives you an interdisciplinary and cross-cultural perspective on contemporary architecture and urban design. Read more
The MA in Architecture and Urban Design (MAUD) is a wide-ranging mainstream Master's programme in architecture that gives you an interdisciplinary and cross-cultural perspective on contemporary architecture and urban design. The programme informs you about the latest knowledge of architecture and urban design in order to prepare you to become a successful professionals working on a global scale.

You are taught how to combine academic analysis with the development of creative and intellectual skills. We regard theory and practice of architecture as equally important, and believe that joint effort and excellence in both areas are necessary for communicating architecture and urban design competently and successfully. You are encouraged to develop your creative and imaginative abilities; to produce ideas and undertake work that conveys your understanding of architecture and cities in fresh and effective ways.

You learn how to approach contemporary architecture and cities and their relation to the society, culture and arts including film and theatre. Through the analysis of wider social and environmental aspects and through modeling of cities’ life and its dynamic forces, programme considers the ways in which both the heritage buildings and the new design proposals can facilitate in the sustainable development of cities in the future.

Kent School of Architecture (KSA) has developed a unique partnership with Farrells, the internationally renowned architects and urban planners. John Letherland, the Head of Master Planning, currently leads a design module for all students on this programme.

This is a versatile Master’s qualification for architects, urban designers, surveyors, historians, landscape architects, theorists, engineers and other related professionals involved with planning and design of contemporary cities, as well as graduates interested in pursuing further postgraduate studies and an academic career.

This programme is taught at our Canterbury campus. There is also a version of this programme which allows you to spend a term in Paris (https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/181/architecture-and-urban-design-paris).

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/180/architecture-and-urban-design

About Kent School of Architecture

Research at Kent School of Architecture achieves excellence in both the history and theory of architecture and in sustainable urban, peri-urban and environmental design. School staff have design expertise and specialist knowledge; they are at the forefront of current architectural issues, including sustainability, technology, professional practice and research. Our staff are active at academic and professional conferences, both nationally and internationally, and appear and publish in local and national media. The School promotes innovative and interdisciplinary research, emphasising sustainable design.

Much of the project work involved in the Kent School of Architecture is located on 'live' sites in the local region, using real clients and engaging challenging issues. Students in all stages of the school have been introduced to real urban and architectural design challenges in Lille, Margate, Folkestone, Dover, Rye, Chatham and, of course, Canterbury. Much of this work involves liaising with external bodies, such as architects, planners, council and development groups.

Course structure

The MA is composed of four taught modules (two modules per term full-time, one module per term part-time) and a dissertation on the topic of your own choice. The programme leads to an MA but may be taken as a Postgraduate Diploma without the dissertation.

Graduates have worked at the cutting edge of the architectural profession on a global level and progressed to work in academia.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

AR831 - Urban Landscape (30 credits)
AR832 - Research Methods and Analysis (30 credits)
AR848 - Theory and History of Urban Design (30 credits)
AR847 - Urban Design Project (30 credits)
AR999 - Dissertation:Urban Design (60 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is by coursework and the dissertation.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- ensure that you achieve excellence in your knowledge of architecture and cities through the development of your understanding, research, design and other related abilities

- promote creativity and excellence in architecture and urban design; from understanding concepts to thoughtful project development and the integration of research, strategically and in detail

- develop your knowledge of the theoretical, historical and professional contexts of architecture and urban design and ensure that you are aware of your responsibilities

- develop your understanding of architecture, cities and urban design within a broader cultural context that would include studies of arts and humanities

- promote and support independent research and high-quality skills

- accommodate a wide range of views and develop your specialised original interests

- develop understanding of how the boundaries of knowledge are advanced through research and promote originality in applying knowledge in architecture and urban design

- develop initiative, responsibility and sound critical judgement in making decisions about complex architectural and urban design issues

- enable you to develop strategies for self-improvement and commitment to research and learning

- support you in achieving your full potential in all parts of the programme.

Careers

Our Master’s programmes have been devised to enhance your prospects in a competitive world. Professionals in the architectural, planning, environmental design and conservation fields who develop higher-level skills, accredited by relevant bodies, will find themselves well-placed to progress in their field. Our students have gone on to work for major public agencies and universities, as well as leading practitioners in the private sector.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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Master the art of architecture with a Master’s degree. The University of Canberra’s Master of Architecture has a unique status as the only postgraduate architecture program in Canberra, itself an internationally recognised model design city. Read more

Master the art of architecture with a Master’s degree

The University of Canberra’s Master of Architecture has a unique status as the only postgraduate architecture program in Canberra, itself an internationally recognised model design city. This professionally accredited, two-year course focuses on the contemporary issues informing urban architecture and promotes the processes of urbanisation as a laboratory for architectural research.

Accredited by the Australian Institute of Architects and the Architects Accreditation Council of Australia, our course’s ‘design studios’ will arm you with the professional and intellectual knowledge you need to practice architecture on a global scale, fine-tune your expertise in related careers such as in industrial design, urban design or heritage management or allow you to pursue a PhD in alternative subjects, including architectural history, urban planning or digital architecture.

Study a Master of Architecture at UC and you will:

  • understand analytical and theoretical approaches to site, context, program and technologies
  • propose formal, spatial and programmatic resolutions for major urban scale projects
  • demonstrate an understanding of the complex and challenging social, ethical, environmental, political and regulatory contexts within which architectural practice is carried out
  • demonstrate an advanced ability to respond to and develop a client brief, scope of work and detailed design proposals up to start of construction
  • debate the importance of the interconnections of architecture with its cultural, theoretical, technical and historical contexts.

Work-integrated learning (WIL)

Work-integrated learning (WIL) is learning first-hand through real work or work-like experiences. WIL is a key element to enhancing employability in the workplace and is integral to many of our courses. This reinforces our commitment to preparing professional and highly employable graduates with the right mix of skills and knowledge.

Professional Accreditation

Accreditation by the Australian Institute of Architects, and the Architects Accreditation Council of Australia

Typical study pattern

Year 1

Semester 1

Semester 2

Year 2

Semester 1

Semester 2

Career opportunities

Opportunities exist for Bachelor of Master of Architecture graduates in a range of sectors, including:

  • Government departments
  • Statutory bodies
  • Local authorities
  • Commercial development companies
  • Self-owned practices or partnerships


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The MPhil in Architecture and Urban Studies (MAUS) is a one-year full-time programme of advanced study on contemporary architecture and the continued development of cities around the world. Read more
The MPhil in Architecture and Urban Studies (MAUS) is a one-year full-time programme of advanced study on contemporary architecture and the continued development of cities around the world.

The MPhil in Architecture and Urban Studies (MAUS) is a 1-year programme of advanced study on modern and contemporary architecture and the continued development of cities around the world. Students from a variety of academic backgrounds work in an interdisciplinary environment with urbanists, environmental specialists, architectural theorists and historians and design practitioners. Students will explore a wide range of ideas, research methods and theoretical approaches in order to undertake critical and rigorous analysis of issues relating to both architecture and the challenges and complexities of the world’s rapidly changing cities.

Key benefits

- In the 2014 Research Excellent Framework, Cambridge Architecture’s research work was ranked 1st in the UK, achieving the highest proportion of combined World Leading research. 88% of the research produced by the Department was rated as World Leading or Internationally Excellent (Unit of Assessment 16: Architecture, Built Environment and Planning). This consolidates our top ranking established in the previous Research Assessment Exercise of 2008.

- Ranked 1st for Architecture by the Guardian's 2015 University Guide.

Visit the website: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/aharmpaus

Course detail

The course offers a flexible structure that is tailored to the needs of individual student’s research interests. Seminars and lectures are organised along two basic streams: 1) one focuses on sustainability and environmental design from a more technical point of view; 2) the other emphasises the socio- political and cultural context of architecture and cities with an approach rooted in the humanities and social sciences. Students may participate in both streams, but can also focus on one only. In the second term there is choice of more specialist seminars within both streams. Students are actively encouraged to explore issues across these basic disciplinary boundaries. The course asks students to expand upon their own experiences by pursuing research in their areas of interest.

Format

Teaching in the course is closely integrated with the Department’s research arm, the Martin Centre for Architecture and Urban Studies -http://www.martincentre.arct.cam.ac.uk/ which has a world reputation for research on a wide range of issues and geographical areas. The MPhil benefits from direct input in the form of lectures and seminars and/or individual supervision from the Martin Centre’s research groups:

- Cities and Transport - http://www.martincentre.arct.cam.ac.uk/research/citiesandtransport
- Behaviour and Building Performance - http://www.martincentre.arct.cam.ac.uk/research/behaviour-and-building
- Centre for Urban Conflicts Research - http://www.martincentre.arct.cam.ac.uk/research/conflict-in-cities
- Sustainable Building - http://www.martincentre.arct.cam.ac.uk/research/sustainablebuilding
- Cities South of Cancer - http://citiessouthofcancer.org/
- Digital Studio - http://www.martincentre.arct.cam.ac.uk/research/digital-studio
- History and Theory of Architecture - http://www.martincentre.arct.cam.ac.uk/research/history-and-theory
- Cambridge University Centre for Risk in the Built Environment (CURBE) - http://www.martincentre.arct.cam.ac.uk/research/risk
- Natural Materials and Structures - http://www.martincentre.arct.cam.ac.uk/research/natural-materials-and-st...

Professor Richard Sennett - http://www.richardsennett.com/site/senn/templates/home.aspx?pageid=1&cc=gb, The Department of Architecture’s Sir Arthur Marshall Visiting Professor, contributes a workshop to the programme in the second term. The course also entertains close connections with the Masters in Architectural and Urban Design (ARB/ RIBA Pt2) (MAUD) - http://www.arct.cam.ac.uk/courses/mphil-degree-in-architecture-and-urban-design-maud-arb-riba-pt2 programme enabling research-driven dialogue with designers.

Teaching is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars and workshops, which are supported by individual supervisions. Individual supervisions are an essential part of the programme, they help to assist, direct and monitor progress of students’ work while, at the same time, help to provide continuous feedback throughout the course.

There is also a range of activities in the Department of Architecture, and throughout the University, that will help students to develop their research interests and to meet the programme outcomes. These include the Martin Centre lunchtime seminar, the City Seminar and ARCSOC Talks. Students may choose to attend units on the MPhil in Sustainable Engineering, Faculty of Engineering Faculty - http://www-esdmphil.eng.cam.ac.uk/ and the MPhil in Screen and Media Cultures, Faculty of Modern and Medieval Languages - http://www.mml.cam.ac.uk/graduates/mphil_SMC.html with whom we have a reciprocal arrangement. MAUS students are welcome to be involved with MAUD in reviews and discussions. The programme includes research skills training designed specifically for the needs of our students.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the programme, students will have acquired the type of research training required to carry on to the PhD, or if conceived as a standalone degree, will have acquired the skills to specialise and enhance their professional prospects.

Assessment

- The dissertation of not more than 20,000 words represents 50% of the overall mark. The word count includes footnotes but excludes the bibliography. Any appendices will require the formal permission of your Supervisor who may consult the Degree Committee. Students submit two hard copies and one electronic copy of their thesis for examination at the end of July.

- An oral examination (viva voce) on the dissertation and on the general field of knowledge within which the work submitted falls may be required. Students must remain in or be prepared to return to Cambridge for such oral examinations, which will be held in September.

- Three essays of 3,000 - 5,000 words including footnotes but excluding the bibliography, on topics approved by your supervisor and the Faculty will be presented for examination. One will be submitted at the beginning of the Lent (Spring) term and the additional two at the beginning of the Easter (Summer) term respectively. The three essays represent 50% of the total mark.

- Students undertake a review of their work on a termly basis day which take place at the end of the Michaelmas (Autumn) and Lent (Spring) Terms and the beginning of the Easter (Summer) Term. Students present their work to a supportive forum which will include academic critics who will provide constructive criticism about the students' proposed essays and dissertations.

Continuing

To continue to read for the PhD degree following the course, MPhil in Architecture & Urban Studies students must achieve an overall total score of at least 70%. Continuation is also subject to Faculty approval of the proposed research proposal, and, the availability of an appropriate supervisor.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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The Manchester School of Architecture (MSA) is well integrated with the vibrant architectural community of a culturally diverse city, a powerful regional profession and an extensive and active array of international partners. Read more
The Manchester School of Architecture (MSA) is well integrated with the vibrant architectural community of a culturally diverse city, a powerful regional profession and an extensive and active array of international partners. The Master of Architecture (MArch) programme at MSA is highly respected for the capability of its graduates who succeed in the transglobal setting of research and practice in architecture.

The MArch is a lively student centred environment, where peer-to-peer learning, practice based research and live events projects connect students, expert academics, design professionals and wider communities. Internationally recognised study tour research and access to the exchange programmes, connects the MArch with other leading Schools of Architecture. The extensive MSAplus alumni network, Manchester Society of Architects and Digital Innovation, are examples of a vibrant academic and professional context, where students are supported to develop their own links and approaches to architecture. Students can access sports clubs, societies and activities available at both Manchester and the University of Manchester.

The course is for students who have completed RIBA Part One for example a BA (Hons) Architecture course. The Master of Architecture (MArch) programme is a professionally recognised award (prescribed at Part 2 level by the Architects Registration Board and validated at Part 2 level by the Royal Institute of British Architects) leading towards a career as a professional architect. The MArch course is an opportunity to complete the academic components of architecture education and develop a portfolio suited to employment opportunities in contemporary professional practice at one of the most popular and highly regarded architecture schools in the UK. The award is jointly conferred by Manchester Metropolitan University and the University of Manchester and students benefit from access to the physical and intellectual resources of both institutions.

The content, duration and structure of the programme are defined by regulatory requirements in the EU and the particular arrangements for student finance that apply in the UK context of architecture education. Within this framework Full-time, Hybrid and Part-time routes are offered to promote choice that reflects individual ambitions and particular circumstances, to qualify as architects or pursue further postgraduate study.

Special Features

-Manchester School of Architecture is a unique collaboration between Manchester Metropolitan University and the University of Manchester.
-Consistently ranked as one of the best schools of Architecture in the UK.
-Engaged and responsive design teaching, working with expert, research active academic staff and leading design professionals.
Students actively take part in the research culture of the school.
-Opportunities for study exchange in Europe through the Erasmus programme.

Our RIBA award winning Manchester School of Art building gives high quality environments:
-Open Studio: Managed and organized by MSA students for model making, digital and analogue drawing, supporting collaborative peer groups.
-Review Studio: Used for formal discussion and review of work.
-Workshops: High quality making supported by large well-equipped specialist workshops and trained technical staff at Manchester Metropolitan and the University of Manchester.
-Lecture: Digitally equipped lecture theatres across both university estates support delivery of formal and open lectures and events.
-Library: Excellent 24/7 library resources, supported by specialist architectural librarians, enable access to a vast amount of recently published and archival material. IT systems support working away from the main Studios when appropriate.

Course Content

This course is for students who have completed a RIBA Part One course in Architecture. The course comprises of studio, research methods, dissertation and professional studies units, delivered through a diverse range of research driven ateliers and workshops. Each group approaches architecture from a different specialised position, offering expertise, skills and knowledge that respond to contemporary events and issues. Course units are delivered through studio days, workshops, seminars and lectures, made available digitally for distance learning. Students vote at the beginning of each academic year from a selection of ateliers and workshops. Student projects connect with research-based design, contemporary investigative methods and live workshops, aligned with strong areas of research activity and professional practice undertaken by the academic team within the wider cultural context.

Studio units centre on face to face discourse, focused on the creative and exploratory design thesis. Units are aligned (e.g. Methods and Dissertation) to capitalise on research themes and methodologies located in both theory and studio practice and delivered through lectures, seminars and talks. Professional Studies combines the benefits of employment contexts and academic environments to deliver technologically and professionally responsive design projects and case studies. Blending digital communication and live discourse, Professional Studies also facilitates distance learning as a part of the Hybrid route.

Study tours and international collaborations with other leading Schools and organisations take place each year and there is the possibility for exchange under the Erasmus programme.

All students will be required to make a number of different submissions, including detailed examinations of building proposals, 12000-word dissertation, annotated reports, methods exploration and a design thesis.

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The Architecture MA incorporates a number of different study options including an extensive range of individual module choices and specialist pathways in Cultural Identity and Globalisation, History and Theory, and Digital Media. Read more
The Architecture MA incorporates a number of different study options including an extensive range of individual module choices and specialist pathways in Cultural Identity and Globalisation, History and Theory, and Digital Media.

Situated in the progressive intellectual milieu of London, the Architecture MA programme offers a flexible programme of study and a unique opportunity to pursue advanced postgraduate research combining high-level theoretical investigation with innovative design approaches.

The Department of Architecture at the University of Westminster provides first-class facilities such as state-of-the-art digital design/fabrication equipment and a team of lecturers and researchers deeply immersed in the very latest developments in architectural design, theory, historical research, and technology. The Architecture MA is part of a suite of Masters offered by the Department of Architecture aimed at graduates looking to further their education and enhance their employability by acquiring new knowledge and skills. Focused on architectural research, the Architecture MA also offers a firm grounding for those seeking to pursue further research and/or an academic career.

Course content

The Architecture MA provides a course that is wide-ranging and flexible, facilitating alternative modes of study and a range of options, including the choice of either a written or design-based thesis. The programme also allows for specialism through its three designated pathways: Architecture (Cultural Identity and Globalisation); Architecture (Digital Media) and Architecture (History and Theory), or alternatively, you can also create your own pathway, under the heading Architecture MA, by selecting and combining relevant modules that meet your individual requirements.

The range of optional and specialist modules offered allows you to develop your individual learning trajectories through the in-depth study of specific subject areas, involving theoretical components as well as practical applications. A series of theory rich modules will stimulate you to analyse current trends in architecture, design theory and practice on the basis of your research and critical judgement, and use these insights to produce high quality written work in a scholarly manner.

In parallel, a set of design-oriented activities encourages you to develop your artistic, aesthetic and intellectual vision through the use of different media, in order to produce individual proposals with a high level of spatial, material and formal resolution. The course is taught within a dynamic learning environment that comprises seminar-based sessions along with studio-based activities, suitably integrated by a wide range of lectures, tutorials, site visits, research training sessions, and independent study periods.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of what you will study on this course.

Core modules
-Research and Positioning
-Thesis Development and Major Thesis Project

Pathway/option modules
-Critical Issues in Architecture
-Programming and Computational Design
-Theories of Identity
-Applied Animation
-City Cultures: Conceptual Design for Complex Cultural Contexts
-Ethnographic Ways of Knowing: Critical and Creative Explorations of Site
-Introduction to Design Computing
-Picturing London
-Site and Motion

Careers

Our dedicated Career Development Centre is actively working with an ever-expanding network of over 3,000 employers to provide you with exceptional employability support and guidance. As a result we were nominated as finalists for a significant industry award – the NUE Awards Most Improved Commitment to Employability 2016.

We provide our students with work placements and international opportunities to support them in becoming highly employable, globally engaged graduates, and with one million businesses operating within 20 miles of the University of Westminster, over 84% of our students are in work or further study six months after graduation. Our graduates work in a variety of sectors and organisations, from small/medium-sized companies and start-ups to large not-for-profit organisations and corporates.

During your time at Westminster you will be able to use our comprehensive online vacancy service and meet with our experienced careers consultants, providing you with thorough training and support on CV writing, application forms, interview preparation and assessment centres.

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This programme is grounded on the belief that architects should be thinking well beyond the constraints of market forces and the traditional disciplinary limits of the profession, towards forms, technology and spaces for a more sustainable future. Read more
This programme is grounded on the belief that architects should be thinking well beyond the constraints of market forces and the traditional disciplinary limits of the profession, towards forms, technology and spaces for a more sustainable future. This is a student-led programme, and you can have very different experiences within it depending on the choices of studios and courses you make.

Why choose this course?

Founded in 1927, the School of Architecture at Oxford Brookes has established an international reputation for the quality of both its research and its teaching. As one of the largest architecture schools in the UK, with around 600 students and 70 staff, it plays a leading role in defining the national, and international, agenda in design education and research. The school enjoys an international reputation in research, in areas ranging from sustainable design to modular buildings and from design for well-being to vernacular architecture.

Staff in the school regularly secure research funding from the UK's research councils and the European Union as well as industry, with an annual research grant income averaging £1m in recent years. This programme provides RIBA/ARB Part 2.

Professional accreditation

Accredited by the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) and the Architects Registration Board (ARB).

This course in detail

Year 1 - Research into design
This year has a very strong emphasis on acquiring in-depth knowledge of an architecturally important field of study and utilising that knowledge in design. This is achieved by taking one of the six 'design specialisations'.

You choose which design specialisation is best for you. The specialisations on offer are deliberately highly diverse to cater for the changing nature of the profession in practice. This course produces graduates for the global market and as such requires a high level of commitment from staff and students.

The design specialisations are:
-Advanced Architectural Design
-International Architectural Regeneration and Development
-Development and Emergency Practice
-Sustainable Building: Performance and Design
-Research-led Design
-Urban Design.

Each of the research specialisations offers teaching from experts within that subject area, and links, through teaching focus and staff, to the five research clusters that are an invaluable resource within the School of architecture.

The five research clusters keep the specialisations at the cutting edge in terms of a global agenda. They are, in general terms, environmental design, technology, development and emergency practice, humanities and architectural design.

Each of the design specialisations include a design project or projects, to which you will apply your detailed learning.

In addition to the design specialisation the first year will, through the Research Philosophy for Design module, widen your thinking in terms of what constitutes research, test your critical thinking and improved your analytical abilities. All of these are essential tools and their enhancement will place you in a stronger position to undertake the design studio in the second year.

Your ability to represent your ideas in a coherent and focused manner is the remit for the Representation module. This module will identify your strengths and build up your weaknesses, both in terms of visual and verbal communication methods. You will be able to dedicate time to fine-tuning techniques or building from basics in sketching, model making, 2D and 3D CAD. Your presentation of methods and actual practice will enable you to build confidence in verbal communication skills.

The Management, Practice and Law module in year one looks at the landscapes within which these issues are being informed. This module is taught by practising architects who have first-hand experience of the issues under discussion. Through a series of workshops you will work on topics that are essential to the practice of architecture. Management, practice and law is part of the design delivery of the programme and you will be expected to approach the coursework from a design position. This module asks that you approach this subject with a very different mind-set than the traditional position.

Due to the diverse and preparative basis of this year it is compulsory for all students to pass all compulsory components of the Research into Design year in order to be progress to the Design and Technology year.

Year 2 - Design and technology
This year is structured to enable you to synthesise a broad range of complex cultural, aesthetic, research and technical factors, and design-specialisation learning, into your major design project and portfolio.

The year is spent participating in one of six design studios. All studios have control over their own programme of projects, and each has a different view of architectural culture and promotes different design methods. The design studios are taught by some of the brightest designers and tutors in the country and consequently their programmes demand high levels of creative and intellectual endeavour from you, as well as high levels of productivity. Their aim is to raise your design thinking, skills and production to the highest possible standard.

All six units present their projects for the year in the induction session and you are asked to select all six in order of preference. This system is to allow for an even distribution of students across all six units. Most students are allocated to their first choice of studio although there is no guarantee of a particular design unit - normally at worst you are allocated your second choice.

During the design and technology year, your design work must develop into technically ambitious architecture and be the subject of your compulsory Advanced Technology for Design module. This module designs through technology and fully complements and parallels your work in the design studio. There is a very strong emphasis here upon the creative possibilities for architectural technology. We ask for an open and experimental approach to technology, but also a clear understanding of its context and aims.

The staff delivering the teaching in the design studio unit and the Advanced Technology for Design module are made up from academics and practitioners. This energetic mix will challenge you to think about design and technology in a new manner, building confidence in ability, enabling deep thinking, and aiding you to define a personal design spirit.

Sitting alongside the design and technology is the second Management, Practice and Law module. This module builds on the learning and skills from the first year module and prepares you for stepping back into practice. As in the first year module this is learning is delivered by practicing architects. Through focus groups with architectural practices, this module figures in the skills that are seen as highly desirable for the ARB part 2 graduate to have when seeking employment.

Throughout the two years of the programme there will be interim reviews. This offers an opportunity to receive feedback from outside of your design studio or design specialisation. We have strong links with practice and architectural institutions and can attract the most able people to sit on our reviews.

This is a programme that aims to give you the skills for international practice.

As our courses are reviewed regularly, modules may vary from those listed here.

Teaching and learning

The unique nature of the Applied Design in Architecture offers you the opportunity to select an individual pathway that will create a distinctive graduate profile that is unique to you alone.

The ability to choose modules from within design specialisations offers you the prospect of defining your own position. You will find that you are being taught with, in most cases, direct entry master's students from countries around the world.

This aspect is complemented by the Year 2 design studio where you will engage with a distinctive agenda and experience a diversity of design specialisation thinking from students within your unit.

Self-directed learning is highly supported by staff in the School of Architecture. Personal choice engenders motivation and a high level of commitment, and the programme has been designed to embrace this aspect whilst clearly building on skills, thinking, application and design production to achieve a final portfolio of the highest standard.

Careers and professional development

The modules Management Practice, and Law 1 and 2, include guidance on the necessary professional skills that are required both for ARB Part 2 and for preparation in commencing ARB Part 3. The design studio generates a portfolio of work that not only demonstrates the learning for ARB Part 2 but also written, research and visual skills. The design portfolio is intended as the vehicle for students to synthesise all facets of their learning in order to seek practice employment.

In addition the school maintains a jobs wall that advertises vacancies locally, nationally and internationally.

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The Landscape Architecture Studies MA will educate you in the knowledge and values of landscape architecture and its interface with planning and architecture. Read more
The Landscape Architecture Studies MA will educate you in the knowledge and values of landscape architecture and its interface with planning and architecture. You will develop a practical understanding of the theories, methods and techniques that are applied to landscape architecture, with much of what you learn applicable worldwide.

Through studying this course you will learn how to demonstrate systematic knowledge and understanding of landscape architecture and its interface with planning and architecture. This includes the design and planning of both urban and rural landscapes with the potential to study landscape projects in a range of country contexts.

We will work with you to expand on your ability to think critically about the design of place and space. You will develop advanced skills so that you can deal with complex aspects of landscape design and planning in a creative and innovative way.

You will develop an advanced knowledge and understanding of the way landscape has been conceptualised and theorised at different times and in different places, informed by relevant research findings and relevant practice. You will consider this historical context with changes in the environment and the impact this will have on landscape architecture in the future.

The studio based design projects offer an opportunity for you to refine your design skills. The practical skills you will develop include being able to creatively respond to complex architectural briefs and generating design proposals. You will be able to evaluate the materials, process and techniques that apply to landscape architectural projects and integrate these into your proposals.

On graduation you will be equipped for advanced practice in landscape-related disciplines. The Landscape Architecture Studies MA is ideal if you want to further your education, develop your career, or prepare for further specialised study. Through the course you will develop advanced transferrable skills in literacy, design and communication.

The course can also open up some career paths outside of landscape architecture, such as landscape conservation and garden design history.

Delivery

The course is taught and based on the Newcastle campus. The course runs across two taught semesters with the summer months taken up with a final thesis design project.

You will participate in a significant amount of work with your tutor and the other students. The style of teaching depends on the modules selected and includes:
-Design studio teaching
-Lectures
-Guided reading
-Seminars
-Project work
-Site visits

You will be assessed by multiple choice exams and coursework, including essays, individual and group studio projects, response diaries and your final major thesis.

Facilities

The course is based in a dedicated taught postgraduate Design Studio building. The School's Workshop is nearby. Dedicated School desktop computers and large and small format printers are also available. Most spaces in the School are Wi-Fi enabled.

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Research profile. This programme enables students to study architecture at an advanced level. Read more

Research profile

This programme enables students to study architecture at an advanced level. Most major subjects and fields of inquiry within architecture are available for research, including the history and theory of architecture; cultural and visual studies; digital media; technology, structures and materials; and sustainable design.

The programme structure comprises a compulsory research methods course, the choice of one optional course subject, and a 20,000-word dissertation based on independent research.

Our expertise and interests range across the following areas:

Architectural Conservation

Our focus includes conservation theory and history; urban conservation; conservation technology; and the challenges of bridging the gulf between heritage and new architecture.

Architectural History, Theory and Criticism

We have particular strength in the history of architecture in Britain and the British colonial world (18th and 19th centuries); Germany, Central Europe and Russia; modernism in Europe, North America and Africa; Renaissance Italy; the history of landscape; the history of technology; the international history of mass housing and urban development; the theory and philosophy of architecture; the philosophy of place; and critical inquiry and methodology.

Design-led Research and Studio Practice

We focus on research in and through design, as informed by contemporary architectural and cultural theory; studio pedagogy; research-led teaching; and methodologies of urban research and fieldwork.

Digital Media and Design

We have expertise in the spatial, social and philosophical implications of media; the relationship between computers and design practice; cognitive models of human-computer interaction; 3D modelling; mobile computing; the sonic environment; and e-commerce.

Technology, Environment and Sustainability

We offer expertise in lightweight steel structures; the building envelope; concrete construction; design and manufacturing; and sustainable design in both qualitative and quantitative senses, looking at environmental response, design theory, rural planning and user-centred solutions.

Programme structure

The programme consists of a compulsory research methods course, the choice of one option course subject and a 20,000-word dissertation based on independent research.

Training and support

Students are equipped with skills in advanced research techniques, critical analysis and writing, presentation, and a developed understanding of architecture and its applications.

Facilities

Research programmes in architecture are served by high-quality library facilities. All students in the programmes are provided with 24-hour-accessible study space, as well as access to well-equipped multimedia laboratories, photography and exhibition facilities.



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Since the Department of History of Art's foundation in 1970, we have established ourselves as one of the world’s leading centres for advanced research in the field. Read more
Since the Department of History of Art's foundation in 1970, we have established ourselves as one of the world’s leading centres for advanced research in the field. We are proud of our team of staff and students whose impressive performance is critical to sustaining and enhancing the national and international reputation created by our distinguished alumni.

Cambridge itself is, from an art historical point of view, a stunning city in which to live and work. We make full use of Cambridge’s unique holdings of art and architecture, including the Fitzwilliam Museum (on our doorstep), Kettle’s Yard and the University Library as well as the College libraries. The Hamilton Kerr Institute at Whittlesford, a department of the Fitzwilliam Museum, is dedicated to the conservation of easel paintings and contributes to our teaching and research.

The MPhil in the History of Art and Architecture is a nine-month course providing advanced study and training in research in specialised areas of the subject. It is intended as a self-contained programme of art-historical study, but also serves as a preparation for students intending to proceed to doctoral research. Please note that this is a research degree with taught methodological elements, not a conversion course for students whose first degree lies in another subject.

The educational aims of the programme are:

- to provide teaching and learning to post-graduate students in the history of art and architecture in a range of fields linked to the research interests of the staff;
- to provide high-calibre students with training in relevant research skills and to offer excellent specialist supervision of their individual research in these fields;
- to provide a stimulating environment in which students can reach their full intellectual potential;
- to help students develop a wide range of intellectual abilities and skills which will enable them to make a significant contribution in their chosen careers and walks of life, including academic teaching and research.

Visit the website: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/ahhamphaa

Course detail

On completion of the MPhil, students should have:

- made the transition in learning style and pace from undergraduate to postgraduate level;
- acquired the necessary research skills in the use of bibliographical, archival and museum resources as relevant to their field of study;
- gained practice in the use of the languages and archival skills relevant to their chosen research area;
- gained confidence in the choice and use of different methodological approaches and theoretical perspectives;
- refined their critical skills in the examination, recording and analysis of works of art and/or architecture, especially at first-hand (through travel and fieldwork if appropriate);
- gained experience in oral and written presentation, and in a sustained piece of research in the form of a dissertation of not more than 15,000 words;
- acquired the proficiency needed to present in writing a coherent and sustained piece of academic research.

Format

Teaching is delivered through a series of seminars held in the Faculty during the Michaelmas (Autumn) and Lent (Spring) Terms, focusing on salient critical and theoretical issues in the discipline, and organised into two parallel strands in each term. The seminars include presentations by MPhil students and other research students. Students may either take one option in each term, or follow the same course throughout. A taught course in visual culture offered at MPhil level by another university department (eg Classics, English, History, Modern and Medieval Languages) may be undertaken in addition to one of the two taught courses, with the approval of your supervisor and the Degree Committee of the Faculty of Architecture and History of Art. This needs to be discussed and arranged at the beginning of the Michaelmas Term.

Throughout the course, students are encouraged to undertake independent reading and study, in order to consolidate what is under discussion in the seminars. In addition, they attend the Department’s weekly public Graduate Research Seminar organised by the graduate students, the Department's fortnightly Medieval Seminars and other lectures and seminars in the Department and elsewhere in the University.

The syllabus is as follows:

- Attendance at two selected seminar courses in specialised areas of research, one in the Michaelmas (Autumn) Term and one in the Lent (Spring) Term;
- Attendance at the department's weekly graduate seminars;
- Attendance at classes in skills training and career development;
- Frequent individual consultation with the candidate's supervisor, who will guide the candidate's choice of topics and preparation of individual written work for essays, presentations and dissertation.

Each of the seminar courses runs over two terms (Michaelmas and Lent), with a different emphasis in each term. The seminars include presentations by MPhil students and other research students. Students may either take one option in each term, or follow the same course throughout. A taught course in visual culture offered at MPhil level by another university department (eg Classics, English, History, Modern and Medieval Languages) may be undertaken in addition to one of the two taught courses, with the approval of your supervisor and the Degree Committee of the Faculty of Architecture and History of Art. This needs to be discussed and arranged at the start of Michaelmas Term.

Assessment

- The dissertation of not more than 15,000 words represents 60% of the overall mark and is submitted at the end of May.
- Two essays of not more than 6000 words (one of which may include a literature review). The essays represent 40% of the total mark. One will be submitted at the end of the Michaelmas (Autumn) and one at the end of the Lent (Spring) terms respectively.

Continuing

To continue to read for the PhD following the course, MPhil in History of Art & Architecture students must achieve an overall average score of at least 70%. Continuation is also subject to the approval of the proposed research proposal, and, the availability of an appropriate supervisor.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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MSc Architecture is a specialised programme designed to develop digital design and practical manufacturing skills. It builds on the ethos of rigorous and directed design studio tuition of LSBU’s established RIBA part 1 and 2 degrees. Read more
MSc Architecture is a specialised programme designed to develop digital design and practical manufacturing skills. It builds on the ethos of rigorous and directed design studio tuition of LSBU’s established RIBA part 1 and 2 degrees. It also emphasises the value of detailed and analytical research and the expression of this through structured extended writing.

You’ll extend your understanding of advanced architectural design and progressive contextual urbanism through studio- and workshop-based projects. Tutorials in the design studio and analogue and digital workshops, as well as instruction in advanced design software, will help you define and enhance your personal response to architectural challenges.

The course connects 2D and 3D representations (drawing and physical modelling) with an understanding of digital fabrication and manufacturing, and you’ll have the opportunity to develop and make architectural components using the onsite facilities of the DARLAB(Digital Architecture and Robotic Lab).

You’ll also consider architectural history and theory, and evaluate this to develop your own position in the form of an extended written project on a subject of your choice. For your final design project you'll develop a proposition for a complex building or buildings, drawing together all your learning to highlight the relationships between theory, design and technology.

Modules

Advanced digital design techniques
Integrative technologies: robotic manufacturing
Design 1: research
History and theory: critical thinking
Architecture and theory: dissertation
Technology: technical thesis
Design 2: synthesis

Assessment

All design modules are subject to continuous assessment:

• Design tutors monitor design scheme proposals throughout the semester, and collectively moderate assessments at each semester’s end;
• Individual feedback on design project proposals is provided at every individual studio tutorial;
• An evaluative, critical summary of design projects is provided at all final presentations

Provisional grades are given at the end of semester 1, with all students offered opportunities to review, revise, and add to their design
project submissions:

• A written and illustrated project report examining aspects of environmental technology;
• A major extended written and illustrated assignment (dissertation) on a subject of personal interest related to architecture, and using primary and secondary sources;
• Workshop-based fabrication and design projects;
• A written and illustrated technology report examining aspects of the constructional, environmental, and material implications of the major design project.

Teaching and learning

Teaching takes place in our dedicated Masters level studios, and makes use of LSBU’s specialist workshops; the Digital Architecture Robotic Laboratory, and Centre for Efficient and Renewable Energy in Buildings.

You'll learn in a variety of formats including structured lecture programmes, 1:1 tutorials, small and large group seminars, and interim and final design juries with tutors and invited guests present.

Timetable

Typically each module involves 40 contact hours, and 160 self-managed learning hours; exceptionally, 'Design 2: synthesis' involves 80 contact hours, and 320 self-managed learning hours.

Professional links

The course has been developed in consultation with employers interested in upskilling their workforce with enhanced digital design and manufacturing skills. The course has strong links with the Royal Institute of British Architects, Architects Registration Board, and South London Society of Architects, plus numerous local, regional, and national practices.

Employability

Digital design and practical manufacturing skills are applicable to, and sought after in a very broad range of employment opportunities in architecture and other design-related activities, including visualisation, gaming, animation, media, production engineering, and industrial design.
The course is not intended to lead to a professional qualification, although it reflects the criteria and graduate attributes used by RIBA to deliver their validation services to programmes in architecture.
Curriculum developed to reflect (but not meet) professional and statutory body requirements.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

• Direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
• Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
• Mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

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Why you should choose this course. -You are interested in exploring a range of perspectives in relation to contemporary architecture and urbanism. Read more
Why you should choose this course:
-You are interested in exploring a range of perspectives in relation to contemporary architecture and urbanism
-You want a course that crosses disciplines and is accredited by leading institutions in architecture teaching and research
-You are looking to pursue a career in roles associated with the development of sustainable urban spaces

This course is for students who have completed the BA (Hons) Architecture course and, typically, a year in practice. The course comprises studio (with integrated technology), dissertation and professional studies. The studio course is delivered through research-driven clusters called ateliers that align strong areas of research activity and mutual interests via trios of staff. This enables students to develop ideological positions that are critically underpinned through seminars, workshops and symposiums to enhance their knowledge and skills. The first year of their studies enables each student to locate themselves within a broad range of perspectives in relation to contemporary architecture and urbanism. The second year builds upon this knowledge and developing skillset to orientate each student towards a suitable role in the parameters of the profession. The MArch programme has continued to maintain a diverse range of ateliers and expertise and enables us to provide a series of distinct and significant areas of focus with respect to the future of architecture and urbanism in a wider cultural context. At the beginning of each academic year you will make a preference from a choice of the School's ateliers. You would normally expect to spend a year studying with a particular atelier.

This course is jointly accredited by the University of Manchester (UoM) and Manchester Metropolitan University (MMU) with cross-disciplinary connections between the School of Environment, Education and Development (UoM), the Manchester School of Architecture (MMU) and Manchester Institute for Research and Innovation in Art and Design (MMU).

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The Professional Diploma is a design-driven course that will enable you to focus your skills and develop excellence in your work. Read more
The Professional Diploma is a design-driven course that will enable you to focus your skills and develop excellence in your work. In the most recent (2014-15) Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) survey, 96.9% of graduates from this course were in work or further study within six months.

More about this course

In an increasingly competitive profession we distinguish ourselves as an academic forum engaged responsibly and directly with the world around us. We are committed to expanding the creative possibilities through courageous and ambitious engagement with the world around us. Design drives the speculation within the school, used as both tool and intention.

The Professional Diploma is a design-based course that will enable you to focus your skills and develop excellence in your work. The main areas of study are in design, technology and practice, and history and theory. Each area is taught through a wide choice of tutors, studios and interest groups with a strong emphasis on self-directed study and ambitious agendas. You are encouraged to explore particular lines of interest and develop ideas in depth.

The course as a whole encourages fresh thinking, experiment and risk. You will also be encouraged to understand and engage with the society you are part of and serve; and to engage with social, political and economic infrastructures that predetermine built form. Our students have had considerable successes in the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) President's medals, winning the RIBA Silver Medal in 2012, 2003 and 2002, and the Bronze in 2004.

The architecture subject area is housed in a purpose designed building on Whitechapel High Street, created by our own architects, ARU, and has access to the Graduate Centre, designed by renowned architect, Daniel Libeskind. Students benefit from the course's central London location and its close proximity to its internationally renowned creative and industry hubs. The School's extensive networks encourage graduates of the course to expand their knowledge and skills through lectures, events and careers advice, leaving them with excellent career prospects.

Assessment

Your design projects will be assessed via your portfolio and a presentation at the end of the course. The history, theory and practice coursework is assessed through seminar papers and an essay. The technology studies are examined in portfolio and through a technology dissertation, coursework and professional reports.

Professional accreditation

Our course is fully accredited by the RIBA and ARB. Upon graduation you will receive your RIBA part 2 qualification, the second stage of three in the professional qualification of an Architect in the UK.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2016/17 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:
-Advocacy: Practice Beyond Aesthetics (core, 20 credits)
-Applied Technology in Architecture (core, 40 credits)
-Design Level 4 Process and Proposal (core, 20 credits)
-Design Level 4 Subject and Context (core, 20 credits)
-Cinema and the City (option, 20 credits)
-Concepts of Space (option, 20 credits)
-Economics of Place (option, 20 credits)
-Forgetting of Air (option, 20 credits)
-Poetry and Architecture (option, 20 credits)
-Research for Spatial Planning and Specialism (option, 20 credits)
-Sustainable Communities and Governance of Place (option, 20 credits)
-The Problem of Irony (option, 20 credits)
-The Question of Technology (option, 20 credits)
-The Soundscape of Modernity (option, 20 credits)
-Urban Design (option, 20 credits)
-Writing About Architecture (option, 20 credits)

Year 2 modules include:
-Design Thesis Project: Resolution (core, 40 credits)
-Design Thesis Project: Specialisation and Proposition (core, 40 credits)
-Integrated Design Study (core, 20 credits)
-Advanced Digital Design Techniques (option, 20 credits)
-Changing Places (option, 20 credits)
-Critical Transformations (option, 20 credits)
-Digital Design Techniques (option, 20 credits)
-Energy Comfort and Buildings (option, 20 credits)
-Histories (option, 20 credits)
-Interpretation (option, 20 credits)
-Planning and Urban Practice (option, 20 credits)
-Planning and Urban Theory (option, 20 credits)
-Theories (option, 20 credits)

After the course

After securing a Professional Diploma in Architecture (RIBA 2), many students decide to study the Examination in Professional Practice (RIBA 3), following a period of practical experience. RIBA 2 also enables you to progress to a specialised Masters course.

Moving to one campus

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2017. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

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This design-based course, open to architects and designers, will give you a strong platform from which to develop your own MA thesis. Read more
This design-based course, open to architects and designers, will give you a strong platform from which to develop your own MA thesis.

More about this course

This course builds on the established strengths of The Cass in the two major disciplines, their common interest in spatial design and a critical theoretical framework. It is open to architects and interior designers and is taught in parallel with the Professional Diploma in Architecture. The course offers a rare opportunity for high-level joint study. The different elements are coherent and testing. The course is design-based and research-orientated. It will enable you to focus your skills and develop excellence in your work. The coursework provides a strong design platform from which you can develop your thesis creatively and intellectually. The main subject areas are in design, history and theory, each taught through a wide choice of tutors, studios and interest groups with a strong emphasis on self-directed study.

Professor Florian Beigel and Professor Philip Christou have made a video that introduces the Architectire Research Unit.

The design projects are assessed through an end-of-year portfolio presentation. The history and theory coursework is assessed through a written dissertation. Optional modules are assessed according to the nature of the module.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2016/17 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:
-Design Research (core, 40 credits)
-Design Thesis (core, 60 credits)
-Design: Concept and Proposition (core, 40 credits)
-Advanced Digital Design Techniques (option, 20 credits)
-Architectural Publication and Journalism (option, 20 credits)
-Changing Places (option, 20 credits)
-Cinema and the City (option, 20 credits)
-Concepts of Space (option, 20 credits)
-Critical Transformations (option, 20 credits)
-Digital Design Techniques (option, 20 credits)
-Energy Comfort and Buildings (option, 20 credits)
-Forgetting of Air (option, 20 credits)
-Histories (option, 20 credits)
-Interior Contexts (option, 20 credits)
-Interpretation (option, 20 credits)
-Media Voices (option, 20 credits)
-Poetry and Architecture (option, 20 credits)
-The Problem of Irony (option, 20 credits)
-The Question of Technology (option, 20 credits)
-The Soundscape of Modernity (option, 20 credits)
-Theories (option, 20 credits)
-Writing About Architecture (option, 20 credits)

After the course

The course provides a practical and theoretical understanding of both architecture and interior design. Graduates generally work within architecture and interior design and in fields allied to both. Students wishing to develop their research are encouraged to apply to undertake a PhD.

Moving to one campus

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2017. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

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In a world constantly in flux there’s a greater need for more coherent, sustainable cities. You’ll gain advanced understanding of how architecture can engage with and improve our changing world. Read more
In a world constantly in flux there’s a greater need for more coherent, sustainable cities. You’ll gain advanced understanding of how architecture can engage with and improve our changing world. Hone your skills, knowledge and thinking to RIBA and ARB Part 2 level. Test your work in the public domain through live projects. Explore architecture as a tool to create more sustainable, inclusive and resilient places. Immersed in our design studio, we’ll help you become the architect you aspire to be.

Our course is fully validated by the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) and prescribed by the Architects Registration Board (ARB). Over 95 per cent of our recent graduates have found work in the UK, the Middle East and Australia – with award-winning architects such as Allies and Morrison, Feilden Clegg Bradley, Hopkins, John McAslan, Keith Williams, Make, Nicholas Hare and Walters and Cohen.

Advice from graduate Madhusha Wijesiri

"Architecture is one of the most competitive fields. You will experience this competitive nature during your education as well as when you step out into the real world. Competition should not be taken as an opportunity to defeat someone, but to improve yourself and to push yourself a bit beyond where you stand today.

Competition should be the nitrous oxide for your engine, which gives you additional energy to improve your performance. Never forget to offer your helping hand and to carry others with you, so that you will see competition within you disappear and turn into strength. This recarveals a wonderful purpose and a meaning to all the design work you do."

Key features

-Get creative with our amazing facilities and resources. You’ll be based in our eye-catching Faculty of Arts building in the heart of the campus, with students and staff from other art courses to bounce ideas off and collaborate with. And, you’ll have 2.5 square metres of desk to call your own.
-Study a programme fully validated by the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) and prescribed by the Architects Registration Board (ARB) – with National Student Survey results consistently above 90 per cent satisfaction.
-Interact with the public domain with architecture that’s responsive to people, places and tectonics. Work with local communities and institutions, including city councils, business organisations and non-governmental organisations.
-Choose one of the few programmes of this kind to be assessed by 100 per cent coursework – no exams.
-Work on live studio-based projects, both in the UK and abroad. Previous projects have been based in the UK, Spain, Portugal, Latvia and Poland.
-Benefit from our future-facing programme that features a strong urban and sustainability dimension.
-Learn from tutors with industry experience and interdisciplinary research interests. Our school was described as ‘charged’ by Architects’ Journal.
-Find employment after graduating from our programme. Over 95 per cent of our recent graduates have found work in the UK, the Middle East and Australia – with award-winning architects such as Allies and Morrison, Feilden Clegg Bradley, Hopkins, John McAslan, Keith Williams, Make, Nicholas Hare and Walters and Cohen.

Course details

Year 1
In your first year, you’ll undertake design studio projects set around live UK or overseas urban regeneration projects. You’ll study your core subjects this year – exploring key theories and tools through philosophies of sustainability; considering urban design praxis through urban methodologies; and deepening your understanding of professional practice through professional studies.

Core modules
-ARCH652A Detailed Design
-ARCH655A Professional Studies
-ARCH651A Inception and Strategic Design
-ARCH653A Connecting Sustainable Practices
-ARCH654A Urban Methodologies

Final year
In your final year, you’ll have a more flexible timetable. You’ll combine the skills and knowledge you've developed in the design studio with the individual study of an area of your choice. Your design studio projects this year are set around live urban regeneration projects overseas or in the UK. And for your individual study topic, you’ll be able to choose from a selection of modules grounded in current research activity in the School of Architecture, Design and Environment.

Core modules
-ARCH752A Advanced Detailed Design
-ARCH754A Technical Design
-ARCH751A Advanced Inception and Strategic Design
-ARCH753A Emerging Research in Architecture

Every undergraduate taught course has a detailed programme specification document describing the course aims, the course structure, the teaching and learning methods, the learning outcomes and the rules of assessment.

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The Arts MRes allows you to undertake a one year full-time or two year part-time research project in one or more of the School of the Arts’ key subject areas. Read more
The Arts MRes allows you to undertake a one year full-time or two year part-time research project in one or more of the School of the Arts’ key subject areas: Architecture, Communications and Media, English, Music and Philosophy. You will receive training in research skills and supervision from one or more academic specialists in their subject area(s).

The programme provides excellent preparation for you if you’re intending to undertake a PhD in the Arts and Humanities, but is also a good choice if you wish to pursue a research project for purposes of professional development or personal interest. You will become part of a community of active researchers and will be encouraged to pursue your own research interests in collaboration with an academic supervisor.

Why School of Architecture?

Highly rated research

Liverpool was the UK’s first Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) accredited University School of Architecture. Research lies at the core of our activities and we have highly rated international research in the fields of History and Theory and Environment and Process.

The activities of the research groups within these two fields provide the knowledge and expertise required by the professional discipline that the School serves, but also reach out into related areas in the visual arts, urban design, conservation and innovative technologies.

Career prospects

Students who successfully complete a Higher Degree go on to interesting and rewarding careers in architecture, the wider construction industry, management, higher education, the arts and conservation and many other specialisms to be found in the arts, architecture and the built environment.

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