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Masters Degrees (Chinese Medicine)

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Acupuncture is now well known as a system of medicine that involves the insertion of needles to specific points on the body. However, traditional practice also utilises other techniques such as moxibustion and cupping. Read more
Acupuncture is now well known as a system of medicine that involves the insertion of needles to specific points on the body. However, traditional practice also utilises other techniques such as moxibustion and cupping. The Chinese word for acupuncture is zhenjiu; literally needle and moxibustion. It originated In China around three thousand years ago and soon spread to other countries in Asia such as Japan and Korea. Acupuncture is now widely used around the world.

This course provides a strong foundation in the theory and application of acupuncture, as well as extensive clinical experience and a grounding in Chinese language and culture. Over the four year course, you'll also gain a thorough understanding of western bio-medical sciences and the skills to be a reflective and professional practitioner. Research will play an important role in the future development of the profession of acupuncture and this programme is designed to equip you with excellent research skills.

Modules covering Chinese medicine, language and culture will be taught by experienced lecturers from China. You'll benefit from this wealth of clinical experience and extensive knowledge of the various traditions and historical developments in Chinese medicine. You'll also learn from practitioners based in the UK to gain a more complete picture and understanding of the skills required to be a professional acupuncturist in the West.

Clinical experience is central to understanding and good practice of acupuncture. You'll train throughout the course at our teaching clinic. You'll also undertake an extended clinical placement in a Chinese hospital and study at our partner institution the Heilongjiang University of Chinese Medicine.

All this combined will help you to develop the skills to be a reflective and professional acupuncturist.

Modules

Year 1

Chinese medicine 1: basic principles
Concepts of inter-professional practice in health and social care
Tuina and Jingluo 1
Clinic 1: observation 1
Chinese language 1
Biomedicine 1: anatomy and physiology
History of Chinese medicine
Concepts of inter-professional practice in health and social care

Year 2

Tuina and Jingluo 2
Clinic 2: observation 1
Biomedicine 2: pathophysiology and pharmacology
Sociology of health
Chinese language 2
Chinese medicine 2: pattern differentiation
Running a practice

Year 3

Expertise, evidence and research: Informing clinical practice
Clinic 3: Patient management 1
Chinese medicine 3: integration
Biomedicine 3: diagnosis and treatment
Research in health and social care

Year 4
Clinic 4: Patient management 2 Dissertation

Option 1: China trip

Chinese hospital placement
Chinese language 3

Option 2: Remain in the UK

Chinese Medicine 4: Plurality and classics
Chinese language 3

Timetable

The course is delivered mostly on weekends and evenings, with clinic attendance on weekdays.

Professional links

This course is accredited by the British Acupuncture Accreditation Board (BAAB). BAAB accredits courses on behalf of the British Acupuncture Council (BAcC).

This course is run in partnership with London South Bank University, the Confucius Institute at LSBU, Heilongjiang University of Chinese Medicine and Harbin Normal University. All students on the course are eligible to apply for scholarships through the Confucius Institute to undertake studies in Chinese medicine and language in China.

Career progression

This course will enable you to work as a professional acupuncturist, and many recent graduates from this course have gone onto be professional clinical practitioners in acupuncture.

As a graduate from this course, you will be able to apply for further study at postgraduate level.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

• Direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
• Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
• Mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

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The MSc Chinese Herbal Medicine extends your acupuncture practice into the other of the major modalities of Chinese medicine. It is a theoretical and clinical professional entry-training. Read more
The MSc Chinese Herbal Medicine extends your acupuncture practice into the other of the major modalities of Chinese medicine. It is a theoretical and clinical professional entry-training. You will develop your diagnostic and case formulation skills and also learn the materia medica and formulae of Chinese herbal medicine. Phytochemistry and pharmacokinetics are integrated into the understanding of the energetic interactions of herbs. Extensive practice with patients will take place in our on-site teaching clinic where theory is deconstructed and applied. Working in the dispensary with raw herbs will develop your kinaesthetic skills to deepen understanding. The aim is that you learn how to modify classic formulae to create new formulae which address complex patterns of illness.

This course contextualises Chinese medicine within its historical roots, and grounds it in the legal, ethical and inter-professional framework of the UK.

Course content

"The University of Westminster MSc CHM is accredited (approved) by the European Herbal and Traditional Medicine Practitioners Association which accredits courses on behalf of all EHTPA Professional Associations, including the Register of Chinese Herbal Medicine. This enables graduates from the MSc CHM to apply for membership of the RCHM. The EHTPA system of accreditation was endorsed by, and included in, the initial Steering Group Report to Government which recommended that a statutory register for herbal medicine practitioners be established".

Modules

The following modules are indicative of what you will study on this course.
-Chinese Herbal Medicine Clinical Practice
-Chinese Herbal Medicine in the UK
-Chinese Herbs and Formulae
-Formulas and Strategies
-Postgraduate Research Methods
-The Classics: Shang Han Lun and Wen Bing

Associated careers

This course is designed for acupuncturists who want to extend their practice repertoire to include herbal medicine, or for Chinese herbal medicine practitioners who wish to upgrade their academic skills to Masters level. Individual modules can be taken as consuming professional development (CPD)

Professional recognition

The course is accredited by the European Herbal and Traditional Medicine Practitioners Association. This enables graduates to apply for membership of the Register of Chinese Herbal Medicine.

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This one-year programme is intended for graduates of Chinese Studies programmes and native Chinese speakers who wish to gain further understanding and develop expertise in a range of subjects concerned with Chinese health and wellbeing and the impact of China, historically and in the present day, on health around the world. Read more
This one-year programme is intended for graduates of Chinese Studies programmes and native Chinese speakers who wish to gain further understanding and develop expertise in a range of subjects concerned with Chinese health and wellbeing and the impact of China, historically and in the present day, on health around the world.

Degree information

This MA offers an interdisciplinary approach to health in China including history of medicine in China, population studies, the built and natural environment, climate change, law and medical ethics, public health and policy making. Intensive training in academic English and translation for publication online is provided.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of one core course (15 credits), direct reading and translation modules (60 credits), dissertation (60 credits) and two or three options or elective modules (45 credits).

Core modules
-An Interdisciplinary Approach to China: Health and Humanity
-Translation and Direct Reading
-Dissertation (see below)

Optional modules
-History of Chinese Medicine I: the Classical World and its Legacy
-History of Chinese Medicine II: from Song Public Health to the Chinese Medical Diaspora
-Chinese Health and Heritage
-Chinese Law and Health
-Chinese Film and the Body
-Chinese Nutrition: History, Culture and Society
-Elective Modules within SOAS, Institute of Global Health, and Anthropology
-Suitable elective module from other departments at UCL

NB: Not all options will be available every year.

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of up to 12,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is taught by specialists in the field and is delivered through a combination of lectures, tutorials, seminars, presentations, workshops and direct reading. Assessment is through examination, presentations, essays and the dissertation.

Careers

This programme aims to train the next generation of professionals in the interdisciplinary approaches and skills necessary for understanding and improving population and individual health in China and internationally. It will be invaluable for all those intending to work in professions with an interest in Chinese health including: health systems and reform, the health environment, integrated health, in NGOs and multilateral organisations as policymakers, administrators, and workers in the field. It will also prepare students to work in art and media where Chinese health issues are concerned.

Employability
Graduates from the MA will be well prepared to take advantage of job opportunities that are also available to graduates from the Institute of Global Health and Anthropology, but with the added advantage of an expertise in China: health administration policy and consultancy, health law, in bilateral and multiliteral organisations, NGOs, built and natural environment, climate change, health research in China and the UK. The programme also aims to create new expertise on China's health culture that will open up job opportunities as China begins a rapid programme of developing private health-care partnerships.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL History enjoys an outstanding international reputation for its research and teaching.

The department is strongly committed to the intellectual development of all our students; if you come to UCL, you will receive individual supervision from leading academics.

Located in Bloomsbury, UCL History is just a few minutes' walk away from the exceptional resources of the British Library, the British Museum and the research institutes of the University of London, including the Warburg and the Institute of Historical Research.

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Health humanities seeks novel ways of understanding health and illness in society, and how methods from the humanities and social studies may be brought to bear on biomedicine, clinical practice, and the politics of healthcare. Read more
Health humanities seeks novel ways of understanding health and illness in society, and how methods from the humanities and social studies may be brought to bear on biomedicine, clinical practice, and the politics of healthcare. Experiences and portrayals of health and illness in literature, film and contemporary culture are also studied.

Degree information

The programme enables students to approach issues relating to health and illness from both a historical and contemporary perspective and from a variety of a disciplines, including anthropology, history, philosophy, sociology, science and technology studies, global health, literature and film studies. Students will also learn to work in an interdisciplinary manner.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (60 credits), elective modules of 15 or 30 credits each (up to a total of 60 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits). A Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits), two core modules (60 credits) and two electives (60 credits) is also offered. A Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits), two core modules is also offered.

Core modules
-Illness
-Madness

Optional modules - students may choose from the list of recommended modules below, or other relevant modules in UCL, with the approval of the convenors.
-Anthropology and Psychiatry
-Classical Chinese Medicine
-Clinically Applied Cultural Psychiatry
-Conflict, Humanitarianism and Health
-Cultural Memory
-Death, Dying and Consequences
-Disease in History
-German Literature and Psychology
-Global Health and Development: Emerging Policy Debates
-Global Justice and Health
-Health Inequalities Over the Lifecourse
-Health Policy and Reform
-Medical Anthropology
-Medieval Science and Medicine in Global Perspective
-Science, Technology, and Identity
-Social Value and Public Policy, Health and the Environment
-From Imperial Medicine to Global Health, 1860s to present
-Medicine on Screen

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000-12,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures and seminars. Assessment is through essays and a dissertation. There is no unseen examination.

Careers

This MA provides an exceptional foundation for those hoping to undertake PhD research and pursue an academic career, ranging from interdisciplinary work in the health humanities to a broad spectrum of more specialised disciplines, such as medicine, the philosophy of medicine, history of medicine, medical sociology or medical anthropology, among others. It is also a suitable preparation for a range of careers including science and medical journalism, bioethics, healthcare policy, NGOs and museum and heritage.

Employability
The programme gives students the opportunities to work in an interdisciplinary manner, and to engage in debate and develop their presentation skills. Students will gain experience of writing essays and training in conducting original research and applying the appropriate methodology. There are many additional activities available, both within the UCl Health Humanities Centre and the Institute of Advanced Studies, and the wider UCL community, to help students develop employability skills.

Why study this degree at UCL?

Health Humanities MA is based in UCL's new Health Humanities Centre which draws together world-leading researchers from different disciplines including medicine and health in history, philosophy, sociology, anthropology, and cultural and film studies.

Leading clinicians at UCL's acclaimed Medical School and Division of Psychiatry, who are engaged in humanities and social science research, are also actively involved with the centre. The centre was formed through the merger of the Centre for Philosophy, Justice and Health and the Centre for the History of Psychological Disciplines.

UCL Health Humanities Centre forms part of the new UCL Institute of Advanced Studies, which showcases and fosters multidisciplinary research within the humanities and the social sciences, with an active programme of events and visiting international scholars.

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The Graduate Certificate in Integrative Health is designed for health care professionals desiring graduate study of evidenced-based, integrated approaches to health promotion, disease prevention, and treatment. Read more
The Graduate Certificate in Integrative Health is designed for health care professionals desiring graduate study of evidenced-based, integrated approaches to health promotion, disease prevention, and treatment.  An accelerated format is available for many of the courses, so that the Certificate can be earned in three semesters or less.  Students without adequate preparation in disease etiology are strongly advised to take    HEA 500 Diseases. Those desiring advanced study in a particular integrative health area may elect, under advisement, HEA 609 Independent Study; while those desiring a clinical field experience may elect HEA 611 Field Placement, also under advisement.

To address the diverse needs of students, three options for earning the Certificate are offered:

1. Joint program leading to the Master of Public Health degree plus the Graduate Certificate in Integrative Health.
2. Evidence-based study in integrative health.
3. Integrative health coaching.

Curriculum

Below are the curricula for each option.

1. Joint MPH/Certificate in Integrative Health (45 credits)

Certificate Courses  (21 credits):

• HEA 501 Integrative Health
• HEA 538 Evaluation of Health Programs
• HEA 539 Health Promotion Program Planning
• HEA 550 Evidence-Based Medicine and Public Health
Three elective courses selected under advisement.*

MPH Courses (24 credits):

• HEA 520 Public Health Epidemiology
• HEA 526 Biostatistics for Public Health
• HEA 630 Health Care Administration
• HEA 632 Advanced Theories of Health Behavior
• HEA 648 Research Methods
• ENV 530 General Environmental Health
• HEA 649 Applied Learning Experience I
• HEA 650 Applied Learning Experience II

2.  Evidence-based study in Integrative Health (21 credits)

• HEA 501 Integrative Health
Six elective courses selected under advisement*

3. Integrative Health Coaching (21 credits)
             
• HEA 501 Integrative Health
• HEA 545 Mind/Body Medicine
• ENV 530 Environmental Health
• NTD 515 Public Health Nutrition
• KIN 615 Special Topics in Kinesiology
• HEA 610 Integrative Health Coaching
• HEA 611 Field Placement

*Suggested electives include but are not limited to:
 
• HEA 500 Diseases
• HEA 510 Adolescent Medicine
• HEA 511 Stress Management Techniques
• HEA 512 AIDS and Public Health
• HEA 543 Transcultural Health Practice
• HEA 545 Mind/Body Medicine
• HEA 547 Principles of Botanical Medicine
• HEA 581 Special Topics:  Traditional Chinese Medicine
• HEA 581 Special Topics:  Homeopathy
• NTD 581 Perspectives on Obesity
• NTD 515 Public Health Nutrition
• HEA 609 Independent Study
• HEA 611 Field Placement

Please visit the website for descriptions of these modules:

https://wcupa.edu/HealthSciences/health/courses-ipm.asp

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- check at. http://www.unipd.it/en/biotecnologie-alimentazione. http://www.unipd.it/en/how-apply. Instructions in English. http://www.unipd.it/en/educational-offer/second-cycle-degrees/school-of-agricultural-sciences-and-veterinary-medicine?ordinamento2011&keyIF0362. Read more

Admission Notice now available

- check at
http://www.unipd.it/en/biotecnologie-alimentazione
http://www.unipd.it/en/how-apply

Instructions in English:
http://www.unipd.it/en/educational-offer/second-cycle-degrees/school-of-agricultural-sciences-and-veterinary-medicine?ordinamento=2011&key=IF0362
.

Biotechnologies for Food Science

In the 2016-2017 academic year, the University of Padova inaugurated a new curriculum of the Master Degree “Biotechnology applied to Food Security and Nutrition” (Second Cycle Degree) entitled “Biotechnologies for Food Science " to be entirely taught in English.
The “Biotechnologies for Food Science " Master degree (MSc) is an interdisciplinary and research-oriented Master of Science Programme and explores how to produce healthier and safer food following a cross-cutting, farm/field-to-fork approach. It is focused on the application of advanced biotechnologies in food production and safety and it is the ideal trait-d’union between the requests of consumers, of producers in the agro-food sector and research applied to production and food-safety.
The course has a strong component on cutting-edge methods, such as genomics, bioinformatics, proteomics, metabolomics, nanotechnologies, all in the context of animal and crop production as well as food quality and safety. Theoretical lessons are mixed with practical training, offering hands-on experience in advanced DNA, RNA, and protein analysis together with substantial lab sessions in bioinformatics. Lectures will deal with food production, hygiene and quality, molecular methods of agro-food analyses, effects of agro-biotech products on human beings and environments. Moreover environmental stresses, disease mechanisms, pathogens and pests will be treated as essential to understand how to protect crop and farm animals and how food might impact on human health: the lectures move across animal infectious disease, immunology, microbiology, plant pests and pathogens as well as abiotic stresses to show how biotechnology might help preventing disease and improve food production. As consumers are increasingly worried about the presence of contaminants in food and on the real origin of what they eat; the Programme includes a course in food toxicology and regulation, and one on traceability for food authentication.
Our Programme is based at the Agripolis campus, where are located four departments of the School of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine of the University of Padova, all of which contribute to the MSc course, offering the best opportunities for a rich, cross-disciplinary experience in a highly qualified scientific environment.

Who is the MSc candidate?

This programme is open to Italian and foreign students from the EU and abroad, interested in learning and implementing effective value-added practices for the production of high-quality food products both in the EU and in international markets. English knowledge must be minimum at B2 level (CEFR). Applying students might possibly have a three-year Bachelor’s degree in a field connected with the Master’s curriculum. Good background in molecular biology, biochemistry, and microbiology is requested.

How is the programme organised?

Biotechnologies for Food Science is a 2-year Master programme (120 ECTS, equivalent to a Master of Science). Requirements for graduation include courses and preparation and defense of the Master thesis. Students will be encouraged to spend a period of their studies abroad, through Erasmus+ or other local programmes and agreements. Financial support to meet part of the cost for thesis work is granted to best students.
Visit the MSc “Biotechnologies for Food Science” page on the Università di Padova web-site (http://www.unipd.it/en/biotecnologie-alimentazione) for more details.

Teaching methods

Teaching takes place in an international environment and includes lectures and laboratory activities, practical exercises and seminars by experts; opportunities for intensive tutoring and for master thesis-related stages of at least six months duration will be available with outstanding companies in the sector of the food industry or with other relevant organisations in the private or public sphere. The Programme assists students to find suitable internship opportunities with qualified laboratories in Italy and abroad.
Examinations are written or oral and assess students’ participation also through reports, presentations, and group work.

Course structure

During the two-years MSc course students attend the following 12 course units

Applied genomics for animal and crop improvement
Applied Bionformatics
Food Microbiology and Food Microbial Biotechnology
Molecular basis of disease, immunology, and transmissible diseases
Laboratory of advanced DNA, RNA, and protein analysis
Biotechnology for crop production
Epidemiology and risk analysis
Traceability tools for species authentication  
Advanced technologies for the agrifood sector (nanotechnologies, proteomics, metabolomics)
Biotechnology for plant protection
Food toxicology and food regulation
Foreign language (English)

First year
During the first year of the programme the student will acquire knowledge on animal and crop genomics, focusing on the most advanced methods for high throughput genomic analysis (transcriptomics, genome-wide SNP analysis, epigenomics) and on the most recent approaches for selective breeding (genomic selection, genomic prediction). In parallel, the student will learn how bioinformatics tools might be applied to manage large sets of data, how biological data bases are organized and how to link different types of data. Extensive practical training in bioinformatics will be offered with various sessions in a dedicated lab. Food-borne pathogens and the positive role of microorganisms in food processes will be examined in an integrated microbiology course, while the molecular basis of pathology, host-response to infection, epidemiology, and diagnostics of transmissible diseases will form the basis of two courses. A course on biotechnology for crop production will introduce the molecular and physiological basis of crop production. Biotechnological approaches to improve crop yield, with particular attention to fruit production, and to reduce impact of abiotic stresses will examined. Molecular tools for food traceability and an intensive practical lab in DNA/RNA/protein analysis applied to food control will conclude the first year.

Second year
In the second year, the first semester have three courses. One will focus on novel technologies (proteomics, metabolomics, nanotechnology) and their application to food production. A second one will extend knowledge on plant biotechnology exploring advanced technologies for crop disease and pest management. A third one will deal with contaminants in food and food legislation. The second semester is completely dedicated to lab internship. It is possible to join a research lab in the campus or to have a working stage in the private sector.
link to the Campus descriptions:
http://youtu.be/gR4qcWUXvGg

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A member of CIUTI, this vocational course is designed specifically for starting or advancing a career in translation, and covers specialist translation areas including law, politics, medicine, business, IT, media, subtitling and localisation. Read more
A member of CIUTI, this vocational course is designed specifically for starting or advancing a career in translation, and covers specialist translation areas including law, politics, medicine, business, IT, media, subtitling and localisation.

It also includes work placement opportunities to give you a career headstart.

More about this course

The MA Translation is a member of the Conférence Internationale Permanente d'Instituts Universitaires de Traducteurs et Interprètes (CIUTI) - an international association of universities and institutes with translation and interpretation programmes.

Designed specifically for starting or advancing a career in translation, the course is open to qualified graduates and translators seeking a professional qualification in specialised translation to enhance their career.

The programme aims to equip students with the required knowledge and skills to succeed in the industry, where the need for qualified translators able to communicate complex, specialised material has never been greater. The course has a vocational emphasis on specialist translation, focusing on areas such as law, politics, medicine, business, IT media, subtitling and website and software localisation and translation of institutional documents.

You will have the opportunity to translate using the following languages paired with English (translating into mother language): Arabic, Chinese (Mandarin), Dutch, French, German, Greek, Italian, Japanese, Polish, Portuguese, Russian, and Spanish.

One of the strong features of the course is the work placement with reliable employers in the translation industry. The course also benefits from strong links with international organisations (EU and UN).

Here's a selection of translation technology software used in our courses:
-SDL Trados Studio
-SDL MultiTerm
-Wordfast Anywhere
-Crowdin - Localization Management Platform
-Memsource - The Translation Platform

Students are assessed via a variety of methods including translations, commentaries, essays, portfolios, work placement report and the MA dissertation.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2016/17 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:
-Characteristics of Specialised Texts (core, 20 credits)
-Independent Research Project (core, 30 credits)
-Independent Translation Project (core, 30 credits)
-The Translator and the Specialised Text (core, 20 credits)
-The Translator and the Translation Process (core, 20 credits)
-Translation Tools and the Translator (core, 20 credits)
-Work Placement (core, 20 credits)
-Subtitling (option, 20 credits)
-Translating for International Organisations (option, 20 credits)
-Website and Software Localisation (option, 20 credits)

After the course

This course is an excellent preparation for career opportunities in translation agencies, EU and international institutions, multinational companies, news corporations, government bodies or work on freelance basis.

A substantial built-in part of the course is the work placement, which is an opportunity to gain hands-on professional experience with one of the many translation service providers in the UK and, whenever possible, with the UN and the EU. These placements may lead to longer-term work opportunities for our graduates.

Some of our students also go on to further advanced study (PhD).

Moving to one campus

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2017. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

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Prestigious Scottish Funding Council Awards are available to high calibre applicants for this programme. The SFC has selected this programme in recognition of the high demand for students with these qualifications. Read more
Prestigious Scottish Funding Council Awards are available to high calibre applicants for this programme. The SFC has selected this programme in recognition of the high demand for students with these qualifications. The awards cover all tuition costs; for further information, please see: http://www.glasgow.ac.uk/postgraduate/funded/

This Masters introduces you to the study of the history of collecting, as it has been pursued by individuals and by civic, educational or national institutions. It examines cultures of collecting and various modalities for the presentation of collections as developed in Asia, Europe, and more specifically Britain, from the late 18th century onwards through to the present. You will consider a range of theoretical and ethical issues as well as financial and societal mechanisms, which have informed collecting practices historically and that continue to do so. You will explore methodological approaches and core concepts, such as connoisseurship, taste and professionalisation, and consider how international travel, the trajectory of the art market and other types of exchange have impacted upon collecting practices.

Key facts

• MLitt: 12 months full-time; 24 months part-time
• Contact: Dr. Minna Torma:

Why Glasgow

• You will learn from world-leading researchers and develop expert knowledge in this specialised area within History of Art.
• Glasgow’s civic and university collections are some of the richest and most diverse in Europe and are of international standing. The University’s own Hunterian Museum and Art Gallery is the oldest public museum in Scotland and has extensive holdings covering fine art, geology, anatomy and the history of medicine.
• Our research forum provides you with a lively and stimulating introduction to methodological debates within art history. It provides a sense of art history’s own history as well as contemporary concerns and practice, examining the beliefs and values that have informed various forms of historical and visual analysis and enquiry. It is focused around a series of seminars or workshops run by members of staff and visiting academics.

You will take five core courses and one optional course and complete a dissertation 15,000 words in length (including footnotes but excluding bibliography) which will be on a topic chosen in consultation with the tutors and the programme convenor. You will also have the opportunity to take part in a field trip.

Core courses

• Research methods in practice
• Cultures of collecting
• Collecting East Asian art
• Collecting landscapes

Optional courses

• Patterns of collecting Chinese art
• Economies of collecting contemporary art

And then you may choose
• a Humanities Advanced Technology and Information Institute (HATII) course: 2D Digitisation (Theory and Practice)
• a course from elsewhere in the College of Arts, subject to the approval of the programme convenor.

Or from these options offered by History of Art
• Independent study
• Hunterian placement
• Work placement

Background

This programme introduces you to the study of the history of collecting, as it has been pursued by individuals and by civic, educational or national institutions. It examines cultures of collecting and various modalities for the presentation of collections as developed in Europe, Asia, North America and more specifically Britain, from the late 18th century through to the present. You will consider a range of theoretical and ethical issues alongside cultural, financial and societal mechanisms that have informed collecting practices historically and which continue to do so. You will also have the opportunity to explore a range of different collections from the encyclopaedic to the concise, and to question their context and strategies of presentation and their circulation through loan.

Themes of the programme include:
• How collections have been framed by: questions of subjectivity; by the emergence of nation states or the pursuit of empire; by the emergence of exchange and circulation mechanisms such as the market; and by broader societal processes informing the collecting practices of institutions and individuals
• The significance of a range of factors to collections and their histories, including: connoisseurship, taste and travel, the operations of the market, patterns of exchange, the professionalization of the curator, specialisation of knowledge, civil society and benefactors

Through its courses and the work placements it offers, the programme seeks to offer you sustained engagement and contact with collections in context. Teaching is based partly in the classroom and partly in collections, and the University’s own Hunterian collections provide a consistent point of departure and contextualisation for the students. The programme makes use of public and private collections accessible in Glasgow, Edinburgh, Dundee and further afield in Scotland.

The programme includes a field trip to Newcastle and the Northeast.

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This MSc programme combines knowledge of the engineering and medical sciences with advances in technology and practice to generate applications and solutions to clinically relevant problems. Read more

Why this course?

This MSc programme combines knowledge of the engineering and medical sciences with advances in technology and practice to generate applications and solutions to clinically relevant problems.

It affords a Masters level degree in this clinical area, while considering globally the effects of disability within a population and society’s approaches globally.

This is one of the few programmes globally that offers a specific degree in prosthetics and orthotics. The National Centre for Prosthetics and Orthotics (NCPO) has an international reputation for quality education within this field. The staff of the NCPO is involved in research and clinical practice both nationally and internationally.

The main aim of the course is to produce postgraduates capable of developing careers in allied health professionals and biomedical engineering (research, industrial and NHS).

We require candidates first degree to be in Prosthetics & Orthotics. Our learning environment brings together ideas and concepts from science, medicine and engineering to enable the development of relevant clinical and industrial research.

What you'll study

Taught classes, laboratory demonstrations, practical exercises and clinical visits take place during semesters 1 and 2. Diploma students then complete a project dissertation and MSc students complete a research or development project reported by a thesis.

Work placement

Visits to local clinical centres and lectures from industrialists and visiting experts from the UK and overseas are an integral part of our courses.

You'll also have the opportunity to meet our many industrial and clinical collaborators to help advise and further your career.

Major projects

You'll undertake a clinically relevant project in the rehabilitation area of prosthetics and/or orthotics.

Facilities

The Department of Biomedical Engineering consists of the Bioengineering Unit and the National Centre for Prosthetics and Orthotics – two complementary and key areas of health technology teaching and research within the University.

The National Centre for Prosthetics and Orthotics was established in 1972, growing out of the Bioengineering Unit at the University of Strathclyde, which was established more than 50 years ago, both being internationally-recognised centres of excellence for education and research at the interface of engineering and the medical science, with particular emphasis on clinically-related teaching and research. The new department of Biomedical Engineering in 2012 was formed through the merger of these two esteemed units.

Research areas include:

Rehabilitation Engineering
Medical Devices
Diagnostic Technologies: the Foot in Diabetes

The department also hosts the Centre for Doctoral Training in Medical Devices and Health Technologies, the Strathclyde Institute of Medical Devices and the Centre for Excellence in Rehabilitation Research.

In addition the department is a major partner in the Glasgow Research Partnership in Engineering; Health Technologies Knowledge Transfer Network; and Glasgow Health Technology Cooperative.

Guest lectures

This programme will include internationally recognised lecturers from the World Health Organisation and large NGOs globally which may include Handicap International and the international Committee for the Red Cross.

Fees and funding

Scotland/EU/Rest of UK: Any UK practicing Orthotist wishing to undertake this Masters programme will be eligible to apply for funding from the Orthotic Education and Training Trust OETT, and would be considered for funding up to a maximum or 67%.

International: £19,100

International Excellence Awards: Biomedical Engineering is pleased to offer these prestigious competitive scholarships to four full-time international applicants to the MSc Biomedical Engineering. Recipients will be awarded up to £4,000 towards their fees. The recipients will be notified before the beginning of term.

The China-Scotland Friendship Award: This award of £4,000 towards tuition fees is offered to a Chinese applicant of outstanding ability. The recipient will be notified before the beginning of term.

Biomedical Engineering Celebration Awards for India: These awards of £6,000 towards tuition fees are open to well-qualified applicants from India joining the one-year full-time MSc Biomedical Engineering. The final submission date for applications is 29 May 2015. Applicants will be advised of the outcome in June 2015.

Biomedical Engineering Malaysia Award: This competitive award of £4,000 towards tuition fees is offered each year to one very well-qualified Malaysian applicant to the MSc Biomedical Engineering. The recipient will be notified before the beginning of term.

Home applicants: Home applicants may apply for a Postgraduate Student Awards Agency for Scotland (PSAS) loan which covers the cost of tuition fees on specific eligible courses.

Scottish students: Students living in Scotland can find out more about funding from the Student Awards Agency Scotland.

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