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Masters Degrees (Children's Rights)

We have 66 Masters Degrees (Children's Rights)

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The MSc Children's Rights is part of a suite of programmes in childhood studies. Read more
The MSc Children's Rights is part of a suite of programmes in childhood studies. It meets the increasing demand for a postgraduate qualification in Children's Rights, explicitly focused on interdisciplinary research and child rights-based research methods, delivered flexibly through a blended format of online and face-to-face learning.

The aim of the MSc Children's Rights is to provide high-level knowledge and skills in children's rights law and practice of value to those working with and for children, including public officials and NGOs as well as educators, social workers and health care providers.

The programme is linked to the Centre for Children’s Rights, an innovative inter-disciplinary centre with an international reputation for advancing understanding of children’s rights, promoting children’s participation and developing children’s rights-based research methods. This new and unique MSc incorportates the Centre's expertise and will develop students’ knowledge and skills in two distinct but interconnected areas:

- Children’s Rights - using the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child and other relevant international standards to evaluate the laws, policies and practices which affect children.
- Research with Children - evaluating the best methods of conducting research into children’s lives with a particular focus on approaches which involve children actively in the research process. The CCR has a particular expertise in relation to children’s rights-based research.

The MSc in Children’s Rights will provide students with a thorough grounding in these two areas and the opportunity to explore a range of contexts in which these perspectives can be used to better understand children’s lives and secure improved outcomes for children. Professionals will have the opportunity to improve aspects of their practice and career development.

The Centre for Children’s Rights has extensive links with Northern Ireland charities and NGOs and can provide some opportunities for students to undertake relevant research. This may be of particular interest to students seeking to gain experience in the children’s sector, perhaps to secure a job or to change position. The Centre has a vibrant community of students undertaking PhD research in a range of issues and in several countries. The MSc in Children’s Rights will provide a good foundation for students wishing to pursue their own research through doctoral study.

Why Choose Children's Rights at Queen's?

◦As a prestigious Russell Group University, Queen’s is ranked 8th within the UK in relation to research intensity;
◦Education at Queen’s has been ranked 4th within the UK in relation to research intensity with 87% of the research undertaken within the School assessed as ‘internationally excellent or world leading’ (REF, 2014);
◦The programme features input from leading international children’s rights scholars;
◦There will be some opportunities available to develop advanced workplace skills by collaborating with community organisations to undertake research to help them improve their services for children and young people;
◦The programme incorporates the Centre for Children's Rights expertise in interdisciplinary work and rights-based approaches to research methods. This will empower students to undertake research with children and young people in a range of contexts;
◦The programme is part of an innovative university wide initiative ‘Improving Children’s Lives’ which will give students access to interdisciplinary research and education which aim to improve the quality of life for children in Northern Ireland and beyond;
◦The interdisciplinary nature of the programme reflects the real-life practices of many child-related services;
◦If you don’t want, or need, to study for the research dissertation, flexible exit awards are available (PG Diploma/ PG Certificate);
◦You may also undertake individual course modules without completing a full degree.

“The best thing about studying children’s rights at Queen’s is that it provides you with the opportunity to reflect on your professional practice with academics who are leaders in their field. This has equipped me to return to my workplace and be a better informed and more analytical practitioner. I have taken the learning from this course and applied it directly into my professional practice with positive outcomes for service users and colleagues. It is the sort of training that has given me the confidence and skills to go further and make a real difference." Gerry Marshall (Children’s Services Inspector)

Programme Content

The award of MSc requires the accumulation of 120 credit points from the taught modules and a 15,000-20,000 word dissertation, equivalent to 60 credit points. Modules include:

Core modules

Childhood and Youth Research in Practice
Children's Rights
Children's Rights-Based Research Methods
Perspectives on Childhood and Youth
Research Methods

Optional modules

Childhood Adversity
Children's Rights and Disability
Children's Rights and Education
Children's Rights and Health
Children's Rights and Social Care
Children's Rights; Philosophical Approaches
Qualitative Research in Childhood and Youth
Quantitative Research in Childhood and Youth

Assessment

Modules are assessed by a variety of methods eg multiple choice exam, essays, project reports, and contributions to an online forum. Students will have the option of undertaking research work for external organisations to submit as part of their dissertation.

Opportunities for Careers

There is increasing demand for postgraduates with high-level skills in interdisciplinary research, participatory research methods and knowledge of children's rights.

Professionals within children/human rights-focused NGOs, public officials, educators, social workers and health professionals who work with children should find this degree beneficial.

Special Features

Flexibility: this programme is designed to meet the needs of local and international professionals and is delivered via blended and online learning.

Choice: there are several entry and exit points to this programme, please see School website.

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What are the rights of the child when it comes to forced marriages or protection against violence or exploitation? Which rights do refugee children have in their host communities? And how can children’s rights be legally enforced in various countries across the globe?. Read more

What are the rights of the child when it comes to forced marriages or protection against violence or exploitation? Which rights do refugee children have in their host communities? And how can children’s rights be legally enforced in various countries across the globe?

What does this master’s programme entail?

Advanced Studies in International Children’s Rights provides in-depth specialisation and teaches you to respond to the increasing international, regional and national legal developments in relation to children. During the programme, you will address highly topical and global issues related to children and their human rights. You will also take a theoretical, legal and practical approach to exploring various fields, including:

  • child and family
  • migration
  • juvenile justice
  • digital technologies

During this programme, you will learn to:

  • look at international children’s rights from a comparative perspective
  • explore the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, as well as major regional legal instruments concerning the rights and status of children
  • assess the impact of international children’s rights on domestic jurisdiction
  • address the most significant challenges with regard to children’s rights implementation
  • analyse the complex roles of the different actors (children, parents, state and non-state actors), and their interrelation in various legal contexts
  • critically reflect on the potential and limitations of international and regional standards for the legal protection of children

Reasons to choose International Children’s Rights at Leiden University?

  1. Only one in the world: The programme prides itself as being the only programme in the world offering a legal degree (LL.M.) on international children’s rights.
  2. Excellent reputation: The Department of Child Law at Leiden Law School enjoys a strong international reputation for its high-quality education and research.
  3. Expert instructors: The academic staff members are renowned legal experts in children’s rights. You will also interact with prominent guest lecturers from international organisations, including the UN Committee on the Rights of the Child.

More reasons to study International Children’s Rights at Leiden.

Is International Children’s Rights the right programme for you?

Are you interested in learning how to promote and protect the rights of children around the world? This programme will provide the specialist knowledge and professional skills you need to effectively protect the rights of children worldwide.

To be a good fit for this programme, one of the following should apply:

  • you are a legal professional
  • you have a full law degree (offering access to legal practice) or
  • you have a degree at an equivalent level in another discipline, with a sufficient background in or understanding of law


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The Sociology of Childhood and Children's Rights MA will introduce students to a range of contemporary social theories about childhood and children's rights, critically explore social constructions of childhood, and consider the implications these have for professional practice and research with children and young people. Read more
The Sociology of Childhood and Children's Rights MA will introduce students to a range of contemporary social theories about childhood and children's rights, critically explore social constructions of childhood, and consider the implications these have for professional practice and research with children and young people.

Degree information

This programme provides students with the opportunity to gain an understanding of sociological theories and concepts of childhood and children’s rights, including a recognition of the varied childhoods experienced by children in richer and poorer contexts and how these are shifting in a globalising world. It also helps students develop their critical analytical skills and improve their theoretical understanding and professional practice when working with, and for, children.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of three core modules (90 credits), one optional module (30 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

Core modules
-Children's Rights in Practice
-Social Theory
-Theories of Childhood and Society

Optional modules
-Researching Childhood*
-Understanding Research

*recommended

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 20,000 words.

Teaching and learning
Taught modules run in the evenings and/or over a one-week intensive block. Teaching is delivered face-to-face and through lectures, discussions and debates, and analysis of readings, images, and films. In addition there are tutorials for essays and dissertation preparation. Participants are encouraged to reflect upon their own experiences and backgrounds in teaching sessions. Each core module is assessed by 5,000-word written assignments.

Careers

Graduates of this programme are currently working across a broad range of areas. Some are working as international NGO staff, children's charity workers, child advocacy workers and policy advisors. Graduates are also working as teachers and early years practitioners, while others have jobs as university and college lecturers and researchers.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Project Worker, Barnado's
-Research Advocacy Officer, Approach Ltd

Why study this degree at UCL?

This MA explores cutting-edge research and theorising about young people's experiences and their social status in varied global contexts. It is unique in its sociological attention to childhood, children's rights, and children and young people's participation in society.

Students are introduced to internationally-renowned academic experts and international children's organisations and have the opportunity to explore their own areas of interest or professional practice.

The MA is based in UCL Social Science which houses three prestigious, research intensive units. Together they provide a foundation for world-leading work in childhood studies, social work, social pedagogy, families and health-related studies with a strong professional dimension.

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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Human Rights at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Human Rights at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

Environmental changes, ageing populations, the media and new technologies, asylum and migration, intergenerational justice, complex multilevel governance arrangements, the impact of trade and investment, poverty and inequalities, the rise of identity politics and the changing nature of the personal sphere are contemporary global challenges facing human rights calling into question the fundamental tenets of human rights law both in terms of its formulation and implementation through policy development and law-making.

Differentiated from existing LLMs, the LLM Human Rights explicitly focuses on these contemporary challenges and how best to respond to them though law, policy and practice. The Human Rights programme draws on the research strengths in the College of Law and Criminology, but also from other colleges, in its teaching; and, exploits strong relationships with external partners to integrate a distinctive applied focus to the Human Rights programme.

Key Features

Students pursuing the LLM Human Rights will benefit from a programme designed around high calibre research and impact in human rights. Human Rights students will also benefit from academics' strong relationships with external partners working in the field of human rights, giving the programme a distinctive approach centred on the implementation and application of human rights.

The focus on implementation and practice in human rights is complemented by a multidisciplinary approach. Human rights policy and practice often do not recognise disciplinary divides. The Human Rights programme allows students to experience teaching from other disciplines to enhance their knowledge and understanding of human rights as an integrated project (e.g. politics and international development).

Uniquely the Human Rights programme addresses diverse challenges in human rights faced by law and policy, and by practitioners at the global, regional, State and sub-State levels. The approach focuses on how these challenges might be effectively managed through law and policy. The Human Rights programme offers:

- The opportunity and choice to address a range of human rights topics and challenges across a number of thematic areas, with teaching by expert researchers in the field.

- A multidisciplinary approach reflecting the reality of human rights in practice.

- A practical and practice focused philosophy.

Modules

The LLM Human Rights is a modular programme, with students required to accumulate 180 credits to graduate. In appropriate circumstances a student may graduate with a merit or distinction. Each programme is divided into two parts:

Part I consists of 3 taught modules, each 20 credits. Students will be required to undertake 2 compulsory modules, these are: International Human Rights Law and Human Rights and Humanitarian Intervention. Students are also required to select 1 further optional 20 credit taught module from a range of available modules (see below for examples optional modules).

Part II gives students a choice of 3 optional modules, each 20 credits, from a range of available modules (see below for examples optional modules).

Students of LLM in Human Rights are also required to undertake a dissertation, which contributes 60 credits.

The following are examples of modules offered to Human Rights students (modules available for selection will be dependent on contingencies, e.g. whether a module leader is in study leave).

Human Rights and Environment, Climate Change and Sustainability

Trade, Investment and Human Rights

Human Rights and the Media

Human Rights and Family Law

Human Rights and Identities

Accountability for Human Rights Implementation

Impact Assessment and Human Rights

Children’s Human Rights

Human Rights and Poverty

Human Rights, Migration and Human Trafficking

Human Rights and Criminal Justice

Human Rights and Terrorism on-line

Human Rights and Medical Law

Human Rights and Employment

Extra-curricular Activities

Throughout their studies Human Rights students are provided with the opportunity to take part in a number of extra-curricular activities to enhance their practical understanding of human rights. These include:

Guest lectures by expert practitioners in human rights.

Workplace learning through voluntary work and/or placement.

Involvement in collaborative research projects with research partners.

Engagement with the College’s projects focussed on practical implementation and impact from research (e.g. Cyberterrorism Project, Wales Observatory, Centre for Environment, and the Sex Work Consortium).

Careers and Employability

The LLM Human Rights will open the door to a range of careers, including:

- Human rights institutions: increasingly international and regional human rights institutions are seeking to support, monitor and influence State policy and social arrangements. Potential graduate destinations include: the United Nations and the Council of Europe as well as other regional institutions.

- The public sector, including government at all levels. Potential graduate destinations include: civil service, regional, national and sub-national government, local authorities and other public bodies, and, political and policy advice work.

- The private sector: human rights are increasingly the concern of the private sector in the realm of socially responsible capitalism. Potential graduate destinations include: global business (including institutions such as the World Bank); the business sector (from large scale business such as the banking sector, to smaller concerns seeking to appeal to the ethical consumer).

- The NGO sector: non-governmental agencies are well-established stakeholders in human rights. Potential graduate destinations include: international NGOS (e.g. UNICEF); regional or local level NGOS.

- Research and academia: research on human rights is a well-established concern for academia.

The LLM Human Rights enhances student employability as:

- The Human Rights programme ranges across a broad spectrum of human rights topics relevant to law, policy and practice and encourages a practical approach in these areas.

- Students will have the opportunity to engage with projects providing opportunity for hands-on experience of human rights research as well as dissemination to support practical application.

- The Human Rights programme offers a range of work place learning opportunities.

- Entrepreneurial skills will be developed by encouraging students to contribute ideas to project work and project activities.



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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Childhood Studies at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Childhood Studies at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

This course aims to provide a multi-disciplinary approach to the study of children and childhood.

Key Features of Childhood Studies

Performance:

- strong links with a range of international networks and similar university departments in Europe and around the world

Teaching and Employability:

- excellent learning experience and cross cultural views because of international student cohorts

- opportunity to continue studies to pursue a PhD supervised by a well-qualified member of the team

- opportunity to take part in a local field trip

The course in Childhood Studies is designed for a wide range of professionals working with children.

A broad range of topics are covered and students are encouraged to critically reflect on their practice and address theory and research relevant to their own interests in Childhood Studies.

The Childhood Studies course will:

- reflect upon the nature of childhood as a concept and the way in which it comes to be construed as it is

- consider holistic child development in contemporary society

- reflect on childhood and family policy in a variety of contexts

- consider professional roles (one’s own and others) in relation to services for children and their families

- encourage critical analysis of research in relation to childhood

- encourage professional reflective practice.

Modules

Modules on the Childhood Studies course may include:

Researching Childhood

Understanding and Observing Child Development

Child Health

Children's Rights and Safeguarding Children and Young People

Perspectives on Play

Advanced Practice with Children

Therapeutic Work with Children

Childhood Illness

Childhood Nutrition and Growth

Staff Expertise

Team members are active researchers and their work is well published in Childhood Studies.

Childhood Studies students are encouraged to publish their own research – thereby demonstrating the high quality of their work.

Team members include:

Amy Brown – an expert in child health

Jill John – an expert in safeguarding and children’s rights

Pete King – an expert in child development and children’s play across children’s services.

Justine Howard – an expert in child development and play across children’s services

Zac Maunder – an expert in children’s emotional health

Postgraduate Community

The College of Human and Health Sciences has a vibrant postgraduate community with students drawn from a variety of backgrounds and nationalities. The College is known for its friendly, welcoming and supportive environment, which combined with its extensive facilities, state-of-the-art technology and superb beachside location, helps to ensure that students benefit from an exceptional student experience.

In addition, Childhood Studies students have access to a wide range of excellent facilities and equipment for realistic workplace experiences.



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Our Child Studies MA is a multidisciplinary course designed to meet the needs of professionals and graduates working or intending to work with or on behalf of children and young people. Read more

Our Child Studies MA is a multidisciplinary course designed to meet the needs of professionals and graduates working or intending to work with or on behalf of children and young people. The course is aimed at anyone in a child safeguarding role, including social workers, child and family lawyers, named or designated health practitioners, teachers, police officers and NGO staff.

Key benefits

  • The MA Child Studies is delivered by internationally renowned speakers, clinicians and academics.
  • We offer a multi-disciplinary approach to childhood issues and current policy developments.
  • You will study modules based on contemporary issues in child protection and children’s rights.
  • We provide opportunities for you to collaborate and share ideas and experiences with others from different disciplines.

Description

The Child Studies MA is a demanding course that concentrates on an academic and analytical approach to modern-day issues of childhood. The course features a range of modules that are highly relevant to those who are working or intending to work with vulnerable children. We welcome graduates from a variety of disciplines and professions including medicine, education, law, social care, psychology and sociology.

The course combines a range of required and optional modules to a value of between 180 and 190 credits. In addition to a required dissertation, you will take required modules covering Children’s Rights and Child Protection, and then choose from a wide range of relevant optional modules, such as Global Childhoods, Child Health & Development, and Psychology and Learning. 

Course purpose

Designed for professional and personal development, as well as academic. We aim to enable you to develop a multidisciplinary approach to childhood issues within the context of current policy developments. Students come from a variety of disciplines and professions including medicine, education, law, social care, psychology and sociology.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

We use lectures, seminars and group tutorials to deliver most of the modules on the course. A significant proportion of teaching on the course is delivered by expert external lecturers, both academics and practitioners. You will also be expected to undertake a significant amount of independent study. Typically, one credit equates to 10 hours of work.

The teaching contact time for each 30-credit taught Child Studies module is typically 30.5-32 hours. In addition each module will involve one hour of supervision/Q&A time. The typical teaching contact time for each 30-credit taught ‘Education’ optional module is 20 hours. Teaching sessions will usually include lectures, and teacher-led and student-led group discussions based on the main areas of study.

There are 12 hours of teaching for the internship module; this is supplemented by the support of Careers and Employability and mentoring through the internship itself. Students also complete at least 160 hours of employment. Each 30-credit taught module has 267-280 (or 288 for the internship module) hours of self-guided learning time.

For the dissertation module, you will receive 22 hours of research methods training. You may also choose to take research methods as an optional module. You will also receive six to eight hours of dissertation workshops, plus nine additional hours of individual dissertation supervision, to complement the approximately 561-563 hours of self-study.

Contact hours for optional modules taken outside of the course, may vary.

Assessment

This course is assessed by a combination of essays, reports, examinations, presentations, research proposals and case studies. Your assessment methods will be determined by your choice of optional modules. The dissertation is an extended piece of writing of 16,000 words.

Career prospects

Our graduates frequently progress to senior practitioner posts involving child-related work. Recent graduate destinations have included Anna Freud Centre, Barnardo’s, St Christopher’s residential child care services and local authority children’s services.



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The EdD is a partly taught and partly research-based Professional Doctorate in Education which has proved to be both successful and convenient for senior professionals in education and related fields. Read more
The EdD is a partly taught and partly research-based Professional Doctorate in Education which has proved to be both successful and convenient for senior professionals in education and related fields. We offer a wide range of taught modules in the areas of research methods, education policy, education management and professional development. Dissertations are supported within the specialist research centres at the School of Education including effective education, shared education, children’s rights, and autism.

Aims

On successful completion of the programme students will have made an original and independent contribution to educational knowledge in the field determined by the topic of their research dissertation study. They will, through this dissertation, demonstrate a critical evaluation of the relevant literature, a high level of competence in appropriate research methods, and the ability to communicate their results and their implications.

The EdD programme may be taken on a part-time or full-time basis. The normal period of study will be not less that three years full-time or not less than four years part-time. The aim is to allow flexibility for busy professionals, enabling you to complete the degree with minimal disruption to your professional and personal life.

The EdD comprises nine taught doctoral modules (of which four must be research modules) and a research dissertation. The research dissertation has the same level of challenge and high standards as a PhD but is approximately half the scale (40,000 words). Each module is assessed by one 5000 word assignment. The University operates a Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) Scheme which recognises relevant prior assessed and certified learning for credit purposes. This is also known as credit transfer where the credits were awarded by another Higher Education (HE) provider. Applicants who have completed a masters degree within the last 10 years that involved a substantive element of educational research methods training, including a research-based dissertation or project, may be eligible to transfer credit. Applicants for RPL should submit the RPL Application Form to the Postgraduate Administrator, 20 College Green, Belfast, BT7 1LN. Applications for RPL should be made at the same time as your online course application. The dissertation is assessed by an oral examination (a viva-voce).

There are three stages to each EdD taught module which covers a four month period. The first stage is pre-reading. The second stage is attendance for the intensive teaching, normally over a consecutive period of two and a half days. The third stage involves the completion and submission of an assignment, normally within three months of the last date of the taught module.

Research Modules

Educational Research: An Overview (compulsory)
Quantitative Research: Methods, Data and Theory (compulsory)
Qualitative Research: Methods, Data and Theory (compulsory)
The Professional as Researcher
Experimental Methods in Educational Research
Survey Methods in Education
Philosophical and Ethical Issues in Educational Research
Researching Children and Young People in Educational Settings
Narrative and Arts-based Research Approaches

Optional Modules

Education in Divided Societies: contribution to social cohesion
Assessment and Testing: Concepts and Issues
Educational Special Needs: Policy and Partnerships for Inclusion
Education and the Law
Children's Rights - Research and Practice
TESOL: Issues in Language Learning
TESOL: Discourse and Pedagogy

Find out more bout the course here: http://www.qub.ac.uk/Study/Course-Finder/PCF1718/PTCF1718/Course/DoctorateinEducationEdD.html
Find out why Queen's University is a great palce to study here: http://www.qub.ac.uk/Study/Why-Study-at-Queens/

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Recognise and champion the uniqueness of every child as you take a 'whole child' holistic approach to children, from birth to 18, and their families. Read more
Recognise and champion the uniqueness of every child as you take a 'whole child' holistic approach to children, from birth to 18, and their families. You will have the opportunity to study the theory and practice through two distinct routes Early Years or Children and Young People.

Our interdisciplinary and global approach to study and research reflects a commitment to children's rights, social justice for children, child-centred learning and developing awareness of social divisions in childhood.

The Early Years route explores young children's learning, education and care across multiple settings. The Children and Young People route focuses more closely on critically examining concepts, contexts and intervention across different spheres of childhood. Both routes emphasise children and young people as social actors with rights and entitlements, according to their particular cultural and social differences.

We're committed to children's rights, social justice for children, child-centred learning and developing awareness of social divisions in childhood, and these themes are at the heart of this course, forming the basis of your study and research.

- Research Excellence Framework 2014: twice as many of our staff - 220 - were entered into the research assessment for 2014 compared to the number entered in 2008

Visit the website http://courses.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/childhoodearlyyears_ma

Mature Applicants

Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website (http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/studenthub/recognition-of-prior-learning.htm).

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

Careers

This course is ideal if you work - or you aspire to work - in early years settings, therapeutic services, youth work, criminal justice service, play-work, child health, teaching, social work or related children's services. The education graduate job market is competitive and a postgraduate qualification in childhood studies and early years is designed to give you an edge.

- Early Years Advisor
- Nursery Co-ordinator
- Children's Charity Worker
- Social Worker

Careers advice:
The dedicated Jobs and Careers team offers expert advice and a host of resources to help you choose and gain employment. Whether you're in your first or final year, you can speak to members of staff from our Careers Office who can offer you advice from writing a CV to searching for jobs.

Visit the careers site - https://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/employability/jobs-careers-support.htm

Course Benefits

You can study this course over one, two or three years. It's delivered through day, evening and Saturday sessions or via distance learning to fit around your working pattern.

This course is valuable if you want to explore contemporary issues about children's and young people's social, political, cultural and educational lives in a global context. We have students from a variety of professional backgrounds on the course which encourages a significant number of valid and relevant perspectives in class discussions. We also draw ideas from a great variety of academic disciplines including history, geography philosophy, psychology, sociology and anthropology. All of these things mean that you will come away from your course with a broader and more developed view of the sector and what children and young people need today.

Howard Stones

Senior Lecturer in the School of Education

"Our course provides you with the theories, concepts, knowledge and skills to explore children's lives in a global context. This academic course will appeal to anyone who is interested in studying, or working with, children from birth to eighteen."

Howard taught secondary school physics and mathematics for ten years. Subsequently, he has worked on photographic and drama projects with young people before moving to higher education to lecture in community studies, managing change in community, applied criminal justice and childhood.

Facilities

- Online library
Global access to Leeds Beckett's extensive online library, with over 100,000 electronic journals, books and databases to supercharge your study.

- Dedicated Support Team
A highly-skilled and dedicated support team whose job is to work with you through every step of your online learning.

- Virtual Learning Environment
A Virtual Learning Environment that?s easy to use and available whenever and wherever you are.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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Within the Department for Education (DfE) School Direct framework, London Met is able to work with School Partners to offer salaried training routes to QTS. Read more
Within the Department for Education (DfE) School Direct framework, London Met is able to work with School Partners to offer salaried training routes to QTS. These are School Direct Salaried positions. Places are very limited, applications must be made through UCAS Teacher Training and will only be open for applications when Schools have places available. You should check availability with the University before applying in UCAS.

More about this course

An exciting one year PGCE course leading to Qualified Teacher Status, preparing you to teach 5 to 11 year olds (KS1 and KS2). This qualification also allows you to teach in the Early Years. Specialising in teaching within urban, multicultural, multilingual schools, we address issues of language, diversity and equality across the curriculum, with clear links to the United Nations convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC) and the unique London context.

The course is comprised of short blocks at University interspersed with two extended school placements of 8 and 12 weeks offering trainees the chance to reflect on the links between theory and practice and to critically reflect on their own teaching practice. School placements are supported by school based mentors and university link tutors, the latter also deliver university sessions ensuring continuity of support for trainees.

We aim to facilitate student teachers to become teachers who are of the highest quality; reflective, creative, imaginative and responsive to all children’s needs.

The course is designed to enable you to develop your understanding of the role of the Primary teacher within the broad field of education. There will be opportunities to extend your knowledge, develop your classroom practice and examine the underlying principles and values that inform current debates around educational issues. Through evaluation and reflection you will be supported in developing a clear understanding of the links between theory and practice.

We are proud to be one of the first courses to formally embed the principles of children’s rights (UNCRC) into our programme providing a universal values framework within which teachers can work to develop education which meets the needs of the children they teach.

Assessment is made during school visits by a link tutor and through regular assessment by your school-based mentor. Successful assessment leads to the recommendation of QTS.

Recommendation for Qualified Teascher Status (QTS)

On successful completion of the assessment phase the university will recommend the applicant to the National College for Teaching and Leadership for the award of QTS.

Modular structure

The School Direct salaried QTS only pathway is both rewarding and demanding. As this is an employment-based route to QTS, trainees are employed in their school setting and attend the university for a limited number of training days across the training year. The university sessions support the wider professional development of each teacher. This programme provides discussion of the role of children’s rights and how this underpins effective learning relationships; understanding of different aspects of inclusive education; introduction to the whole school and wider children’s workforce and team work and collaborative discussion across different subject areas.

The university study includes reflection on personal learning experiences and their application to the process of becoming a qualified teacher and critical examination of education policy and practices as well as national and local data.

What our students say

“London Met was very proactive in providing support and guidance for my new teaching post. The team educated me on everything necessary to prepare me for my forthcoming post; they are highly skilled professionals who were able to support me through my interview process as well as answer any queries regarding the teaching industry. With regards to course content, I felt everything covered during lectures and the professional studies sessions was relevant to my development and future prospects as a teacher as the course supported my learning over the year.” Jatinder Chohan, Year 5 teacher, Rosedale Hewens Academy, Harlington

“I really enjoyed my course at London Met. It was a very intense year, but the support and guidance from my tutor and mentors was excellent throughout, and by the end of the course I really felt I was prepared to take on my first mainstream teaching assignment. The tutors and lecturers have helped me set the right goals for my development as a teacher as well as giving me the tools to succeed. I had two great school placements arranged by the University, which I feel were key to building my confidence. Finally, I was really happy to be offered a job by one of these schools – my PGCE year couldn’t have ended better.” Maira Rodrigues, Year 4 teacher, Lloyd Williamson Primary School, Kensington

After the course

This intensive training leads to Qualified Teacher Status (QTS).

More about the course

The QTS training is delivered by a small, dynamic team of lecturers who combine their subject knowledge in areas such as English, mathematics, art, computing and working with EAL learners with recent and relevant school experience and a clear understanding of excellent classroom practice. This London Met team is fully committed to supporting trainees in their goal to become a qualified teacher that is uniquely trained to meet the challenges in modern London schools.

Moving to one campus

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2017. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

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The Primary Education (Policy and Practice) MA meets the rapidly changing needs of professionals educating young children, in examining critically the bases for current practices in primary schools, providing insight into international developments in primary education and in offering opportunities to work with leading researchers and practitioners in the field. Read more
The Primary Education (Policy and Practice) MA meets the rapidly changing needs of professionals educating young children, in examining critically the bases for current practices in primary schools, providing insight into international developments in primary education and in offering opportunities to work with leading researchers and practitioners in the field.

Degree information

The Primary Education (Policy and Practice) MA offers opportunities to engage with the latest research and international debate concerning curriculum, pedagogy and assessment and its mplications for professional practice in primary education. Students will develop knowledge and skills to evaluate and conduct educational research related to their professional interests and develop their own perspectives as leaders in primary education.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of three core modules (90 credits), and either a dissertation (60 credits) and one optional module (30 credits), or a report (30 credits) and two optional modules (60 credits). Some modules are available to study remotely.

Core modules
-Futures for Policy and Practice in Primary Education
-Researching Early Years and Primary Education
-What is Education?

Optional modules - a range of optional modules is available to students each year. Students can select optional modules to reflect their personal and professional interests. Recommended modules taken by students in recent years include:
-Contemporary Issues and Debates in Primary Education
-Literacy Development
-Children's Rights in Practice
-Assessment for Learning
-Bilingualism and Multilingualism
-Other modules are also possible - please contact the programme leader, Esmé Glauert, for advice -

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project in primary education (policy and practice). The project culminates in a dissertation of 20,000 words or a report of 10,000 words on a topic agreed with their tutor.

Teaching and learning
A range of learning and teaching approaches is employed across the programme, including lectures, student presentations, group discussion, directed reading/writing tasks and contributions to the Virtual Learning Environment, designed to promote active engagement and capitalise on participants' diverse backgrounds. Student performance is assessed through coursework assignments and the dissertation/report.

Careers

Graduates of this programme are currently working in a broad range of careers, both nationally and internationally. Many have leadership roles in schools, for example as school mentors for early career teachers, subject leaders, phase co-ordinators, assistant head teachers or head teachers. Others work as education advisers and consultants across a range of schools or as inspectors and policymakers at both local and national levels. Graduates can also be found working as researchers, lecturers and teacher educators in higher education and in educational services outside schools such as museums, publishing or children's support services.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-English Teacher, Unspecified English Language School
-Primary School Class Teacher (French), Unspecified CE Primary School
-Primary School Class Teacher (Maths), Unspecified Primary School
-Primary School Class Teacher, Unspecified Primary Academy

Employability
Participation in the programme fosters the development of a number of key skills and personal qualities important in a range of professional contexts including:
-Independence and self-direction in learning - important in continuing professional development in a fast-changing educational climate.
-Ability to examine complex issues systematically and critically - in the context of rapid policy change and increasing requirements for accountability.
-Exercise of initiative and creativity - in interpreting policy and research in particular local contexts to enhance the quality of learning and teaching.
-Skills in communication both orally and in writing to varied audiences - children, educators, parents, governors, policymakers.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The Department of Learning and Leadership at UCL Institute of Education has developed an internationally recognised reputation for early childhood and pre-school and primary education studies.

The department has a vibrant teaching programme, providing opportunities for specialist study of early years and primary education in initial teacher education and at graduate and doctoral levels. It offers a range of enriching events including research seminars and conferences in the field.

In all its work, the department is strongly committed to working in partnership with government agencies, education authorities, schools, early years and community groups and other departments within UCL Institute of Education (IOE).

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The MA offers students the opportunity to extend and deepen their understanding of concepts, theories and issues related to international development, education and sustainable ways of promoting health, wellbeing and social justice. Read more
The MA offers students the opportunity to extend and deepen their understanding of concepts, theories and issues related to international development, education and sustainable ways of promoting health, wellbeing and social justice.

Degree information

Students will:
-Build on their existing knowledge to develop new understandings of key concepts and issues in education, health promotion and international development.
-Appraise and evaluate current policy and practice through evidence-informed analysis.
-Draw connections between distinct academic disciplines with regard to the promotion of wellbeing and social justice.
-Investigate and propose sustainable ways of working.
-Through conducting a small-scale research study, apply what they have learned to create personally and professionally relevant new knowledge of the field.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. The programme consists of two core modules (60 credits), two optional modules (60 credits) and a dissertation (60 credits), or three optional modules (90 credits) and a report (30 credits).

Core modules
-Education and International Development: Concepts, Theories and Issues
-Promoting Health and Wellbeing: Planning, Practice and Participation

Optional modules - a range of optional modules from across UCL Institute of Education (IOE) Master's-level offering are available, including:
-Education, Conflict and Fragility
-Education and Development in Asia
-Education and Muslim Communities
-Planning for Education and Development
-Gender, Education and Development
-Gender, Sexuality and Education
-Learners, Learning and Teaching in the Context of Education for All
-Children's Rights in Practice
-Theories of Childhood and Society
-Understanding Education Research
-Understanding Research

We are keen to encourage students to select modules from across the IOE - including those related to education technology, effective learning, social policy, art education. Please discuss your optional module choices with your personal tutor so that you can build a modular programme relevant to your professional development in the field.

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of up to 20,000 words or a report of 10,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is taught through a combination of lectures, participatory and interactive groupwork, online learning and individual tutorials. Assessment is through coursework, taking the form of 5,000 word assignments or equivalent, such as a 3,500-word project proposal + 1,500 word conceptual framework. The small-scale research study is assessed by way of a 20,000-word dissertation or 10,000-word report.

Fieldwork
Fieldwork is not a compulsory part of the programme. However, students are encouraged to draw from their professional or voluntary experience as well as the ideas encountered during the programme to write critically and cogently for different audiences. The small-scale research study usually takes the form of a combination of desk-based research (a literature review) and fieldwork.

Placement
Placements are not routinely part of the programme. But good links have been established between the programme and UCL’s Volunteering Services Unit (http://uclu.org/services/volunteering-at-uclu). Some students have also taken part in the UCL ChangeMakers programme (https://www.ucl.ac.uk/changemakers). Taking part in these programmes can provide those studying in London with valuable international development-related experience. That said, both on-campus and distance learning students are encouraged to bring their own interests and concerns into their programme, helping to make it personally relevant and professionally significant.

Careers

Graduates of this Master's degree have been engaged:
-As policy-makers and advisers in government ministries and departments.
-As policy advocates and programme managers in international NGOs and development agencies.
-As social research consultants.
-As teachers and lecturers in schools, colleges and universities.
-As international development consultants.
-In doctoral study (either on PhD or EdD programmes).

Employability
Graduates of this Master's degree have used the academic and professional expertise gained through the programme to:
-Set up and manage an NGO or consultancy.
-Prepare successful project and research proposals.
-Develop new reporting procedures adopted throughout their organisation.
-Gain employment as consultants.
-Take on new roles and responsibilities within an organisation.
-Transfer their expertise into international development.
-Engage policymakers, practitioners and members of the public through research-informed practice.

Why study this degree at UCL?

This unique Master's programme provides students with opportunities to explore and examine the links between three academic and professional fields - education, health promotion and international development. It encourages a consideration of the ways that these fields are both distinctive, yet inter-related, and how evidence-informed practice might best contribute to working across professional boundaries, enhancing wellbeing and advocating for social justice.

Students learn alongside tutors who hold a breadth and depth of expertise in education, health promotion, social research and international development and who have professional experience in national and international contexts. Tutors are active in research on areas related to physical and emotional health and wellbeing, international development, refugees, young people, gender and sexuality, teaching and pedagogy and curriculum development.

Students on this MA benefit from involvement in a number of key academic networks including:
-Being part of a cluster of four international development MA programmes, so learning with student peers from across the world.
-An annual study visit to Paris (not included in the programme fee) and usually including visits to UNESCO, the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) and OECD.
-Membership of the London International Development Centre.

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If you're looking to develop your career within the specialist field of early childhood education, then this course could be for you.You'll have the opportunity to focus on current issues faced by early year professionals and you'll study early years education in international contexts. Read more
If you're looking to develop your career within the specialist field of early childhood education, then this course could be for you.You'll have the opportunity to focus on current issues faced by early year professionals and you'll study early years education in international contexts. Themes include children's rights, sociology of childhood, psychological perspectives on childhood and international approaches to early years education. The course can be tailored to suit you to help ensure your knowledge and academic skills progress throughout the course.

The course combines knowledge about practical aspects of the early years curriculum with the opportunity to bring a theoretical understanding to help to deepen and challenge your thinking.

You'll be taught by an outstanding team of teachers; in fact we've been ranked in the top five in the Guardian Guide for Education for the sixth year running. You'll also have access to our extensive professional and academic network which feeds directly into course design and delivery and to excellent facilities and specialist equipment.

Titles of work undertaken by students on this course have included:

• Understanding Nigerian Educators' Perceptions of Child Voice and its impact on practice

• Early Childhood Care and Education: the future for sustainable development in sub-Saharan Africa

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MA Childhood Studies is based on an informed and critical approach to the academic study of childhood and youth and is intended to reflect both the desires and ambitions of postgraduate students and the philosophical traditions and current developments in the social studies of childhood and youth. Read more
MA Childhood Studies is based on an informed and critical approach to the academic study of childhood and youth and is intended to reflect both the desires and ambitions of postgraduate students and the philosophical traditions and current developments in the social studies of childhood and youth.

This taught Masters course has been developed for postgraduate students or senior professionals interested in specialised or advanced study of childhood and youth. It will, therefore, be of particular interest to those wishing to be or already employed in the children and young people’s workforce. In line with recent international developments in social studies of childhood and youth, the MA Childhood Studies is transdisciplinary in approach but has a strong emphasis on perspectives drawn from sociology, social policy, geography, anthropology and history. The course is informed by the United Nations Rights of the Child (UNCRC) framework and draws on current methodological standpoints in childhood and youth research that emphasis participation. It is committed to adopting a ‘child/young person - centred’ philosophy throughout, and reflects the principles of protecting the rights and interests of children and young people and the increasing importance of participation. The changing conditions of childhood and youth and the ways in which children and young people themselves experience and understand their everyday lives is emphasised.

The aims of the MA (including PG Dip/PG Cert) Childhood Studies are:

• To offer an innovative, dynamic and flexible programme that critically considers developments in the academic study of childhood and the changing contexts of childhood and youth in a globalised world.
• To critically explore the cultural and social constructions of childhood and youth and the implications that they have had and continue to have on children and young people’s everyday lives.
• To advance students’ knowledge of the complexity of understanding the relationship between children’s rights, the ideologies and responsibilities for welfare and the lived realities of children’s and young people’s diverse experiences.
• To provide a robust theoretical framework for students to develop an integrated and critically aware understanding of childhood and youth studies and to cultivate a critical and analytical approach to contemporary methodological advances in childhood research.
• To develop in students a range of intellectual skills reflecting both the ethos of lifelong learning and the rigour required at M level, a high level of student autonomy and self-direction in order to facilitate the student to demonstrate initiative, originality alongside integrity and ethical judgement in their advanced scholarship and to become influential and effective specialists in the field of childhood and youth studies.

The MA Childhood Studies course is delivered on a flexible, blended learning basis using both traditionally taught elements of the course with lectures, seminars and tutorials during study days, weekend learning programmes and a research summer school and through new media technologies and the online learning environment. Combined, these provide an effective and dynamic space for engaging students and effectively promoting student learning through a knowledge sharing philosophy.

The course team have a commitment to high quality teaching and they incorporate a wide variety of technological tools and learning and teaching techniques to form a collaborative space that enables a seamless transition between classroom based and online learning. Tutors are able to monitor understanding and clarify and expand on points quickly and efficiently to support student learning. Using audio and video, online lectures, links to key reading and relevant web based materials these methods of technology enhanced learning are part of a blended learning programme. whilst some modules can be studied by students at a time and pace that best suits them, other modules have a more structured approach in their design and students access the course content on a week by week basis. All modules are designed to offer students a shared learning experience with other students and module tutors. They involve discussion boards and blogs and more interactive learning tools and techniques as well as the self-study materials, downloadable documents, email, eportfolio||, podcasts and vodcasts found throughout the course.

Students will require access to Broadband either at home, in their workplace or in a public library and standard PC or MAC technology. Ipods/Mp3 players would be helpful to also facilitate mobile learning for students to download and listen to podcasts.

The course uses a range of different assessment strategies, which could include: essays and reports; critical reviews and commentaries; analytical exercises; individual or group presentations; a project-based or work-experience report; a dissertation; computer-based assessments and informed discussion and debate via module Blogs.

Most modules run along the UCS based semester September to June but the actual arrangement of the taught content of the modules varies. Some modules can be accessed and studied on a more flexible, independent basis than others allowing greater autonomy in student learning whilst other modules follow a more structured approach and provide a more formalised approach to learning with study days, weekend workshop or a summer school. All modules fulfil UCS requirements in providing the necessary hours of study for students to succeed and obtain credits and masters level. A full-time student is expected to study 3 modules in one year, giving 120 credits and undertake a 60 credit research dissertation. A part-time student will take either 40, 60 or 80 credits per year as taught modules and finally the 60 credit research dissertation.

Students can expect to have to study between four to five hours per module each week and to spend at least an equivalent amount of time per week in additional reading and set learning activities and preparing for assignments. Students will be provided with timetables and learning schedules when they join the course. Personal tutorial advice is a key feature of the course and the course team offer students support either on a face-to-face basis, via telephone or personalised blog.

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This programme is designed to equip students with a comprehensive and specialist education in a range of areas within International Intellectual Property Law. Read more
This programme is designed to equip students with a comprehensive and specialist education in a range of areas within International Intellectual Property Law. The course will enable students to master the basic principles of the four main ‘pillars’ of IP Law, namely, Copyright, Patents, Trade marks and Industrial Designs. The four main components of IP Law will be examined from three distinct perspectives: domestic (UK), EU and International (global treaties/conventions) and will encompass analysis of legislation, case law (common law and civil law) and specific legal concepts. Where possible, comparative analysis will be carried out as between for example, specific EU IP Law developments and those of third country States e.g. India, Pakistan and China. In addition, certain third countries with well-developed, mature IP systems (e.g. the U.S., Canada and Australia) will be examined for a comparative assessment. The distinct themes of how the Internet has brought about new thinking in the IP world and, possible overlapping forms of IP protection (e.g. copyright and patent protection of computer software) will be examined.

Through carefully designed course work and varied teaching approaches, students from both a common law and civil law background will acquire the intellectual open-ness, technical expertise and critical thinking abilities that are necessary for effectiveness in a globalising world. The programme will equip students to respond effectively to the wide range of intellectual and professional challenges facing contemporary intellectual property lawyers. The LLM in International Intellectual Property Law will equip them to deal with both case work and policy making.

Employment Opportunities
Employment opportunities for graduates of the programme will include work with international law firms, patent and trade mark attorneys, local Intellectual Property Offices (e.g. the UK Intellectual Property Office, Chinese Patent and Trade Mark Office and the Office of the Controller General of Patents, Designs and Trade Marks in India),international organisations such as the World Intellectual Property Organisation (WIPO), World Trade Organisation (WTO) and the United Nations and specialist bodies within the EU e.g. the Office for the Harmonisation of the Internal Market (OHIM) and the European Patent Office (EPO). Directorate-General Internal Market and Services of the European Commission deals with IP matters and is also a potential employer. Other potential employers include international courts and tribunals, think tanks and research centres (e.g. the specialist Max Planck Institute for Intellectual Property and Competition Law (Munich), non-governmental organisations and government (eg. Ministries of Justice; Business, Innovation and Skills and; Foreign Affairs). Having taken one of our programmes, there will, of course, also be possibilities for academically inclined students to pursue careers in teaching and research.

Compulsory Modules:

Legal Research Methods
Intellectual Property Law
Data Protection Law
Dissertation on any topic within International Intellectual Property Law
Optional Modules (choose 4)

International Criminal Law
International Human Rights Law
Children’s Rights in Domestic and International Law
European Human Rights Law
EU Internal Markets Law
Competition Law
Global Trade Law
Comparative Corporate Governance
International Banking Law
International Commercial Arbitration
International Law of Armed Conflict
Dealing with the Legacies of the Past
Structure
January intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of January to June and September to January and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

September intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of September to June and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

Teaching will mostly be seminar-based which will promote group and individual interaction, which also ensures that every individual student is encouraged to contribute to discussions. Seminar-based teaching enables lecturers and students to discuss issues and investigate topics in greater depth, and develops critical thinking and solution-based learning skills in students; whilst also allowing the course teachers to monitor closely each individual’s progress. Emphasis will be placed on the use of virtual learning through the mechanism of the Blackboard computer-assisted learning system and databases such as Westlaw and LexisNexis. Throughout all modules, comparative elements with other legal systems will be emphasised.

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This programme is designed to equip students with a general yet comprehensive education in a range of areas within International Law. Read more
This programme is designed to equip students with a general yet comprehensive education in a range of areas within International Law. The course will enable students to master the basic principles of the discipline and explore advanced level theories, as well as understand the many traditional and contemporary challenges in International Law. They will have a wide range of International Law options to choose from, and may therefore acquire broad as opposed to specialised knowledge.

Through carefully designed course work and varied teaching approaches, students will acquire the intellectual open-ness, technical expertise and critical thinking abilities that are necessary for effectiveness in a globalising world. The programme will equip students to respond effectively to the wide range of intellectual and professional challenges facing contemporary International Lawyers. The LLM in International Law will equip them to deal with both case work and policy making.

Employment Opportunities
Employment opportunities for graduates of the programme will include work with international law firms, international organisations such as the United Nations, World Bank, World Trade Organisation and European Union, international courts and tribunals, ‘think tanks’ and research centres, non-governmental organisations and government (eg. Ministries of Justice and Foreign Affairs). Having taken one of our programmes, there will, of course, also be possibilities for academically inclined students to pursue careers in teaching and research.

Compulsory Modules:

Legal Research Methods
Public International Law
Dissertation on any topic within International Law
Optional Modules (choose 4):

International Criminal Law
International Human Rights Law
Children’s Rights in Domestic and International Law
European Human Rights Law
EU Internal Markets Law
Competition Law
Global Trade Law
Comparative Corporate Governance
International Banking Law
International Commercial Arbitration
Intellectual Property Law
International Law of Armed Conflict
Dealing with the Legacies of the Past
Structure
January intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of January to June and September to January and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

September intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of September to June and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

Teaching will mostly be seminar-based which will promote group and individual interaction, which also ensures that every individual student is encouraged to contribute to discussions. Seminar-based teaching enables lecturers and students to discuss issues and investigate topics in greater depth, and develops critical thinking and solution-based learning skills in students; whilst also allowing the course teachers to monitor closely each individual’s progress. Emphasis will be placed on the use of virtual learning through the mechanism of the Blackboard computer-assisted learning system and databases such as Westlaw and LexisNexis. Throughout all modules, comparative elements with other legal systems will be emphasised.

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