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Masters Degrees (Child Poverty)

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Underpinned by a children’s rights framework, the MA International Child Studies is a multi-disciplinary programme designed to promote a rigorous academic approach to contemporary issues in childhood. Read more
Underpinned by a children’s rights framework, the MA International Child Studies is a multi-disciplinary programme designed to promote a rigorous academic approach to contemporary issues in childhood. Sociological perspectives encourage examination of children’s experiences, the ways in which childhood is socially and culturally constructed, and reflection upon international policy and practice.

Key benefits

- Multidisciplinary approach

- Covers latest developments in issues that affect childhood globally

- Largely taught by a wide range of external expert speakers, as well as King's staff from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds

- Opportunity for students to exchange ideas and experiences with those from different disciplines

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/international-child-studies-ma.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

Underpinned by a theoretical framework of children's rights, this multidisciplinary programme is designed to encourage students to take a rigorous academic and analytical approach to contemporary issues in childhood which are of relevance to those working or intending to work with or on behalf of vulnerable children. An understanding of sociological perspectives of multiple constructed childhoods is applied to a comparative study of global childhoods, and complements teaching on relevant law and policy, child development, and such contemporary issues as poverty, HIV, child trafficking and child protection.

Our curriculum is subject to change to keep up with policy developments.

- Course purpose -

Our MA International Child Studies is appropriate for professionals working in the statutory or voluntary sector overseas; those aspiring to work in the statutory or voluntary sector overseas who hold a first degree in a relevant subject; and UK professionals working with a diverse population of children/young people.

- Course format and assessment -

Required modules:

- International Child Studies Dissertation
- International Children's Rights
- Global Childhoods

Full-time students take all 180 credits in one academic year. Part-time students normally take all four taught modules in year 1, and research methods training and the dissertation in year 2. However, there is some flexibility, and you may choose to take three taught modules in year 1 and your remaining modules in year 2 if you prefer.

Career prospects

Recent graduate destinations include UNICEF, Children and Families Across Borders, Eastern Washington University (lecturer), Seneca Centre Oakland, California, and DG ECHO (the Humanitarian Aid arm of the EU).

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 20 universities worldwide (2015/16 QS World Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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Our course aims to explore the health of women and children from a global public health perspective. Students will explore individual health issues, both physical, psychological and social that commonly affect women and children, and also explore the wider political and societal issues that impact these. Read more

Overview

Our course aims to explore the health of women and children from a global public health perspective. Students will explore individual health issues, both physical, psychological and social that commonly affect women and children, and also explore the wider political and societal issues that impact these.

Women and children, both in the UK and around the world, face inequality on a daily basis. These inequalities come from lack of access to healthcare, education, employment opportunities, technological advances, legal support, and social, cultural and political opposition (Marmot, 2010). The World Health Organisation has recognised this and explicitly targeted women and children in three of its Millennium Development Goals; to promote gender equality and empower women; to reduce child mortality; to improve maternal health, alongside wider goals to improve universal access to education and to eradicate poverty that also disproportionately affect women (WHO, 2015).

This course focuses on the health of women and children. During their ‘core’ modules, students will be encourage to explore individual health issues, as well as exploring the global legislation that impacts on women’s and children’s health, and understanding how they can implement and influence policy change. The option modules will allow the student to tailor their learning to their individual practice; whether caring for the critically unwell women, doing a physical assessment of a new-born infant (NIPE), understanding the global impact of responsive parenting or as an effective leader or manager of a service.

References

Marmot, M., 2010. Fair society, healthy lives. The Marmot Review. London: University College London.

World Health Organisation, 2015. Millennium Development Goals http://www.who.int/topics/millennium_development_goals/about/en/

Careers

This course will utilise a global public health perspective and is aimed at all practitioners who work with women and children, so will appeal to students both in the UK and internationally. It will offer an inter-professional learning opportunity to a range of professionals including Midwives, Children’s Nurses, Health Visitors, Hospital and Community nurses, Family Support Workers, but is also suitable for those who work with women and children in the voluntary sector or education. The course will be taught by a range of experienced lecturers from a variety of clinical backgrounds. Please be aware that this course is aimed at practitioners working in some capacity with women’s and children’s health and does not lead to a registerable qualification with the Nursing and Midwifery Council in the UK.

Modules & assessment

Core modules -

- Global Challenges to Women and Children's Health:
This module is designed for an inter-professional audience, and has a global public health focus, considering issues affecting women and children around the world. It is designed to provide insight and exploration of the major public health issues affecting the health of women and children. Each of the main areas explored will include an overview of the illness/problem as well as consideration of the social, cultural and political context and influence upon it and evaluation of how this leads to inequality and may reduce life chances.

- Research Proposal - Women's and Children's Health:
This module provides a critical overview of research philosophy and the major methodological and design approaches to research in order to equip you to appreciate the strengths and weaknesses of published research, whether in your specialist area or in the health, welfare and social care field.

- Political Power and Policy Drivers affecting Women and Children's Health:
As part of everyday inter-professional practice, practitioners working with women and children are affected by policy drivers in a number of ways, however, differences may be apparent in how these are translated to healthcare and how they are embedded into practice. Implementing new policy requires practitioners to use their, power, influence and interpersonal skills. The module will enable the student to critically evaluate their own knowledge and skills which underpin their current practice.

- Postgraduate Major Project:
The Major Project, which is central to the Masters award, enables students to demonstrate their ability to synthesise learning from previous modules and use this learning as the basis for planning, conducting and writing up a research or work-based project. This project provides the opportunity for students to demonstrate: the ability to raise significant and meaningful questions in relation to their specialism; depth of knowledge which may involve working at current limits of theoretical and/or research understanding; critical understanding of research methods and its relationship to knowledge; awareness of and ability to develop solutions to ethical dilemmas likely to arise in their research or professional practice; the ability to draw meaningful and justifiable conclusions from information which may be complex or contradictory; the capability to expand or redefine existing knowledge to develop new approaches to changing situations and contribute to the development to best practice; the ability to communicate these processes in a clear and sophisticated fashion; the capability to evaluate their work from the perspective of an autonomous reflective learner. In the course of your studies with us you may generate intellectual property which is defined as an idea, invention or creation which can be protected by law from being copied by someone else. By registering with us on your course you automatically assign any such intellectual property to us unless we agree with the organisation covering the cost of your course that this is retained by them. In consideration of you making this assignment you will be entitled to benefit from a share in any income generated in accordance with our Revenue Sharing Policy in operation at that time. Details of our Intellectual Property Policy and Guidelines can be found on My.Anglia under Research, Development and Commercial Services or by contacting this Office for a hard copy.

Optional modules -

- Applied Leadership & Management:
This module provides an innovative exploration of leadership and management in healthcare, and examines their impact on organisations including wider considerations in the external environment. This module will enable students to assess and analyse the roles that leaders and managers play in a range of organizational contexts; and to apply the principles and techniques of leadership and management in a range of contexts.

- Care of the Critically Unwell Woman:
This module will enable you to develop in-depth knowledge and skills when caring for the critically unwell woman, during the child bearing continuum. Work-based learning is incorporated into the module in order to recognise and value your professional expertise. While practicing midwifery in an area where women with high dependency needs will be cared for, you will also spend clinical time developing your skills in the high dependency or intensive care unit.

- Newborn Infant Physical Examination (NIPE):
This module will focus on the specialist knowledge and the clinical skills that are required to enable you to competently undertake a thorough Newborn and Infant Physical Examination (NIPE) in clinical practice. You will utilise in-depth knowledge and understanding that you have gained to enable you to recognise the deviations from the normal to initiate appropriate care and referral. Critical reflection and completion of the practice documents will allow you to further identify your learning needs and develop your scope of professional practice.

- Global Impact of Responsive Parenting:
This module is designed to examine the positive health impact responsive parenting has on the mother and infant dyad, the wider family, society and the Globe. Historical child rearing styles will be reviewed and debated to highlight their negative effects on child development and on society. The module will explore the current understanding of neurophysiology of infant brain development and how parenting interactions can affect this process. The module will conclude with positive practical steps for health professionals to encourage responsive parenting with the parents they work with every day.

Assessment -

You will have the opportunity to demonstrate your learning in a variety of ways during this course. Assessment will vary between modules, but includes patchwork text, reflective essays, action plans, reports, objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs), essays, ‘journal style’ articles (to prepare you to publish your work) and a major project on a subject of your choice.

Where you'll study

Your faculty -

The Faculty of Health, Social Care & Education is the largest provider of health, social care and education courses in the East of England, with over 6,000 students from more than 20 countries.

With 95% of our students finding full-time employment within six months of graduating, you can be sure that our courses have been designed with your career in mind. We’ve been educating nurses, midwives and social workers for over 25 years.

At the cutting edge of research, we offer a range of internationally recognised undergraduate and postgraduate degree courses taught by friendly and experienced staff.

Designed to enhance your learning experience, our facilities include state-of-the-art simulated skills laboratories that mirror real-life clinical situations and UK hospital wards. Our students also benefit from our Early Childhood Research and Resource Centre; a space in which they can experiment with equipment and play activities.

You’ll study in an exciting, modern faculty which has strong links with regional, national and international organisations, including healthcare trusts, schools and academic institutions.

Your enthusiasm. Our passion. Your best foot forward.

Visit your faculty - http://www.anglia.ac.uk/health-social-care-and-education

Where can I study?

Chelmsford - http://www.anglia.ac.uk/student-life/life-on-campus/chelmsford-campus

Distance learning - http://www.anglia.ac.uk/student-life/life-on-campus/distance-learning

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International economics with a strong empirical and analytical emphasis on the low and middle income countries of the Global South. Read more
International economics with a strong empirical and analytical emphasis on the low and middle income countries of the Global South.
This specialisation offers you the opportunity to follow a state-of-the-art curriculum in International Economics with a strong empirical and analytical focus on the low and middle income countries of the Global South. Hosting one of the largest databases for developing countries in the world, we offer you a unique possibility to analyse poverty, inequality, and economic development in these countries in an international context. Using recent theoretical insights and modern empirical methods, you will be actively involved in comparative research on issues in developing countries such as the impact of globalisation on economic growth, corruption, the education of children, child labour and women’s empowerment.

Why should you choose International Economics & Development in Nijmegen?

- A broad perspective on issues pertaining to low and middle income countries
- Strong comparative and empirical orientation
- One of the world’s largest micro-level database for developing countries
- Small group teaching and close contact with professors and their research
- Excellent reputation in the Netherlands and abroad

Change perspective

Radboud University Master’s specialisation in International Economics & Development pushes your curiosity to understand and evaluate the economic situation in low and middle income countries. You will be taught to look at the bigger picture and to analyse micro-level data in order to discover what is going well and what isn’t. Your analysis will provide information on intra-country or cross-national disparities. It aims to inform both national governments as well as international development organisations, and might lead to programmatic action aimed at bringing about positive changes to people’s lives in the poorest regions of our globe.

Career prospects

Scientific and societal relevance go hand in hand in this programme. We address contemporary issues like child labour, women’s empowerment, human development, children’s schooling and economic growth by evaluating societal developments with the help of sound academic theories. We not only discuss pressing issues of today but also issues we believe will be pressing in the near future.
Upon completing the Master’s programme in International Economics & Development, you will be knowledgeable about recent developments in the field. You will be an up-and-coming professional that is able to:
- Understand and reflect on the international, professional and academic literature in the field of international economics & development.
- Report independently on various issues in international economics and development, including state of the art empirical and theoretical studies.
- Use and apply statistical tools and methods.
- Conduct independent research.
- Present and clearly and consistently defend your views and research outcomes.
- Maintain a critical attitude towards your own work and that of others in your field.

We make sure our graduates have the strong academic background they need to be able to work as economists, policy-makers and researchers for international organisations (The World Bank, UN), development-oriented consultancy firms, NGOs, national governments as well as universities and research institutes.

Our approach to this field

The Master’s specialisation International Economics & Development is theoretically unique in that we not only deal with the problems that poor countries face, but also with interesting new developments taking place in the Global South. We will discuss the rise of the BRIC countries, concentrating on both the potential they have as well as the challenges they face. We will also look at unique new economic phenomena within developing countries, like the emergence of a complete pro-poor banking system based on mobile phone credits in Kenya and other parts of Africa (known as m-pesa).

- Understanding economic changes in the developing world
Our unique and interesting combination of subjects will provide you with a well-rounded understanding in this field. Apart from development economics students will get an academic understanding of economics methodology, the role of international financial markets, behavioural economics and the important influence culture has on economic phenomena. And thanks to a choice of elective subjects, you can give your programme a unique focus that meets your academic interests.

Students taking this Master’s specialisation will learn how to understand and analyse economic changes taking place throughout the developing world. Students will be taught how to discover determinants and develop indicators that make it possible to monitor changes at the sub-national level in great detail. These indicators can be used scientifically, but also for creating detailed overview scans of regions for political or humanitarian purposes.

- Database Developing World and the MDGs
One of the tools our students can use is our Database Developing World (DDW). This database constitutes a unique window to the developing world, making it possible to study important processes on a scale and with a degree of detail that is unique in the world.

The DDW also holds indicators for seven of the eight Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) which range from halving extreme poverty rates to empowering woman and providing universal primary education. The target date of 2015 is fast approaching and although enormous progress has been made, the UN is working with governments, civil society and other partners to carry on with a post-2015 sustainable development agenda. As a graduate of this Master’s specialisation, you could go on to be one of the professionals that helps to achieve the MDGs and thereby making a real difference in people’s lives.

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Researchers, research managers and policy advisers, as well as service planners, are all faced with a growing need for top-quality research that is timely and relevant. Read more
Researchers, research managers and policy advisers, as well as service planners, are all faced with a growing need for top-quality research that is timely and relevant. This programme builds on the links between research and policy in developing the particular skills and capacities needed by policy-oriented researchers, professionals and postgraduate students interested in carrying out public policy, social policy and social welfare research. We believe this is vital if researchers are to maximise the impact of their work in addressing real issues of concern to policy-makers and decision-takers.

The programme provides core research training in philosophy and research design in the social sciences, along with introductions to and further approaches in quantitative and qualitative methods in the social sciences. It also offers elective courses in areas of the school's particular research expertise, namely child and family welfare, gender and violence, health and social care, poverty and social exclusion, and policy-oriented evaluation.

We recognise that students will be joining with relevant - albeit varied - experience. Therefore, there will be opportunities for you to draw on your own experiences as researchers, managers and policy advisers and to share these with other participants on the programme. Those who have recently embarked on a career in policy research, or who hope to do so, will find the programme offers a unique combination of academic rigour, up-to-date policy content and relevant skills development.

Programme structure

The programme is delivered through a combination of intensive block teaching and weekly delivery so as to be most accessible to postgraduate students, busy policy professionals and practitioners. The delivery of units on the programme is designed to allow students to accumulate credits flexibly and organise the patterns of attendance to suit their own needs and circumstances.

The MSc and PG Diploma consist of four core units and two optional units. A dissertation of 10-15,000 words is required for the MSc. The PG Certificate is awarded to students who successfully complete three units, two of which must be mandatory units.

Core units
-Philosophy and Research Design in the Social Sciences
-Introduction to Quantitative Research Methods in the Social Sciences
-Introduction to Qualitative Research methods in the Social Sciences
-Further Quantitative Methods

Optional units
-Further Qualitative Methods
-Domestic Violence: Research; Policy and Activism
-Researching Poverty, Inequality and Social Inclusion
-Economics of Public Policy
-Global Contexts of Rights and Disability
-Disabled Childhoods

Careers

The programme stresses the development of policy research and analysis methods, as well as substantive knowledge. In addition to careers in academia, this program prepares students for careers as policy researchers and analysts, research commissioners and managers in public or private agencies or organisations, both in the UK and overseas.

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Social work, both in the UK and internationally, has been defined as a profession that ‘promotes social change, problem solving in human relationships and the empowerment and liberation of people to enhance social justice.’ Accordingly, social work takes a variety of forms and engages with a broad range of individuals, groups and communities. Read more
Social work, both in the UK and internationally, has been defined as a profession that ‘promotes social change, problem solving in human relationships and the empowerment and liberation of people to enhance social justice.’ Accordingly, social work takes a variety of forms and engages with a broad range of individuals, groups and communities. The scope of social work research is equally broad and requires researchers to be aware of, and able to engage with a variety of disciplines in a range of settings, often working alongside those with different ideas of what social work and social work research are and what each is intended to achieve.

Social work research, in other words, does not simply concern the work of social workers. It may also be concerned, for example, with programmes of community development in the context of poverty or interventions to tackle domestic violence and programmes for young offenders. It may focus on the needs of a particular group, for example children with disabilities or people with severe and long term mental illness, whether or not they receive social work services. It may draw on theories and research methods from any of the social sciences, including economics, law and philosophy.

This programme is designed to build on the links between research and practice in a range of settings in developing the particular skills and capacities needed by practice-based professionals and postgraduate students interested in carrying out social work and social care research.

This programme does not include practical training in social work and does not lead to a professional qualification in social work. If you want to study for a qualification in social work practice, please see the MSc in Social Work: http://www.bris.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/ssl/msc-social-work/

Programme structure

The programme is delivered through a combination of intensive block teaching and weekly delivery so as to be most accessible to postgraduate students, busy policy professionals and practitioners. The delivery of units on the programme is designed to allow students to accumulate credits flexibly and organise the patterns of attendance to suit their own needs and circumstances.

The structure for the MSc and Postgraduate Diploma consists of four core and two optional units. A dissertation of 10-15,000 words is required for the MSc. The Postgraduate Certificate is awarded for the successful completion of three units (two of which must be core units).

Core units
-Introduction to Qualitative Research Methods in the Social Sciences
-Philosophy and Research Design in the Social Sciences
-Further Qualitative Methods

Optional units - You then choose two of the following units which allow you to develop specialist knowledge of the application of research methods to key areas of social work and social policy.
-Further Quantitative Methods
-Domestic Violence: Research, Policy and Activism*
-Researching Poverty, Inequality and Social Exclusion*
-Health and Social Care Research*
-Researching Child and Family Welfare*
-Economics of Public Policy
-Global Contexts of Rights and Disability
-Disabled Childhoods

*These units are offered in alternate years. To see the full programme and unit description, please check the programme catalogue: http://www.bris.ac.uk/unit-programme-catalogue/RouteStructure.jsa?byCohort=N&ayrCode=17%2F18&programmeCode=9SPOL001T

Careers

The programme stresses the development of social work and social research and analysis methods, as well as substantive knowledge. In addition to careers in academia, this programme prepares students for careers as social work and care researchers and analysts, research commissioners and managers in public or private agencies or organisations, both in the UK and internationally.

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The programme is for students who want to analyse and work on social change for the working poor in developing countries. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The programme is for students who want to analyse and work on social change for the working poor in developing countries. It is highly relevant to anyone working or intending to work on labour and labour-related social movements in development agencies and NGOs, labour and solidarity movements, corporate social responsibility initiatives, and to activists in both developed and developing countries. We welcome students with a strong background in the social sciences in their first degree, as well as practitioners and professionals working in the areas of development, labour and employment relations, social movements and other related fields.

A unique Programme

This innovative new programme offers students the opportunity to study labour conditions and relations, social movements of labour and their contributions to development processes and changes in the South. It is the first and only MSc programme in the UK dedicated to Labour, Social Movements and Development. It provides a critical examination of the links between labour, capitalism, development and poverty. It investigates labour in contemporary social and economic development of the South as well as classic and newly emerging social movements of labour in local, national and international spaces. Students will also have the opportunity to experience labour campaigns and policy-making in practice by participating in our interactive sessions on designing and implementing international, regional and national labour campaigns and policies. The MSc draws on the expertise of Department of Development Studies staff in labour, social movements and development in Latin America, Africa and Asia, and on our contacts within such movements, as well as with NGOs and international organisations.

The MSc in Labour, Social Movements and Development explores different theories and methods for the study of the working poor in the South, and offers a critical examination of the links between labour, capitalism, development and poverty, and of the role of social movements and international initiatives for labour.

Highlights include:

- Labour process and organisations: development trajectories and divisions in the South

- A comparative history of labour and social movements in countries such as China, Korea, India, South Africa, Brazil and the Middle East

- Corporate Social Responsibility Initiatives, codes of conduct and anti-sweatshop campaigning

- The impact of neoliberalism and globalisation on workers in the South

- Informalisation of labour, casualization and precarious work

- Feminisation of labour

- The worst forms of exploitation: forced labour and child labour

- Rural labour, migrant labour and labour in Export Processing Zones

- Household and reproductive labour

- The International Labour Organisation, international labour standards and decent work

- Practices and theories of local, national and international labour campaigns.

The unique regional expertise at SOAS allows students of the MSc in Labour, Social Movements and Development to specialise in some of the most dynamic parts of the developing world. The programme’s emphasis on transferable analytical skills will be of great benefit to graduates who return to, or take up, professional careers in international organisations, government agencies and non-governmental organisations and movements. Students also benefit from the wide range of modules on offer, both within the department and across the School, allowing them to create individualised interdisciplinary programmes.

The department has a Labour, Movements and Development research cluster (http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/research/labour/) which carries out research activities linked to labour, social movements and development.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/programmes/msc-labour-social-movements-and-development/

Structure

- Overview
There are four main components to this degree: three taught modules and a 10,000 word dissertation. All students take a core module, Labour, Social Movements and Development. They then select one of two further modules: Political Economy of Development or Theory, Policy and Practice of Development. Through these modules students build their analytical skills and knowledge of the main issues and debates in Development Studies.

- Specialisation
Students also take optional modules (one full unit module or two half-unit modules), allowing them to specialise in particular areas of development and potentially to develop a dissertation in a related theme. By tying these to their individual dissertation topic, students design their degree to suit their own interests and career development goals.

Students should be aware that not all optional modules may run in a given year. Modules at other institutions are not part of the approved programme structure.

Programme Specification

Programme Specification 2015/16 (pdf; 79kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/programmes/msc-labour-social-movements-and-development/file101781.pdf

Materials

- SOAS Library
SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Teaching & Learning

Modules are taught by a combination of methods, principally lectures, tutorial classes, seminars and supervised individual study projects.

The MSc programme consists of three taught modules (corresponding to three examination papers) and a dissertation.

- Lectures

Most modules involve a two hour lecture as a key component with linked tutorial classes.

- Seminars

At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work. Students make full-scale presentations for each unit that they take, and are expected to write papers that often require significant independent work.

- Dissertation

A quarter of the work for the degree is given over to the writing of an adequately researched 10,000-word dissertation. Students are encouraged to take up topics which relate the study of a particular region to a body of theory.

Employment

A postgraduate degree in Labour, Social Movements and Development from SOAS provides graduates with a portfolio of widely transferable skills sought by employers, including analytical skills, the ability to think laterally and employ critical reasoning, and knowing how to present materials and ideas effectively both orally and in writing. Equally graduates are able to continue in the field of research, continuing their studies either at SOAS or other institutions.

An MSc in Labour, Social Movements and Development is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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This MSc in Public Health Nutrition will provide you with the specialist scientific knowledge and practical skills required to meet the nutritional challenges of the 21st century. Read more
This MSc in Public Health Nutrition will provide you with the specialist scientific knowledge and practical skills required to meet the nutritional challenges of the 21st century. You will develop a comprehensive understanding of the role diet and nutrients play in the aetiology, prevention, treatment and management of diseases, discovering how to apply this knowledge in a variety of health-based settings and make evidence-based judgements on appropriate nutritional care. You will also develop a clear understanding of the factors that influence food choice. The context for the programme is provided by societal issues such as a rapidly ageing population, food poverty and food insecurity, health inequalities in nutritional wellbeing and the high prevalence of obesity.

What will I study?

You will learn about the metabolism of nutrients with regards to their effect on the causation and prevention of disease, while exploring the psychological models of behaviour and behaviour change in relation to food choice. Global health challenges, such as maternal and child nutrition, sustainable food production and food poverty, will also be considered.

Alongside this you will study emerging topics in the field of nutrition that have an impact on health status. This will include issues such as nutrigenomics and the impact of sugar intake on health.

The knowledge and skills you develop throughout the course will be utilised in a project-based module that will provide you with the opportunity to complete a research project relevant to your own interests or area of employment. This will be underpinned by a dedicated module enhancing your knowledge of research methods and the research process.

How will I study?

The programme incorporates a variety of teaching and learning strategies including lectures, workshops, student-led seminars, practical activities and case studies. This varied approach is designed to meet a range of learning needs, encourage problem-solving skills and foster peer discussion and communication. Teaching will usually be delivered during the daytime.

How will I be assessed?

Assessment methods are varied and include a combination of essays, case studies, presentations and examinations.

Who will be teaching me?

You will be taught by specialists in the fields of nutrition, health, physiology, biochemistry and psychology. The programme team are actively engaged in nutrition-related research and consultancy and will use this expertise to support and enhance your learning experience.

What are my career prospects?

You will be able to register with the Association for Nutrition as an Associate Nutritionist upon completion of the course via the submission of a portfolio of evidence.

This programme provides ideal preparation to progress into nutrition-related roles in many organisations within the public and private sector. These include local authorities, charitable organisations, the NHS, health promotion organisations, the leisure industry and the private sector. Alternatively, you may wish to progress onto PhD study to further develop a specialist knowledge of nutrition.

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Developing an eye for the diversity in backgrounds and for the difference in treatments and policies these diversities require. Girls discuss the same problems differently to boys. Read more
Developing an eye for the diversity in backgrounds and for the difference in treatments and policies these diversities require.
Girls discuss the same problems differently to boys. Immigrants frequently exhibit pathology different to natives. How can this be? And how do you deal with this? This Master’s specialisation focuses on the diversities in youth care. Diversities in the area of ethnicity, religion, gender and social-economic class. You will develop an eye for the diversity in backgrounds and for the difference in treatments and policies these diversities require.
The Master’s specialisation in Diversities in Youth Care challenges you to look differently at care giving and welfare policies. You will gain specific knowledge and develop a sixth sense on the health care needs of young people. You will broaden your vision. How come fewer immigrants accept (certain forms of) help? How can you make homosexuality a subject of discussion in certain cultures? You will look beyond your own values and differentiate between your own ethical beliefs and cultural values and universal beliefs.
Upon graduating you will be an expert in the area of diversities in youth care. Besides plenty of knowledge, skills and – if you want – experience abroad, you will have a dose of cultural relativism. Why do we do it like that? How could we do it differently? You can use this in your work as remedial educationalist or policy maker. After graduating you will be able to work in and outside of the Netherlands at (development) organisations and institutions in the fields of youth care, education, adoption and refugee relief.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/youthcare

Why study Diversities in Youth Care at Radboud University?

- You may pick electives from different Master’s programmes like Religious Studies, Cultural Anthropology and Management Science. These electives fit in well with the programme Diversities in Youth Care. More information can be found on the programme outline page.

- There is plenty of opportunity to go abroad for an elective or an internship. Our network includes a university and relief organisations in Bangladesh, foster homes and orphanages in Romania and the Ukraine and schools in several African countries.

- Radboud University has the only education and research institute in the Netherlands within the field of social sciences which specialises in gender and sexuality: Institute for Gender Studies (IGS). This means you will have access to the latest and most relevant research.

- The programme collaborates with the knowledge centre Sekse en Diversiteit in Medisch Onderwijs (SDMO) (i.e. Gender and Diversity in Medical Education) of Radboudumc. We exchange case studies and give one another guest lectures. You will profit from this exchange of knowledge!

Change perspective

This programme will continually challenge you to adjust your point of view. To look beyond your own values. What is the dividing line between your ethical beliefs and those of the other people? And at what point have universal values been seriously affected?
You are taught to look at it from the point of view of a child growing up in poverty, of a homosexual youth, of someone with a Moroccan father and a Dutch mother, of a child living in a reconstituted family or in a family with strong religious beliefs. You are taught to continually look at issues from someone else’s perspective. In other words, to be flexible when it comes to making judgements and having expectations. Changing your perspective is the very core of this programme.

Career prospects

Upon completing this Master’s specialisation, you will be an expert in youth care concerning diverse backgrounds and personal traits. There is a large need for professionals who know how to deal with homosexual immigrants, with children who don’t speak the local language or youths that have been traumatised by war. Such knowledge and experience are gained in this programme. You will have a flexible view of diverse backgrounds and be critical of your own area of expertise. After graduating you will be a remedial educationalist or policy maker with an expertise that organisations are desperately in need of!

Job positions

As a professional in Diversities in Youth Care you can work in and outside of the Netherlands in the area of youth care and development. You can work as a policy maker or researcher in organisations as Unicef, adoption agencies, the EU, local governments or research institutions. You can also work as a remedial educationalist for mental health care organisations, refugee centres or with specific groups of children like refugees or LGBT children.

Our approach to this field

The political and media interest for problems regarding ethnicity, gender and sexuality is huge. How do you deal with it? How do you develop policies? This requires specialist knowledge. Knowledge that goes beyond the borders of a country, a culture and a set of beliefs. The Dutch have a very individualistic approach to happiness while other cultures believe that a happy family unit is more important for one’s own happiness. You will not learn what is wrong and what is right, but how things can be different. This will ensure that the policies you will develop will also be different.

The Master’s specialisation in Diversities in Youth Care will train you to become a specialised caregiver. The programme focuses on social issues in the area of diversity. You can develop a clinical or policymaking approach within youth care and diversities of youth. After graduating you will have knowledge on the role of different backgrounds. Whether it’s about culture, religion or gender, you will be flexible enough to identify various problems and to judge and treat them from the right perspective.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/youthcare

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The Programme provides participants with the knowledge and skills for effective participation in the management of development projects. Read more
The Programme provides participants with the knowledge and skills for effective participation in the management of development projects. It explores the evolution of development theories and how successful national development needs to be founded on the integration of sound socio-economic analysis with an enabling legal environment. The contents are multi-disciplinary, ranging from exploration of key topics in development economics, to the rule-of-law and the foundation pillars for the creation and effective operation of development institutions. In addition, the Programme imparts a full spectrum of competencies needed for project cycle management (PCM).

CURRICULUM OF THE MASTER:

PART I -DISTANT LEARNING

A self-learning tutor-assisted period of 12 weeks’ duration designed to introduce the participants to the pre-requisite entry level knowledge in the disciplines of Part II, namely economics, institutional design, sociology, law and project management. The training materials will include selected chapters from key textbooks in addition to a number of articles from well-known journals. The learning content will be posted on the programme’s website while the participants will be provided with at least one prescribed textbook. Two weeks subsequent to arrival in Turin the participants will sit for two written examination covering the topics of Part I.

PART II - FACE-TO-FACE LEARNING

Module I: Introduction to developmentactors and institutions
• Introduction to development aid, international donor institutions – UN system, IMF and World Bank
• Project cycle management: logical framework approach, operational planning, budget, monitoring and evaluation

Module II: Economics of Development

• Economic development theories
• The global economic crisis
• Strategies of economic development: selected countries
• The role of FDI in development
• Environmental economics
• Inequality and poverty
• Cost and benefi t of migration in sending and destination countries

Module III: Legal concepts in development

• Enabling legal frameworks for effective and sustainable development
• The role and function of key actors in development, inter alia, multilateral and bilateral development agencies and NGOs.
• Human Rights based approach to development programming
• Labour Standards with emphasis on gender and prevention of child labour

Module IV: Institutional development and social analysis

• Factors infl uencing “institutional effi ciency “
• Political regimes and instruments of participation
• Development, politics and culture: perspectives from political science
• Family, gender and participation (special reference to problems of health and education)
• NGOs management

This face-to-face part is the core learning component of the Master. The participants will be asked to sit for three written exams in order to assess their learning achievement in the subject matter of Part II.

PART III - INDEPENDENT WORK- thesis preparation

This part is dedicated to individual or group formulation of a full-fledged project document in response to a perceived “development need” in a sector and country related to the participants’ work or field of interest.

Deadline for Application: 26 September 2015



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The objective of the international one-year MSc programme in Population Studies is to train young professionals in the theories, methods and skills required to comprehend population dynamics. Read more
The objective of the international one-year MSc programme in Population Studies is to train young professionals in the theories, methods and skills required to comprehend population dynamics.

Essential to understanding population dynamics is the study of demographic behaviour of people, in terms of their life events, e.g. birth, marriage, divorce, health, migration, and death. The master programme focuses on these demographic events, on how decision-making regarding these life events (e.g. its timing) is influenced by the historical, economic, societal, cultural, and medical context, and on how these demographic events have an impact on population-level trends.

You will learn about:
- Pressing population issues as population ageing, integration of migrants, health inequalities and poverty
- Individual decision-making processes behind demographic events, such as family formation, residential choices and migration, and health care use
- Collecting and interpreting demographic data
- Methods and techniques to analyze demographic data: life table, population projections, advanced survey analysis, qualitative research methods
- Population policies and intervention programmes

The field of Population Studies reflects on and deals with currently relevant demographic topics and related societal issues. The study is simultaneously concrete and broad.

Why in Groningen?

Our programme is unique in its combination of analytical and social demography, its combination of quantitative and qualitative research methods, its structured progress through the research process, and its international, multidisciplinary and strong scientific orientation - as officially being recognized. Interactive ways of teaching are being employed by very enthousiastic and dedicated teachers. Within the Netherlands, Groningen is the only university offering an MSC in Population Studies.

Job perspectives

The program has been developed for future professionals in business, government, non-governmental organisations (NGOs), and academia. Demographers are competent in reflecting on how the context in which we live affects population dynamics (migration, fertility, mortality, ageing, etc.) and vice-versa. This can be either through analyses of large data files for demographic data and trends, or through in-depth qualitative analysis of people's life.

The career perspectives are good. Many of our alumni continue into a PhD, whereas international mid-career alumni mostly acquire a higher position within the institute they were working.

Our alumni gain employment at:
- (interdisciplinary) research institutes
- universities (lecturer, PhD student)
- (inter)national statistical offices
- national planning and government offices
- United Nations agencies
- NGO's, like Doctors without Borders
- private companies (e.g. as data-manager or communication expert)

Research

The Master's thesis topic is integrated in the research theme of the Population Research Centre: “Population and Wellbeing in Context”. This comprises topics such as population decline, population ageing, global migration, life of migrants, healthy ageing in society, families, households, residence, causes of death, child health, nutrition, access to health care, place making of elderly.

The master programme clearly reflects the major characteristics of the research programme by focussing on both the macro (population) and micro level (the demographic behaviour of people); by adopting multi-disciplinary perspectives (demography, epidemiology, anthropology, geography, social ageing, nutrition); by teaching both quantitative and qualitative research methods; by focusing on the translation of research into policies or interventions.

The students are being taught the theories, methods and skills that the different teachers apply in their research. They participate in seminars and discussion groups in an active research environment including guest lectures and seminars by established professionals from other demographic institutions.

Part of the Master Programme is the participation in the Dutch Demography Day - a conference for demographers - and an excursion to the Netherlands Interdisciplinary Demographic Institute in The Hague.

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This course will allow students to gain specialism in a chosen topic through a production of an extended piece of academic writing building on their choice of optional units taken in the second year covering the areas of health, education, gender, international relations, criminology and making use of the applied research methods in development skills acquired in the first year. Read more

Why take this course?

This course will allow students to gain specialism in a chosen topic through a production of an extended piece of academic writing building on their choice of optional units taken in the second year covering the areas of health, education, gender, international relations, criminology and making use of the applied research methods in development skills acquired in the first year.

The distance learning and part time mode of the programme provides a flexible learning framework with opportunities for students to undertake a full Master's qualification, a postgraduate Diploma or a postgraduate Certificate.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Critically engage with an international development studies topic of choice, assembling information from a variety of sources to compose clear detailed and logical argument;
Learn to formulate a systematic and methodologically sound research process through undertaking a literature review and empirical research;
Where applicable, justify ethical considerations surrounding research carried out.

What opportunities might it lead to?

You can expect to graduate from this course with enhanced career prospects in the international development sector, greater knowledge of development issues and an increasing professional network that may allow you to identify career opportunities. You will also be prepared for doctoral study.

Module Details

You will study the following core units:

Theory & Practice of Development:
Explore the history, theory and practice of international development studies, through topics from colonialism to globalisation. You will be introduced to the tools, such as social enterprise, that are used in development practice. Assessment includes a social enterprise project alongside a traditional essay.

Applied Research Methods for Development:
Learn the strategies and methods of collecting and analysing quantitative and qualitative data in the social sciences. You will learn to use SPSS for data manipulation, quantitative data analysis and interpretation, using a range of data sets relevant to international development studies.

Dissertation:
Demonstrate your achievement on the course as a whole, through the production of a 15,000-word research project on a topic of your choice, informed by the optional units you have selected, under the advice and guidance of a personal supervisor.

You will also select two optional units:

International and Comparative Criminal Justice:
Compare differing systems of criminal justice, including international courts and criminal tribunals, as well as international norms and standards. You will examine the role of international criminal justice bodies within the UN and the EU, institutional development, and criminal justice capacity building.

Gender for Development Cooperation:
Combine study of theories in gender (including masculinities) with practical knowledge of the tools used by practitioners to approach gender mainstreaming in development. You will also look at the application of a gendered lens to the design and implementation of development programmes.

Contemporary Security in International Relations:
Examine the most pressing international security challenges facing policy makers, reflect on new debates in security studies, and explore the enduring relevance of strategic thought in the face of contemporary challenges.

Education and Development:
Consider key issues in contemporary debates relating to education and international development, through a range of approaches, theories and research in historical and regional contexts. Themes include fair access, inclusivity, diversity and equity in education and skills policy.

Health and Development:
Examine the challenges in defining and measuring population health, and explore a variety of health topics relevant to both the developed and developing countries including obesity, ageing, health and migration, health inequalities and child under-nutrition.

Economics of Development:
Gain insights into the ways in which economics and economists play a critical role in terms of development policy. You will examine resource endowment and exploitation, poverty and inequality, historic trade theory and the role of finance and microfinance in economic development.

Units (30 credits per unit, 60 credits for the dissertation) are offered individually as credit-bearing short courses, or as part of the Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits), Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits), or MSc International Development Studies (180 credits).

Programme Assessment

This course will be offered entirely through distance learning methods. All course materials and readings, lecture notes, as well as additional links to useful organisational sites, social media hubs and further resources, will be posted and regularly updated in our virtual learning environment. Human contact will be an important part of the programme too, with regular ‘webinars’, discussion forums, one-on-one tutorials with lecturers, email correspondence and skype meetings where necessary.

The assessment methods used on this programme are varied and test all the skills developed in the different modules at different stages of the learning process. These include essays, leading and participating in discussion forums and blogs, portfolios, policy briefs and research projects, allowing for a balance between formative and summative assessment.

Student Destinations

The course is designed to support the needs of those who hope to be, or are already, engaged in the international development sector. It offers highly desirable transferable skills such as communication, qualitative data collection, quantitative data manipulation and data analysis and writing skills. Additionally, the applied nature of this course means that students will be working within ‘live’ development contexts from the start. This will ensure that they are able to develop their professional networks and identify career opportunities. Additionally students will benefit from the advice and guidance regarding career progression given by the experts and development practitioners who teach on this course.

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This course builds on the knowledge in theory and practice of development and applied research methods for development gained in the first year to allow for an in-depth understanding of two optional courses depending on students’ interest and background taken in the second year. Read more

Why take this course?

This course builds on the knowledge in theory and practice of development and applied research methods for development gained in the first year to allow for an in-depth understanding of two optional courses depending on students’ interest and background taken in the second year. Optional units will cover the disciplines of health, education, economics, politics and criminology and the topic of gender.

The distance learning and part time mode of the programme provides a flexible learning framework with opportunities for students to undertake a full Master's qualification, a postgraduate Diploma or a postgraduate Certificate.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Study with academic staff that are actively engaged in research in your chosen optional unit and with an area/regional specialism
Critically engage with a range of topics from the field of international development studies, assembling a clear argument from a variety of information sources
Take advantage of flexible provision that aims to meet your specific needs

What opportunities might it lead to?

You can expect to graduate from this course with enhanced career prospects in the international development sector, greater knowledge of development issues and an increasing professional network that may allow you to identify career opportunities.

Module Details

You will study the following core units:

Theory & Practice of Development:
Explore the history, theory and practice of international development studies, through topics from colonialism to globalisation. You will be introduced to the tools, such as social enterprise, that are used in development practice. Assessment includes a social enterprise project alongside a traditional essay.

Applied Research Methods for Development:
Learn the strategies and methods of collecting and analysing quantitative and qualitative data in the social sciences. You will learn to use SPSS for data manipulation, quantitative data analysis and interpretation, using a range of data sets relevant to international development studies.

You will also select two optional units:

International and Comparative Criminal Justice:
Compare differing systems of criminal justice, including international courts and criminal tribunals, as well as international norms and standards. You will examine the role of international criminal justice bodies within the UN and the EU, institutional development, and criminal justice capacity building.

Gender for Development Cooperation:
Combine study of theories in gender (including masculinities) with practical knowledge of the tools used by practitioners to approach gender mainstreaming in development. You will also look at the application of a gendered lens to the design and implementation of development programmes.

Contemporary Security in International Relations:
Examine the most pressing international security challenges facing policy makers, reflect on new debates in security studies, and explore the enduring relevance of strategic thought in the face of contemporary challenges.

Education and Development:
Consider key issues in contemporary debates relating to education and international development, through a range of approaches, theories and research in historical and regional contexts. Themes include fair access, inclusivity, diversity and equity in education and skills policy.

Health and Development:
Examine the challenges in defining and measuring population health, and explore a variety of health topics relevant to both the developed and developing countries including obesity, ageing, health and migration, health inequalities and child under-nutrition.

Economics of Development:
Gain insights into the ways in which economics and economists play a critical role in terms of development policy. You will examine resource endowment and exploitation, poverty and inequality, historic trade theory and the role of finance and microfinance in economic development.

Units (30 credits per unit, 60 credits for the dissertation) are offered individually as credit-bearing short courses, or as part of the Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits), Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits), or MSc International Development Studies (180 credits).

Programme Assessment

This course will be offered entirely through distance learning methods. All course materials and readings, lecture notes, as well as additional links to useful organisational sites, social media hubs and further resources, will be posted and regularly updated in our virtual learning environment. Human contact will be an important part of the programme too, with regular ‘webinars’, discussion forums, one-on-one tutorials with lecturers, email correspondence and skype meetings where necessary.

The assessment methods used on this programme are varied and test all the skills developed in the different modules at different stages of the learning process. These include essays, leading and participating in discussion forums and blogs, portfolios, policy briefs and research projects, allowing for a balance between formative and summative assessment.

Student Destinations

The living contexts of the work undertaken on this course will offer valuable experience and contacts in the international development sector, while the advice and guidance regarding career progression given by lecturing staff will be invaluable. You may use this career to support work in governmental bodies and NGOs, or charities.

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The Master of Philosophy (MPhil) programme will enable you to conduct supervised research into your chosen topic and produce a written thesis (typically 20,000 - 60,000 words). Read more

Qualifications and durations

The Master of Philosophy (MPhil) programme will enable you to conduct supervised research into your chosen topic and produce a written thesis (typically 20,000 - 60,000 words). You can complete the MPhil in 1 to 3 years (full-time) or up to 4 years (part-time).

Overview

The MPhil is an opportunity to undertake original, in-depth research under expert supervision.

Most of our students are registered in the first instance for the MPhil degree. You will be expected to carry out supervised research at the leading edge of your chosen subject, which must then be written up as a substantial thesis.

Our Department produces high-quality research with a strong focus on application and real world implication. You can study any topic in which we have research expertise (http://www.bath.ac.uk/health/research/). Details of research staff expertise and interests are available on individual staff (http://www.bath.ac.uk/health/staff/) pages, as well as on our current research students (http://www.bath.ac.uk/health/research/research-students/) page.

Visit the website http://www.bath.ac.uk/study/pg/programmes/scho-for-heal-mphi/

Current student projects

Take an insight into what some of our current students are researching » http://www.bath.ac.uk/health/research/research-student-insights/

South West Doctoral Training Centre

This programme is recognised as being part of the following ESRC-funded South West Doctoral Training Centre (SWDTC) (http://www.bath.ac.uk/hss/graduate-school/study-with-us/south-west-doctoral-training-centre/) pathway:

Health & Wellbeing (interdisciplinary pathway)

About the department

The School for Health was established within the University of Bath in 2003, to centralise the high profile research and teaching in the health-related disciplines already taking place throughout the university, so creating a single entity through which links with the health sector at national and international level can be channelled, co-ordinated and developed.

In 2010 the School joined the Faculty of Humanities & Social Sciences and became the Department for Health, providing excellent opportunities for academic teaching and research collaborations with other departments, such as Psychology and Social & Policy Sciences. The Department's postgraduate teaching and research programmes now form part of the Faculty's new Graduate School, also launched in 2010, providing postgraduate students with dedicated support and a strong community in which to base their studies - whether on campus or by distance learning.

In keeping with government initiatives surrounding population health and more general public concerns, the Department divides its activities between two main pillars: Healthcare and Population Health – one focuses on the NHS, healthcare and health services research and the other focuses on population health, healthy living, sport & physical activity and tobacco control; each of these groups, in turn, contain both teaching programmes and research activities. Furthermore, there is a bridging spine between both pillars and which houses the Professional Doctorate in Health, Research in Health Practice and the administrative, finance, learning & teaching development, marketing and support activities of the Department.

The Department’s aims are:

- To develop a research portfolio that is both of the highest academic standard and has applications in the real world
- To build on external links with the public services and other bodies concerned with health and society
- To innovate design and delivery of healthcare services
- To change corporate approaches to healthy organisations
- To support government reform of health and social care provision
- To identify and facilitate opportunities for academic collaboration and new developments.

The Department's postgraduate taught programmes combine academic excellence with flexible and innovative design and delivery; our postgraduate portfolio is distinguished by the provision of a number of Professional Masters and a Professional Doctorate programme designed to be studied part-time by learners working in a wide range of healthcare roles from all around the world. All our postgraduate courses are taught online and this has proved to be one of our unique selling points, with students able to continue within their practice area or working environment whilst gaining a further qualification.

The Department is renowned for its exemplary attention to educational design, integrating knowledge with research evidence and resulting in programmes which are highly relevant to contemporary practice; in addition, the Department boasts some of the most innovative and successful approaches to online and part-time education, recognised through a number of awards.

At all levels, learning and teaching in the Department provides a strong focus on high quality education for real world situations and produces graduates with skills and knowledge relevant to professional roles and in high demand from employers.

Teaching programmes on offer within the Department include:

- Sport & Exercise Medicine, the world renowned flexible masters programme exclusively for doctors
- Sports Physiotherapy, a specialist programme designed by physiotherapists for physiotherapists
- Research in Health Practice, a programme launched in 2008 aimed at health and social care professionals interested in conducting their own research
- The innovative Professional Doctorate in Health which focuses on both Population Health and Healthcare within the Department, providing a doctoral level programme to develop expert practitioners and researchers in practice.

Facilities, equipment, other resources
Sport and exercise science and medical science laboratories. Close links with the English Institute of Sport and the Department of Sports Development and Recreation.

International and industrial links
There are current links with primary care trusts, strategic health authorities, the two hospitals in Bath and colleagues in industry. The Department works closely with esteemed international academic institutions, and individual health practitioners, in order to meet the regional, national and global challenges facing health and social care.

Careers information
Postgraduate research students gain a wealth of experience to assist them with their next step and are offered personal career advice at the University. The Department has an established research training skills programme for all research students. The taught programmes enable students to extend their health and social care career pathways and to build important networks for further professional opportunities.

Main areas of research

The Department carries out research and teaching in health, medicine, exercise and sport, making significant contributions to national and international health agendas.

The Department aims to produce high-quality research with a strongly applied focus. We aim to contribute to promoting the health of the population and to improving the quality and efficiency of the health services that people rely on and pursue this agenda with a variety of partners at local, regional, national and international levels. Our work is organised around the two main themes of population health and healthcare. We are also pleased to offer a range of Research degrees.

- Population health

Historically, health policy has focused almost exclusively on sickness services provided by agencies such as the National Health Service. Although this focus on healthcare remains hugely important, it is increasingly complemented by aspirations to improve the health of the population by tackling the social determinants of health such as poverty and pollution and by encouraging people to adopt health promoting behaviours such as healthy diets and increased physical activity and to stop health damaging ones such as smoking. There is also growing national and international concern that improvements in health should be fairly distributed by reducing health inequalities. The Department for Health organises its work related to population health improvement in three main ways. Much the largest element in the population health portfolio is related to sport, health and exercise science, but the School attaches growing importance to tobacco control and health inequalities.

- Healthcare

The Department’s expertise in Healthcare focuses on innovation in the design, delivery, organization, and evaluation of healthcare interventions. We have a particular emphasis on disabling and distressing, long term or life-limiting conditions, such as chronic pain, stroke, dementia, rheumatic disease, and severe mental health problems. Current research activity involves collaborations with NHS colleagues in Bath at the Royal National Hospital for Rheumatic Diseases – RNHRD, the Royal United Hospital, the Avon and Wiltshire Mental Health Care Trust, the Pan Bath & Swindon Primary Care Research Consortium and RehabNET.

Faculties in the Department have significant research expertise and experience in a range of topics including:

Addictions and addictive behaviour
Alcohol, drugs and the family
Assistive technology and rehabilitation
Child and adolescent cognitive behavioural therapy
Complex Regional Pain Syndromes
Dementia care
Evidence based pain management
Leadership and change
Mental health service development and evaluation
Spondolarthropathy disease and related disability
Stroke rehabilitation
Work, health and wellbeing.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.bath.ac.uk/hss/graduate-school/research-programmes/how-to-apply/

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This is Europe’s only graduate course in reproductive health research and is designed for those interested in acquiring the research skills necessary to conduct policy-relevant research into sexual and reproductive health. Read more
This is Europe’s only graduate course in reproductive health research and is designed for those interested in acquiring the research skills necessary to conduct policy-relevant research into sexual and reproductive health. It provides a non-clinical foundation in family planning, obstetric health, AIDS and sexually-transmitted infections.

This Master's course is recognized by the ESRC as providing high quality research training and a small number of ESRC scholarships (including 1+3 scholarships) are available to UK or EU residents. These are advertised each year with the School scholarships information.

The curriculum has a focus on middle- and low-income settings but also provides excellent training in the principles and methods of research for high-income countries.

Careers

Graduates go into public health and reproductive health programmes, evaluation of family planning programmes, research for governmental and non-governmental agencies and university teaching.

Prize and awards

A prize is awarded each year to the student who has submitted the best project of the year for examination.

- Full programme specification (pdf) (http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/edu/qualityassurance/rshr_progspec.pdf)

Visit the website http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/masters/msrshr.html

Objectives

By the end of this course students should be able to:

- demonstrate advanced knowledge and understanding of evidence-based approaches to research of reproductive and sexual health issues

- critically assess and apply these research approaches to inform development, health and social welfare programmes

- demonstrate a good understanding of the socio-cultural, political and ethical issues surrounding reproductive and sexual health

- identify and address appropriate research questions in reproductive and sexual health, using methods from a range of public health disciplines

- carry out research activities to identify effective components of reproductive and sexual health services within programmes

Structure

Term 1:
Students take the following compulsory modules:

Basic Epidemiology
Foundations in Reproductive Health
Principles of Social Research
Statistics for Epidemiology and Population Health

Further optional modules include:

Extended Epidemiology
Health Policy, Process & Power
Introduction to Health Economics
Population Studies

Terms 2 and 3:
Students take a total of five study modules, one from each timetable slot (Slot 1, Slot 2 etc.). One module (in Slot 4) is compulsory.

*Recommended modules

- Slot 1:
Research Design & Analysis*
Designing Disease Control Programmes in Developing Countries
Health Care Evaluation
Health Promotion Approaches and Methods
Maternal & Child Nutrition
Sociological Approaches to Health

- Slot 2:
Family Planning Programmes*
Population, Poverty and Environment*
Conflict and Health
Design & Analysis of Epidemiological Studies
Qualitative Methodologies
Statistical Methods in Epidemiology

- Slot 3:

Control of Sexually Transmitted Infections*
Current Issues in Safe Motherhood & Perinatal Health*
Social Epidemiology*
Medical Anthropology and Public Health

- Slot 4:
Sexual Health

- Slot 5:

AIDS*
Analysing Survey & Population Data*
Advanced Statistical Methods in Epidemiology
Applying Public Health Principles in Developing Countries
Proposal Development

A restricted number of modules may be taken by self-study, using electronic access teaching material.

Further details for the course modules - http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/currentstudents/studentinformation/msc_module_handbook/section2_coursedescriptions/trsh.html

Project Report:
During the summer months (July-August), students complete a research project. Acceptable types of project are: data analysis; a project proposal; an original literature or policy review.

Students normally remain in London for the preparation of their project report. Exceptionally, and only if appropriate, part of the project period may be spent away from the School, whether in the UK or abroad. Arrangements for this must be discussed and agreed with the Course Director.

Intercalating this course

Undergraduate medical students can take a year out either to pursue related studies or work. The School welcomes applications from medical students wishing to intercalate after their third year of study from any recognised university in the world.

Why intercalate with us?:
Reputation: The School has an outstanding international reputation in public health & tropical medicine and is at the forefront of global health research. It is highly rated in a number of world rankings including:

- World’s leading research-focused graduate school (Times Higher Education World Rankings, 2013)
- Third in the world for social science and public health (US News Best Global Universities Ranking, 2014)
- Second in UK for research impact (Research Exercise Framework 2014)
- Top in Europe for impact (Leiden Ranking, 2015)

Highly recognised qualification: possessing a Master's from the School will give you a focused understanding of health and disease, broaden your career prospects and allow you to be immersed in research in a field of your choice.

Valuable skills: you will undertake an independent research project (summer project) in your chosen topic, equipping you with research skills that will distinguish you in a clinical environment. While your medical qualification will give you a breadth of knowledge; undertaking an intercalated degree will allow you to explore your main area of interest in greater depth.

Alumni network: the School has a strong international and diverse alumni community, with more than 20,000 alumni in over 180 countries.

MSc vs. BSc: undertaking an MSc is an excellent opportunity to develop in-depth specialist knowledge in your chosen topic and enhance your skills in scientific research. Postgraduate qualifications are increasingly sought after by clinicians and possessing a Masters qualification can assist you in your future career progression.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/masters/msrshr.html#sixth

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This is a multidisciplinary programme that bridges the fields of epidemiology, laboratory sciences and public health. It includes a strong practical component and the opportunity to undertake a research project overseas. Read more
This is a multidisciplinary programme that bridges the fields of epidemiology, laboratory sciences and public health. It includes a strong practical component and the opportunity to undertake a research project overseas. The course will train students in all aspects of the control of infectious diseases and prepare them for a career in a range of organisations.

This course will equip students with specialised skills that will facilitate a career in the control of infectious diseases as staff of health ministries, health departments, national or international disease control agencies, aid organisations or universities.

The majority of the research projects are performed overseas, with collaborating public health or research organisations and NGOs. Students are encouraged to take advantage of this overseas opportunity, which is crucial to the nature of the course.

- Full programme specification (pdf) (http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/edu/qualityassurance/cid_progspec.pdf)
- Intercalating this course (http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/masters/intercalating/index.html)

Visit the website http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/masters/mscid.html

Objectives

By the end of this course students should be able to:

- investigate the transmission of endemic and epidemic infections

- select appropriate methods of control

- design, implement and evaluate co-ordinated control methods

- assess constraints of local public health delivery systems

- manage available resources in the context of the control of infectious diseases

- focus their efforts on particular geographical regions or specific diseases

Structure

Term 1:

After orientation, students take two compulsory modules: Basic Statistics and Introduction to Disease Agents & Their Control, which focus on the life cycle and characteristics of infectious disease agents according to their principal transmission routes; the principal intervention strategies used to combat infectious diseases; and examples of successes, partial successes and failures in intervention programmes against infectious diseases.

In addition, students take one of the following module combinations:

- Basic Epidemiology; Health Economics; and Health Policy, Process and Power
- Extended Epidemiology and Health Economics or Health Policy, Process and Power

An interdisciplinary approach is emphasised which takes account of the social, political and economic context in which health systems operate.

Terms 2 and 3:

Students take a total of five study modules, one from each timetable slot (Slot 1, Slot 2 etc.). The list below shows recommended modules. There are other modules which may be taken only after consultation with the Course Directors.

*Recommended modules

- Slot 1:

Designing Disease Control Programmes in Developing Countries*
Epidemiology & Control of Malaria*
Health Care Evaluation*
Childhood Eye Disease and Ocular Infections
Clinical Infectious Diseases 1: Bacterial & Viral Diseases & Community Health in Developing Countries
Clinical Virology
Economic Evaluation
Health Promotion Approaches and Methods
Maternal & Child Nutrition
Research Design & Analysis
Study Design: Writing a Study Proposal.

- Slot 2:

Clinical Bacteriology 1*
Conflict and Health*
Design & Analysis of Epidemiological Studies*
Population, Poverty and Environment*
Statistical Methods in Epidemiology*
Advanced Diagnostic Parasitology
Clinical Infectious Diseases 2: Parasitic Diseases & Clinical Medicine
Health Systems
Qualitative Methodologies

- Slot 3:

Applied Communicable Disease Control*
Control of Sexually Transmitted Infections*
Current Issues in Safe Motherhood & Perinatal Health*
Economic Analysis for Health Policy*
Medical Anthropology & Public Health*
Spatial Epidemiology in Public Health*
Tropical Environmental Health*
Vector Sampling, Identification & Incrimination*
Basic Parasitology
Clinical Infectious Diseases 3: Bacterial & Viral Diseases & Community Health in Developing Countries
Modelling & the Dynamics of Infectious Diseases
Nutrition in Emergencies
Organisational Management
Social Epidemiology

- Slot 4:

Clinical Bacteriology 2*
Epidemiology & Control of Communicable Diseases*
Analytical Models for Decision Making
Clinical Infectious Diseases 4: Parasitic Diseases & Clinical Medicine
Ethics, Public Health & Human Rights
Globalisation & Health; Sexual Health
Vector Biology & Parasite Infections

- Slot 5:

AIDS*
Applying Public Health Principles in Developing Countries*
Integrated Vector Management*
Advanced Statistical Methods in Epidemiology
Antimicrobial Chemotherapy
Integrating Module: Health Promotion
Integrating Module: Health Services Management
Mycology
Nutrition Programme Planning
Principles and Practice of Public Health

Further details for the course modules - http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/currentstudents/studentinformation/msc_module_handbook/section2_coursedescriptions/tcid.html

Project Report:
During the summer months (July - August), students complete a research project studying aspects of an intervention programme, for submission by early September. If appropriate, this may take the form of an optional period in a relevant overseas location. Most students on this course undertake projects overseas. Students undertaking projects overseas will require additional funding of up to £1,500 to cover costs involved.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/masters/mscid.html#sixth

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