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Masters Degrees (Child Development)

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Make a difference in children's lives in developing countries!. Program description. Read more

Make a difference in children's lives in developing countries!

Program description

The International Master of Arts Program in Child Development was established with the goal of improving the lives of children at risk in developing countries around the world by training and promoting professional leadership that will advance various agendas to achieve this objective. The program is offered through the Faculty of Social Sciences in conjunction with the Center for the Study of Child Development and the International School, University of Haifa. Taught in English, the full-time, one-year program is designed to train the next generation of international experts who will focus on pressing questions regarding the nature of child development and how it applies to the lives of children and their families in developing countries.

This unique program equips future professionals with a comprehensive theoretical basis and an applied skillset that will be effective in influencing the well-being of children and their families in a positive manner.

What you will study

The program is made up of courses designed to equip students with a comprehensive understanding of child development from the vantage point of a number of different disciplines, so as to provide a holistic and encompassing understanding of the field in all its facets. Elements of study include developmental psychology, psychopathology, neuroscience, cognitive and language development, intervention and prevention, methodology and statistics, parenting, and child development in a cross-cultural environment. Workshops in clinical observation are also included.

There are also a series of guest lectures by leading scholars from various disciplines where topics covered have included early child care, child maltreatment; environment and genetics; orphanages, foster care, adoption, traumatic stress, drama therapy, sleep and child development; political violence and child soldiers; and children’s rights.

For full curriculum information please click here

Courses

  • Cognitive and Language Development and Emerging Literacy
  • Child development in a cross- cultural perspective
  • Developmental Neuroscience
  • Developmental Prevention and Intervention Methods
  • Developmental Psychopathology
  • Parenting and Attachment
  • Psychological Assessments of Young Children
  • Selected Issues in Child Development Research
  • Statistics for Developmental Sciences
  • Advanced Developmental Psychology
  • Selected Topics in Applied Developmental Sciences
  • Final Project Seminar
  • Observation Methods - Children, Parents, Child Care Settings, Pre-schools
  • and Schools: Workshop

For more detailed program curriculum please click here

Faculty

Our broad and experienced faculty staff afford the department with a range of specializations. The department is headed by Professor Avi Sagi-Schwartz who is Professor of Psychology and Child Development, Academic Head of the International MA Program in Child Development, Director of the Center for the Study of Child Development, and former Dean of the Faculty of Social Sciences at the University of Haifa. A full list of faculty staff and their specializations can be viewed here.

Scholarships

Applicants from developing countries are eligible for scholarships to cover tuition, medical insurance, and living expense. Please email  to obtain further information. 

This program is eligible for Masa scholarship

Careers

The program upgrades significantly the status of professionals working with children and families and prepares students for leadership roles in the community, in educational, health and welfare settings, and NGOs. In addition, the program provides skills for conducting child and family assessments, designing prevention and intervention programs and evaluating the quality of ongoing programs.



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This MSc is taught by our expert team of psychologists specialising in early childhood development. The course covers a range of topics from social and cognitive development, to autism and other atypical developmental issues, to the health psychology of infant feeding practices. Read more

Introduction

Why study at Stirling?

This MSc is taught by our expert team of psychologists specialising in early childhood development. The course covers a range of topics from social and cognitive development, to autism and other atypical developmental issues, to the health psychology of infant feeding practices. Teaching is grounded in practice with input from social psychologists, health psychologists, neuropsychologists and primatologists. As well as a month-long placement, you will also benefit from hands-on learning through our in-house playgroup which is integral to teaching and research on the MSc.

Key information

- Degree type: MSc, Postgraduate Certificate, Postgraduate Diploma
- Study methods: Full-time, Part-time
- Start date: September
- Course Director: Dr Catherine Grainger

Bursaries are available: http://www.stir.ac.uk/scholarships/.

Course objectives

What the MSc is for:
- To train you how to conduct research into child development.
- How the brain and mind develop is critical to our understanding of human psychology.
- Studying this requires special skills and knowledge that you will acquire on this course.

Who the MSc is for:
Graduates in Psychology or related subjects and professionals working with children as continued professional development.

How the MSc is taught:
In addition to core research methods modules, the course includes a seminar series with topics ranging from social and cognitive development to autism and other atypical developmental issues and the health psychology of infant feeding practices. The research placement allows direct experience tailored to each student’s career aspirations, and the dissertation allows extensive research into a chosen aspect of child development.

What you get
Office space and equipment, a personal academic supervisor, and inclusion in a vibrant, stimulating and friendly research community.

English language requirements

If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills:
- IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill
- Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C
- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C
- Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component
- IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17

For more information go to English language requirements https://www.stir.ac.uk/study-in-the-uk/entry-requirements/english/

If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View the range of pre-sessional courses http://www.intohigher.com/uk/en-gb/our-centres/into-university-of-stirling/studying/our-courses/course-list/pre-sessional-english.aspx .

Structure and content

The course is made up of the following modules:
- Child Development: A series of participatory seminars with developmental psychologists covering a range of topics in child development: socio-cognitive development in pre-school children; the social and cognitive characteristics of Autistic Spectrum Disorders; the health psychology of infant feeding practices; representation and social learning in infancy; cross-cultural differences in cognition; language and communication development and assessment.

- Psychological Research Methods I and II: Covers a wide range of techniques used in psychological research and demonstrates these techniques in relation to topics in a range of areas.

- Advanced Statistics: Assumes a reasonable knowledge of statistics, although an additional introductory module is available. The main statistics teaching is aimed at introducing advanced methods such as multivariate statistics and the rationale of using statistical methods.

- Key Skills for Psychology Researchers: Focuses on the research process, including ethical reviews, professional conduct and disseminating research effectively to specialist and non-specialist audiences.

- Qualitative Research Methods: Provides a broad but solid grounding in qualitative research methodology.
- Research Placement: This month-long placement, which can be in an applied setting in a childrens' charity, school or child services or within an academic setting such as a Research Assistant, is carried out in the Spring Semester, allowing students to broaden their practical research experience and enhance their employability skills.
The Division of Psychology also has its own Playgroup which supports developmental research and teaching.

We also offer some flexibility, allowing students to opt for a module from another subject area if this can meet personal training needs.

Dissertation

For those who go onto the MSc, approximately half of the course of study is devoted to a research project, leading to a 12,000-word dissertation.

Delivery and assessment

Teaching is delivered using a variety of methods including tutorials, demonstrations and practical classes, but the majority is seminar-based.
Students are typically taught in small groups in specialist classes, with first-year PhD students or other postgraduate students (for example, in modules from other MSc courses).
The individual module components contribute towards 60 percent of the MSc grade, with the research dissertation contributing the remaining 40 percent.

Why Stirling?

REF2014
In REF2014 Stirling was placed 6th in Scotland and 45th in the UK with almost three quarters of research activity rated either world-leading or internationally excellent.

Strengths

Psychology at Stirling is one of the leading psychology departments in the UK. It ranked in the top 20 in the recent research assessment (REF 2014) and is one of only seven non-Russell group universities to do so (Birkbeck, Royal Holloway, Sussex, Essex, St Andrews and Bangor; source Times Higher Education magazine). Its quality of research publications ranked third in Scotland after Aberdeen and Glasgow. Furthermore, the relevance of its research activity to society received the highest possible rating which only four other psychology departments in the UK achieved (REF 2014 results).

Psychology at Stirling University is small enough to fully involve MSc students in our lively and collegial community of research excellence.

Your three month full-time dissertation is supervised by leading UK academics.

Career opportunities

The course is designed for those going on to do further research in developmental psychology and careers where a knowledge of developmental research is beneficial. The research placement enables you to gain direct experience tailored to your career aspirations and the dissertation allows extensive research into a chosen aspect of child development.

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This Master's programme will deepen students' knowledge of child development and developmental psychology and prepare them for professional work with children and young people, or progression to higher research degrees or employment as a researcher. Read more
This Master's programme will deepen students' knowledge of child development and developmental psychology and prepare them for professional work with children and young people, or progression to higher research degrees or employment as a researcher.

Degree information

This programme provides a high-quality education in the main theories, methods, and findings of psychological research relating to child development. The programme aims to enable independent learning and an approach to developmental psychology that is both informed and critical. Participants have the opportunity to conduct research that contributes to the field of child development.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of three core modules (90 credits), an optional module (30 credits) and a dissertation (60 credits). A Postgraduate Diploma, three core modules (90 credits), one optional module (30 credits), full-time one year or flexible study up to four years, is offered. A Postgraduate Certificate, two core modules (60 credits), flexible study up to two years, is offered.

Core modules
-Developmental Psychology
-Methodology and Statistics
-Social Development

Optional modules - Psychology graduates can take any optional module. Graduates seeking BPS accreditation must take either Atypical Development or Language Development
-Atypical Development
-Language Development
-or other approved Master's level modules

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures delivered both by UCL Institute of Education academic staff and guest speakers, group work, and computer workshops giving hands-on practice. Assessment is through coursework involving exercises in statistics and methodology, and extended pieces of writing on set topics as well as the dissertation.

Careers

Graduates are currently working as:
-Educational or clinical psychologists
-Practising psychologists in the field of child development in the public and private sectors
-PhD students.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-College Lecturer, Morley College
-Senior Lecturer, Middlesex University
-Mentor, The National Autistic Society
-MRes in Research Methods in Psychology, Goldsmiths, University of London
-Behavioural Support Practitioner, Care UK and studying Advanced Professional Diploma Positive Behaviour Support, NHS Wales (Gwasanaeth Iechyd Gwladol Cymru)

Employability
This programme will prepare participants for progression to higher research degrees, employment as researchers or professional training to work with children and young people applying their psychological knowledge.

Why study this degree at UCL?

Psychology and Human Development has more developmental psychologists than most psychology departments. The Institute of Education houses major longitudinal studies such as the Millennium Cohort Study. It is conveniently located for attending research seminars in neighbouring colleges and Institutes, such as the Birkbeck Babylab and the Institute of Child Health. In addition to the Institute’s extensive library and online resources, students have access to Senate House, which contains the British Psychological Society collection.

Our alumni include professors of developmental psychology, educational psychologists, and clinical psychologists. The programme provides the opportunity for suitably qualified applicants to gain the Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership (GBC) with the British Psychological Society.

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The MSc in Child Development is designed to prepare psychology graduates for the next stage of their career in research or applied areas of psychology. Read more

Overview

The MSc in Child Development is designed to prepare psychology graduates for the next stage of their career in research or applied areas of psychology.

Keele has a vibrant, well-established and ever-expanding community of researchers in child development. Students will benefit from their expertise across a wide range of areas including child social development (e.g. bullying and peer relationships), child cognitive development (e.g. theory of mind, attention in autism and ADHD) and education (e.g. girls and science and enhancing collaborative learning in the classroom). MSc students are made to feel part of this research culture both through the formal modules and through involvement in research seminars and meetings.

- Career Destinations:
Many of our MSc graduates go on to take up positions in the workplace, register for professional psychology training (e.g. educational psychology) or a PhD in psychology.

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/childdevelopment/

Course Aims

The programme provides taught content and research training in a range of areas in Child Development, building on areas of staff research expertise. Strengths include: children’s peer relationships, e.g. bullying in schools; children’s trust in health professionals; written emotional expression in adolescents; eye movements in children with autism and ADHD; how an understanding of the nature of knowledge and beliefs develops in children and young adults; social influences on learning, such as how teachers use feedback in the classroom; and how to promote collaborative learning; factors that influence children’s subject choices, e.g. girls and science; children’s musical development and engagement; and parenting, e.g. interactions at family mealtimes.

We have well-established links with local schools and have created research partnerships where students come to the university to experience learning in a university setting as well as allowing our students to gain valuable experience working and collecting data in a school setting. We also run the project White Water Writers which gives groups of young people the chance to write and publish their own full length novel in a week. We work with local primary, secondary, SEN and other youth groups such as looked after children and MSc students are given the opportunity to take the lead in running this project.

Course Content

The programme addresses written and communication skills, independent learning skills, data analysis, critical reflection and critical evaluation. Our students benefit from a wide range of support including accessible academic staff with a wide range of expertise, laboratory and other research space, study space, and access to IT and research tools.

List of Module Titles:
- Advanced Study in Child Development (30 credits)
- Contemporary Research in Psychology (15 credits)
- Advanced Research Skills & Design (15 credits)
- Qualitative Research Methods (15 credits)
- Advanced Quantitative Statistics (15 credits)
- Research Apprenticeship in Psychology (15 credits)
- Dissertation (75 credits)

Teaching & Assessment

The course is of one year duration for full time and two years for part-time.

The course is assessed through written coursework, unseen examination, verbal presentation of research, and independent research written up as a dissertation.

Additional Costs

Apart from additional costs for text books, inter-library loans and potential overdue library fines we do not anticipate any additional costs for this postgraduate programme. Limited support is available for research-related expenses.

Scholarships

There are substantial scholarships available, please see this link: http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/internationalfunding/postgraduate/
or
http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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This degree is unique in its anthropological perspective in studying children and childhood. Its key organising principle is that children are nor just passive recipients of the world in which they live, but actively help to constitute that world, as well as being constituted by it. Read more
This degree is unique in its anthropological perspective in studying children and childhood. Its key organising principle is that children are nor just passive recipients of the world in which they live, but actively help to constitute that world, as well as being constituted by it. The course includes taught modules in the social anthropology of childhood and child development, along with research methods modules leading to a dissertation. Modules reflect cover topics such as: the child in kinship; the anthropology of childhood; children in health and sickness; and cultural processes of learning.

For more information, see http://www.brunel.ac.uk/courses/pg.

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This unique course offers exceptional opportunities for you to combine knowledge of research, basic and applied, with the analysis of educational programmes and policy. Read more
This unique course offers exceptional opportunities for you to combine knowledge of research, basic and applied, with the analysis of educational programmes and policy. This full-time, one year course, welcomes applicants from varied backgrounds wishing to develop their knowledge of children and educational issues: primary school teachers seeking specialisation in literacy or numeracy; experienced Early Years professionals; teachers of children with special educational needs; professionals aiming to take on a leadership role in different types of services for children. Psychology graduates and professionals who wish to pursue a doctoral degree later will find the course an excellent first step.

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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Childhood Studies at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Childhood Studies at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

This course aims to provide a multi-disciplinary approach to the study of children and childhood.

Key Features of Childhood Studies

Performance:

- strong links with a range of international networks and similar university departments in Europe and around the world

Teaching and Employability:

- excellent learning experience and cross cultural views because of international student cohorts

- opportunity to continue studies to pursue a PhD supervised by a well-qualified member of the team

- opportunity to take part in a local field trip

The course in Childhood Studies is designed for a wide range of professionals working with children.

A broad range of topics are covered and students are encouraged to critically reflect on their practice and address theory and research relevant to their own interests in Childhood Studies.

The Childhood Studies course will:

- reflect upon the nature of childhood as a concept and the way in which it comes to be construed as it is

- consider holistic child development in contemporary society

- reflect on childhood and family policy in a variety of contexts

- consider professional roles (one’s own and others) in relation to services for children and their families

- encourage critical analysis of research in relation to childhood

- encourage professional reflective practice.

Modules

Modules on the Childhood Studies course may include:

Researching Childhood

Understanding and Observing Child Development

Child Health

Children's Rights and Safeguarding Children and Young People

Perspectives on Play

Advanced Practice with Children

Therapeutic Work with Children

Childhood Illness

Childhood Nutrition and Growth

Staff Expertise

Team members are active researchers and their work is well published in Childhood Studies.

Childhood Studies students are encouraged to publish their own research – thereby demonstrating the high quality of their work.

Team members include:

Amy Brown – an expert in child health

Jill John – an expert in safeguarding and children’s rights

Pete King – an expert in child development and children’s play across children’s services.

Justine Howard – an expert in child development and play across children’s services

Zac Maunder – an expert in children’s emotional health

Postgraduate Community

The College of Human and Health Sciences has a vibrant postgraduate community with students drawn from a variety of backgrounds and nationalities. The College is known for its friendly, welcoming and supportive environment, which combined with its extensive facilities, state-of-the-art technology and superb beachside location, helps to ensure that students benefit from an exceptional student experience.

In addition, Childhood Studies students have access to a wide range of excellent facilities and equipment for realistic workplace experiences.



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This programme, run in conjunction with, and based at The Anna Freud National Centre for Children and Families, provides a unique foundation for individuals interested in pursuing a psychotherapy training or an academic career in childhood development. Read more
This programme, run in conjunction with, and based at The Anna Freud National Centre for Children and Families, provides a unique foundation for individuals interested in pursuing a psychotherapy training or an academic career in childhood development. The programme combines psychoanalytic theory of development and inter-family relationships with year-long observations of infants and children and a research project.

Degree information

Students develop a theoretical grounding in psychoanalytic theories as related to child development and clinical practice. Observations of infants, parents and children allow students to witness some of these theoretical constructs in real world contexts and help students develop the observational skills essential in clinical work. The research teaching covers qualitative and quantitative research methodologies and gives students the tools necessary for conducting reliable, valid and ethical research.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits, with the research dissertation accounting for 60 of these credits. A Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits) is also offered on both a full-time and part-time basis.

Core modules
-Psychoanalytic Perspectives on Child Development I: Infancy
-Psychoanalytic Perspectives on Child Development II: Toddlerhood and Early Childhood
-Psychoanalytic Perspectives on Child Development III: Latency and Adolescence
-An Introduction to Psychoanalytic Theory
-The Clinical Theory of Psychoanalysis
-Research Methods II: Introduction to Statistical Analysis
-Observation I: Parent Infant

Optional modules
-Observation II: Toddler Observation
OR
-Observation III: Observation of a Nursery-School Aged Child

Dissertation/report
All MSc students undertake an independent research project, supported by a supervisor, which culminates in a dissertation of a maximum of 12,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, workshops, and theory and observation seminars. Seminar groups are small, often led by clinicians and allow plenty of opportunity for discussion and reflection. Research work is supported by an individual supervisor and by workshops throughout the year. Assessments include a variety of essays, examinations, observation papers and a research dissertation and assessment occurs throughout the programme (usually at the end of the relevant module).

Careers

Some graduates of this programme go on to psychoanalytic/psychotherapy, doctoral-level trainings and PhD programmes, whilst others progress into work as child mental health workers, psychology or teaching assistants.

Employability
Students who successfully complete the MSc can apply their degree in a variety of settings. Our graduates have found work as psychology assistants or child mental health workers, taken up posts as research assistants and have been admitted to psychotherapy trainings in both adult and child programmes.

Why study this degree at UCL?

Teaching on the programme is based at The Anna Freud National Centre for Children and Families in London, a world-renowned centre for research, training and clinical practice in the field of child mental health.

The MSc is based within UCL's Division of Psychology & Language Sciences. This is one of the world’s leading integrated departments of research and teaching in mind, behaviour, and language.

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The programme is for students who want to analyse and work on social change for the working poor in developing countries. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The programme is for students who want to analyse and work on social change for the working poor in developing countries. It is highly relevant to anyone working or intending to work on labour and labour-related social movements in development agencies and NGOs, labour and solidarity movements, corporate social responsibility initiatives, and to activists in both developed and developing countries. We welcome students with a strong background in the social sciences in their first degree, as well as practitioners and professionals working in the areas of development, labour and employment relations, social movements and other related fields.

A unique Programme

This innovative new programme offers students the opportunity to study labour conditions and relations, social movements of labour and their contributions to development processes and changes in the South. It is the first and only MSc programme in the UK dedicated to Labour, Social Movements and Development. It provides a critical examination of the links between labour, capitalism, development and poverty. It investigates labour in contemporary social and economic development of the South as well as classic and newly emerging social movements of labour in local, national and international spaces. Students will also have the opportunity to experience labour campaigns and policy-making in practice by participating in our interactive sessions on designing and implementing international, regional and national labour campaigns and policies. The MSc draws on the expertise of Department of Development Studies staff in labour, social movements and development in Latin America, Africa and Asia, and on our contacts within such movements, as well as with NGOs and international organisations.

The MSc in Labour, Social Movements and Development explores different theories and methods for the study of the working poor in the South, and offers a critical examination of the links between labour, capitalism, development and poverty, and of the role of social movements and international initiatives for labour.

Highlights include:

- Labour process and organisations: development trajectories and divisions in the South

- A comparative history of labour and social movements in countries such as China, Korea, India, South Africa, Brazil and the Middle East

- Corporate Social Responsibility Initiatives, codes of conduct and anti-sweatshop campaigning

- The impact of neoliberalism and globalisation on workers in the South

- Informalisation of labour, casualization and precarious work

- Feminisation of labour

- The worst forms of exploitation: forced labour and child labour

- Rural labour, migrant labour and labour in Export Processing Zones

- Household and reproductive labour

- The International Labour Organisation, international labour standards and decent work

- Practices and theories of local, national and international labour campaigns.

The unique regional expertise at SOAS allows students of the MSc in Labour, Social Movements and Development to specialise in some of the most dynamic parts of the developing world. The programme’s emphasis on transferable analytical skills will be of great benefit to graduates who return to, or take up, professional careers in international organisations, government agencies and non-governmental organisations and movements. Students also benefit from the wide range of modules on offer, both within the department and across the School, allowing them to create individualised interdisciplinary programmes.

The department has a Labour, Movements and Development research cluster (http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/research/labour/) which carries out research activities linked to labour, social movements and development.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/programmes/msc-labour-social-movements-and-development/

Structure

- Overview
There are four main components to this degree: three taught modules and a 10,000 word dissertation. All students take a core module, Labour, Social Movements and Development. They then select one of two further modules: Political Economy of Development or Theory, Policy and Practice of Development. Through these modules students build their analytical skills and knowledge of the main issues and debates in Development Studies.

- Specialisation
Students also take optional modules (one full unit module or two half-unit modules), allowing them to specialise in particular areas of development and potentially to develop a dissertation in a related theme. By tying these to their individual dissertation topic, students design their degree to suit their own interests and career development goals.

Students should be aware that not all optional modules may run in a given year. Modules at other institutions are not part of the approved programme structure.

Programme Specification

Programme Specification 2015/16 (pdf; 79kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/programmes/msc-labour-social-movements-and-development/file101781.pdf

Materials

- SOAS Library
SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Teaching & Learning

Modules are taught by a combination of methods, principally lectures, tutorial classes, seminars and supervised individual study projects.

The MSc programme consists of three taught modules (corresponding to three examination papers) and a dissertation.

- Lectures

Most modules involve a two hour lecture as a key component with linked tutorial classes.

- Seminars

At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work. Students make full-scale presentations for each unit that they take, and are expected to write papers that often require significant independent work.

- Dissertation

A quarter of the work for the degree is given over to the writing of an adequately researched 10,000-word dissertation. Students are encouraged to take up topics which relate the study of a particular region to a body of theory.

Employment

A postgraduate degree in Labour, Social Movements and Development from SOAS provides graduates with a portfolio of widely transferable skills sought by employers, including analytical skills, the ability to think laterally and employ critical reasoning, and knowing how to present materials and ideas effectively both orally and in writing. Equally graduates are able to continue in the field of research, continuing their studies either at SOAS or other institutions.

An MSc in Labour, Social Movements and Development is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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This course will allow students to gain specialism in a chosen topic through a production of an extended piece of academic writing building on their choice of optional units taken in the second year covering the areas of health, education, gender, international relations, criminology and making use of the applied research methods in development skills acquired in the first year. Read more

Why take this course?

This course will allow students to gain specialism in a chosen topic through a production of an extended piece of academic writing building on their choice of optional units taken in the second year covering the areas of health, education, gender, international relations, criminology and making use of the applied research methods in development skills acquired in the first year.

The distance learning and part time mode of the programme provides a flexible learning framework with opportunities for students to undertake a full Master's qualification, a postgraduate Diploma or a postgraduate Certificate.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Critically engage with an international development studies topic of choice, assembling information from a variety of sources to compose clear detailed and logical argument;
Learn to formulate a systematic and methodologically sound research process through undertaking a literature review and empirical research;
Where applicable, justify ethical considerations surrounding research carried out.

What opportunities might it lead to?

You can expect to graduate from this course with enhanced career prospects in the international development sector, greater knowledge of development issues and an increasing professional network that may allow you to identify career opportunities. You will also be prepared for doctoral study.

Module Details

You will study the following core units:

Theory & Practice of Development:
Explore the history, theory and practice of international development studies, through topics from colonialism to globalisation. You will be introduced to the tools, such as social enterprise, that are used in development practice. Assessment includes a social enterprise project alongside a traditional essay.

Applied Research Methods for Development:
Learn the strategies and methods of collecting and analysing quantitative and qualitative data in the social sciences. You will learn to use SPSS for data manipulation, quantitative data analysis and interpretation, using a range of data sets relevant to international development studies.

Dissertation:
Demonstrate your achievement on the course as a whole, through the production of a 15,000-word research project on a topic of your choice, informed by the optional units you have selected, under the advice and guidance of a personal supervisor.

You will also select two optional units:

International and Comparative Criminal Justice:
Compare differing systems of criminal justice, including international courts and criminal tribunals, as well as international norms and standards. You will examine the role of international criminal justice bodies within the UN and the EU, institutional development, and criminal justice capacity building.

Gender for Development Cooperation:
Combine study of theories in gender (including masculinities) with practical knowledge of the tools used by practitioners to approach gender mainstreaming in development. You will also look at the application of a gendered lens to the design and implementation of development programmes.

Contemporary Security in International Relations:
Examine the most pressing international security challenges facing policy makers, reflect on new debates in security studies, and explore the enduring relevance of strategic thought in the face of contemporary challenges.

Education and Development:
Consider key issues in contemporary debates relating to education and international development, through a range of approaches, theories and research in historical and regional contexts. Themes include fair access, inclusivity, diversity and equity in education and skills policy.

Health and Development:
Examine the challenges in defining and measuring population health, and explore a variety of health topics relevant to both the developed and developing countries including obesity, ageing, health and migration, health inequalities and child under-nutrition.

Economics of Development:
Gain insights into the ways in which economics and economists play a critical role in terms of development policy. You will examine resource endowment and exploitation, poverty and inequality, historic trade theory and the role of finance and microfinance in economic development.

Units (30 credits per unit, 60 credits for the dissertation) are offered individually as credit-bearing short courses, or as part of the Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits), Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits), or MSc International Development Studies (180 credits).

Programme Assessment

This course will be offered entirely through distance learning methods. All course materials and readings, lecture notes, as well as additional links to useful organisational sites, social media hubs and further resources, will be posted and regularly updated in our virtual learning environment. Human contact will be an important part of the programme too, with regular ‘webinars’, discussion forums, one-on-one tutorials with lecturers, email correspondence and skype meetings where necessary.

The assessment methods used on this programme are varied and test all the skills developed in the different modules at different stages of the learning process. These include essays, leading and participating in discussion forums and blogs, portfolios, policy briefs and research projects, allowing for a balance between formative and summative assessment.

Student Destinations

The course is designed to support the needs of those who hope to be, or are already, engaged in the international development sector. It offers highly desirable transferable skills such as communication, qualitative data collection, quantitative data manipulation and data analysis and writing skills. Additionally, the applied nature of this course means that students will be working within ‘live’ development contexts from the start. This will ensure that they are able to develop their professional networks and identify career opportunities. Additionally students will benefit from the advice and guidance regarding career progression given by the experts and development practitioners who teach on this course.

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This course builds on the knowledge in theory and practice of development and applied research methods for development gained in the first year to allow for an in-depth understanding of two optional courses depending on students’ interest and background taken in the second year. Read more

Why take this course?

This course builds on the knowledge in theory and practice of development and applied research methods for development gained in the first year to allow for an in-depth understanding of two optional courses depending on students’ interest and background taken in the second year. Optional units will cover the disciplines of health, education, economics, politics and criminology and the topic of gender.

The distance learning and part time mode of the programme provides a flexible learning framework with opportunities for students to undertake a full Master's qualification, a postgraduate Diploma or a postgraduate Certificate.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Study with academic staff that are actively engaged in research in your chosen optional unit and with an area/regional specialism
Critically engage with a range of topics from the field of international development studies, assembling a clear argument from a variety of information sources
Take advantage of flexible provision that aims to meet your specific needs

What opportunities might it lead to?

You can expect to graduate from this course with enhanced career prospects in the international development sector, greater knowledge of development issues and an increasing professional network that may allow you to identify career opportunities.

Module Details

You will study the following core units:

Theory & Practice of Development:
Explore the history, theory and practice of international development studies, through topics from colonialism to globalisation. You will be introduced to the tools, such as social enterprise, that are used in development practice. Assessment includes a social enterprise project alongside a traditional essay.

Applied Research Methods for Development:
Learn the strategies and methods of collecting and analysing quantitative and qualitative data in the social sciences. You will learn to use SPSS for data manipulation, quantitative data analysis and interpretation, using a range of data sets relevant to international development studies.

You will also select two optional units:

International and Comparative Criminal Justice:
Compare differing systems of criminal justice, including international courts and criminal tribunals, as well as international norms and standards. You will examine the role of international criminal justice bodies within the UN and the EU, institutional development, and criminal justice capacity building.

Gender for Development Cooperation:
Combine study of theories in gender (including masculinities) with practical knowledge of the tools used by practitioners to approach gender mainstreaming in development. You will also look at the application of a gendered lens to the design and implementation of development programmes.

Contemporary Security in International Relations:
Examine the most pressing international security challenges facing policy makers, reflect on new debates in security studies, and explore the enduring relevance of strategic thought in the face of contemporary challenges.

Education and Development:
Consider key issues in contemporary debates relating to education and international development, through a range of approaches, theories and research in historical and regional contexts. Themes include fair access, inclusivity, diversity and equity in education and skills policy.

Health and Development:
Examine the challenges in defining and measuring population health, and explore a variety of health topics relevant to both the developed and developing countries including obesity, ageing, health and migration, health inequalities and child under-nutrition.

Economics of Development:
Gain insights into the ways in which economics and economists play a critical role in terms of development policy. You will examine resource endowment and exploitation, poverty and inequality, historic trade theory and the role of finance and microfinance in economic development.

Units (30 credits per unit, 60 credits for the dissertation) are offered individually as credit-bearing short courses, or as part of the Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits), Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits), or MSc International Development Studies (180 credits).

Programme Assessment

This course will be offered entirely through distance learning methods. All course materials and readings, lecture notes, as well as additional links to useful organisational sites, social media hubs and further resources, will be posted and regularly updated in our virtual learning environment. Human contact will be an important part of the programme too, with regular ‘webinars’, discussion forums, one-on-one tutorials with lecturers, email correspondence and skype meetings where necessary.

The assessment methods used on this programme are varied and test all the skills developed in the different modules at different stages of the learning process. These include essays, leading and participating in discussion forums and blogs, portfolios, policy briefs and research projects, allowing for a balance between formative and summative assessment.

Student Destinations

The living contexts of the work undertaken on this course will offer valuable experience and contacts in the international development sector, while the advice and guidance regarding career progression given by lecturing staff will be invaluable. You may use this career to support work in governmental bodies and NGOs, or charities.

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This comprehensive programme is intended for professionals specialising in paediatrics and child health and is based at the Institute of Child Health, which occupies a unique position in UK paediatrics because of its strong links to Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children and UCL. Read more
This comprehensive programme is intended for professionals specialising in paediatrics and child health and is based at the Institute of Child Health, which occupies a unique position in UK paediatrics because of its strong links to Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children and UCL.

Degree information

The Community Child Health pathway aims to help participants develop the public health skills central to community child health practice. You will build an awareness of current and future developments in community child health and gain the skills necessary to critically appraise practice and policy, and undertake independent research if the full MSc is taken.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of three core modules (45 credits), five optional modules (75 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits, full-time 9 months, flexible 2-5 years) is offered. The programme consists of three core modules (45 credits) and five optional modules (75 credits). A Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits, part-time 1 year, flexible 1-2 years) is offered. The programme consists of three core modules (45 credits) and one optional module (15 credits).

Core modules
-Evidence-based Child Health
-Research Methodology and Statistics
-Epidemiology for Child Health

Optional modules include
-Leadership and Professional Development
-Molecular and Genetic Basis of Paediatrics
-Specialist Paediatrics I
-Specialist Paediatrics II
-Teaching and Learning in Medical Education
-Immunisation and Communicable Diseases
-Healthy Child Programme 0–18 years
-Disability
-Safeguarding Children and Children in Society
-Nutrition, Growth and Physical Activity
-Respiration through Life, Health and Disease
-Principles and Practice in Paediatric Gastroenterology
-Investigations and Management in Paediatric Gastroenterology

Dissertation/report
All MSc students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, tutorials and research project supervision. Assessment is through a combination of multiple choice questions and short-answer question examinations, essays, posters, presentations, reflective portfolios, critical appraisal of literature and, if the full MSc is taken, the dissertation, including an oral presentation.

Careers

This pathway provides the skills necessary to become a community health practitioner. Graduates will be able to assess the need for child health services and planning of services, and understand the rationale and organisation of preventive child health services and the relationship between social conditions and health.

Employability
Students on this pathway will have learnt valuable academic and clinical skills in community practice and will be able to use these in their everyday working environment. Graduates based in the UK continue in their career pathway in community child health.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The Institute of Child Health pursues an integrated, multidisciplinary approach to enhance understanding, diagnosis, therapy and prevention of childhood diseases. Our research and our educational portfolio covers a broad range of paediatric issues, from molecular genetics to population health sciences, and our structure facilitates interdisciplinary work and allows flexibility for the development of new areas of investigation.

Our close relationship with the Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children means that much of our research and teaching is carried out on a joint basis. Students benefit from excellent facilities in both laboratory and non-laboratory subjects.

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Improving global health, including halting the spread of HIV/AIDS and malaria, supporting maternal health and reducing child mortality were a central part of the eight Millennium Development Goals agreed by world leaders at a United Nations summit in 2000. Read more
Improving global health, including halting the spread of HIV/AIDS and malaria, supporting maternal health and reducing child mortality were a central part of the eight Millennium Development Goals agreed by world leaders at a United Nations summit in 2000.
NGOs and other aid and relief organisations deal every day with communities and the dangers to their health.

This unique course offers you the opportunity to work at the interface between international development and health to understand the causes of health-related development deficits and global patterns in health and development outcomes.
You will learn about the roles of different actions in improving health care provision.

The course is accessible to a wide range of students -- from graduates and development practitioners to healthcare professionals and administrators who are interested in health inequalities in low and middle-income countries.

Your tutors have expertise in broad range of key development areas, including South Asia, East Africa, Latin America, Palestine and Bangladesh.

WHAT YOU WILL LEARN

Health remains a critical part of the international development agenda following the Millennium Development Goals. Many of the challenges of international development policy and management are closely linked to health issues.
This course explores the dynamic links between international development and health inequalities in public health access and provision across low and middle-income countries.

It builds on the expertise at the University of East London in both health and development and includes core and optional modules from our courses in NGO and Development Management MSc (School of Social Sciences) and Public Health MSc (School of Health, Sport and Bioscience).

You will study the health issues which many communities face – from HIV, water-borne diseases and malaria to sanitation and nutrition – and how development agencies and NGOs try to engage people in helping to deal with them.
The three main modules focus on Development Management in an International Context, Public Health Policy and Strategy and Research Methods.

YOUR FUTURE CAREER

If you want to establish a career as a development and health specialist, this course will help you on the way to achieving your professional goals.

It opens the door for you to secure a career in development and health planning and policy roles with development agencies, consultancies and NGOs as well as in related areas such as development planning, advocacy and policy research.

It will also give you a strong research grounding if you wish to continue to research at PhD level. The contacts and links which both the staff and former students enjoy with key organisations involved in public health within international contexts will help you to set up your work placement and, in turn, your future career pathway.

If you have already been working in this sector, the additional skills and expertise you will gain on this course will put you in a stronger position to advance your career.

Our course has a strong focus on employability and your learning will be guided by best practice in the field and by the expertise of our academic team from their wide-ranging experience and expertise.

MODULES

The following are the core and optional requirements for this programme:

Development in the International Context (Core)
Public Health: Policy and Strategy (Core)
Qualitative Research Methods for the Social Sciences (Core)
Double Dissertation (Core)
Sustainable Development and the Commons (Optional)
Current Issues in Forced Migration (Optional)
Health Promotion: Theory and Practice (Optional)
Core Themes and Structures in Health Promotion (Optional)

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In the master programme in Education and Child Studies students can choose a specialisation in one of the sub disciplines of Education and Child Studies. Read more

In the master programme in Education and Child Studies students can choose a specialisation in one of the sub disciplines of Education and Child Studies. All specialisations prioritize the students’ academic education.

The master programme in Education and Child Studies is an academic programme that focuses on the link between theory, research and practice. Students are taught to seek evidence based solutions to problems occurring in child rearing and education. Students choose a specialisation from the start. All specialisations have one course in common, a course on the practice of empirical research. The rest of the year is spent deepening the students’ scientific knowledge in the field of their choice, doing an internship and completing a master’s project in which students carry out their own research and prepare a written report of their research project.

Specialisations



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This online programme in Advanced Child Protection Studies is designed to develop students’ specialist knowledge within the field of child protection. Read more

About our programme

This online programme in Advanced Child Protection Studies is designed to develop students’ specialist knowledge within the field of child protection. It will interest those who are currently employed, involved, or interested in the field, whether in a leadership, practice, or support role.

It is taught by experienced practitioners and experts in the field and provides students with the opportunity to focus on specific areas of interest.

There are four 30-credit modules over two years (see modules below) and a dissertation in year three to achieve the MSc.

This programme aims to equip students with advanced knowledge that will enable them to work effectively in the field of child protection, whether this is in the area of practice, management, research, or service development. The programme aims to facilitate the development of higher-level critical analysis skills, and to develop students’ capacity for knowledge-informed practice and more original thinking in relation to the complex issues that arise in the contested field of child protection.

The programme is designed to appeal to the experienced professionals already engaged in this area of activity – for example in social work, policing, law, education, nursing and health. However, those with an academic interest in the area (for example social policy, law or criminology graduates) are also encouraged to apply, subject to being able to satisfy the requirements of the various modules.

More specifically, the programme aims to help students develop:

• a theoretical and practical understanding of the complexities of child protection practice, including interagency working
• a critical awareness of the familial, social, cultural and political contexts in which child protection practice is located - both nationally and internationally
• a critical perspective in the assessment and evaluation of research, law, policy and practice relevant to child protection work
• skills in promoting more effective responses to child protection concerns at both front line practice and strategic levels

The programme emphasises the relevance of systems thinking and emotional processes, and includes attention to international perspectives and extra-familial as well as intra-familial child protection issues. Additionally, the programme gives the opportunity to look at some of the critical debates in this area of work (for example, the tensions between medical and social models of child protection, the relationship between non-consensual adoption and child protection, and family preservation orientations in the context of child protection).

Modules

Our modules are structured to provide easily accessible learning resources, tasks, and assessments that engage you in flexible and streamlined learning. Support is provided throughout the programme directly by the tutor in group and individual sessions. Furthermore, some activities are organised to encourage peer support and develop peer learning within the cohort to enhance the learning experience.

• Law, Policy and Inter-agency Working (30 credits)
• Risk, Analysis and Decision Making (30 credits)
• Help, Advice and Direct Work (30 credits)
• Organizations, Systems and Leadership (30 credits)

Online and distance learning

Above all else, we aim to provide a fulfilling, stimulating, and supportive learning experience. Online and distance learning programmes are well suited to those with busy personal and work lives, and we believe that online technologies have now reached the point where it’s possible to deliver an online child protection programme that surpasses on-campus courses.
A variety of learning and teaching methods are used throughout, including:

Online learning: our online learning environment is powerful, reliable and refreshingly easy to use, enabling you to access all information and materials at any time on any device
Video lectures: experts in the field provide short videos on specific topics to develop analytical and critical thinking
Interactive learning tasks: learning is organised and integrated into the teaching topic, actively engaging students in the learning exercises
Work-centred learning: learning is integrated into real-time child protection practice to compliment and tailor your workplace and personal interests in specialist areas
Social interaction: online and face to face interaction is provided through discussion forums, learning sets and one-to-one tutorials, ensuring you feel connected and supported
The technology we use is simple to use and provides students with convenient access to all programme materials and connects them with the tutors and other students. And as importantly, this can all be accessed from wherever the student is, on whatever device they want to use.

A tailored programme

Our programme allows you to focus on those areas of child protection that are of interest, enabling students to specialise. The learning tasks as designed to be relevant to real-life child protection work and some learning tasks are integrated into real-time practice, providing a streamlined learning approach to developing specialist knowledge.

The taught modules enable you to develop skills in three key areas:

• Reviewing and using the research evidence
• Understanding the dynamics that occur within child protection work
• Developing evidence informed ideas on how to improve practice and services

The workload is broken down into units carefully designed with the busy professional in mind and we ensure you are supported throughout. Similarly, the assessments are structured to avoid having to submit lengthy essays.
The programme includes contributions from leading researchers and commentators in the field.

If you would like further information about these requirements please contact Mark Chesterman or Matthew Gibson.

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