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Masters Degrees (Child Abuse)

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Supported by the internationally renowned Child and Woman Abuse Studies Unit, the MA in Woman and Child Abuse provides a solid grounding in theoretical frameworks, policy and practice approaches. Read more
Supported by the internationally renowned Child and Woman Abuse Studies Unit, the MA in Woman and Child Abuse provides a solid grounding in theoretical frameworks, policy and practice approaches.

The course is ideal for those who are working in specialised services for women and children who have experienced violence, in policymaking or delivery at local, regional or national levels, or are wishing to establish careers in these sectors.

More about this course

This course provides a comprehensive grounding in theoretical frameworks, research, policy and practice approaches to woman and child abuse.

The MA content covers all forms of violence against women and child abuse, including sexual violence, domestic violence, sexual exploitation, trafficking and harmful practices. Reflecting the work of the Child and Woman Abuse Studies Unit, a specialist research unit, the MA focuses on what we know about these forms of abuse, the contexts in which they occur and the connections between them. While the main focus will be on the UK, intellectual, policy and practice approaches from across the globe will be discussed.

The course content will be cross-disciplinary, mainly drawing on sociology and including social policy, criminology and psychology.

Assessment approaches vary according to the aims of each module and how it is delivered. Examples include essays or other written coursework and individual presentations.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2016/17 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:
-Researching Communities (core, 20 credits)
-Sexual Exploitation of Children and Young People (core, 20 credits)
-Sexual Violence: Causes, Consequences and Interventions (core, 20 credits)
-Violence Against Women: Issues, Research and Policy (core, 20 credits)
-Woman and Child Abuse Dissertation (core, 60 credits)
-Children and Families: Policy and Practice (option, 20 credits)
-Community Development (option, 20 credits)
-Crime and Offender Patterns (option, 20 credits)
-Doing Evaluation: Skills and Techniques (option, 20 credits)
-International Child and Human Rights Law (option, 20 credits)
-Law, Ethics and Policy in Mental Health (option, 20 credits)
-Social Policy Themes and Priorities: Local, Regional and Global (option, 20 credits)
-Social Research: Principles, Practice and Contexts (option, 20 credits)
-Women, Gender and Human Rights (option, 20 credits)

After the course

The course is particularly suited to those who are working in specialised services for women and children who have experienced violence. It is also excellent preparation for those who are wishing to establish careers in this sector.

Our graduates have gone on to key roles in policymaking or service delivery at local, regional and national levels, and some pursue further studies to PhD level, including with the Child and Woman Abuse Studies Unit.

Moving to one campus

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2017. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

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This is currently the only master's course in the UK that covers the safeguarding of both children and adults. You'll gain a unique perspective on how to improve the lives of society's most vulnerable people and make a difference in cases of extreme, entrenched, or multi-generational abuse and neglect. Read more
This is currently the only master's course in the UK that covers the safeguarding of both children and adults. You'll gain a unique perspective on how to improve the lives of society's most vulnerable people and make a difference in cases of extreme, entrenched, or multi-generational abuse and neglect.

Visit the website: http://bucks.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/MC2CPA1/

Is this course for me?

Our MSc Child Protection and Adult Safeguarding is now more relevant than ever, with recent changes in safeguarding legislation (i.e. the Care Act 2014), and the impact of high-profile enquiries, such as the Independent Inquiry into Child Sexual Exploitation in Rotherham and Child Sexual Abuse. Offered on a full-time or part-time basis, it's ideal for professionals who want to improve their knowledge and practice when working with vulnerable people.

This unique, multi-disciplinary programme attracts working professionals in a range of areas and roles. Our postgraduate students include social workers, nurses and midwives, early years professionals, police officers, and doctors who want to become experts in safeguarding.

The course also appeals to analytical people who enjoy problem solving and want to add to research in this vital area. We attract graduates from a range of disciplines including sociology, psychology and education. Your peers will help you develop a greater understanding of the challenges faced by the safeguarding system.

[What will this course cover?]]

Our teaching staff are experienced professionals and lead research in areas such as healthcare, social care, education and policing. As such, their teaching is wide-ranging and informed by best practice. We offer a wide range of optional modules including: disability, psychology, sociology, leadership/management, education, criminology and healthcare.

You can expect to:
• learn how to facilitate positive change and best practice in safeguarding
• learn the policy, research and practice settings for safeguarding work
• understand social behaviour and experience
• understand the social causes of abuse
• learn to identify risk indicators
• understand how to a be a socially responsible social scientist
• develop critical analysis skills.

The dissertation element of the programme may take the form of a work-based project, which will allow you to actively combine a critical theoretical analysis with reflective project work. This can also be an extended review of the literature on a particular topic.

Modules

• Applied Research Skills
• Data Analysis and Interpretation
• Postgraduate Dissertation
• Critical Practice in Child Protection and Adult Safeguarding

Attendance

You can take this course full-time or part-time. The part-time route is completed in 2 years, and the full-time route in 12 months. Part-time students will need to allow at least 10 hours a week for study outside of class, and 18 hours if you're studying full-time. The majority of classes are offered during one weekday afternoon and evening.

What are my career prospects?

Safeguarding children and adults is an extremely rewarding career that makes a big difference in the lives of society's most vulnerable members. When you graduate from this course, you will be able to advance your current career, change careers into a role more specifically focused on safeguarding. You'll also be in the position to pursue further academic research.

After completing this course, you can expect to work in roles of increasing seniority within your profession, or to work for local authority Safeguarding Children and Safeguarding Adults Boards. NHS Trusts/CCGs, local authorities, voluntary/charities and schools have specific roles for those qualified in safeguarding.

Bucks graduates have gone on to roles including:
• Safeguarding Leads
• Local Authority Designated Officer
• Head of Safeguarding
• Policy Adviser (Skills for Care)
• NSPCC Research Officer
• Policy Advisor for NGOs.

Some of our graduates choose to continue their education by completing a PhD. Continuing your education gives you the opportunity to develop your skills further and research your area of interest.

How will you help me prepare for my future career?

The Safeguarding course will provide you with a strong skill set and the confidence to improve the quality of care and communication with vulnerable children and adults.

If you want to develop a career in safeguarding practice, this course will prepare you for job roles such as policy developer, researcher, team leader, programme manager or unit manager in the NHS, local government and charities.

How to apply

Apply here: http://bucks.ac.uk/applynow/

Funding

There are a range of funding opportunities for postgraduate students which include sponsorship, bursaries, scholarships and loans: http://bucks.ac.uk/fees_funding/postgraduate-masters-scholarships/

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Drawing on current research across the social sciences, government guidance, and legislative frameworks, this degree focuses on the issues that are key in facilitating your professional and academic development as a social worker- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-social-work/. Read more
Drawing on current research across the social sciences, government guidance, and legislative frameworks, this degree focuses on the issues that are key in facilitating your professional and academic development as a social worker- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-social-work/

Why study MA Social Work at Goldsmiths?

-This Masters programme is ideal if you are a graduate, with relevant experience, interested in pursuing a professional career in social work

-It prepares you according to the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) Standards of Proficiency – Social Workers in England and the Professional Capabilities Framework (PCF), the Quality Assurance Agency subject benchmark for social work, and the Department of Health's requirements for social work training

-Social work education at Goldsmiths has a long and distinguished record – we house one of the most respected social work units in the UK, and you will be taught by established social work academics and associate lecturers who have considerable research and/or practice experience in their fields

-Our social work programmes are highly regarded by potential employers within London and further afield, and our graduates have an excellent record of securing employment; they've gone on to work in local authority children's services departments, adult services departments, and independent sector and voluntary sector agencies such as the NSPCC, Family Action and Mind, and a recent graduate was named Newly Qualified Social Worker of the Year

-We'll equip you with the knowledge, values and skills you'll need to practise as a reflective and ethical social worker, equipped for the challenges of contemporary social work practice

-You will cover areas of human growth and development; community; needs and services; law and organisational contexts of social work; and research methods. Specific learning will include mental health and disability, and social work processes of assessment, planning, intervention and review

-The Masters includes practice placements in two settings and with different service user groups, so you'll be able to gain invaluable real world experience

-We'll encourage you to think deeply about human rights and social justice, and to embed these values in your practice

-You will develop your skills for reflective and evidence-based practice and will be able to further your research mindedness

This programme is approved by the Health & Care Professions Council.

Excellence in practice and teaching

Goldsmiths has a long tradition of social work education, and our programmes are internationally regarded as excellent in both practice learning and critical studies. They also have a strong focus on anti-discriminatory and anti-oppressive practice.

We have a lively programme of research taking place in areas as diverse as:

-the links between child abuse and domestic violence
-multi-family group work with teenage parents
-service user perspectives and transnational adoption
-mental health social workers' use of mental health laws and coercion
-equality and diversity in social work education
-the effects of political conflict on social work practice and education
-reflective professional social work practice
-evaluative approaches to service provision

Our research informs and underpins our teaching and students are invited to share our interests as well as develop their own through undertaking a small scale research project and developing their research mindedness in a final year extended essay.

Find out more about service user and carer involvement in social work education at Goldsmiths.

South East London Teaching Partnership

The Department of Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies at Goldsmiths has recently entered into a formal Teaching Partnership with the Royal Borough of Greenwich, the London Borough of Southwark and the London Borough of Lewisham for the delivery of social work education at Goldsmiths.

We are one of only four sites across the country to have received government funding to develop and test new and innovative approaches to social work qualifying education, early career training and continuing professional development programmes. As a result, a significant number of social work practitioners, from all levels within these three local authorities, are involved in the MA Social Work programme, delivering or co-delivering lectures, workshops and seminars. This means that there is a very close relationship with practice to ensure that by the end of the programme students are equipped to deliver authoritative, compassionate, social work practice that makes a positive difference to people’s lives.

You will be encouraged to make links between anti-oppressive practice, social work values, the legal framework, theories, methods and skills of intervention and social work practice throughout the course.

Intake

The programme has an intake of around 35-40 students each year. Goldsmiths is committed in its policy and practice to equal treatment of applicants and students irrespective of their race, culture, religion, gender, disability, health, age or sexual orientation. We particularly welcome applications from members of minority groups.

The teaching includes lectures and workshops with the entire student group and small study groups, reflective practice discussion groups and seminars of between 10 and 14 students. A significant proportion of the course takes the form of small study groups and seminars.

The MA is a full-time course. It is not possible to study the course part-time. It is not possible for students to transfer from a social work course at another university onto the second year of the Goldsmiths MA in Social Work course.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact the Admissions Tutor.

Modules & Structure

Successful applicants on the MA in Social Work commit to studying on a full-time taught course over two years. On successful completion you will receive a MA in Social Work which is the professional entry qualification to be a social worker and it enables you to apply for registration as a social worker with the Health and Care Professions Council.

The curriculum aims to provide you with the value, knowledge and skill base for practice and is organised around study units, workshops, lectures/seminar modules, projects and private study. The teaching and learning opportunities centre on the key areas of the social sciences and their application to Social Work practice, as well developing your intellectual capacity, and the skills necessary to get you ready for practice. There is an expectation that you attend at least 85% of all aspects of the programme.

The structured learning includes specific learning in:

human growth and development, mental health and disability
social work theories and methods; assessment, planning, intervention and review
communication skills with children, adults and those with particular communication needs
law, and partnership working across professional disciplines and agencies
social science research methods, including ethical issues
Practice is central to the programme, and there will be practice placements in two settings and with different service user groups (eg child care and mental health). The learning on the programme builds over the two years and prepares you to apply your knowledge to practice situations. We work closely with a range of practice organisations in the Greater London Area. The placements are allocated by our placement tutor and matched with individual profiles. In some instances you may have to travel long distances to your placement organisation. You will need to cover the cost of travel to your placement. You will be expected to work the core hours.

At Goldsmiths we recognise:

the unique contribution that all students bring as individuals to the programme in terms of their personal qualities and life experiences
that professional training builds on the uniqueness of each individual by facilitating the student’s exploration of the values, knowledge base and skills of Social Work practice
that it is the student’s responsibility not only to develop a technical acquaintance with the framework of Social Work practice but also to demonstrate competence through its application in practice
that Social Workers are at the interface of society’s attempts to promote welfare
Social workers have a dual responsibility to act within the state’s welfare framework and also to recognise the pervasive influence of oppression and discrimination at an individual and a structural level in most of the situations in which they work. We will prepare you for this professional responsibility.

Year 1

In year 1 you are introduced to social work as a professional activity and an academic discipline. You consider key concepts such as the nature of need, community, social work services, and the significance of the service user perspective.

You are also provided with an introduction to: life-span development, assessment in social work and a range of social work intervention approaches. Your assessed practice consists of 70 days spent as a social worker; this gives you the chance to develop your communication and social work practice skills with service users, and to work in partnership across professional disciplines and agencies.

Year 2

Year 2 provides you with an overview of the legal and organisational context of social work, and extends your knowledge and skills in one of the two main specialist areas of social work practice: working with children and families, or working with adults in need. You will work in small groups to explore methods of intervention, research and theories which are relevant to a particular area of social work, while another assessed practice element enables you to meet the professional requirements for social work training via 100 days of practice under the guidance of a practice assessor.

You are expected to demonstrate competence across a range of standards and this is formally assessed. The learning on the MA Social Work programme builds over the two years and prepares you to apply that knowledge to practice situations.

Practice placements

You are required to spend 170 days in practice settings.

In Year 1 there is a practice placement lasting 70 days and in Year 2 the practice placement lasts 100 days. These placements are arranged through the allocation system devised by the College. The practice placements will be supported by 30 days for the development of practice skills.

You have an identified Practice Educator for each of the two practice placements. Most of our placements are located in South East London, so if you live elsewhere you will need to travel.

We have partnership agreements with the following organisations for placements in social work:

London Borough of Brent – Childrens Services
London Borough of Brent – Adults Services
Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea – Adults Services
London Borough of Lambeth – Childrens Services
London Borough of Southwark – Childrens Services
London Borough of Southwark – Adults Services
London Borough of Lewisham – Childrens Services
London Borough of Lewisham – Adults Services
London Borough of Croydon – Adults Services
Royal Borough of Greenwich – Childrens Services
Royal Borough of Greenwich – Adults Services
London Borough of Bromley – Childrens Services
London Borough of Bromley – Adults Services
NSPCC (London Region)

We also work with about 20-30 voluntary/private social care agencies each year. Here are some that we've worked with recently:

Equinox Care Mental Health Services
Body and Soul HIV Service
Jamma Umoja Family Assessment Services
Advocacy in Greenwich Learning Disability Service
Lewisham Refugee Network
Turning Point Mental Health Services
Carers Lewisham

Assessment

The programme is assessed by a range of methods including essays, assessed role plays, take home papers, project work, a practice based case study, a final year dissertation, and the production of a practice portfolio for each placement.

Assessment of practice is by reports by your Practice Educator. This includes direct observation of your work with service users as well as your practice portfolio, and a narrative giving an evaluation of your work.

Professional standards

Social work is a regulated profession. From 1 August 2012, the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) took on the regulation of social workers and the regulation of the performance of social work courses. This means that social work students will need to adhere to the standards set out in the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) Guidance on conduct and ethics for students (HCPC 2009), and work towards meeting the HCPC Standards of Proficiency - Social workers in England (HCPC 2012). These are the standards social work students are expected to demonstrate at the end of their last placement/ qualifying level.

Skills

You'll develop the ability to practise social work in a wide variety of settings with different service user groups.

Careers

The programme will enable you to register and practise as a qualified social worker.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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The course was one of the first to take an internationally comparative perspective across a broad range of criminology and criminal justice issues. Read more
The course was one of the first to take an internationally comparative perspective across a broad range of criminology and criminal justice issues. It is designed to meet the needs of three groups of potential students: those requiring a thorough research training specialising in criminology and criminal justice; those who are interested in pursuing criminology and criminal justice to an advanced level; and practitioners in the criminal justice field who wish to expand their horizons from national to international levels. The programme components consist of a generic research module (The Research Process) for training in qualitative and quantitative research methods in the Social Sciences, specialised training in Applied Research Criminology and a module on international case studies in Criminology, which allows students to incorporate their particular research interests and areas of enquiry in comparative criminological and criminal justice research. The MA includes a 20,000 word dissertation.

Structure
The course aims to provide advanced training in research and analysis, linking theoretical awareness with empirical studies in criminology and criminal justice. The taught element of the course is studied by both MA and Diploma students and consists of core research training and theory modules, plus a module focussing on international and comparative criminological and criminal justice research. MA students who successfully complete the taught element proceed to the research dissertation.

Core modules:

The Research Process
Comparative Criminological Research
Key Issues in Crime and Justice
Empirical studies:

Applied Research in Criminology
MA students also take part in the fortnightly lecture series of the School of Social Sciences. Visiting speakers and Bangor staff present topics related to social policy, criminology and sociology.

Research Dissertation
The dissertation is a piece of independent research where you are expected to apply your research skills to a specific criminological or criminal justice topic. You will conduct this work with academic guidance provided by your supervisor who will be a member of the criminology and criminal justice team. Examples of successful MA dissertations in the past include:

Youth crime: high spirits or a criminal act
Sex offenders in the community
Human trafficking
An Englishman’s home is his castle
’Get out of jail free’ – malingered psychosis in prison populations
Research Interests of the Criminology and Criminal Justice Team
Youth homelessness and crime
Institutional child abuse
Critical approaches to law, crime and criminology
Sociology of law
Public opinion on crime and criminal justice
Penal policy
Rural criminology
Lay judges and jurors
Procedural justice
Popular legal culture, including film and TV
Victimology
Islamic extremism and terrorism
Trust in courts, police and the legal profession
Teaching and assessment methods
Teaching occurs via lectures, seminars and tutorials given by research experts in the School of Social Sciences. The team of lecturers employs the concept of ’active learning’ by students. Assessment methods include essays, assignments, presentations and a 20,000 word dissertation.

Careers
The course prepares for a wide range of employment including:

Law-enforcement agencies: the police, customs, the prison service
Public administration: including crime prevention units, offender management, general administration, international institutions
Political associations, work for members of parliaments, for lobby groups related to the criminal justice system and to issues of social justice broadly conceived
Research institutes, researching criminological and sociological issues
Academic institutions such as universities

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The Advanced Child Protection MA is a distance learning programme which runs on a part-time basis for two or more years. The programme is for experienced professionals and is fully accredited by the University of Kent. Read more
The Advanced Child Protection MA is a distance learning programme which runs on a part-time basis for two or more years. The programme is for experienced professionals and is fully accredited by the University of Kent.

The MA gives a 360-degree perspective on child protection, introducing you to the viewpoints of academics, practitioners, organisations, parents, children and young people, integrated with contemporary research theory and policy. The impact that technology has on protecting children as well as the effect of the globalisation of the abuse and exploitation of vulnerable children is considered throughout.

The MA has attracted national and international students, all with a variety of experience in child protection. The opportunity to access this diverse pool of knowledge, within an environment that allows you to question and excel, has made the Advanced Child Protection MA a success.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/326/advanced-child-protection

About the Centre for Child Protection

The Centre for Child Protection is part of the School of Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research (SSPSSR) and is the first centre of its kind in Europe. Combining research with distance learning programmes and a range of innovative serious training games, the Centre for Child Protection is leading the way in building knowledge and training opportunities for professionals working in this area.

The Centre is led and informed by a team of experts in the field of child protection. With many years of experience in both research and practice, we are committed to improving the provision of continued professional development to enhance the skills of those involved in child protection.

The Centre’s range of serious game simulations provide research-based case studies and opportunities to explore the complex dynamics involved in making professional assessments and decisions in these contexts.

The University was presented with the 2016 Guardian University Award (http://www.kent.ac.uk/sspssr/ccp/news/news-summary.html?view=2805) for digital innovation in recognition of the ground-breaking 'Lottie' project, which provides an interactive simulation tool to help children become more aware of the dangers of sexual grooming.

Course structure

Teaching is based on guided study using an online learning environment (Moodle), videoed expert lectures, online seminars, 'serious games', acted and filmed role play, as well as web-based weekly forums.

The Centre for Child Protection is a leader in developing and disseminating interactive simulations dealing with a range of child protection issues.

During the programme you:

- develop innovative techniques for professional training and support

- translate and apply the latest research and knowledge to inform best practice

- create diverse and flexible learning programmes

- address gaps in post-qualification training provision and opportunities

- facilitate safe and realistic environments in which child protection professionals can develop and enhance their skills and professional practice.

We also offer a variety of 10 week online distance learning standalone MA modules. Visit the Centre's pages for more information.

The modules can be taken on their own or as a taster to Master's-level study. All the work is completed online where you participate in online forums and have access to journal articles and specialist materials. After successful completion of the assignment, the module is equivalent to 20 credits at Master’s level. For further information, see the Centre for Child Protection website (http://www.kent.ac.uk/sspssr/ccp).

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

SO926 - Understanding Social Research (20 credits)
SO927 - Definitions, Prevalance, Causes and Consequences of Child Abuse and Neg (20 credits)
SO928 - Contemporary Child Protection Practice and Policies (20 credits)
SO931 - The 'Unconscious at Work': The OrganizationalDimensions of Risk-Managem (20 credits)

Assessment

A range of assessment methods ensure that theory and research relate to contemporary professional practice.

Programme aims

Our aims are to provide students with:

- detailed knowledge of child protection and safeguarding research, practice and policy from a variety of inter-professional perspectives

- the knowledge to understand, respect and reflect on the roles of all professionals involved in child protection and to explore methods of communication between agencies

- advanced knowledge of contemporary child protection practice in the UK and globally

- the ability, through the use of innovative techniques, to explore the potential complexities and risk involved in child protection assessment and to explore different methods of working

- the opportunity to visit and revisit complex child protection scenarios, through the use of serious games, case studies, research, forum discussions and acted, filmed role plays, and the ability to apply knowledge from Serious Case Reviews to promote best practice

- with opportunities to critically evaluate support, help and current intervention strategies in child protection

- the ability to reflect on your own practice and situations that promote ‘hot cognitions’ in child protection and to explore how to react in an emotionally intelligent way

- to critically evaluate research and theoretical perspectives in key areas of child protection work

- the ability to work in a manner which respects diversity and equality.

Careers

Our Master’s and stand-alone modules give you the opportunity to further your career and expertise in child protection. As well as benefiting from Kent’s academic excellence, you gain insight into multi-agency relationships and responsibilities. The Centre attracts students from across social work, health, education, probation and the third sector, and widens your potential learning experience. The distance learning delivery of the Master’s programme enables you to fit learning around your life and work commitments and you have the chance to apply your knowledge as you progress. Each cohort contains a unique mix of experiences and professions, providing a valuable opportunity for information exchange and networking.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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The focus of this programme is on contemporary substantive issues in criminology and criminal justice and on criminological research methods. Read more
The focus of this programme is on contemporary substantive issues in criminology and criminal justice and on criminological research methods. It is particularly appropriate for those engaged in criminal justice policy analysis and development or similar work in allied fields.

The programme develops a theoretical, policy and technical understanding of key issues within criminology, criminal justice and research methods. More specifically, it aims to develop an advanced understanding of the complex nature of crime, harm and victimisation together with an appreciation of the role of the state/criminal justice system in the regulation of human behaviour, deviance and crime. The programme will equip you to design and implement social scientific research using a broad range of methodologies, consider research ethics, analyse and present the material such research generates.

Through combining criminology and research methods, the programme enables you to think logically and in an informed manner about criminological issues. The programme fosters a critical awareness of the relationship between theory, policy and practice and enables you to utilize your research knowledge of research skills and translate these into research practice in the field of criminology and broader social science research professions.

See the website http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/courses/course-finder/criminology-social-research-methods-msc

Modules

You'll undertake modules from a broad base of subject areas including:

- Criminological theory
This module charts the development of criminological thinking from the onset of modernity through to the present day. It will place discrete theories in their proper sociological, historical, political and cultural contexts. It will seek to establish the implications and relationships of various theories to criminal justice policy. A number of contemporary issues (terrorism, urban disturbances, and gang culture) will be explored with a view to critically evaluating the value of competing theoretical frameworks.

- Crime, harm and victimisation
The module aims to deconstruct the fundamental elements of criminology: the crime, the criminal and the victim. It begins by examining historical and contemporary patterns of crime and criminality, as officially measured, within the UK and beyond. It then engages with more critical academic debates about defining and measuring crime, considering definitions of crime as: a breach of criminal law; a violation of collective conscience; a product of conduct norms; a social construct; ideological censure; a gendered reality; a violation of human rights, and; social or environmental harm. The module engages with critical deconstructions of the 'offender' and the 'victim', considering how these are socially constructed and how our understanding of these, like of 'crime', has changed and continues to change in late-/post-modern society.

- Responding to crime: justice, social control and punishment
This module explores some of the key issues and controversies in the delivery of justice, social control and punishment. It begins with a critical consideration of the concept of justice and emphasises the significance of this in relation to how the state responds to various forms of crime. It encourages you to think critically about the role of the state in the regulation of behaviour and provides an overview of key changes that have occurred in the field of crime control and criminal justice. One of the key features of contemporary crime control discourse is the rise of risk management and the pursuit of security. This module outlines the ways in which such a discourse has transformed criminal justice thinking and practices of both policing and penal policy, and also of crime (and harm) prevention.

- Criminological research in practice
This module uses examples from recent and current research conducted by members of the Crime and Justice Research Group at LSBU and external guest speakers to develop both the research training and subject understanding elements of the MSc, demonstrating how research becomes knowledge – generating theoretical advances, policy initiatives, new research questions and university curricula. Lectures/seminars will take the form of a research commentary, talking you through a research project from idea inception through research design, fieldwork, analysis and dissemination and, where appropriate, on to the influences research has had (or could have) on subsequent academic works and policy developments. Particular emphasis will be placed on challenges peculiar to criminological research.

- Methods for social research and evaluation: philosophy, design and data collection
This module introduces you to core concepts in social research and shows how they can be used to address social scientific questions and practical issues in policy evaluation. You'll be introduced to central topics in the philosophy of social sciences and the effect they have on research choices. You are then introduced to different ways research can be designed and the ways design affects permissible inferences. You are then introduced to the theory of measurement and sampling. The final third of the module focuses on acquiring data ranging from survey methods through qualitative data collection methods to secondary data.

- Data analytic techniques for social scientists
You are introduced to a range of analytic techniques commonly used by social scientists. It begins by introducing you to statistical analysis, it then moves to techniques used to analyse qualitative data. It concludes by looking at relational methods and data reduction techniques. You'll also be introduced to computer software (SPSS, NVivo and Ucinet) that implements the techniques. Students will gain both a conceptual understanding of the techniques and the means to apply them to their own research projects. An emphasis will be placed on how these techniques can be used in social evaluation.

- Dissertation
The dissertation is a major part of your work on the MSc, reflected in its value of 60 credits. The aim of the dissertation is to enable students to expand and deepen their knowledge of a substantive area in criminology, whilst simultaneously developing their methodological skills. You'll choose an area of investigation and apply the research skills of design and process, modes of data generation and data analysis techniques to undertake a 15,000 word dissertation. You'll be allocated a dissertation supervisor from the departmental team and will meet regularly for personal supervision meetings.

Employability

This MSc will enable you to pursue a range of professional careers in criminal justice related work in statutory, commercial or community voluntary sectors and operating at central, regional and local government levels, for example, the Home Office; police forces; local government; crime and disorder reduction partnerships and their equivalencies throughout the world.

The acquisition of specific criminological and research methods knowledge will also enhance the career opportunities if you are currently working in the field. The specialist focus on research methods also offers an excellent foundation for those interested in undertaking subsequent doctoral research in the field.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

- direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
- Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
- mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

Professional links

The Crime and Criminal Justice Research Group, (CCJRG), at LSBU has developed a strong national and international reputation for delivering high quality and real life impact research. It has worked closely with a range of government agencies, including the Office for Criminal Justice Reform (Ministry of Justice); Government Office for London; the Scottish Executive, Northern Ireland Office and the Equalities and Human Rights Commission. It has also undertaken extensive research in collaboration with various London local authorities together with a range of voluntary and charity-based agencies.

Placements

Our criminology programme also has a strong voluntary work scheme.You're encouraged to undertake voluntary work in a variety of criminal justice related agencies. Recent positions have been within the police service, the prison service, legal advice, victim support, domestic violence and child abuse agencies and youth offending and youth mentoring schemes.

Teaching and learning

Study hours:
Year 1 class contact time is typically 6 hours per week part time and 12 hours per week full time plus individual tutorial and independent study.

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This exciting and innovative multi-professional open learning course is designed for health, education and social care professionals and those with an interest in this dynamic area of work. Read more
This exciting and innovative multi-professional open learning course is designed for health, education and social care professionals and those with an interest in this dynamic area of work. It aims to challenge and extend the knowledge base, skills and attitudes of those working in, or interested in the field of children, young people and family wellbeing. It critically analyses the evidence-base for such work, and examines interventions that link to positive outcomes.

The programme is offered as open learning only. It is open to home, EU and international students interested in child and adolescent wellbeing, and who want to interact with other graduates and professionals in an online research-based environment. It is taught by experts with a strong record of research and publications in the area.

Please note: course content is scheduled for a forthcoming review and there may be minor changes to the course entry following this review in mid-January 2016. Please continue to check the course entry for the most up to date details.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/child-welfare-and-wellbeing/

Why choose this course?

You will benefit from:
- Teaching by highly qualified staff - many of the teaching team have reputations for excellence in their research fields both nationally and internationally.

- A course that has been designed to maximise flexibility.

- The course can be taken part-time, including, on a module by module basis, building to the PGCert (three modules), a PGDip (six modules), or to a full MSc (nine modules including a triple dissertation module).

- It can be studied by those in full-time or part-time employment.

- The convenience of studying at home with regular periods of concentrated online study with other students on the course.

- Teaching which is delivered through state-of-the-art learning technologies via our Moodle platform.

- Excellent support in the on-line environment by lecturers who are experts in their subject areas, in the child welfare and drug and alcohol fields.

- A lively and exciting department.

- Excellent opportunities for shared learning, with students from many different backgrounds and locations.

- Strong links with Oxford Brookes University’s Children and Families Research Group.

- If you are a social worker or health care professional this course will contribute to ongoing CPD with a focus on learning and continuous improvement.

Teaching and learning

The MSc in Child Welfare and Wellbeing by open learning offers exciting opportunities to those who may be unable to attend university full-time but want to study to an advanced level in a stimulating and dynamic online environment.

Web based open learning materials are provided to guide you during your studies.

You will encounter a variety of innovative online teaching methods, which are designed to support your needs as an open learner.

Approach to assessment

Assessment is mostly on the basis of coursework. A broad range of assessment approaches are used on the course, including essays, critical reviews, case studies, research proposal and virtual presentations. Formative assessment is used extensively to enable you to develop the skills and knowledge required for your summative assignments. Coursework is designed to help you develop a wide range of transferable skills in research, communication and team working.

If you wish to obtain the full MSc in Child Welfare and Wellbeing, the dissertation provides an opportunity to conduct a piece of investigative research that will further your understanding and facilitate the development of a specific area of study.

Specialist facilities

Fully open learning and highly flexible mode of study in the University’s virtual learning environment.

Teaching is delivered through state-of-the-art learning technologies via our Moodle platform.

The programme is delivered by open learning but runs within the University's standard calendar of semesters so there will be specific activities to do each week during the semester and deadlines to meet for coursework submission. During the module you can interact with course tutors and fellow students, enabling for instance, discussion of topics of current interest in child welfare and wellbeing.

Attendance pattern

This is a fully open learning online course, so attendance at the University is not required. It is a highly flexible mode of study and as a course participant you study at a time and place that suits you.

Careers

Our course attracts graduates from a wide range of disciplines. Candidates from around the world enrol on the course to learn about child welfare and wellbeing from an international perspective.
Many students undertaking the MSc in Child Welfare and Wellbeing either work in the children and families field or want to gain future employment in this area of work.

This course supports students in their professional career development as it provides an excellent foundation in the theoretical and research underpinnings of work with children and families.

It is also helpful for people working in the field who are seeking, for the purpose of career advancement, knowledge outside their own specialist area.

The content of modules (ie child protection, substance misuse, evidence informed interventions in child welfare) is highly relevant to the workplace and will enhance your knowledge and understanding of the multiple factors that correlate with outcomes for children and young people.

Students undertaking this course have gone on to work for charitable organisations internationally and in the UK, while others have successfully gained professional promotion or developed their leadership and specialist roles.

Undertaking a research dissertation provides an opportunity to conduct a small piece of investigative research relating to child welfare and wellbeing. This is an opportunity to gain first hand research experience and may lead some to further academic study at PhD level.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

The course is taught by academics with a rich track record in research and publication in the children and families and drug and alcohol fields.

The master's course has close links with the Children and Families Research Group. This group brings together researchers, MSc and PhD students, lecturers, practitioners and external researchers and speakers who have an interest in child welfare and wellbeing and who wish to develop research in this area. Members of the group also contribute to the development of national and international policy guidance.

We are also a strategic collaborator with Action for Children and Work closely with BASPCAN (the British Association for the Study and Prevention of Child Abuse and Neglect) and the European Society for Prevention Research (EUSPR).

Our group also has collaborative research links with colleagues in Psychology and Nutrition at Oxford Brookes University, with colleagues from a number of NHS Trusts and Local Authorities and externally with several universities throughout the UK and internationally with universities in Finland, Japan, Australia and Canada.

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Social work education at Goldsmiths has a long and distinguished record. We welcome enquiries from appropriately qualified applicants with research interests that align with those of our staff- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mphil-phd-social-work/. Read more
Social work education at Goldsmiths has a long and distinguished record. We welcome enquiries from appropriately qualified applicants with research interests that align with those of our staff- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mphil-phd-social-work/

We provide a thriving research environment in which the research interests of staff are enormously varied, including:

child protection
learning disability
mental health
the interconnections between domestic violence and child abuse
explorations of gender and sexuality in social care

Assessment is by thesis and viva voce.

The MPhil programme offers the opportunity for you to continue your research to a PhD.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Jennifer Mayo-Deman.

Department

The Department of Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies has human relationships at its heart

You’ll benefit from the wealth of experience of our staff and their commitment to ensuring that you’ll leave us as a reflective, research-minded professional.

We offer programmes in Community Studies, Social Work, and Therapeutic Studies.

Our degrees are informed by our commitment to social justice and applied practices – whether you want to:

-understand and challenge the ways that vulnerable individuals and groups are disadvantaged and marginalised
-become a social worker, community and youth worker, therapist or counsellor
-change people’s lives through dance, drama and music

You’ll benefit from the wealth of experience of our staff and their commitment to ensuring that you’ll leave us as a reflective, research-minded professional.

How to apply

Before you apply for a research programme, we advise you to get in touch with the programme contact, listed above. It may also be possible to arrange an advisory meeting.

Before you start at Goldsmiths, the actual topic of your research has to be agreed with your proposed supervisor, who will be a member of staff active in your general field of research. The choice of topic may be influenced by the current research in the department or the requirements of an external funding body.

If you wish to study on a part-time basis, you should also indicate how many hours a week you intend to devote to research, whether this will be at evenings or weekends, and for how many hours each day.

Research proposals

Along with your application and academic reference, you should also upload a research proposal at the point of application.

This should be in the form of a statement of the proposed area of research and should include:

delineation of the research topic
why it has been chosen
an initial hypothesis (if applicable)
a brief list of major secondary sources

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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The programme is jointly delivered by the School of Law and the Department of Psychology and is designed for full and part-time study. Read more
The programme is jointly delivered by the School of Law and the Department of Psychology and is designed for full and part-time study.

The contributions to the programme from academics in Psychology, Criminology and Law reflect the multidisciplinary context of applied forensic psychology and will develop your skills in integrating multidisciplinary concepts and communicating to multidisciplinary colleagues. The strong links with external practitioners in the field of forensic psychology give the programme a distinctive emphasis on detention and prisons, the assessment and treatment of the mentally disordered offender and young people in the Criminal Justice System.

The programme is accreditated by The British Psychological Society, so accounts for Stage 1 of the Qualification in Forensic Psychology

Embedded within the programme are a series of optional work experience opportunities that staff members promote among the cohort. Although these opportunities will not attract course credits or extend the period of student registration, staff endeavour to generate a range of relevant opportunities and work with colleagues in the careers service to ensure that necessary paperwork and insurance are in place.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/criminologyandsociology/coursefinder/mscforensicpsychology.aspx

Why choose this course?

- The contributions to the programme from academics in Psychology, Criminology and Law reflect the multidisciplinary context of applied forensic psychology and will develop your skills in integrating multidisciplinary concepts and communicating to multidisciplinary colleagues.

- The strong links with external practitioners in the field of forensic psychology give the programme a distinctive emphasis on detention and prisons, the assessment and treatment of mentally disordered offenders and young people in the Criminal Justice System.

- The assignments that we use are not only exams and traditional academic essays but also include professional reports, oral presentations and written reflections which enable you to build important skills that are critical for your future career as a forensic psychologist.

- The programme is accredited by the MSc British Psychological Society, so accounts for Stage 1 of the Qualification in Forensic Psychology.

- We deliberately limit student numbers to ensure high standards and to enable us to develop a good relationship with each of our students.

Department research and industry highlights

The programme is delivered by a team of leading academics with expertise in their fields. The core teaching staff is made up of:

- Dr Emily Glorney is a Registered Forensic Psychologist with over 15 years of experience working in forensic practice and conducting research across secure hospitals and prisons. Emily is currently working on collaborative research projects with Broadmoor Hospital, exploring the meaning of religion and sprituality in the recovery pathways of patients and developing a quantitative observation system for the alerting of aggressive and violent behaviour.

- Professor Rosie Meek is a Chartered Psychologist and prison researcher, conducting qualitative and quantitative research throughout the UK and internationally. She works closely with a range of Criminal Justice agencies, including prisons and Immigration Removal Centres, a broad range of third sector organisations that work directly with offenders, and the Ministry of Justice. Her specialisms include prison healthcare and education, the role of the voluntary sector in reducing reoffending and promoting desistance, and the evaluation of prison-based interventions and programmes. Dr Meek’s most recent book ‘Sport in Prison’ has been used by those responsible for developing physical activity policy in prisons in England and Wales.

- Dr Laura Mickes is a Cognitive Psychologist who specialises in modelling human memory. Laura was part of the team that developed a widely-used statistical method for use in eyewitness identification research. Her current research is dedicated to identifying and developing procedures that enhance eyewitness accuracy, where she works with Identification Officers at the Metropolitan Police.

- Professor Amina Memon is a Chartered Psychologist with over 25 years of experience in higher education and research. Her research in the area of psychology and law spans cognitive, social and forensic domains. Her work is firmly grounded in policy and practice, for example she studies how to maximise the accuracy, truthfulness and credibility of witness statements, has contributed to training of the police and judiciary and has served as an expert witness in family court cases and criminal trials. Professor Memon’s background in human rights had led to her extending her research to third sector organisations such as Asylum Aid, Plan UK and Freedom From Torture.

- Dr David La Rooy is a Chartered Psychologist. He is an internationally recognised memory expert, expert in investigative interviewing techniques, and conducts research that has influenced the training of child forensic interviewers, the police, lawyers and judges around the world in how best to interview victims of child abuse. He has co-edited two volumes for the 'Wiley Series in the Psychology of Crime, Policing and Law.'

Course content and structure

The programme is made up of the following six core courses (Four delivered in the Autumn term and two in the Spring term) and the dissertation which is undertaken throughout the year.

The programme confers Stage 1 of a two-stage process of professional training in forensic psychology that is assessed by the British Psychological Society (the second stage of professional training is subsequent and external to the MSc Forensic Psychology programme at Royal Holloway). International students would be welcome on the programme of study.

The British Psychological Society requires that core knowledge domains are incorporated into the course so as to reflect the diversity of research and practice in forensic psychology. The unique selling point and emphasis of the programme at Royal Holloway is defined by the multidisciplinarity of the teaching (jointly by forensic psychologists and those carrying out research relevant to forensic psychology in the departments of Psychology and Law) and the research strengths of both departments.

Core course units:
- Research Based Practice in Forensic Psychology
- Young People in the Criminal Justice System
- The Legal Process
- Aspects of the Investigative Process
- Advanced Techniques in Social and Behavioural Research
- Statistics for Research
- Dissertation

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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As our lives become increasingly digitised the scope and potential impact of cybercrime is becoming ever broader. Read more
As our lives become increasingly digitised the scope and potential impact of cybercrime is becoming ever broader. In both the business and personal worlds, cyber criminals have the ability to cause considerable harm from remote locations, with numerous industry reports1 estimating that the global cost of cybercrime has grown to rival that of the illegal drugs trade. From financial theft to child abuse, cybercrime can take many forms, and the need for skilled professionals capable of tackling these problems will only grow as smart, connected devices increasingly become the norm.

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The primary aim of this course is to develop your professional career beyond initial registration as a nurse or midwife. Read more
The primary aim of this course is to develop your professional career beyond initial registration as a nurse or midwife.

To achieve this, the course aims to prepare you to meet the academic, practice and professional requirements that will enable you to apply to Part 3 of the NMC register as a Specialist Community Public Health Nurse (HV or SN). It also aims to support your individual learning needs on your chosen pathway, either HV or SN and in the context of interprofessional practice; to practise as part of a team and apply professional judgement, to be accountable for decisions made in changing and challenging environments within the field of practice, either Health Visiting or School Nursing.

Visit the website: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/courses/postgraduate/specialist-community-public-health-nursing.aspx

Course detail

Applicants are required to have current registration with the NMC as either a Nurse or a Midwife, and hold a diploma in Nursing or Midwifery (or have the equivalent academic credits i.e. 240 level 5 credits). If you have a degree and don't fulfil the criteria to study at Level 7 or do not want to, you can apply for the Level 6 Graduate Diploma.

Your current NMC registration must be maintained for the duration of the course and as part of professional registration.

If you don't have the academic credits we would advise you apply to undertake the Portfolio for Entry to Degree qualification in the CPD Scheme.

Specialist Community Public Health Nursing is currently offered in both School Nursing and Health Visiting pathways.

Content

There are seven modules you will study reflecting the knowledge and understanding as well as skills required to practice safely and effectively in either the HV or SN pathway.

This will include:
• Perspectives of contemporary public health and the application to the SCPHN role;
• Research methods and the evidence base for practice which will develop skills for searching and applying data and information in your future career.
• Studying child development theories will prepare you to understand how children and young people grow and develop and the life experiences which can interfere with their development including emerging evidence of the contribution from neuroscience.
• Safeguarding children and young people you will build on your knowledge of assessment and observation skills from child development to study the importance of partnership and collaboration with families, professionals as well as the voluntary sector in the prevention of child abuse and neglect.
• Leadership and the facilitation of change and working with teams will be explored as part of the programme.
• Skills of advanced communication including the ‘family partnership model’, motivational interviewing, self-efficacy and solution focussed helping strategies are also part of your studies.
• You will be able to study the Community Practitioner Nurse Prescribing module as an optional part of the programme.

Format

The programme will prepare you to become an independent lifelong learner by supporting your personal professional journey; providing teaching and learning experiences using a variety of active learning methods. Active learning is designed to enable you to interact with other students in and out of the classroom in activities directed by tutors as well as in self­directed study with your peers. Active learning encourages you to become a critical thinker capable of finding solutions to manage complex professional practice issues and to develop critical reflection skills to equip you with the skills to question your practice and the context and culture of practice. The programme uses clinical supervision, action learning sets, tripartite practice reviews, reflection activities, skills workshops, seminars to enable you to develop these skills.

You will be allocated a practice placement where 50% of your learning will take place and be supported by a suitably qualified Practice Teacher and SCPHN Mentor.

Assessment

The programme uses a variety of different assessment techniques including examination and essays. You will be assessed by; undertaking group and interprofessional seminars, reflecting on case studies from practice and complete an video recording of an interview with a client.

The Community Practitioner Nurse Prescribing V100 optional module will be assessed by an examination and portfolio. You will be allocated a Practice Teacher in your placement who will be responsible for your practice assessments and as part of this assessment you will compile a reflective portfolio from your practice experiences.

All students will organise and participate in a Mini conference in the Leadership Module.

What can I do next?

When you have successfully completed the programme you will have achieved the knowledge and skills required for Specialist Community Public Health Nursing practice, in either the HV or SN pathway through your academic study combined with learning from your practice placement.

On successful completion of all compulsory elements of the programme you will be able to apply to Part 3 of the NMC register as either a HV or SN having met the academic standards.

Students who successfully complete the Community Practitioner Nurse Prescribing module will be able to apply to the NMC to have their qualification recorded on the register.

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow this link: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/how-to-apply/how-to-apply.aspx

Funding

-Masters Loans-

From 2016/17 government loans of up to £10,000 are available for postgraduate Masters study. The loans will be paid directly to students by the Student Loans Company and will be subject to both personal and course eligibility criteria.

For more information available here: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/funding-your-degree/funding-your-postgraduate-degree.aspx

-2017/18 Entry Financial Support-

Information on alternative funding sources is available here: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/funding-your-degree/2017-18-entry-financial-support.aspx

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The Department of Social Work has a longstanding tradition of providing excellent social work education and training and has produced a wide range of research that has been highly influential in the development of social work practice. Read more
The Department of Social Work has a longstanding tradition of providing excellent social work education and training and has produced a wide range of research that has been highly influential in the development of social work practice.

The MSc Social Work is an accelerated programme for applicants who already have a first degree and want to embark on a career in social work; the course will fully prepare you for a professional career in the statutory or voluntary social care field.

This Masters degree runs in close partnership with local social care agencies and local authorities based in inner and outer London boroughs. The course is a combination of a taught and practice curriculum, where you will undertake two fieldwork placements in addition to the College-based teaching over the two years.

We welcome overseas and self-funding students.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/socialwork/coursefinder/mscsocialwork.aspx

Why choose this course?

Students have said the following about this course:
- “Lectures are delivered by experienced practitioners and leaders in the Health and Social Care field.”

- “The teaching is of a high standard and lectures are interactive with opportunities for small group activity.”

- “Staff are enthusiastic, knowledgeable and professional.”

- "There is excellent support for mature students, especially those with childcare and family commitments.”

- “I am a final year student and proud to be a postgraduate student at Royal Holloway.”

Department research and industry highlights

Since its inception, the department has developed a reputation for delivering high quality research across a range of areas by engaging with matters of public concern. In the Research Assessment Exercise (RAE) 2008 45% of the department’s quality profile was ranked 3-4*.

- A team of researchers in the department recently conducted a major study into leadership in health and social care services.

- Two members of staff are currently completing a small-scale study into decision-making in the field of child and family welfare.

- The department hosted the Centre for Trauma and Abuse studies and continues to maintain strong links with this centre.

- The department runs the most successful Graduate Diploma in Child and Family Studies in partnership with 28 London Boroughs and has been designated a Centre of Excellence.

Course content and structure

The MSc in Social Work is a two-year course that runs over two academic years, and is based at Royal Holloway’s Egham campus. The course is full time and students are expected to attend from 9am - 5pm, both in College and while on placement. The course integrates theory, research, policy and practice in social work, and the academic and practice programmes run concurrently.

- Course structure and organisation
In the first year you'll attend College four days a week during the first term. In the second term you are on placement (70 days) from Monday to Thursday and in College on Fridays. The placement continues in the third term. There are occasional block weeks on placement and Recall Days when you need to attend College.

In year two you'll attend College on Mondays and Tuesdays and are on placement (100 days) the rest of the time. Again there are occasional block weeks on placement and Recall Days when you need to attend College. Please see information about placements for more details regarding the practice element of the course.

- First year courses
Practice Learning 1: preparation for practice. .

Social Policy for Social Workers: gain an understanding of social policy issues related to social work.

Human behaviour in the social environment: gain knowledge about psychology in relation to working with service users.

Child observations: develop observation skills that are relevant to social work with all service user groups.

Theories and knowledge for Social Work practice: gain knowledge of theories and approaches used to understand how to work with service users.

Law for Social Work: learn about law relating to working with services users.

- Second year courses
Critical Social Work: issues relating to working with service users and about different service user groups e.g. adult and child safeguarding, assessments, working with asylum seekers, substance misuse, working with resistant service users.

Choose one of three optional seminars depending on your area of interest: mental health, child and family welfare or vulnerable adults.

Practice Learning 2 - critical reflection: students explore and reflect upon their practice in seminar groups.

Research methods: Students learn about research methods in preparation for their dissertation.

Understanding and working in organisations: learn about the legal obligations, structures and cultures within organisations and how these impact on policy, procedure and practice.

- Support
Students are provided with one to one support from: Academic Tutors, who'll support you throughout the course; Placement tutors and Practice Educators; Dissertation Supervisors in the second year.

Royal Holloway provides range of wider services that support students including the Educational Support Office, Student Financial Advisor, Counselling Services, Students’ Union and Careers Service.

On completion of the course graduates will have advanced knowledge of:
- sociology, psychology, social policy and law and their application to social work practice

- the contribution and application of social research to social work theories and practice

- the range of statutory, voluntary and private welfare organisations within social work agencies and in health, housing and educational environments

- the range of theories and methods needed for effective social work practice

- the social and individual origins of a typical range of problems presented to social care agencies

- values and ethics relevant to social work practice

- the significance of inequalities and difference in working with organisations and social service users

- the significance of cultural diversity and anti discriminatory practice in working with organisations and social service users.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework, examinations, presentations and a dissertation. Students are also required to successfully complete one 70-day and one 100-day practice-learning placement.

Employability & career opportunities

The MSc in Social Work qualifies graduates for careers in statutory and voluntary social work. Qualified social workers can continue their professional/academic development through taught post-qualifying programmes or research opportunities within the department. This course also equips you with the subject knowledge and a solid foundation for continued PhD studies.

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This pioneering course provides students with a specific qualification in the assessment of child and adult attachment, parenting and family functioning. Read more

Summary

This pioneering course provides students with a specific qualification in the assessment of child and adult attachment, parenting and family functioning. It is designed for health and social care professionals, who wish to broaden their skills in assessing attachment, improve the outcome of interventions and want to conduct small or large scale research projects.

This unique programme draws on Patricia Crittenden’s Dynamic Maturational Model of attachment and we pride ourselves in taking a systemic, non- blaming culturally aware approach to the contribution attachment studies can make to alleviating human suffering. Our aim is to prepare you to be at the forefront of the next generation of attachment scholars.

You will also learn to conduct a wide range of assessment procedures and achieve clinical or research levels of reliability in analysing the results. Assessment includes physiological measures such as cortisol, EEG and heart rate variability. You will also be able to formulate intervention and treatment plans and select the therapeutic approach which is most likely to help your client.

You will develop sound foundations in attachment theory, current developments in neuro-science, research and practice, and broaden your observation and assessment skills, which are crucial to both research and practice. For example, you will observe and record human attachment in natural settings, where you will need to be aware of your own impact on the subjects you are studying. You will also be trained in the infant CARE-Index, and other procedures for screening for risk in children’s development. While attachment theory is traditionally focused on children, this course incorporates assessments of attachment applicable to older children, adults, families and wider social networks.

There is an integrated focus on practice and research, making this course invaluable for students interested in a research career in the field of attachment studies. Examples of PhD student’s research areas include the physiology of developmental trauma (PTSD) in children, attachment and family systems, the effectiveness of play therapy with traumatised children, the impact of early trauma on parents who abuse or neglect their children, and attachment in chimpanzees that are reared by humans.

Content

Initial modules will give you a historical and contemporary understanding of attachment theory, laying the groundwork for you to be able to critically evaluate the conclusions and therapeutic outcomes. You will also look at one of the most common practical procedures using attachment theory, the infant CARE-Index. This module will give you the knowledge to assesses the relationship between children, aged from 1 day to 15 months, and their carer (usually a parent or legal guardian), through a play-based framework. This procedure provides a screening tool for clinicians working with at risk families and gives a thorough grounding in the development of attachment and exploration.

In the second part of the course you learn to code the Adult Attachment Interview which assesses how adults process information about their childhood and how this impacts on their behaviour in the present. You also have the opportunity on the course to learn to implement and analyse the Strange Situation procedure, Pre-school Assessment of Attachment; Narrative Story Stems using the Child Attachment and Play Assessment and the Meaning of the Child to the Parent (a central part of parenting assessments).

Another key module will introduce you to the importance of naturalistic observation, which is the practice of observing naturally occurring behaviour, as a means of understanding human attachment. This module will focus not only on the traditional mother-child relationship, but encourage you to observe behaviour in older children, adults, family and wider systems including institutions, local and more complex communities. In building your practical observation skills, you will learn about the development of attachment in safe or typical children, and how these skills are used for the purpose of clinical assessment.

Other modules, for example the Clinical Intervention Seminars, are designed to help you understand the application of attachment theory and research in forensic settings, for example, helping you to be able to produce assessment reports, which are increasingly used in courts.

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This is a highly applied degree which lets you obtain the knowledge and skills relevant to forensic psychology. An ideal course for anyone who wishes to work in an applied legal or criminological setting. Read more
This is a highly applied degree which lets you obtain the knowledge and skills relevant to forensic psychology. An ideal course for anyone who wishes to work in an applied legal or criminological setting.

More about this course

Through a combination of lectures, workshops, exercises and field trips, this course will give you the skills and knowledge relevant to forensic psychology as well as many other allied areas.

The course is informed by current developments within the field, as well as practical experience. In addition to a comprehensive understanding of forensic psychology theory, we aim to give you practical skills. This is shown in our strong focus on applied assessment and intervention (within a variety of settings and with a range of different clients).

You can further develop your understanding of different client groups by choosing from a range of optional modules. These cover working with children, victims of sexual offences, individuals in secure settings and legal professionals. Alternatively you may wish to study alongside students from America on our International Perspectives on Forensic Psychology Module (delivered alternately in the States and the UK).

We discuss how psychological theory and research is relevant to a range of professional practice settings. This helps you to consider different career options following completion of your studies. A further strength of our course is the opportunity to study alongside other disciplines and areas of psychology. This gives you an understanding of the breadth and range of applied psychology, as well as some of the skills required to work in multidisciplinary teams.

The course is assessed through both coursework and open book examination. Assessment requirements vary according to each module and are designed to allow students to demonstrate their theoretical knowledge in applied ways. Therefore example assessments include professional reports, portfolios, oral presentations, case studies and reflective accounts.

All of the assessments have been designed to enhance students’ academic, professional and employability skills.

Modular structure

The course consists of six core modules, a substantial empirical research project (equivalent to three modules) and an option or designate module.

The main areas of study are:
-Psychology and Criminal Behaviour
-The Investigation and Prosecution of Criminal Offences
-Introduction of Assessment and Intervention
-Applied Assessment and Intervention
-Professional Context and Practice of Forensic Psychology
-Advanced Research Design and Analysis for Psychology
-Forensic Psychology Project

You should also pick one of the following designate modules:
-Applied Legal Psychology
-Psychology and the Penal System
-Psychology and Sexual Violence - In conjunction with the Child and Women Abuse Studies Unit (CWASU), London Metropolitan University
-Psychology and the Sexual Exploitation of Children and Young People – Also in conjunction with the Child and Women Abuse Studies Unit (CWASU)
-International Perspectives in Forensic Psychology - We are very pleased to be able to offer students the opportunity to meet and work alongside US forensic psychology students during the course of this module. This is a joint teaching programme offered in conjunction with Marymount University, Virginia. This module has proved extremely popular and is run alternatively in the UK and in Arlington, near Washington DC. The module consists of a series of site visits and workshops facilitated by UK and American practicing forensic professionals.

We strive to offer a full range of designates. However we cannot guarantee to run all designates every year.

After the course

Our graduates go on to work in a variety of settings and with a range of clients (eg offenders, victims, police, and probation). A such, our graduates have gone on to work as police officers, offender treatment providers, within victim services and in probation departments.

We have graduates that work in the Home Office, HM Prison Service, the NHS, Youth Offending Teams and relevant government departments. Other students have focused on working with forensic psychiatric residents in secure settings (eg Medium or Regional Secure Units).

We have also had a number of our students obtain work with charities (such as NACRO) and go on to do further research.

Moving to one campus

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2017. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

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Working in this sector is very rewarding. Social workers help some of the most vulnerable people in society. The role provides support and assistance to a host of individuals, families and groups, from the homeless to people with learning and physical disabilities. Read more
Working in this sector is very rewarding. Social workers help some of the most vulnerable people in society. The role provides support and assistance to a host of individuals, families and groups, from the homeless to people with learning and physical disabilities. Social workers often spend their time with people – be it at hospitals, care homes or at people's homes, assessing their circumstances and building relationships.

This is both an academic and a professional qualification with all successful graduates are eligible for registration as professional social workers with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC). The aim of the programme is to develop practitioners who can meet the needs of the service users, carers and communities in the context of a complex and changing welfare environment. Founded on holistic, service user-centred model of care, the course produces creative, innovative and reflective social work professionals committed to working in partnership to promote well-being and make a real difference.

On MA Social Work practice-based learning complements university-based lectures, seminars and workshops, drawing on established, contemporary and innovative approaches to work with a diverse range of service users. The course is underpinned by a commitment to inter-professionalism, service-user and carer empowerment and involvement, anti-oppressive and anti-discriminatory values and evidence based practice. The course adopts a systematic approach to the development and assessment of your social work skills and includes a specific programme of social work development.

There are five core areas of knowledge and understanding relevant to social work:
- Social work services and the needs of service users
- The service delivery context
- Values and ethics
- Social work theory
- The nature of social work practice.

These areas are systematically explored throughout the course in relation to the key roles of social work, which include:
- Assessment
- Intervention
- Support
- Managing risk
- Managing your own practice
- Demonstrating professional competence.

Employment based route

It is also possible to study the MA Social Care on an employment based route (EBR). Candidates need to be sponsored and supported by their employing agency to undertake this. It is taught alongside the existing MA Social Work and the structure is the same, but students have the option of doing the dissertation in a third year and completing their qualification over a three year period.

See the website http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/courses/course-finder/social-work-ma

Modules

Year 1:
- Readiness for direct practice
This module develops practice relevant skills and awareness of the social work role and responsibilities. It will ensure that you are ready for your initial period of direct practice and to provide you with a foundation for skills development throughout the programme. Service users, carers and practitioners will be involved in the development, delivery and assessments of the module.

- Human growth and development
This module critically explores a range of human growth and development theories across the life course in order to facilitate understanding of ordinary development and the impact of life events, disability, abuse, mental health issues, drug and alcohol use on development throughout life. You will complete a series of child observations over the period of the module which provide a key opportunity to integrate theoretical knowledge with practice, and to develop reflective skills.

- Practice placement 1
70 days practice learning in practice placement.

- Social work Law
This module introduces legal context and statutory responsibilities of social workers in England and Wales. You will be familiarised with the basic principles of English Law and the systems through which the legal process operates. You will be enabled to develop a sound understanding of the key legislation relevant to professional practice. There is a strong focus on the key major current legislation Children Act (1989), the NHS and Community Care Act (1990), the Mental Health Acts (1983 and 2007) and the Mental Capacity Act (2005). The module aims to ensure that you not only understand relevant law but are also able to apply it to specific areas of practice. The module familiarises you with the powers and duties of social workers and others in relation to children and families, and vulnerable adults. It also examines the implications for social work practice of the UK legislation on discrimination and the implications of the incorporation into UK law of the European Convention on Human Rights.

- Methods and theories for practice
This module introduces the core body of knowledge clustered around the major social work theories, processes and methods. A major emphasis will be on anti-discriminatory practice, evidence based practice and critical reflection. You will learn about a range of theoretical perspectives and methods of intervention and their application in practice.

Year 2:
- Society and ethics
This module brings together selected key areas of social policy and ethics relevant to social work. There will be a strong emphasis on the use of social policy to illuminate the challenges facing and social work in contemporary British society. Using a critical analysis of the impact of neo-liberalism and globalisation the module will be a focus on the ethical dimensions of decision making and practice delivery of policy. You will be encouraged to engage with contemporary debates and controversies associated with social work and to relate your work in class, with your reading and developing practice.

- Professional capabilities in social work practice settings
This module covers the four settings of social work; disability, adults at risk, mental health and child and family. It is focused on gaining familiarity with the process and delivery of social work services, with particular regard to safe-guarding and empowering service-users.

- Communication and collaborative working

- Practice learning placement 2
100 days practice learning in practice placement.

- Limited systematic review dissertation
This module provides the opportunity to undertake a limited systematic review into a contemporary and novel topic of choice with reference to the specific profession of social work. The findings would add to the professional evidence base. Dissemination of findings by publication is encouraged and expected.

Employability

- Social work as a career
You will normally specialise in a certain group of society, such as children. Much of the work is around helping decide the level of support or protection required, responding to requests for help and working with other agencies and professionals for the best outcomes. Most opportunities are with local authorities, where salaries can vary substantially between regions - you are likely to earn more working in London. However there are also opportunities available at private care homes, charities and NHS Trusts.

A patient, non-judgemental mind-set is needed, with the ability to communicate effectively with a host of different people and gain their trust. The work demands a level of resilience and a genuine desire to help people, as some cases may be disturbing, and some people won't want your help.

- Career progression
On graduation you will be eligible to register as a Social Worker, with starting salaries ranging from £19,500-£25,000, with this possibly rising to £40,000 with experience and further responsibilities. (National Careers Service)

After qualifying as a social worker there are a variety of postgraduate professional development courses you could undertake. To find out more about what's on offer visit our online CPPD prospectus.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

- direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
- Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
- mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

Professional links

This course has been developed in partnership with local authority and voluntary sector partners, with input from a wide range of service users and carers. We work in partnership with a number of London local authorities, and other organisations on both the public and private sector, who contribute to planning the programme, to learning and teaching, and to the provision of practice learning opportunities. The MA Social Work is both an academic and professional qualification.

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