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This fully accredited MSc programme from the Centre for Environmental and Health Engineering is highly popular and relevant to the needs of future engineers, scientists and professionals in the environmental-health, water, pollution-control, waste-management and environmental sectors. Read more
This fully accredited MSc programme from the Centre for Environmental and Health Engineering is highly popular and relevant to the needs of future engineers, scientists and professionals in the environmental-health, water, pollution-control, waste-management and environmental sectors.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

This MSc attracts UK and overseas graduates who wish to take advantage of the considerable global interest in water, wastewater, sanitation and waste to develop their careers.

Many graduates from the programme go on to work for consultancies, water utilities, contractors, relief agencies, regulatory bodies and international organisations.

Graduates from the programme also have the potential to progress to relevant specialist PhD or EngD research programmes in the field.

In the past, scholarship students have been accepted from a range of schemes, including: Foreign Office and British Council Chevening, World Bank, Commonwealth, Thames Water, Commonwealth Shared Scholarships, and the Royal Academy of Engineering, together with students from numerous overseas national schemes.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time students must study at least two taught technical modules per academic year. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation project. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Environmental Health
-Water Treatment
-Wastewater Treatment
-Applied Chemistry & Microbiology
-Pollution Control
-Groundwater Control
-Regulation & Management
-European Study Tour
-Water Resources
-Dissertation Project

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The programme aims to provide graduates with:
-A comprehensive and robust understanding of key areas of water and environmental engineering
-Skills that will enable students to explore, critically assess and evaluate problems and produce systematic and coherent solutions integrating core engineering science with practical applications both independently and within a team structure
-An understanding of how this knowledge can be articulated around sustainable development practices
-A sound base for enhanced communication skills both oral and written
-A pathway that will prepare graduates for successful careers in the field including, where appropriate, progression to Chartered Engineer status

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas.

Knowledge and understanding
-The fundamental principles underpinning the key topics covered in the subject area
-Investigation and research techniques which provide a sound base for critical evaluation, selection and use of a wide range of scientific, technical and management processes relevant to the field
-The multidisciplinary nature of the subject area and its underlying principles and the importance of developing integrated approaches to solving complex problems
-The importance of identifying emerging trends to existing knowledge structures and theoretical frameworks and propose new alternative application and methodological approaches relevant to the student’ s research interests
-Management, organisation and communication skills including problem definition, project and experimental design, time management, decision making processes, independent and team work, knowledge transfer via written and oral presentations

Intellectual/cognitive skills
-An integrated and multidisciplinary approach to solving complex problems using professional judgment taking into consideration the engineering, economic, social and environmental impacts
-The ability to critically evaluate outcomes and accurately assess and report on own/others work with justification and relate them to existing knowledge structures and methodologies
-The ability to formulate, conduct and write-up a systematic and coherent research programme topic demonstrating in-depth knowledge and high level of problem solving skills

Professional practical skills
-Critical review of the scientific literature for effective justification and support of results and decisions
Acquisition of the necessary skills to collect as well as generate data via laboratory experiments or computer-based programmes
-Critical analysis of results/recommendations and their presentation in a concise and logical manner
-Preparation of technical reports and presentation of work to an informed audience
-Awareness of difficulties and ethical issues likely to arise in professional practice and an ability to formulate solutions in dialogue with peers, industry professionals, institutional professionals and others

Key/transferable skills
-Critical analysis, evaluation and synthesis of complex information and data
-Communication and knowledge transfer through oral presentations and written reports
-Selection and use of appropriate advanced research methods
-Integrated and multidisciplinary approach to problem solving
-Time and resource management
-Effective use of a range of communication and technology tools aimed at different audiences
-Effective learning and working, both independently and as a part of a team

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

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The focus of governments and humanitarian NGOs has progressively shifted towards conflict prevention and building sustainable peace. Read more
The focus of governments and humanitarian NGOs has progressively shifted towards conflict prevention and building sustainable peace. Yet to prevent conflict or to build a secure and inclusive state and society after conflict involves a complex set of skills straddling conflict analysis, conflict mediation and negotiation, peace processes, state stabilisation, post-conflict reconstruction, peace building and early warning.

This inter-disciplinary, custom-designed MSc offers the opportunity to develop operational and vocational skills for conflict prevention and peacebuilding within the context of the latest theories on conflict and conflict prevention. Students will acquire the analytical skills to map conflict dynamics, design conflict sensitive projects and develop early warning mechanisms, enabling them to better predict, and so avoid, the outbreak of violent conflicts. They will also gain the skills necessary to assess and evaluate the impact and outcomes of interventions.

The MSc is designed for practitioners looking to enhance their existing skills, as well as graduates with a career in conflict prevention, conflict mediation, or post-conflict reconstruction in mind. It is particularly aimed at those seeking to work or already working in the (I)NGO sector, governmental departments or inter-governmental organisations.

While rooted in peace and conflict studies, the MSc draws on strategic and security studies as well as development studies, enabling much needed cross-fertilisation between these traditionally divergent perspectives. It draws on real-life case studies as well as interactive role plays, and exposes students to both cutting-edge academic developments and the latest practitioner experience, with a particular focus on bottom-up approaches.

Courses are taught by a mixture of academics and practitioners, and cover both critical and problem-solving approaches. Conflict dynamics are analysed drawing on multiple disciplines, including security studies, peace studies, anthropology, law, archaeology, history and political theory. Modules include both traditional, term-long modules and short, usually more skills-oriented continuing professional development courses as well as fieldtrips (e.g. fieldtrips have been organised to Nepal, Kenya, Lebanon, Sri Lanka and Kosovo).

Student Profiles

"What I really like about DGSi programs is that they are able to match a great theoretical understanding of the issues I am interested in with a clear focus on the practical skills that are required for working in the field." Lianne Vostermans, 2013/14

“Having co-sponsorship from the Foreign and Commonwealth Office of the UK and Durham University, I was able to accomplish my Chevening scholarship doing MSc Conflict Prevention and Peacebuilding (CPP) at Durham Global Security Institute (DGSi). Although it was found to be quite intensive and intellectually challenging, I have no doubt that this master programme will equip junior diplomats like me with necessary knowledge and skills, especially in security and peacebuilding domains, so that we can contribute our best capacities in the making of the world a more peaceful home to the whole mankind.” Chan Aye, 2015/16

“I chose the Conflict Prevention and Peacebuilding Master because of its interdisciplinary character, topics and the combination between theory and practice. During the course I have had the opportunity to meet very many interesting scholars, practitioners and very intelligent and diverse fellow students, from different cultural and academic backgrounds. The course gave me insight in things I had only read about in books before by confronting us with people who have actually been in the field, and by taking us there ourselves through the study trip and fieldwork opportunities for our dissertations. I have learned to look at conflict situations from new perspectives, something I hope to use in future employment in order to help create a more peaceful world.” Marit Jansen, 2014/15

Course Structure

The MSc will provide students with advanced knowledge of the complex and specialised areas of peacebuilding, among it conflict analysis, conflict prevention, conflict resolution and conflict transformation, community driven reconstruction, peace processes within the context of contemporary conflicts and in the context of broader international (humanitarian) interventions. Integrated into the MSc structure are opportunities to develop operational and vocational skills for example in negotiations, conflict mediation, conflict sensitive programme design and programme management, or urban peacebuilding. Students are provided with theoretical and empirical knowledge and with practical skills that are helpful for current and future employment opportunities. The courses are thus attractive to both graduates and mid-career practitioners. Whilst the academic and applied focus of the MSc comes through a peace and conflict studies analytic lens, course material will also draw from traditional strategic/security and development studies, enabling cross fertilisation between different perspectives. It allows the exploration of unique and new paradigms and practices in the fields of conflict, peace, security, defence, diplomacy, development and humanitarian intervention.

Five core modules worth 75 credits plus a Dissertation worth 60 credits plus three optional modules to the value of 45 credits.

Core Modules
-Defence, Development and Diplomacy in Conflict: Evolving Actors, Factors and Paradigms
-Conflict Prevention and Sustainable Peace
-Responses: Peace Processes and Political Negotiation
-Recovery and Reconstruction: Consolidating Peace after Violence
-Capstone Exercise: Humanitarian Intervention Simulation (in MSc-specific roles)

Dissertation.
Optional Modules - Optional modules in previous years have included:
-Religion, Culture and Conflict
-Conflict Mediation
-Fieldtrip
-Conflict Sensitive Programme Management
-Re-thinking Counter Terrorism
-Urban Violence - Urban Peacebuilding
-International Negotiation as Instrument in Conflict Management
-Policing Post-Conflict Cities
-Conflict Analysis

Learning and Teaching

At the beginning of the academic year, as well as the general induction programme offered by the School and the university, Durham Global Security Institute (DGSi) students are invited to a programme specific induction. This induction provides an overview of the programme an opportunity to meet members of the team and an opportunity to discuss optional module choices.

The 180 credits one-year MSc degree programme is divided into five core and three optional modules of 15 credits each. Students also have to submit a dissertation (60 credits) of not more than15,000 words. Practitioners have the option of writing an in-depth policy document as their dissertation.

Most of the modules are delivered during the first two terms and students spend the remaining time to write the dissertation. Assessment methods include: an examination, essays, presentations, reflective journal, reports, article reviews and policy briefs.

Although all modules have 18/19 contact hours, the core modules are spread over 9/10 weeks and 132 hours of self-directed learning. The modules are mainly delivered through weekly 2-hour sessions which take the form of a one hour lecture and a one hour tutorial. The form in which seminars are conducted can differ from one module to another. Typically modules would have elements of lectures, discussions, and presentations from students—the extent of each of these components would differ from one module to another. The optional modules of the programme are either delivered over two full days, through a mixture of lectures, Q&A sessions, seminar discussions, and role plays or over a single term in 2-hour seminar sessions. There is also the opportunity to participate in a study visit which provides an opportunity to investigate issues ‘in the field’ concerned with conflict prevention, conflict resolution, state and peace-building. Of particular interest is the theory-practice linkage

Students can also meet their module coordinators or programme coordinator during their weekly contact hours or by making an appointment. When students are working on their dissertations during the latter half of the year, they are required to attend two 4-hour workshops. In addition, they have the opportunity to meet their assigned supervisors for an average of 6 meetings. Students also have access to the MSc Programme Director and the School’s Director of Taught Post Graduate Studies whenever there is a need.

The School hosts events throughout the year which all postgraduate students are invited to attend. Students are also fully integrated into the Durham Global Security Institute which also hosts guest lectures and seminars throughout the year. These events provide students with the opportunity to engage with, and debate, the most important issues in current political and international studies, and in conflict, peace and security studies.

Towards the end of the programme students can contact the Careers Office of the University to get advice on available job prospects and get assistance on applying for these.

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This programme combines a sound basis of advanced knowledge and understanding in the broader and more disparate field of International Studies with the opportunity to choose optional specialist areas of study from among those offered in the School, and other schools such as Modern Languages and Cultures. Read more
This programme combines a sound basis of advanced knowledge and understanding in the broader and more disparate field of International Studies with the opportunity to choose optional specialist areas of study from among those offered in the School, and other schools such as Modern Languages and Cultures. The particular interests reflected in the choice of options may then be developed through the researching and writing of a dissertation.

Through the programme, you will gain advanced knowledge and understanding of:
-The extent to which an international community has developed and the driving forces shaping its development
-Factors determining humanitarian interventions
-The processes of globalisation in the political, economic, cultural and scientific fields
-The governance role of international organisations
-How the degree of integration of countries into the international political and economic system varies and the determinants of those variations
-Historical and/or contemporary issues and debates in the politics and political economy of specific states and/or areas and/or international institutions and organisations
-Regime analysis and the concept of soft power governance
-An appropriate topic in international politics of their choice

Student Profiles

The time I spent as an International Relations student at SGIA was one of the most precious moment in my life. In this course, there is a large number of modules that I can choose to study based on my interest. Furthermore, these modules are interdisciplinary, which help to develop the knowledge and enhance knowledge adaptability skill of the students. Besides, class discussion with foreign classmates, along with the contribution of skillful teaching staff, not only help me to create friendships across the border and engage in international community, but also, help to develop my analytical skills, and provide me the different perspective to view the world that help me to get the better understanding of human beings and the society. I feel really honoured that I had a chance to study in this course and become the member of this school and this university.” Poramet "Jay" Tangsathaporn, 2015/16

“As I have been extensively involved in development projects implemented by different international organisations such as the Asian Development Bank, Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation, Voluntary Services Overseas, and the UNDP for 7 years, I have had acquired the practical skills of working in different fields with international experts with diverse backgrounds. While doing my master’s programme in International Studies at the School of Government and International Affairs of Durham University, I have captured very good academic skills that should help me successfully pursue my career at regional and worldwide development organisations. I chose the MA International Studies programme for its focus on international political economy and development as well as regional studies. I have been grateful that my goal of studying the topics where I have had very limited knowledge matched the areas where Durham is recognised as number one in the UK. Therefore, I went deeper into economic, political, and security issues of particular regions such as Asia and the Middle East within my optional modules, which enabled me to fully understand and assess the whole world issues based on evidence. Learning to always ask ‘why’ to understand the root of the problem, and to ask ‘how’ to offer solutions has been one of the delicious fruits that I have harvested during my journey of original, creative, and critical thinking in Durham. Finally, I feel grateful to Durham University and the Chevening Secretariat for providing me with the greatest opportunity of studying at one of the top universities of the world with full scholarship.” Onon Sukhbaatar, 2015/16

“Participating in the MA International Relations programme has been a really positive experience. Students can choose from a wide range of modules, allowing for specialisation in a particular region or a more eclectic approach. The style of teaching in the department encourages independent thought and research, critical analysis and active contribution meaning students develop important skills relevant to further study as well as the workplace. The number of extra-curricular talks organised by the faculty enriches the learning experience while the diverse nature of the student body facilitates the sharing of different perspectives and ideas. Finally, learning is supported by several well-resourced libraries, IT facilities, and knowledgeable and enthusiastic staff.” Sarah Clowry, 2015/16

Course Content

Students will take four core modules to the value of 135 credits and optional modules to the value of 45 credits.

Core Modules:
-Research Methods and Dissertation Production
-Model United Nations
-International Relations Theory

Optional Modules - Optional modules in previous years have included:
-European Institutions and the Policy Process
-The European Union as a Global Actor
-German Foreign Policy
-Collective Memory and Identity in Post-War Europe
-Collective Identities and Political Thought in Britain Since 1850
-Contemporary Socio-Political Issues in Muslim Religious Thought
-European Security
-International Relations and Security in the Middle East
-Issues in the Politics of Military Occupation
-Just War in Political Theory and Practice
-The Contemporary Politics of the Middle East
-The Political Economy of Development in the Middle East
-America and the World: The Making of US Foreign Policy
-Region, Nation and Citizen in SE Asia
-Political Economy and Development in Chinese Business
-Nationalism, Revolution and Reform in Contemporary China
-Human Rights
-Political Ideology
-Strategic Asia: Policy and Analysis
-Theories of Capitalism
-A module offered by the School of Modern Languages

Learning and Teaching

At the beginning of the academic year, students go through five-day induction events in which they are informed about University, the School, the MA/MSc programmes and the facilities available for their learning.

The 180 credits one-year MA degree programme is divided into three core and three optional modules of 15 credits each. Furthermore, students have to submit a dissertation of 75 credits of not more than 15,000 words. Most of the modules are delivered during the first two terms and students spend the remaining time to write the dissertation.

Usually a module has 18 contact hours spread over 9 weeks and 132 hours of self-directed learning. The modules are mainly delivered through weekly 2 hours sessions which can either take the form of seminars or one hour of lecture and one hour of tutorial. The form in which seminars are conducted can differ from one module to another. Typically modules would have elements of lectures, discussions, and presentations from students—the extent of each of these components would differ from one module to another.

All modules have written exercise for formative assessments. Upon getting feedback on these assignments, students can meet their lecturers to discuss their marks before then eventually completing a summative assessment. Typically summative assessments are 3000 word essays but some modules may be assessed by examination. Students can also meet their module coordinators during their weekly contact hours or by making an appointment. When students are working on their dissertations during the later half of the year, they meet their assigned supervisors for a minimum of 6 hours. Students also have access to the academic advisors whenever there is a need.

SGIA has a wide variety of resources available to students such as: computer room/work room with networked PC’s, printing facilities including scanner and photocopier, audio system, Wi-Fi and a relaxation area with satellite television system.

SGIA conducts weekly seminars and organises lectures and conferences which all postgraduate students can attend. These events provide students the opportunity to engage with, and debate, the most important issues in current political and international studies.

Towards the end of the programme students can contact the Careers Office of the University to get advice on available job prospects and get assistance on applying for these.

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