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Surrey Business School’s Business Analytics programme is dedicated to producing creative and knowledgeable Business Analysts with the ability to convert Big Data to actionable insight in business. Read more
Surrey Business School’s Business Analytics programme is dedicated to producing creative and knowledgeable Business Analysts with the ability to convert Big Data to actionable insight in business.

Whether it’s using Artificial Intelligence to improve a chess programme, or understanding the power of visualisation from a simple graph.

With input from industry experts in class and on-site, you will engage with real-world business problems.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning, Big Data. New technologies and ways of working are changing the way we make decisions.

This programme will take your career to the next level and develop your ability to confidently make high impact businesses decisions that are driven by data.

The programme focuses on two key areas: analysing business data, and solving business challenges analytically. Optional modules allow you to further specialise in areas such as the economic, managerial or finance or aspects of the subject.

Furthermore, you will benefit from hands-on experience of a wide range of analytics software such as simulators and mathematical tools.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

The programme is studied full-time over one academic year. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Data Analytics
-Supply Chain Analytics
-Econometrics I
-Machine Learning and Visualisations
-Principles of Accounting
-Foundations of Finance: Finance and Investments
-Supply Chain and Logistics Management
-Information for Decision Making
-Managing Decisions Implementation
-Introduction to Marketing Analytics
-Econometrics II
-Business Process Management
-Innovation Management
-Investment Analysis
-Dissertation

CAREER PROSPECTS

Business analytics students often pursue careers as consultants, researchers, managers, and analysts.

SOFTWARE

You will get hands-on experience using a wide range of tools in the course. An indicative list of the software tools is as follows:
-Excel (using the Solver and Data Analysis Add-Ins) and Tableau for decision making and visual analytics
-COGNOS and SQL Server for Business Intelligence for analytical processing
-Apache Hadoop (Map Reduce) with Amazon’s Elastic Cloud or IBM’s Smart Cloud for distributed Big Data analytics
-SAP for Enterprise Resource Planning
-R, SPSS and EViews for coding, statistics and forecasting
-ILOG’s Optimisation Studio (Cplex) for optimisations
-Matlab for algorithms and programming and Simulink (SimEvents) for simulations
-Arena (or Simul8) for Discrete Event Simulations

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The programme’s aim is to provide a high quality education that is both intellectually rigorous and at the forefront of management science research, relevant for problem solving and decision making by managers.

It will respond to the emergent needs of corporations and academia for professionals who are able to work with analytical tools to generate value from available Information depots and take advantage of the vast amounts of data now provided by the modern ICT and ERP systems, which underlie the operations of modern corporations.

The program will implant understanding of the theoretical base around knowledge management and knowledge work, practical skills and experience in using analytical software tools.

It will allow future professional managers and consultants to cope with an increasingly complex and global operational environment of the modern corporation.

Completion of the programme will provide a sound foundation for those considering continuing their academic development towards a PhD degree in the management disciplines.

The programme is structured in a way that would provide students with a choice between a more quantitative intensive track of modules or a qualitative analytic (business development track) which would reflect students’ personal strengths and preferences and match future career aspirations.

The compulsory modules provide a sound foundation which builds an analytical skillset using relevant statistical and management theories, and supports the development of practical hands-on experience applying the theoretical aspects using real-world data to address corporate challenges and find solutions to actual problems.

The readings in the module will build a sound basis which would allow students to access and understand the academic literature and undertake empirical investigations in the areas of decision modelling and business development.

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:

Knowledge and understanding
-A systematic, in-depth understanding of the development; issues and influences relevant to discipline of Management Decision Making, Management Science, and Data Science.
-Deep and thorough understanding of quantitative analytical methodologies and hands-on experience with decision-making software and data management tools.
-Knowledge about issues, application and analysis of Big Data
-An understanding of the academic research process.

Intellectual / cognitive skills
-Demonstrate deep learning, understanding of the material and ability to apply the knowledge and demonstrate skills in problem solving in the topic space of the modules studied
-Carry out assessments of data in a repository, select the appropriate analysis tools, design and execute an analytical methodology (not required for PG Certificate), apply adequate visualization methodologies to present the results and interpret the findings and finally to communicate the results effectively to a select audience

Professional practical skills
-Demonstrate the ability to independently evaluate critical approaches and techniques relevant to Business Analytics
-Know and apply a range of techniques and tools to analyse data related to business operations
-Capability of selecting the right methodology and software to solve management and operational business issues
-Relate existing knowledge structures and methodologies to analytical business challenges

Key / transferable skills
-Conduct critical literature review; to select, define and focus upon an issue at an appropriate level
-Develop and apply relevant and sound methodology
-Apply the methodology to analyse the issue
-Develop logical conclusions and recommendations
-Be aware of the limitations of the research
-Identify modifications to existing knowledge structures and theoretical frameworks and therefore to prose new areas for investigation, new problems, new or alternative applications or methodological applications

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

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The Core Archaeology course introduces current debates in archaeological theory and the history of archaeological thought, as well as archaeological methods (ranging from the study of prehistoric exchange to bio-archaeological techniques to artefact studies, quantitative analyses and dating methods). Read more
The Core Archaeology course introduces current debates in archaeological theory and the history of archaeological thought, as well as archaeological methods (ranging from the study of prehistoric exchange to bio-archaeological techniques to artefact studies, quantitative analyses and dating methods). Area option courses examine the archaeology of a particular region of the world (such as South Asia or Europe) in detail. Students are encouraged to choose a third module from the range of MPhil options on offer in the Division of Archaeology to complement their specific interests (e.g., heritage, science, material culture, etc). All module choices must have the approval of the module's instructor and the MPhil in Archaeology Coordinator.

Students may choose to specialise in any of the following options:

- Archaeological Heritage and Museums
- Archaeological Science
- Archaeology of the Americas
- Egyptian Archaeology
- European Prehistory
- Medieval Archaeology
- Mesopotamian Archaeology
- Palaeolithic and Mesolithic Archaeology
- South Asian Archaeology

Visit the website: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/hsarmpmar

Course detail

Students electing the Archaeological Heritage option will take three taught modules:
1. The Socio-politics of the Past
2. Museums: History, Theory, and Practice
3. Management of the Archaeological Heritage. This course concentrates on issues of differentiation of interpretation.

The topics are all of academic importance and the teaching focuses on a theoretical understanding of the issues involved, with practical examples used as case studies. The aim is to educate you within this expanding field and to activate further research.

Students choosing the Archaeological Science option will take:
1. Archaeological Science
2. Practical Application of Scientific Methods modules
3. One other module offered by the Division of Archaeology (chosen in consultation with the supervisor and MPhil Coordinator).

This course covers a broad range of scientific archaeological approaches with geo- and bioarchaeological foci, from theoretical, methodological and practical points of view. A series of recurrent case studies is used to introduce the questions, techniques and ideas applicable in each archaeological situation. In addition, this MPhil equips students with analytical skills in archaeological science.

Format

All MPhil students in the Division of Archaeology take a Research Skills Module and write a dissertation (15,000 words maximum). Students choosing Archaeology of the Americas, Archaeology of Egypt, European Archaeology, Medieval Archaeology, Mesopotamian Archaeology, Palaeolithic and Mesolithic Archaeology, or South Asian Archaeology take:

1. the Core Archaeology course
2. the appropriate area option course
3. any other module offered by the Division of Archaeology (in consultation with the supervisor and MPhil coordinator).

The assessed components of the three selected modules each represent 15% of the final mark. The assessed components of Research Skills module represents 5%, while the dissertation counts for 50% of the final mark.

Assessment

- The dissertation is an extended piece of independent, original research. Students work with their supervisor to formulate a dissertation project, carry out research and write it up. The topic of the dissertation has to be approved by the Faculty Degree Committee. The dissertation is of maximum 15,000 words (excluding bibliography and appendices) and is due at the end of August; it counts as 50% of the student’s final mark.

- Students taking the MPhil in Archaeology are usually required to produce between 3 and 6 assessed essays depending on their chosen course of study and the modules they select. The essays are between 3000 and 4000 words and are submitted in Michaelmas, Lent and Easter Terms.

- Students taking the MPhil in Archaeology are required to sit written examinations for some modules.

- Attendance at the relevant Research Skills Workshops is required of all MPhil students in the Division of Archaeology. MPhil students submit a 2000 word research proposal and give a presentation to teaching staff and peers which form the assessed part of the Research Skills module and are worth 5% of the overall MPhil degree.

Continuing

MPhil students wishing to continue to the PhD in Archaeology are required to achieve a High Pass mark of 68 overall and no less than 68 in their dissertation, and to obtain the support of an appropriate supervisor. In some circumstances additional academic conditions may be set to ensure appropriate skills, such as language competence, are in place prior to admittance on the PhD programme.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are many different sources of funding available to support UK/EU and international students at the Division of Archaeology but full scholarships for MPhil students are highly competitive. The Division of Archaeology enters exceptionally strong MPhil candidates for Gates Cambridge, CHESS and AHRC scholarships and scholarship schemes administered by the Cambridge Trust. The Division of Archaeology also administers several funds which aim to support Archaeological fieldwork, Egyptology and Assyriology at MPhil level and will endeavour to support students in obtaining funding from University and external sources. For further information about funding opportunities at the Division of Archaeology consult the Division website: http://www.arch.cam.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduate-funding or contact the Graduate Administrator: .

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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This MPhil caters both for beginners in Akkadian and those with some previous knowledge of the language. A demanding course, this MPhil delivers competence in language and specialist knowledge of culture and history over a relatively short time. Read more
This MPhil caters both for beginners in Akkadian and those with some previous knowledge of the language. A demanding course, this MPhil delivers competence in language and specialist knowledge of culture and history over a relatively short time. All MPhil students in the Division of Archaeology take a Research Skills Module and write a dissertation (15,000 words maximum). The MPhil in Assyriology also includes three taught modules, chosen in consultation with the supervisor according to the student's interests. The student's first choice must be a language course. The student's second and third modules can be chosen from the modules listed below, and with the consent of the module's instructor and the MPhil in Assyriology Coordinator one of these may be any other appropriate MPhil module offered in the Division of Archaeology. Modules typically offered include:

- Akkadian (Akkadian language and texts or Advanced Akkadian language and texts)
- Sumerian language and texts (Sumerian is only available to those with some previous knowledge of Akkadian).
- Mesopotamian culture (Mesopotamian literature or Mesopotamian scholarship & religion)
- Archaeology of Mesopotamia (Archaeology of Mesopotamia: Early period to 2000 BC or Archaeology of Mesopotamia: Late period, 2000-539 BC)
- Topics in Mesopotamian history and archaeology
- Any other appropriate MPhil module taught in the Division of Archaeology, consent of the module's instructor and the MPhil in Assyriology Coordinator.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/hsarmpass

Course detail

The MPhil in Assyriology delivers competence in language and specialist knowledge of culture and history over a relatively short time. All MPhil students in the Division of Archaeology take a Research Skills Module and write a dissertation (15,000 words maximum). The MPhil in Assyriology also includes three taught modules, chosen in consultation with the supervisor according to the student's interests. Students will learn Akkadian at either an introductory or more advanced level depending on previous experience.

Assessment

The dissertation is an extended piece of independent, original research. Students work with their supervisor to formulate a dissertation project, carry out research and write it up. The topic of the dissertation has to be approved by the Faculty Degree Committee; the dissertation is of maximum 15,000 words (excluding bibliography and appendices) and is due at the end of August; it counts as 50% of the student’s final mark.

Students taking the MPhil in Assyriology are usually required to produce between 1 and 4 assessed essays depending on their chosen course of study and the modules they select. The essays are between 3000 and 4000 words and are submitted in Michaelmas, Lent and Easter Terms.

Students taking the MPhil in Assyriology are required to sit written examinations for some modules. Language modules are assessed through a written exam in Easter Term. For language modules, choice of module is subject to the student’s prior experience to make sure that they have the preparation to benefit from the module taken; the course co-ordinator will provide guidance upon this.

Attendance at the relevant Research Skills Workshops is required of all MPhil students in the Division of Archaeology. MPhil students are required to submit a 2000 word research proposal and give a presentation to teaching staff and peers which form the assessed part of the Research Skills module and are worth 5% of the overall MPhil degree.

Continuing

MPhil students wishing to continue to the PhD in Archaeology are required to achieve a High Pass mark of 68 overall and no less than 68 in their dissertation, and to obtain the support of an appropriate supervisor. In some circumstances additional academic conditions may be set to ensure appropriate skills, such as language competence, are in place prior to admittance on the PhD programme.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are many different sources of funding available to support UK/EU and international students at the Division of Archaeology but full scholarships for MPhil students are highly competitive. The Division of Archaeology enters exceptionally strong MPhil candidates for Gates Cambridge, CHESS and AHRC scholarships and scholarship schemes administered by the Cambridge Trust.

The Division of Archaeology also administers several funds which aim to support Archaeological fieldwork, Egyptology and Assyriology at MPhil level and will endeavour to support students in obtaining funding from University and external sources.

For further information about funding opportunities at the Division of Archaeology consult the Division website: http://www.arch.cam.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduate-funding or contact the Graduate Administrator: .

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This MPhil is appropriate for students who are prepared for graduate work and who wish to undertake research in Egyptology, but who need further training in either the language(s) or the archaeology of the region. Read more
This MPhil is appropriate for students who are prepared for graduate work and who wish to undertake research in Egyptology, but who need further training in either the language(s) or the archaeology of the region. The student may choose either an archaeological or a linguistic emphasis. All MPhil students in the Division of Archaeology take a Research Skills module and write a dissertation (maximum 15,000 words). In addition, students taking the MPhil in Egyptology select three taught modules, chosen in consultation with the supervisor.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/hsarmpegy

Course detail

Modules on offer include:

- Introduction to Egyptian Language;
- Advanced Egyptian Language;
- Coptic;
- Demotic;
- Landscapes, Built Environment, and Material Culture of Ancient Egypt;
- Historical Archaeology of Ancient Egypt I;
- Historical Archaeology of Ancient Egypt II;
- Topics in Egyptology;

or any other MPhil module offered in the Division of Archaeology (with consent of the module's instructor and the MPhil in Egyptology Coordinator).

Format

The MPhil in Egyptology delivers competence in language and a detailed knowledge of the cultures of ancient Egypt, emphasizing historical archaeology, landscape and the built environment, art, and the language and/or literature of ancient Egypt. All MPhil students in the Division of Archaeology take a Research Skills Module and write a dissertation (15,000 words maximum). The MPhil in Egyptology also includes three taught modules, chosen in consultation with the supervisor according to the student's interests. Students will learn an Ancient Egyptian language at either an introductory or more advanced level depending on previous experience.

Students receive written feedback on all assessed essays and reports from internal markers via the Graduate Administrator. Coursework and exam marks are communicated to students following the first examiners meeting at the end of Easter Term. Feedback on dissertations are available to students on request following the second examiners meeting in September.

Assessment

The dissertation is an extended piece of independent, original research. Students work with their supervisor to formulate a dissertation project, carry out research and write it up. The topic of the dissertation has to be approved by the Faculty Degree Committee; the dissertation is of maximum 15,000 words (excluding bibliography and appendices) and is due at the end of August; it counts as 50% of the student’s final mark.

Students taking the MPhil in Egyptology are usually required to produce between 1 and 4 assessed essays depending on their chosen course of study and the modules they select. The essays are between 3000 and 4000 words and are submitted in Michaelmas, Lent and Easter Terms.

Students taking the MPhil in Egyptology are required to sit written examinations for some modules. Language modules are assessed through a written exam in Easter Term. For language modules, choice of module is subject to the student’s prior experience to make sure that they have the preparation to benefit from the module taken; the course co-ordinator will provide guidance upon this.

Attendance at the relevant Research Skills Workshops is required of all MPhil students in the Division of Archaeology. MPhil students are required to submit a 2000 word research proposal and give a presentation to teaching staff and peers which form the assessed part of the Research Skills module and are worth 5% of the overall MPhil degree.

Continuing

MPhil students wishing to continue to the PhD in Archaeology are required to achieve a High Pass mark of 68 overall and no less than 68 in their dissertation, and to obtain the support of an appropriate supervisor. In some circumstances additional academic conditions may be set to ensure appropriate skills, such as language competence, are in place prior to admittance on the PhD programme.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are many different sources of funding available to support UK/EU and international students at the Division of Archaeology but full scholarships for MPhil students are highly competitive. The Division of Archaeology enters exceptionally strong MPhil candidates for Gates Cambridge, CHESS and AHRC scholarships and scholarship schemes administered by the Cambridge Trust.

The Division of Archaeology also administers several funds which aim to support Archaeological fieldwork, Egyptology and Assyriology at MPhil level and will endeavour to support students in obtaining funding from University and external sources.

For further information about funding opportunities at the Division of Archaeology consult the Division website: http://www.arch.cam.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduate-funding or contact the Graduate Administrator: .

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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The course is intended for students who have a substantial background in geography or a related discipline with a good first degree. Read more
The course is intended for students who have a substantial background in geography or a related discipline with a good first degree. It aims to provide: (i) broad-based training in geographical research, its philosophical backgrounds and debates, and interpretation of geographical literature, (ii) comprehensive training in research methods in human geography and the social sciences as a whole, and (iii) the opportunity to develop large scale research management skills by completing a research thesis under academic supervision and guidance. Students choose two geography modules, which are combined with two modules in research design and methods, and a thesis. The course aims to develop general transferable skills for research employment in a wide range of walks of life, or as the first stage of a PhD thesis.

The course is intended to give students a broad-based advanced training and critical awareness of geographical research and its methods, including awareness of the research methods of related disciplines. The course is offered to all students hoping to undertake a PhD in Human Geography. Hence the thesis often forms a ‘pilot’ for a larger scale PhD proposal and will include a review of the relevant literature, research questions, an outline and evaluation of appropriate research methods, and an assessment of the initial findings and their significance.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/eaggmpmgr

Course detail

The course aims to develop further the students’ understanding of the relationship between society, nature and space, emphasising both global and local processes and connections. They develop further their skills of assessing the merits of contrasting theories, explanations and policies; collecting and critically judging, evaluating and interpreting varied forms of evidence; preparing maps and diagrams; employing various methods of collecting and analysing spatial and environmental information; combining and interpreting different types of evidence to tackle specific problems; recognising the ethical and moral dimensions of study.

Learning Outcomes

At the end of the 11 months, students taking the MPhil in Geographic Research will be expected to have:

- Acquired a broad knowledge of qualitative research methods and general statistics
- Acquired the skills to use library and internet resources independently
- Acquired specialist knowledge of the relevant literature related to their thesis
- Acquired skills to independently structure their research design
- Given a presentation on their thesis to their peers and academic staff
- Written three essays and one thesis

Format

Each student is allocated a thesis supervisor before the course begins. Generally up to 10 meetings of up to one hour of one-to-one supervision as well as briefer meetings when needed.

The Department runs a series of seminars during term which students on this course should attend. This introduces them to the breadth of the discipline and a new level of academic debate. Students may attend other lectures, seminars, classes and reading groups after consultation with their supervisors. Students attend Research Methods classes and lectures in the first and second term. Students are also expected to take part in their research group’s activities.

Skills and research training programme = 8 x 1 hour lectures in first term and optional lectures in the 2nd term. hours per term

Social Science Research Methods Centre (SSRMC) courses: workshops and practicals. Approx. 15 hours per term hours per term

Dissertation presentation in 3rd term.

Written feedback on each submitted essay and the dissertation.

Assessment

- 20,000 word dissertation; oral examination at discretion of examiners
- 3 essays or other exercises of up to 4,000 words

Continuing

70% overall in MPhil

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

ESRC (1+3) for applicants who plan to continue to PhD. (1+3 = one year MPhil and 3 years PhD)
AHRC Masters via CHESS Scheme for AHRC topics approved for the AHRC DTP at University of Cambridge.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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The highly regarded Keuzegids Master’s Selection Guide 2016 ranked Utrecht University’s International Relations in Historical Perspective programme as the best in the field in the Netherlands. Read more

Judged best in the field

The highly regarded Keuzegids Master’s Selection Guide 2016 ranked Utrecht University’s International Relations in Historical Perspective programme as the best in the field in the Netherlands.

Elsevier Best Studies Top Rated Programme

In this year's Elsevier Best Studies Survey, students have also rated International Relations as the best programme.
International Relations in Historical Perspective bridges the historical and political science approaches of international relations. In this way, the programme offers you the best of both worlds.

The international political stage is much like a game of chess between multiple players. During the course of this Master's programme you will gain a greater understanding of the parties involved, and prepare yourself for a future as a participant in the game of global politics.

Political theory is an important tool in the analysis of international developments. In order to fully understand those developments, however, you need a wider historical viewpoint. Nothing is without its history – and while history never repeats itself exactly, you can learn a great deal from it. By bridging history and political science, the Master of International Relations in Historical Perspective (IR/HP) offers in-depth insight into both worlds.

The programme content uses central research themes that help shed light on modern international politics and provide students with the tools to analyse a wide range of topics.

During the programme, you can choose to participate in an internship of at least three months, which is an important step towards obtaining future employment. You will put your knowledge and skills into practice, and this experience will form an important part of your resume.

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