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Masters Degrees (Chem)

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The Advanced Chemical Engineering with Information Technology and Management programme addresses recent developments in the global chemical industry by focusing on advancements of information technology and business management skills, including entrepreneurship. Read more
The Advanced Chemical Engineering with Information Technology and Management programme addresses recent developments in the global chemical industry by focusing on advancements of information technology and business management skills, including entrepreneurship.

It builds on the Department’s established strengths in computer modelling, process systems engineering, reaction engineering, numerical modelling, computational fluid dynamics, finite element modelling, process control and development of software for process technologies.

Teaching is augmented by staff from other departments and has an emphasis on design activities.

The programme aims to provide in-depth understanding of the IT skills required for advanced chemical processes and raise students’ awareness of the basic concepts of entrepreneurship, planning a new business, marketing, risk, and financial management and exit strategy.

Core study areas include process systems engineering and applied IT practice, research and communication, modelling and analysis of chemical engineering systems and a research project.

See the website http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/chemical/advanced-chem-eng-it-management/

Programme modules

Core Modules
Semester 1:
- Process Systems Engineering and Applied IT Practice
- Research and Communication

Semester 2:
- Advanced Computational Methods for Modelling and Analysis of Chemical Engineering Systems

Semester 1 and 2:
- MSc Project

Optional Modules (select three)
Semester 1:
- Chemical Product Design
- Filtration
- Downstream Processing
- Colloid Engineering and Nano-science
- Hazard Identification and Risk Assessment

Semester 2:
- Mixing of Fluids and Particles

Optional Management Modules (select two)
Semester 1:
- Enterprise Technology

Semester 2:
- Entrepreneurship and Small Business Planning
- Strategic Management for Construction

Careers and further study

Our graduates go on to work with companies such as 3M, GE Water, GL Noble Denton, GSK, Kraft Food, Tata Steel Group, Petroplus, Shell, Pharmaceutical World and Unilever. Some students further their studies by enrolling on a PhD programme.

Why choose chemical engineering at Loughborough?

The Department of Chemical Engineering at Loughborough University is a highly active, research intensive community comprising 21 full time academic staff, in addition to research students, postdoctoral research fellows and visitors, drawn from all over the world.

Our research impacts on current industrial and societal needs spanning, for example, the commercial production of stem cells, disinfection of hospital wards, novel drug delivery methods, advanced water treatment and continuous manufacturing of pharmaceutical products.

- Facilities
The Department has excellent quality laboratories and services for both bench and pilot scale work, complemented by first-rate computational and IT resources, and supported by mechanical and electronic workshops.

- Research
The Department has a strong and growing research programme with world-class research activities and facilities. Given the multidisciplinary nature of our research we work closely with other University departments across the campus as well as other institutions. The Departments research is divided into six key areas of interdisciplinary research and sharing of expertise amongst groups within the Department is commonplace.

- Career Prospects
The Department has close working relationships with AstraZeneca, BP, British Sugar, Carlsberg, E.ON, Exxon, GlaxoSmithKline, PepsiCo and Unilever to name but a few of the global organisations we work with and employ our graduates.

Find out how to apply here http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/chemical/advanced-chem-eng-it-management/

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Penn’s Master of Chemical Sciences is designed for your success. Chemistry professionals are at the forefront of the human quest to solve ever-evolving challenges in agriculture, healthcare and the environment. Read more
Penn’s Master of Chemical Sciences is designed for your success
Chemistry professionals are at the forefront of the human quest to solve ever-evolving challenges in agriculture, healthcare and the environment. As new discoveries are made, so are new industries — and new opportunities. Whether you’re currently a chemistry professional or seeking to enter the field, Penn’s rigorous Master of Chemical Sciences (MCS) builds on your level of expertise to prepare you to take advantage of the myriad career possibilities available in the chemical sciences. With a faculty of leading academic researchers and experienced industry consultants, we provide the academic and professional opportunities you need to achieve your unique goals.

The Penn Master of Chemical Sciences connects you with the resources of an Ivy League institution and provides you with theoretical and technical expertise in biological chemistry, inorganic chemistry, organic chemistry, physical chemistry, environmental chemistry and materials. In our various seminar series, you will also regularly hear from chemistry professionals who work in a variety of research and applied settings, allowing you to consider new paths and how best to take advantage of the program itself to prepare for your ideal career.

Preparation for professional success
If you’ve recently graduated from college and have a strong background in chemistry, the Master of Chemical Sciences offers you a exceptional preparation to enter a chemistry profession. In our program, you will gain the skills and confidence to become a competitive candidate for potential employers as you discover and pursue your individual interests within the field of chemistry. Our faculty members bring a wealth of research expertise and industry knowledge to help you define your career direction.

For working professionals in the chemical or pharmaceutical industries, the Master of Chemical Sciences accelerates your career by expanding and refreshing your expertise and enhancing your research experiences. We provide full- and part-time options so you can pursue your education without interrupting your career. You can complete the 10-course program in one and a half to four years, depending on course load.

The culminating element of our curriculum, the capstone project, both tests and defines your program mastery. During the capstone exercise, you will propose and defend a complex project of your choice, that allows you to stake out a new professional niche and demonstrate your abilities to current or prospective employers.

Graduates will pursue fulfilling careers in a variety of cutting-edge jobs across government, education and corporate sectors. As part of the Penn Alumni network, you’ll join a group of professionals that spans the globe and expands your professional horizons.

Courses and Curriculum

The Master of Chemical Sciences degree is designed to give you a well-rounded, mechanistic foundation in a blend of chemistry topics. To that end, the curriculum is structured with a combination of core concentration courses and electives, which allow you to focus on topics best suited to your interests and goals.

As a new student in the Master of Chemical Sciences program, you will meet with your academic advisor to review your previous experiences and your future goals. Based on this discussion, you will create an individualized academic schedule.

The Master of Chemical Sciences requires the minimum completion of 10 course units (c.u.)* as follows:

Pro-Seminar (1 c.u.)
Core concentration courses (4-6 c.u., depending on concentration and advisor recommendations)
Elective courses in Chemistry, such as computational chemistry, environmental chemistry, medicinal chemistry, catalysis and energy (2-4 c.u., depending on concentration and advisor recommendations)
Optional Independent Studies (1 c.u.)
Capstone project (1 c.u.)
Pro-Seminar course (CHEM 599: 1 c.u.)
The Pro-Seminar will review fundamental concepts regarding research design, the scientific method and professional scientific communication. The course will also familiarize students with techniques for searching scientific databases and with the basis of ethical conduct in science.

Concentration courses
The concentration courses allow you to develop specific expertise and also signify your mastery of a field to potential employers.

The number of elective courses you take will depend upon the requirements for your area of concentration, and upon the curriculum that you plan with your academic advisor. These concentration courses allow you to acquire the skills and the critical perspective necessary to master a chemical sciences subdiscipline, and will help prepare you to pursue the final capstone project (below).

You may choose from the following six chemical sciences concentrations:

Biological Chemistry
Inorganic Chemistry
Organic Chemistry
Physical Chemistry
Environmental Chemistry
Materials
Independent Studies
The optional Independent Studies course will be offered each fall and spring semester, giving you an opportunity to participate in one of the research projects being conducted in one of our chemistry laboratories. During the study, you will also learn analytical skills relevant to your capstone research project and career goals. You can participate in the Independent Studies course during your first year in the program as a one-course unit elective course option. (CHEM 910: 1 c.u. maximum)

Capstone project (1 c.u.)

The capstone project is a distinguishing feature of the Master of Chemical Sciences program, blending academic and professional experiences and serving as the culmination of your work in the program. You will develop a project drawing from your learning in and outside of the classroom to demonstrate mastery of an area in the chemical sciences.

The subject of this project is related to your professional concentration and may be selected to complement or further develop a work-related interest. It's an opportunity to showcase your specialization and your unique perspective within the field.

Your capstone component may be a Penn laboratory research project, an off-campus laboratory research project or a literature-based review project. All components will require a completed scientific report. It is expected that the capstone project will take an average of six months to complete. Most students are expected to start at the end of the first academic year in the summer and conclude at the end of fall semester of the second year. Depending on the capstone option selected, students may begin to work on the capstone as early as the spring semester of their first year in the program.

All capstone project proposals must be pre-approved by your concentration advisor, Master of Chemical Sciences Program Director and if applicable, your off-campus project supervisor. If necessary, nondisclosure agreements will be signed by students securing projects with private companies. Additionally, students from private industry may be able to complete a defined capstone project at their current place of employment. All capstone projects culminate in a final written report, to be graded by the student's concentration advisor who is a member of the standing faculty or staff instructor in the Chemistry Department.

*Academic credit is defined by the University of Pennsylvania as a course unit (c.u.). Generally, a 1 c.u. course at Penn is equivalent to a three or four semester hour course elsewhere. In general, the average course offered at Penn is listed as being worth 1 c.u.; courses that include a lecture and a lab are often worth 1.5 c.u.

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The master of science degree in chemistry is offered on a full- or part-time basis. The program is designed to fill the needs of the traditional student or the practicing chemist who is employed full time and wishes to pursue a graduate degree on a part-time basis. Read more

Program overview

The master of science degree in chemistry is offered on a full- or part-time basis. The program is designed to fill the needs of the traditional student or the practicing chemist who is employed full time and wishes to pursue a graduate degree on a part-time basis. The School of Chemistry and Materials Science has research- and teaching-oriented faculty, as well as excellent equipment and facilities that enable full-time graduate students to carry on a program of independent study and develop the ability to attack scientific problems at the fundamental level. The research can result in either a thesis or a project report.Through course work and research activities, the program strives to increase the breadth and depth of the student’s background in chemistry. Students develop the ability to attack scientific problems with minimal supervision.

Plan of study

The program offers two options: a thesis option and a project option. Concentrations are available in organic chemistry, analytical chemistry, inorganic chemistry, physical chemistry, polymer chemistry, materials science, and biochemistry. Customized concentrations are available to accommodate specific student interests and needs relating to graduate study in chemistry. Each student, together with an adviser, chooses courses to create a customized curriculum that best meets their interests, needs, and career aspirations. Each student's curriculum is subject to the approval of the director of the graduate program. A deliberate effort is made to strengthen any areas of weakness indicated by the student’s undergraduate records and the placement examinations. The MS degree consists of the following requirements:

1. A minimum of 30 semester credit hours beyond the bachelor’s degree.
Courses in chemistry consist of core and focus area courses. Core courses are designed to increase a student’s breadth of chemical knowledge, while focus area courses increase depth. Core courses include four semester credit hours in Graduate Chemistry Seminar (CHEM-771, 772, 773, 774) and one credit hour in Chemistry Writing (CHEM-670). Focus area courses are chosen to address the student’s career goals and any undergraduate deficiencies in chemistry. Focus area courses must be at the graduate level and are chosen in consultation between the student and graduate adviser. Focus area courses outside of chemistry are acceptable provided they are approved by the student’s graduate adviser.

2. Research
Ten semester credit hours of research are required with the thesis option. For students who opt for the project option, four semester hours of project research are required.

3. Capstone
Students enrolled in the thesis option are expected to complete an independent research thesis and pass an oral defense. Typically, all requirements are met within two years. Students enrolled in the project option have numerous ways of satisfying the capstone requirement for their project. These include but are not limited to conference presentations, papers, journal articles, patents, and seminars.

Curriculum

Thesis and project options for the Chemistry MS degree differ in course sequence, see website for details.

Other admission requirements

-Submit official transcripts (in English) for all previously completed undergraduate or graduate course work.
-Submit scores from the Graduate Record Exam (GRE). It is recommended that candidates also submit scores from the chemistry GRE.
-Submit two letters of reference.
-Complete a graduate application.
-International applicants whose native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). International English Language Testing System (IELTS) scores will be accepted in place of the TOEFL exam. Minimum scores will vary; however, the absolute minimum score required for unconditional acceptance is 6.5. For additional information about the IELTS, please visit http://www.ielts.org. This requirement may be waived for students submitting transcripts from American universities, or those at which the language of instruction is English. Foreign students with English language deficiencies may be required to take the Michigan Test of English Language Proficiency, given by the RIT English Language Center. If a student’s score is below standard, additional course work may be recommended. Successful completion of this work is a requirement of the program. This may mean that the student will need additional time and financial resources to complete the degree program.
-As a supplement to the normal application process, it is strongly recommended that students visit RIT.

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Goal of the pro­gramme. Society urgently needs experts with a multidisciplinary education in atmospheric and Earth System sciences. Read more

Goal of the pro­gramme

Society urgently needs experts with a multidisciplinary education in atmospheric and Earth System sciences. Climate change and issues of air quality and extreme weather are matters of global concern, but which are inadequately understood from the scientific point of view. Not only must further research be done, but industry and business also need environmental specialists with a strong background in natural sciences. As new regulations and European Union directives are adopted in practice, people with knowledge of recent scientific research are required.

Upon graduating from the Programme you will have competence in

  • Applying experimental, computational and statistical methods to obtain and analyse atmospheric and environmental data
  • Knowledge applicable to solving global challenges such as climate change, air pollution, deforestation and issues related to water resources and eutrophication
  • Making systematic and innovative use of investigation or experimentation to discover new knowledge
  • Reporting results in a clear and logical manner

Further information about the studies on the Master's programme website.

Pro­gramme con­tents

The six study lines are as follows:

Aer­o­sol phys­ics

Aerosol particles are tiny liquid or solid particles floating in the air. Aerosol physics is essential for our understanding of air quality, climate change and production of nanomaterials. Aerosol scientists investigate a large variety of phenomena associated with atmospheric aerosol particles and related gas-to-particle conversion using constantly improving experimental, theoretical, model-based and data analysis methods.

Geo­phys­ics of the hy­dro­sphere

Hydrospheric geophysics studies water in all of its forms using physical methods. It includes hydrology, cryology, and physical oceanography. Hydrology includes the study of surface waters such as lakes and rivers, global and local hydrological cycles as well as water resources and geohydrology, the study of groundwater. Cryology focuses on snow and ice phenomena including glacier mass balance and dynamics, sea ice physics, snow cover effects and ground frost. Physical oceanography covers saline water bodies, focusing on describing their dynamics, both large scale circulation and water masses, and local phenomena such as surface waves, upwelling, tides, and ocean acoustics. Scientists study the hydrosphere through field measurements, large and small scale modelling, and formulating mathematical descriptions of the processes. 

Met­eor­o­logy

Meteorology is the physics of the atmosphere. Its best-known application is weather forecasting, but meteorological knowledge is also essential for understanding, predicting and mitigating climate change. Meteorologists study atmospheric phenomena across a wide range of space and time scales using theory, model simulations and observations. The field of meteorology is a forerunner in computing: the development of chaos theory, for example, was triggered by the unexpected behaviour of a meteorological computer model. Meteorology in ATM-MP is further divided into dynamic meteorology and biometeorology. Dynamic meteorology is about large-scale atmospheric dynamics, modelling and observation techniques, whereas biometeorology focuses on interactions between the atmosphere and the underlying surface by combining observations and modelling to study the flows of greenhouse gases and energy with links to biogeochemical cycles, for example.

Biogeo­chem­ical cycles

Biogeochemistry studies the processes involved in cycling of elements in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems by integrating physics, meteorology, geophysics, chemistry, geology and biology. Besides natural ecosystems, it also studies systems altered by human activity such as forests under different management regimes, drained peatlands, lakes loaded by excess nutrients and urban environments. The most important elements and substances studied are carbon, nitrogen, sulphur, water and phosphorus, which are vital for ecosystem functioning and processes such as photosynthesis. Biogeochemistry often focuses on the interphases of scientific disciplines and by doing so, it also combines different research methods. It treats ecosystems as open entities which are closely connected to the atmosphere and lithosphere. You will thus get versatile training in environmental issues and research techniques. As a graduate of this line you will be an expert in the functioning of ecosystems and the interactions between ecosystems and the atmosphere/hydrosphere/lithosphere in the context of global change. You will have knowledge applicable for solving global challenges such as climate change, air pollution, deforestation and issues related to water resources and eutrophication.

Re­mote sens­ing

Remote sensing allows the collection of information about the atmosphere, oceans and land surfaces. Various techniques are applied for monitoring the state and dynamics of the Earth system from the ground, aircraft or satellites. While Lidar and radar scan from the surface or mounted on aircraft, instruments on polar orbiting or geostationary satellites permit measurements worldwide. In atmospheric sciences remote sensing has found numerous applications such as observations of greenhouse and other trace gases, aerosols, water vapour, clouds and precipitation, as well as surface observations, for example of vegetation, fire activity, snow cover, sea ice and oceanic parameters such as phytoplankton. Synergistic satellite data analysis enables the study of important processes and feedback in the climate system. Remote sensing advances climate research, weather forecasting, air quality studies, aviation safety and the renewable energy industry.

At­mo­spheric chem­istry and ana­lysis

Atmospheric chemistry studies the composition and reactions of the molecules that make up the atmosphere, including atmospheric trace constituents and their role in chemical, geological and biological processes, including human influence. The low concentrations and high reactivity of these trace molecules place stringent requirements on the measurement and modelling methods used to study them. Analytical chemistry is the science of obtaining, processing, and communicating information about the composition and structure of matter and plays an essential role in the development of science. Environmental analysis consists of the most recent procedures for sampling, sample preparation and sample analysis and learning how to choose the best analytical methods for different environmental samples. Physical atmospheric chemistry studies focus on the reaction types and reaction mechanisms occurring in the atmosphere, with emphasis on reaction kinetics, thermodynamics and modelling methods.



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This course is offered in response to sustained international demand for highly skilled graduates in mechanical engineering for manufacturing and process engineering industries. Read more
This course is offered in response to sustained international demand for highly skilled graduates in mechanical engineering for manufacturing and process engineering industries. On completion of the course, you will be able to:

- show a thorough understanding of the principles and theoretical bases of modern manufacturing techniques, automation, and production processes
- identify appropriate manufacturing systems for different production requirements and analyse their performance
- apply appropriate technology, quality tools and manufacturing methodology to design, re-design and continuously improve the manufacturing operations of engineering companies
- plan, research, execute and oversee experiments and research projects, critically analyse and interpret data, and effectively disseminate results
- work effectively as a member of a multidisciplinary team, be self-motivated, able to work independently and demonstrate leadership

Visit the website: http://www.ucc.ie/en/ckr27/

Course Details

The course is 12 months in duration starting in September and consists of 60 credits in Part I from September to March, and 30 credits in Part II from June to September. You take 10 taught modules from the list below to the value of 50 credits and also undertake a preliminary research project (ME6019) worth 10 credits in Part I. If you obtain a minimum of 50% in the taught modules and the preliminary project, you will be eligible to progress to Part II and undertake a major four-month research project (ME6020) worth 30 credits, and submit a dissertation leading to the award of the MEngSc degree.

ME6001 Manufacturing Systems (5 credits)
ME6002 CAD/CAM (5 credits)
ME6003 Production Management (5 credits)
ME6004 Operations Research and Project Economics (5 credits)
ME6007 Mechanical Systems (5 credits)
ME6008 Mechatronics and Robotics (5 credits)
ME6009 Industrial Automation and Control (5 credits)
ME6010 Technology of Materials (5 credits)
ME6012 Advanced Robotics (5 credits)
PE6002 Process Automation and Optimisation (5 credits)
PE6003 Process Validation and Quality (5 credits)
PE6007 Mechanical Design of Process Equipment (5 credits)
PE6009 Pharmaceutical Engineering (5 credits)
CE3010 Energy in Buildings (5 credits)
CE4016 Energy Systems in Buildings (5 credits)
CE6024 Finite Element Analysis (5 credits)
EE4012 Biomedical Design (5 credits)

Further details on the content and modules are available on the Postgraduate College Calendar - http://www.ucc.ie/calendar/postgraduate/Masters/engineering/page05.html

Format

Each module typically consists of 24 lectures, 12 hours of continuous assessment, plus additional supplemental reading and study, carried out over one of two 12-week semesters from September to December (Semester 1), or January to March (Semester 2). The exact workload in each teaching period will depend on the choice of modules. In addition, a substantial weekly commitment to the project module ME6019 is expected over both semesters.

Assessment

Individual modules have different methods of assessment but this typically consists of a single end-of-semester examination in December or April/May, plus continuous assessment throughout the relevant semester. This continuous assessment may consist of a combination of in-class tests, formal laboratories or practicals, design exercises, project work, written reports and presentations. Any repeat examinations are held in August.

Students who pass but fail to achieve an average mark of at least 50% across the taught modules excluding the Preliminary Research Project (ME6019) or do not achieve a mark of at least 50% in the Preliminary Research Project (ME6019) will be eligible for the award of a Postgraduate Diploma in Mechanical Engineering (Manufacturing, Process and Automation Systems). Candidates passing Part I of the programme who do not wish to proceed to Part II may opt to be conferred with a Postgraduate Diploma in Mechanical Engineering (Manufacturing, Process and Automation Systems).

Careers

In response to increasing demand for highly skilled graduates in the field of mechanical engineering applied to the manufacturing and pharma-chem industries, this course will produce mechanical engineering postgraduates who are proficient in the development and realisation of modern manufacturing, process and automation systems. This is achieved through developing an understanding of the concepts of manufacturing systems, and the skills to analyse, design and implement manufacturing systems in practice. This is combined with an understanding of process automation and operational management. The course will equip you with an-up-to date knowledge of manufacturing techniques and processes.

How to apply: http://www.ucc.ie/en/study/postgrad/how/

Funding and Scholarships

Information regarding funding and available scholarships can be found here: https://www.ucc.ie/en/cblgradschool/current/fundingandfinance/fundingscholarships/

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What is the Master of Chemistry all about?. The overall aim of the Master of Chemistry programme is to train students to . Read more

What is the Master of Chemistry all about?

The overall aim of the Master of Chemistry programme is to train students to conduct research in an academic or industrial setting.

Students apply the knowledge and skills they have acquired by identifying a research question, situating it in its proper chemical and social context and designing a study that addresses this research question.

This is an initial Master's programme and can be followed on a full-time or part-time basis.

Structure

The full programme comprises 120 ECTS (European Credit Transfer System), including 18 ECTS for compulsory courses and 54 ECTS for electives. In addition, students develop advanced practical skills in an internship at KU Leuven to the value of 18 ECTS, while the remaining 30 ECTS are allocated to the Master’s thesis.

There are five majors to choose from:

  • Quantum Chemistry and Physical Chemistry.
  • Molecular Design and Synthesis.
  • Molecular Imaging and Photonics.
  • Polymer Chemistry and Materials.
  • Biochemistry, Molecular and Structural Biology

Department

The Department of Chemistry consists of five divisions, all of which conduct high quality research embedded in well-established collaborations with other universities, research institutes and companies around the world. Its academic staff is committed to excellence in teaching and research. Although the department's primary goal is to obtain insight into the composition, structure and properties of chemical compounds and the design, synthesis and development of new (bio)molecular materials, this knowledge often leads to applications with important economic or societal benefits.

The department aims to develop and maintain leading, internationally renowned research programmes dedicated to solving fundamental and applied problems in the fields of:

  • the design, synthesis and characterisation of new compounds (organic-inorganic, polymers).
  • the simulation of the properties and reactivity of (bio)molecules, polymers and clusters by quantum chemical and molecular modelling methods.
  • the determination of the chemical and physical properties of (bio)molecules, and polymers on the molecular as well as on the material level by spectroscopy, microscopy and other characterisation tools as related to their structure.

Objectives

Knowledge and understanding

  • has extensive knowledge and understanding of a number of chemical fields of expertise and at least one advanced or specialized chemical topic;
  • can acquire autonomously chemical insights and methods;
  • has advanced theoretical and practical knowledge of methods of specialised chemical synthesis and characterisation.

Research

  • knows to organize and carry out original chemical research;
  • can delineate a research topic, postulate a research question and revise this question in the course of the research;
  • can select and apply autonomously proper experimental and theoretical methods;
  • can find, use and interpret with intent specialized literature.

Acquire, use and form an opinion about information

  • has insight in the strategies of acquiring and using knowledge that are central to the domain of the exact sciences;
  • can acquire, adapt, interpret and evaluate quantitatively information and data;
  • can adapt and interpret research results in a multidisciplinary context, position it in the international context and report about this;
  • can apply his knowledge, understanding and problem solving capacities in a broader context;
  • can critically evaluate complex problems in the field of chemistry and formulate scientifically sound solutions.

Communication and social skills

  • can express verbally and in written form the results of research for a group of people of experts and laymen;
  • can take a scientific viewpoint and defend it for a public of fellow students, lecturers and specialist;
  • can function in a heterogeneous environments and teams;
  • has English communication skills;
  • can be in the lead and run a team;
  • can work autonomously.

Motivation and attitudes

  • is open to complementary input from other disciplines;
  • can take responsibility for and give direction to his personal professional development;
  • has professional behavior;
  • can autonomously function and contribute to research.

Employment

  • has competency that gives access to the PhD study and to employment in chemical and various other fields.

Career perspectives

The Master of Science in Chemistry offers a wide range of specialisations and, as such, many career options are available to our graduates. More than half of our alumni work in industry, while others work in academia or other research institutes.

Within industry, graduates can opt for a technical, a commercial, or research-oriented career. Since the chemical industry is also a major industrial sector throughout Europe and the rest of the world, employment opportunities are enhanced by obtaining a PhD. A few examples of professional domains where chemists are needed include industry (chemistry, petrochemistry, medical sector, pharmaceutical industry, agrochemistry, food industry etc.), government or public administration, and research institutes.



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What is the Erasmus Mundus Master of Science in Theoretical Chemistry and Computational Modelling all about?. Get in at the bleeding edge of contemporary chemistry. Read more

What is the Erasmus Mundus Master of Science in Theoretical Chemistry and Computational Modelling all about?

Get in at the bleeding edge of contemporary chemistry: theoretical and computational chemistry are marking the new era that lies ahead in the molecular sciences. The aim of the programme is to train scientists that are able to address a wide range of problems inmodern chemical, physical and biological sciences through the combination of theoretical and computational tools.

This programme is organised by:

  • Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (coordinating institution), Spain
  • Universiteit Groningen, the Netherlands
  • KU Leuven, Belgium
  • Università degli Studi di Perugia, Italy
  • Universidade do Porto, Portugal
  • Université Paul Sabatier - Toulouse III, France
  • Universitat de Valencia, Spain

The Erasmus Mundus Master of Theoretical Chemistry and Computational Modelling is a joint initiative of these European Universities, including KU Leuven and co-ordinated by the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. 

This is an initial Master's programme and can be followed on a full-time or part-time basis.

Structure

The programme is organised according to a two-year structure.

  • The first year of the programme introduces you to concepts and methods. The core of the programme is an intensive international course intended to bring all participants to a common level of excellence. It takes place in the summer between year 1 and year 2 and runs for four weeks. Coursework is taught by a select group of invited international experts.
  • The second year of the programme is devoted to tutorials covering the material dealt with in the intensive course and to a thesis project carried out in part at another university within the consortium. The intensive course is organised at the partner institutions on a rotating basis.

Department

The Department of Chemistry consists of four divisions, all of which conduct highquality research embedded in well-established collaborations with other universities, research institutes and companies around the world. Its academic staff is committed to excellence in teaching and research. Although the department's primary goal is to obtain insight into the composition, structure and properties of chemical compounds and the design, synthesis and development of new (bio)molecular materials, this knowledge often leads to applications with important economic or societal benefits.

The department aims to develop and maintain leading, internationally renowned research programmes dedicated to solving fundamental and applied problems in the fields of:

  • the design, synthesis and characterisation of new compounds (organic-inorganic, polymers).
  • the simulation of the properties and reactivity of (bio)molecules, polymers and clusters by quantum chemical and molecular modelling methods.
  • the determination of the chemical and physical properties of (bio)molecules, and polymers on the molecular as well as on the material level by spectroscopy, microscopy and other characterisation tools as related to their structure.

Objectives

Modern Chemistry is unthinkable without the achievements of Theoretical and Computational Chemistry. As a result these disciplines have become a mandatory tool for the molecular science towards the end of the 20th century, and they will undoubtedly mark the new era that lies ahead of us.

In this perspective the training and formation of the new generations of computational and theoretical chemists with a deep and broad knowledge is of paramount importance. Experts from seven European universities have decided to join forces in a European Master Course for Theoretical Chemistry and Computational Modelling (TCCM). This course is recognized as an Erasmus Mundus course by the European Union.

Graduates will have acquired the skills and competences for advanced research in chemical, physical and material sciences, will be qualified to collaborate in an international research team, and will be able to develop professional activities as experts in molecular design in pharmaceutical industry, petrochemical companies and new-materials industry.

Career perspectives

In addition to commanding sound theoretical knowledge in chemistry and computational modelling, you will be equipped to apply any of the scientific codes mastered in the programme in a work environment, or develop new codes to address new requirements associated with research or productive activities.

You will have attained the necessary skills to pursue a scientific career as a doctoral student in chemistry, physics or material science. You will also be qualified to work as an expert in molecular design in the pharmaceutical industry, at petrochemical companies and in the new-materials industry. You will also have a suitable profile to work as a computational expert.



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The University academic year begins the first week of September, and the academic year is divided into a 13 week first term - September, October, November - and a 14 week (including reading week in mid-February) second term - January, February, March. Read more

Graduate Programs

The University academic year begins the first week of September, and the academic year is divided into a 13 week first term - September, October, November - and a 14 week (including reading week in mid-February) second term - January, February, March. There is a formal examination period scheduled at the end of each term. The four month summer term is devoted to research. The usual period for completing an MSc is two to two and one half years while that for a PhD is about five years. All students accepted for the MSc or PhD will be offered a package of funding which includes a research assistantship and a teaching assistant ship - two years guaranteed for the MSc, five years guaranteed for the PhD.

The normal times for a student to begin their programme of study are September 1 or January 1. It is also possible to begin May 1 upon Departmental approval and agreed supervisor selection.

The Department offers MSc and PhD degrees - each degree requires graduate courses and research work reported in a thesis. Each degree requires 12 credits of course work, unless the candidate already holds an approved MSc. Most courses are worth 3 credits.

Students are generally encouraged to complete all their course requirements in their first year if possible in order to allow a more efficient use of time for their research projects. A one credit pass/fail seminar course is part of the requirements. An individual programme is designed by consultation between the graduate advisor, the student's supervisor (if known), and the student at the time of his or her arrival. There are no entrance or cumulative examinations.

Students accepted into the MSc program may transfer directly to a PhD degree program after one year without completing their MSc, provided they have completed in the first year a minimum of 12 credits of course work with an overall average of at least 80%, 9 credits of 80% standing, and one of the seminar courses CHEM 540A, 540B or 540C.

The progress of each PhD student is evaluated once a year at a meeting of the faculty. A supervisory committee is formed for each student; this committee normally consists of the research supervisor and three other faculty members, one of whom is chosen by the student. In their second year, PhD students are required to pass a comprehensive examination. This exam consists of an oral report of their research progress and questioning on their work and the background related to it - this meeting is normally the last requirement before the thesis and must be passed in one or two attempts to achieve candidacy.

At the completion of the thesis, both MSc and PhD students must defend their results and thesis at a formal oral defense. In the case of PhD students an external examiner, chosen in consultation with the supervisor and the graduate advisor, is also asked by the Faculty of Graduate Studies to review the thesis.

Quick Facts

- Degree: Master of Science
- Specialization: Chemistry
- Subject: Science
- Mode of delivery: On campus
- Program components: Coursework + Thesis required
- Faculty: Faculty of Science

Research focus

Biological & Medicinal Chemistry, Catalytic Processes, Chemical Physics, Chemical Synthesis, Environmental Chemistry, Interfacial and Surface Chemistry, Materials & Polymer Chemistry, Molecular Spectroscopy, Nuclear and Radiochemistry

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The MSc in Sustainable Chemical Engineering is designed for ambitious graduates who aspire to play leading roles in managing, innovating and delivering resource efficient products, processes and systems in a sustainable way. Read more
The MSc in Sustainable Chemical Engineering is designed for ambitious graduates who aspire to play leading roles in managing, innovating and delivering resource efficient products, processes and systems in a sustainable way. The process industry has a high dependence on material and energy resources. Because of this, there is a strong interest in improving resource efficiency to increase competitiveness and decrease environmental impact.

Resource efficiency is about 'doing more and/or better with less' and delivering this sustainably presents a major opportunity and challenge for engineers and scientists. Industry needs skilled graduates with the expertise to take up this challenge now.

This course benefits from the support of our multidisciplinary EPSRC Centres for Doctoral Training:

- Sustainable Chemical Technologies (University of Bath)
- Water Informatics: Science and Engineering (Universities of Bath, Exeter, Bristol, Cardiff)
- Catalysis (Universities of Bath, Cardiff, Bristol).

The three Centres for Doctoral Training offer excellent opportunities for cross-disciplinary projects in engineering and science as well as access to a lively programme of talks and other events throughout the year. At the start of the MSc programme you will be assigned a doctoral student who will act as your mentor in addition to an academic tutor and supervisor.

Make an Impact: Sustainability for Professionals

If you are interested in sustainability, you can sign up for our free MOOC (massive open online course) Make an Impact: Sustainability for Professionals (https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/sustainability-for-professionals). The course starts in April.

Visit the website http://www.bath.ac.uk/engineering/graduate-school/taught-programmes/sustainable-chemical-engineering/index.html

Learning Outcomes

This course teaches and builds on advanced concepts and technologies core to sustainable chemical engineering. It will train you how to integrate systems thinking and economic, environmental and social objectives in problem solving and decision making. You will graduate with the practical and interpersonal skills required by professionals to work in the emerging and expanding employment market in the green sector.

You will:

- gain a holistic understanding of the environmental, social, ethical, regulatory and economic dimensions of sustainable chemical engineering and how they interact

- apply methodologies and tools to design and evaluate alternative products, processes and systems based on sustainability criteria

- apply your knowledge of resource conservation to deal with complex scenarios, real-life problems and decision making in the face of incomplete or uncertain information

- develop 'big picture' thinking to evaluate alternative products, processes and systems using whole systems approaches, which consider the multiple criteria and stakeholders along the process industry value chain

- develop the skills to formulate and implement research and design projects independently and in professional multidisciplinary teams.

Structure

The programme creates many opportunities for interdisciplinary and active learning through authentic, industrially relevant case studies, games and project work. There are guest speakers from industry and other organisations, as well as opportunities for industrial visits. Transferable skills development, such as problem solving, teamwork, effective communication, networking and time and resource management, is embedded throughout the programme.

- Semester 1 (September to January):
The first semester consists of five taught compulsory units that provide you with a foundation in sustainability and systems analysis to apply throughout the programme.

The units advance your understanding of the concepts, technologies and issues in resource recovery, including the valorisation and the re-use of waste streams (waste2resource). You will examine in detail how resources can be conserved by transforming wastes and other feedstocks into high value products in the bioeconomy.

Each unit consists of lectures, tutorials and case studies, and is supplemented by private study and preparation for in-class activities.

Assessment is by a combination of coursework and examination.

- Semester 2 (February to May):
In the second semester you will take two further technical specialist units on resource conservation. These cover a range of advanced technologies and concepts, including process intensification and waste, water and energy integration.

You will also develop your understanding of Sustainable Chemical Engineering in a design, research and management context through three project-based units, focused on resource efficiency and conservation.

In the group activity, you will apply engineering and project management techniques to solve a design problem, just as an industry-based design team would.

Project unit 1 introduces you to research methods and project planning. You will then apply this to detailed background research in your discipline area to prepare for your individual summer dissertation project in Project unit 2.

Assessment is by a combination of coursework and examination.

- Semester 3 (June to September):
The final semester consists of an individual project leading to an MSc dissertation. Depending on your chosen area of interest, the project may involve theoretical, computational and/or experimental activities. You will conduct your individual project at Bath under the supervision of a member of academic staff, with opportunities for industrial co-supervision. You will have access to the state-of the-art facilities in the Department of Chemical Engineering.

Assessment is through a written dissertation and an oral presentation.


Facilities and equipment
The Department has a full range of research facilities with pilot plants for all major areas of research. Our analytical facilities include gas chromatography, mass spectrometry, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), UV-VIS, FTIR and Raman, photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS), microcalorimetry, adsorption measurement systems, surface and pore structure analysis systems and particle sizing equipment. Within the University, there is access to atomic force, scanning and transmission electron microscopes.

Research Excellence Framework 2014
We are proud of our research record: 89% of our research was graded as either world-leading or internationally excellent in the Research Excellence Framework 2014, placing us 10th in the UK for our submission to the Aeronautical, Mechanical, Chemical and Manufacturing Engineering.

Careers information
We are committed to ensuring that postgraduate students acquire a range of subject-specific and generic skills during their research training including personal effectiveness, communication skills, networking and career management. Most of our graduates take up research, consultancy or process and product development and managerial appointments in the commercial sector, or in universities or research institutes.

Find out how to apply here - https://secure.bath.ac.uk/prospectus/cgi-bin/applications.pl?department=chem-eng

We have Elite MSc Scholarships for £2,000 towards your tuition fees available for this course - http://www.bath.ac.uk/engineering/graduate-school/taught-programmes/funding/

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We offer research programmes in a variety of areas including Advanced Separations Engineering, Bioprocessing Research Unit, Reaction and Catalytic Engineering and Water and Wastewater engineering. Read more
We offer research programmes in a variety of areas including Advanced Separations Engineering, Bioprocessing Research Unit, Reaction and Catalytic Engineering and Water and Wastewater engineering.

Our philosophy

The Department of Chemical Engineering is a multidisciplinary centre focusing on research into future sustainable materials and technologies. Chemical engineering research is crucial and supports development and production of new materials, fuels, drugs, consumer products, health care products, foods and beverages, electronic components, medical implants, and more.

As the number and complexity of chemical, biochemical and biological materials used in consumer products and supporting technologies increases, this research will play an increasingly vital role in the development of modern societies across the world.

Our applicants

We seek applications from outstanding individuals from anywhere in the world who are strongly committed to and potentially capable of high-quality academic research in any of the disciplinary areas covered by our Research Centres. You can apply for one of our pre-defined research projects or develop your own proposal. Our academic staff are always open to ideas that extend existing work or introduce new topics to their subject areas.

The dissemination of research findings is seen as a vital component of the research process and graduate students are encouraged to prepare papers for publication as part of their research training.

Successful applicants are welcomed very much as junior academic colleagues rather than students, and are expected to play a full and professional role in contributing to the Department’s objective of international academic excellence.

Visit the website http://www.bath.ac.uk/engineering/graduate-school/research-programmes/chemphd/index.html

Structure

The MPhil programme combines taught research training and applied research practice.

Candidates join the Department as a member of the Research Centre (http://www.bath.ac.uk/chem-eng/research/index.html) in which they initially have a broad research interest and that will have overseen their acceptance into the Department.

Candidates are expected to carry out supervised research at the leading edge of their chosen subject, which must then be written up as a substantial thesis.

International students

Please see the International students website (http://www.bath.ac.uk/study/international/) for details of entry requirements based on qualifications from your country.

In addition all non-native speakers of English are required to have passed English language tests as follows.

If you need to develop your English language skills, the University’s Academic Skills Centre (http://www.bath.ac.uk/asc/) offers a number of courses.

Only English language tests taken in the last two years are valid for entrance purposes.

About the department

This is a dynamic department, actively pursuing advanced research in many areas of chemical, biochemical and biomedical engineering, and also offering taught Masters courses. The Department is internationally recognised for its contributions to research, many of which are achieved in partnership with industry and prestigious research organisations. Our staff are highly skilled with excellent international reputations, and our facilities are amongst the best in the country.

Facilities and equipment
The Department has a full range of research facilities with pilot plants for all major areas of research. Our analytical facilities include gas chromatography, mass spectrometry, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), UV-VIS, FTIR and Raman, photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS), microcalorimetry, adsorption measurement systems, surface and pore structure analysis systems and particle sizing equipment. Within the University, there is access to atomic force, scanning and transmission electron microscopes.

International and industrial links
We have active links with UK universities - Bristol, Durham, Glasgow, Leeds, Imperial College, Liverpool, Oxford, Cambridge, Southampton, Edinburgh - and with European institutions including the CNRS laboratory at Toulouse and Lappeenranta University of Technology in Finland together with the Universities of Alicante, Delft, Oveido, Porto, Paris, Aachen and Wroclaw.

Research Excellence Framework 2014
We are proud of our research record: 89% of our research was graded as either world-leading or internationally excellent in the Research Excellence Framework 2014, placing us 10th in the UK for our submission to the Aeronautical, Mechanical, Chemical and Manufacturing Engineering.

Careers information
We are committed to ensuring that postgraduate students acquire a range of subject-specific and generic skills during their research training including personal effectiveness, communication skills, networking and career management. Most of our graduates take up research, consultancy or process and product development and managerial appointments in the commercial sector, or in universities or research institutes.

Other resources
Postgraduate students are encouraged to become members of professional societies and to present the results of their research at national and international scientific meetings. The Department runs a vibrant weekly research seminar programme where students are given the opportunity to present their research.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.bath.ac.uk/engineering/graduate-school/research-programmes/how-to-apply/index.html

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Both routes for this programme are designed to prepare student teachers to become professional, competent and reflective secondary school teachers of science, with chemistry as a specialist subject. Read more
Both routes for this programme are designed to prepare student teachers to become professional, competent and reflective secondary school teachers of science, with chemistry as a specialist subject. The programme focuses on addressing the needs of pupils aged 11 to 16.

Students following this programme will have the opportunity to gain 60 Masters level credits as part of their PGCE and gain Qualified Teacher Status. This one-year programmes comprises two elements; university-based teaching (60 days) and school-based experience (120 days). Practical teaching experience is gained in two main schools, where student teachers are allocated subject-specialist mentors who offer feedback and guidance. As well as covering all aspects of the National Curriculum and addressing all relevant government standards, this programme helps student teachers to develop as effective teachers. University workshop sessions cover a range of topics, including planning lessons, assessment of pupils and classroom management. There is also the opportunity to work collaboratively with students from other subject areas.

The aims of the programme are:

- Develop practical knowledge amd theoretical understanding of science within the context of the National Curriculum

- To address the needs of secondary school pupils within the context of the curriculum at Key stage 3 and 4

- Widen individuals skills, expertise and background knowledge across the field of science education

- Continue professional development and become an innovator capable of active involvement in the future evolution of chemistry.

Visit the website http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/courses/pg/seced/chem

Education - Secondary

Our secondary education programme is for students who want to train to teach young people in secondary schools. The programme is a mixture of learning at the university together with periods of practical teaching experience in our partner schools and colleges.

What you'll study

Full time
- Year 1:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Professional e-Portfolio (Level 7) (15 credits)
Professional Studies and School-Based Research (Level 7) (45 credits)
School Experience A (15 credits)
School Experience B (15) (15 credits)
Subject Knowledge and Pedagogy 1 (30 credits)
Subject Knowledge and Pedagogy 2 (30 credits)

Fees and finance

Your time at university should be enjoyable and rewarding, and it is important that it is not spoilt by unnecessary financial worries. We recommend that you spend time planning your finances, both before coming to university and while you are here. We can offer advice on living costs and budgeting, as well as on awards, allowances and loans.

Assessment

Progress will be assessed through a professional portfolio, written assignments and observation of classroom teaching. In order to qualify as a teacher, you need to meet the standards for Qualified Teacher Status, as set out by the National College for Teaching and Leadership.

Career options

Graduates are equipped for careers working in secondary schools and other educational settings, such as: teaching science and/or chemistry in a secondary school; Head of Science; Teaching and learning responsibilities for cross-curricular projects; STEM involvement and collaboration.

Find out about the teaching and learning outcomes here - http://www2.gre.ac.uk/__data/assets/pdf_file/0005/644414/Prof-GCE-and-Prof-Cert-in-Lifelong-Learning.pdf

Find out how to apply here - http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/apply

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Help improve human or animal health through creating new or more effective drugs and medicines. Learn the research processes used to identify drug targets and develop new therapeutics. Read more

Help improve human or animal health through creating new or more effective drugs and medicines. Learn the research processes used to identify drug targets and develop new therapeutics.

Your studies will combine the biological sciences with chemistry, giving you the skills to target, design, synthesise, create and assess new drugs. You'll also learn about protecting intellectual property, assessing the financial viability of drugs and the pre-clinical and clinical trial processes.

Tailor your studies to your strengths, interests and career goals. You'll learn a mix of academic and practical skills that are closely aligned to the needs of industry.

The Master of Drug Discovery and Development is best suited to very able students with backgrounds in chemistry or relevant life-science subjects such as biochemistry, biomedical science, pharmacy or pharmacology. It is an intensive one-year taught programme, unique in New Zealand.

Learn from the best

Learn from academics and professionals who are leaders in the field and have experience in successfully taking drugs to market. Each course is taught by at least three academics so you'll be exposed to a wide range of expertise.

Drug Discovery and Development is taught by the Schools of Chemical and Physical Sciences and Biological Sciences in collaboration with the University's Ferrier Research Institute and the Centre for Biodiscovery.

You'll be able to take advantage of the research expertise of the Ferrier Research Institute in drug design and development, and if you're doing a Master's, you'll be working alongside the more than 30 scientists who make up the largest carbohydrate research team in the world. The Institute also has its own manufacturing facility so you'll have the opportunity to observe the drug development process from discovery to product.

You'll also benefit from the programme's links with the Centre for Biodiscovery where you will interact with the research teams that are actively discovering, designing and assessing novel bioactive compounds.

Drugs in the real world

Get wise to the real-world issues facing pharmaceutical development and make the most of the hard-earned experiences of staff who have worked in the local and international biotech industry. Learn not only how to handle chemicals on a large scale, but to develop the mindset to do this in a way that is safe, reliable and robust—so you end up providing medicines that will change people’s lives.

Victoria offers three postgraduate qualifications in Drug Discovery and Development. Choose the one that suits your career goals, time constraints and financial situation.

  • Master of Drug Discovery and Development
  • Postgraduate Diploma in Drug Discovery and Development
  • Postgraduate Certificate in Drug Discovery and Development

If you begin by enrolling in the Certificate or Diploma programme you can continue on to complete your Master's. Or if you enrol in the Master's but can't complete it, for whatever reason, you may have completed enough points to be awarded a Certificate or Diploma.

What you'll study

Each qualification includes the core courses DRGD 401 Chemical Biology and Drug Discovery, and a choice between DRDG 402 Drug Design or CHEM 421 Organic Chemistry and Bio-organic Chemistry.

After that you'll choose from selected courses from the study areas of Drug Discovery and Development, Biomedical Science, Biotechnology, Chemistry, Clinical Research and Microbiology.

All three qualifications give you the opportunity to do at least some research.

Postgraduate Certificate

You'll complete four courses worth 60 points made up of the two core courses and two further choices.

Postgraduate Diploma

You're likely to take seven courses that will include the two core courses, your elective options and the 30-point Research Preparation course.

Master's

You'll study for your Master's in two parts over three trimesters. In Part 1, the first two trimesters, you're likely to take seven courses that will include the core courses and a 30-point Research Preparation course.

In Part 2, you'll complete a full research project. Choose between DRDG 561 Applied Research Project, where you'll complete one or more problem-solving projects, or DRGD 590 Research Project, where you'll focus on medicinal chemistry and the formulation of active pharmaceutical products. In some cases you may be able to replace the research project with the thesis course DRGD 595.

Your Master's may be endorsed with a specialisation in either Drug Discovery, Drug Development or Chemical Biology. Check the requirements to find out what you need to do for these.

Workload and duration

You can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for much of your studies.

The MDDD can be completed in 12 months full time, or in two years of part-time study but you'll need to discuss this option with the programme directorfirst. The Diploma will take you two trimesters and the Certificate one trimester.

Location

You'll study at Wellington's Kelburn campus where you will have access to state-of-the-art research facilities. Students doing a research programme will also work in partnership the world-renowned Ferrier Research Institute in Lower Hutt.

Research topics

Be part of a dynamic and collaborative scientific research community. Past students' research areas in drug discovery and development have included:

  • development of a new scaled-up catalytic process for a high value fine chemical
  • isolation and characterisation of a novel bioactive from a New Zealand marine organism
  • formulation of a novel therapeutic for cancer immunotherapy.

Community

Become part of an active community of scientists. Postgraduate study at Victoria will help you build valuable relationships and networks with peers, university staff and future colleagues. You'll have unprecedented access to world industry leaders who visit as guest lecturers and run seminars with students.

Careers

You'll have the broad skills you need to work in drug discovery in companies, universities, research institutes or with drug regulatory authorities. You might work within the pharmaceutical, bioanalytical or chemical industries, or take your skills into nutraceuticals or agrichemicals.



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