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The MLitt in English Studies is a literature degree offering specialist options in each of the major literary periods, from Old English to the present day. Read more
The MLitt in English Studies is a literature degree offering specialist options in each of the major literary periods, from Old English to the present day. Our expert tutors will introduce you to the very latest academic debates, along with longstanding critical issues such as race, class and sexuality.

Why study English Studies at Dundee?

The MLitt English Studies is a taught one year full-time, or two years part-time, postgraduate degree, which can be tailored to your needs, allowing you to pursue any literary interest you can imagine, whether it’s Arthurian literature or American crime fiction, animal rights or post colonialism.

This degree will:
Provide training in literary and cultural research as a firm basis for proceeding to doctoral work
Provide a taught postgraduate programme to suit individual student research interests and research needs
Enable completion of a dissertation of 18,000 words: an independent piece of work based on primary texts and sources, on your own topic, under the direction of an expert in the field.

Unique to Dundee is the “Special Author” option module, which allows you to explore in depth the full range of your chosen author’s works, whether it might be the Harry Potter series, Walter Scott’s Waverley novels, or the poems of Geoffrey Hill. Other examples include: Shakespeare, Jonathan Swift, Robert Burns, Jane Austen, Charles Dickens, George Orwell, Joseph Conrad, or Angela Carter.

What's so good about English Studies at Dundee?

Research Excellence:
English Studies is part of the School of Humanities at Dundee, is a centre of research excellence, we have recognized strengths in book history, authorship studies and visual culture, and we lead the way in interdisciplinary scholarship. Our research culture thrives on probing the creative relationships between literature and film, poetry and theatre, word and image.

In the most recent RAE, a full 90% of English's research publications were rated as of international excellence in terms of their 'originality, significance and rigour' and 45% of our research output was rated in the two very highest categories of 'international excellence'.

Postgraduate Culture

The English at Dundee offers a lively postgraduate culture, including a regular postgraduate forum, visiting speakers and an annual postgraduate conference.

We are also home to an annual Literary Festival which regularly attracts high profile writers to Dundee.

"The English department at the University of Dundee is worth recommending for a number of reasons ... I greatly enjoyed the fact that I was allowed a free hand with my own research; supervision being present and supportive, but not controlling or stifling in the least."
Samira Nadkarni, MLitt English Studies

Who should study this course?

As well as being a research preparation degree for students who intend to proceed to a PhD, this course also caters directly for students who wish to take their first degree to a higher level of advanced study, for either career development or merely general interest.

The start date is September each year, and lasts for 12 months on a full-time basis, or 24 months part-time

How you will be taught

All the core teaching is conducted 5.30-7.30pm to allow attendance by part-time and full-time students alike. Other classes are scheduled for the mutual convenience of staff and students.

What you will study

There is one core module: Approaches to Literary and Visual Culture which runs over two semesters, and you choose two optional modules, from the list available each year, plus the English Studies Dissertation.

Below is a typical list of modules, which varies from year to year, and is subject to demand and availability. You can also choose your optional modules from any grouping.

Medieval and Renaissance Literature

History of the Book, 1500-1800
Arthurian Literature from Chaucer to Malory and Beyond
The History of Drama: from the Greeks to the Victorians
Exploring Old English Texts
Special Author: directed reading
Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century Literature

History of the Book, 1500-1800
The Scottish Novel
Arthurian Literature from Chaucer to Malory and Beyond
Approaches to Film Adaptation
The History of Drama: from the Greeks to the Victorians
British and Irish Poetry, 1680-1830
Intermedial Poetic-Visual Art Works
The Pictured Page: Literature to Comics
Literature & Society, 1750-1900
The Irish Novel
Special Author: directed reading
Modern and Contemporary Literature

The Scottish Novel
Constructing Identities: Self, Subject and Persona in Contemporary Poetry
Virginia Woolf
The History of Drama: from the Greeks to the Victorians
The Pictured Page: Literature to Comics
The Irish Novel
The Literature of Hollywood
Writing, Texts and Books
Joyce and the Cinema
Postwar American Fiction and Transatlantic Exchange
Intermedial Poetic-Visual Art Works
Gender, Ethnicity, Text: Contemporary Readings
Special Author: directed reading
For the current list, visit the Humanities website.

How you will be assessed

Assessment is normally by extended essays for each module. All students allowed to progress to the MLitt phrase must attempt the dissertation. Students whose dissertation fails to satisfy the examiners will be awarded the PG Diploma, provided that the taught elements of the course have been successfully completed.

Careers

Students who take this course will gain a solid foundation from which they can proceed to doctoral research.

However, due to the non-vocational nature of a Humanities degree many students also enter jobs unrelated to their course of study. For these students this course provides them with an opportunity to further develop their written presentation skills, as well as the ability to work independently and plan independent research and study.

"I am so glad I did the Creative Writing module offered by the English department at Dundee as part of my MLitt degree pathway in Humanities. I am currently finishing a second novel, halfway through writing the script of a play, and working on a paper for the Conference of Clinical Anatomists. I am also involved in two or three different writing-in-the-community projects. The contacts I've made, and my confidence in trying different genres, is in large part attributable to that module."
Eddie Small, recent graduate

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The MA in English Literature. Early Modern Studies, 1300-1700 pathway offers you the opportunity to explore the culture of the English Middle Ages and Renaissance within its European framework. Read more

The MA in English Literature: Early Modern Studies, 1300-1700 pathway offers you the opportunity to explore the culture of the English Middle Ages and Renaissance within its European framework.

Register your interest

Apply now

The Early Modern Studies pathway invites you to study the vibrant culture of Europe between 1300 and 1700. Our approach is interdisciplinary, drawing on aspects of history, religion, and visual culture from the period as well as on its literature. In order to develop your understanding of pre-modern documentary and material culture, our teaching involves close study of original manuscripts and early printed texts and of early objects.

Working alongside distinguished scholars in English Literature you will be asked to think about what we mean by the terms ‘Medieval’ and ‘Early Modern’, and to formulate conclusions using a profoundly interdisciplinary approach: you will examine the literature, history, religion, visual culture, social relations, and politics of the period. Imaginative and ambitious themed modules enable you to study some of the most influential writers working between the 14th and 17th centuries within their cultural and historical context: Chaucer, Erasmus, Shakespeare, Machiavelli, Montaigne, Donne, and Milton amongst others. You’ll construct a historical understanding of the key movements, debates, and ideas that shaped the period in preparation for researching and writing your dissertation.

Queen Mary’s strong early-modern cluster is widely recognised for its vibrant teaching and research strengths. The early-modern MA programme offers core study in medieval and early-modern historiography, and archival, bibliographical, and research skills. The optional modules draw on the interests of our leading researchers and vary from year to year. We have particular concentrations in globalisation, trade, the exotic, and cartography (Jerry Brotton, Alfred Hiatt); book history, the material text, and editing (David Colclough, Joad Raymond, Claire Preston, Julia Boffey, Tamara Atkin, Jaclyn Rasjic); epistolarity, early newspapers, news networks, the circulation of books and manuscripts (Ruth Ahnert, Joad Raymond, Warren Boutcher); and women’s writing (Andrea Brady).

Other research specialisms include prison writing, network theory, the history of reading, late-medieval London literary production, forgery, early-modern political thought, literary-scientific relations, medieval chronicles, prison writing, pre-Shakespearean drama, John Donne, John Milton, Thomas Browne.

You will be trained to a very high level in research skills and you’ll get hands-on experience of working with a variety of early modern items, with access to otherwise uncatalogued and unexplored materials. You’ll work with rare books and manuscripts during this training. Throughout, you’ll be considering the impact of developments in manuscript culture and the new technologies in printing and publishing in the period.

The optional modules draw on the interests of our leading researchers and vary from year to year. We have particular concentrations in globalisation, trade, the exotic, and cartography (Jerry Brotton, Alfred Hiatt); book history, the material text, and editing (David Colclough, Joad Raymond, Claire Preston, Julia Boffey, Tamara Atkin, Jaclyn Rasjic); epistolarity, early newspapers, news networks, the circulation of books and manuscripts (Ruth Ahnert, Joad Raymond, Warren Boutcher); and women’s writing (Andrea Brady).

 

Compulsory modules

  • Writing in the Pre-Modern World
  • The Material Text, 1300-1700
  • Dissertation

Option modules:

You choose two modules from a list of options that changes from year to year (one can be from the range of modules offered across the MA English Studies curriculum). In 2017-2018 we hope to offer the following. If members of our specialist research staff win research funding it will mean that their module won’t run, so for that reason this list is indicative only. 

You may also opt to take a cognate elective module offered by the Schools in the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences and by other Colleges of the University of London.



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This interdisciplinary course is designed for well-qualified graduates who wish to extend their interest in medieval studies. Read more
This interdisciplinary course is designed for well-qualified graduates who wish to extend their interest in medieval studies. The flexible structure of the course allows students to construct their degree around their particular areas of interest, while acquiring both the technical expertise to investigate primary medieval documents and an insight into the complexities of medieval culture generally. Students will have the opportunity to be taught not only by Trinity staff but also by visiting lecturers from other internationally renowned institutions.

Students take four core courses:

Research Methodology;
Medieval Thought;
Medieval Culture and Society;
and a language chosen from: Elementary Classical Latin, Medieval Latin, Old English, Middle English, Italian, Medieval German, Medieval French, Old Irish.

Two options are also chosen. Currently the subject areas include:
Chaucer; Language and Genre; Varieties of Comedy in Dante and Boccaccio; 'Wild' Women in Medieval Literature; Old English Prose; Arthurian H; Courtly love song in Medieval Europe, Early Medieval Ireland; Text and Image; Old English Heroic Poetry; The Unruly Middle Ages; Medieval Philosophy.

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This Master's degree in history considers the culture and society of the medieval period, which is usually understood as stretching from the transformation of the Roman Empire to the Renaissance. Read more
This Master's degree in history considers the culture and society of the medieval period, which is usually understood as stretching from the transformation of the Roman Empire to the Renaissance. The programme will introduce you to a variety of topics within this broad span of time, including religion and heresy, philosophy and political thought, gender, the expansion of urban communities, power and kingship, and the dynamics of historical change. You will develop your ability to critically assess and analyse historical evidence and we will look at the archaeological record, documentary evidence, including parliamentary petitions, guild records and manorial court rolls, and literary sources by authors such as Geoffrey Chaucer and William Langland, among others. While the focus is on Britain, you will also study the British medieval experience comparatively alongside that of mainland Europe, in particular France and Italy.

After the core module, you can choose option modules that will further extend your exploration of the period and engage your passion for particular topics. The dissertation allows you to pursue independent research in an area of personal interest under the expert supervision of one of our research-active academics. If you are interested in how societies develop over time, this course will give you a stimulating and complex perspective on this fascinating period.

Key teaching staff on this programme

Course director: Dr Caroline Goodson

Staff involved in teaching the MA include:

Dr Rebecca Darley
Professor Vanessa Harding
Professor John Henderson
Professor Matthew Innes.

Other medievalists at Birkbeck include:

Dr Alison Finlay, a lecturer in English, specialising in Old Icelandic sagas and heroic poetry, and Old English.

Professor Anthony Bale, a Reader in English who works on late medieval texts and culture.
Dr Isabel Davis, a lecturer in English who works on late medieval texts and culture.
Dr Zoe Opacic, a lecturer in art history, who works on late medieval art and architecture.
Dr Robert Maniura, a lecturer in art history who works on late medieval art and architecture.

Why study this course at Birkbeck?

Arts and humanities courses at Birkbeck are ranked third best in London and 11th in the UK in the Times Higher Education 2015-16 World University Subject Rankings.
Birkbeck has research and teaching strengths in the medieval period and you will be taught by academics with expertise across history, English literature, cultural studies and interdisciplinary combinations.
This programme allows you to follow your own interests, with a wide choice of option modules, while developing your research skills and writing a dissertation in an area that interests you.
Our Department of History, Classics and Archaeology is one of the leading research and teaching departments for history in the UK. It is ranked 6th in the UK for the percentage of our research deemed world-leading or internationally excellent.
Our academic staff are international authorities in their fields, delivering stimulating, research-led teaching.
Our department is home to thriving student societies and a number of affiliated research centres that actively run seminars, conferences and other events where some of the world's best scholars present their latest research. These include the Pears Institute for the Study of Antisemitism, the Raphael Samuel History Centre and the Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities.
We are located 5 minutes' walk from the British Museum and the British Library, while the Museum of London is easily reachable. The Institute of Historical Research is located in Bloomsbury, near the main Birkbeck campus, and has an internationally renowned library collection and seminars that you can attend.
Birkbeck Library has an extensive history collection, including the major specialist journals, and access to online materials.

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The prose, poetry and drama of the later medieval period (roughly 1350-1550) in England and Scotland offer a remarkably rich subject for advanced literary study. Read more

The prose, poetry and drama of the later medieval period (roughly 1350-1550) in England and Scotland offer a remarkably rich subject for advanced literary study.

This programme allows you to pursue individual projects in Scottish and/or English literature within a wider interdisciplinary understanding of the period as a whole. Whether your interests lie in major figures such as Chaucer, Langland, The Gawain Poet, Malory, Skelton, Henryson, Dunbar, Douglas or Lyndsay, in less well-known or anonymous writers, the romance tradition, lyric poetry or drama, or in the relationships between literature, society and politics, you will have the opportunity to undertake a substantial piece of supervised independent research, supported by a flexible choice of taught options in related areas.

We are the oldest department of English Literature in the world, and at the last Research Assessment Exercise were awarded the highest research rating possible, of 5*A. We have one of the largest graduate programmes in this area in the country and a rich research culture covering all aspects of literatures in English.

We offer supervision in all areas of medieval literature, and have particular strengths in verse and prose romance, religious and secular drama, and lyric poetry.

The research of staff has made valuable contributions to the areas of literature and philosophy, modernism/postmodernism, medieval and early modern literature, history of the book, romanticism, transatlantic studies and performance studies.

English Literature houses the Centre for the History of the Book and is one of the UK's leading forces in this area. It works closely with the Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities and with the National Library of Scotland. The latter's recently acquired Murray Archive is crucial for studies in Romanticism, Book History, Bibliography and Archive Studies.

Programme structure

The course includes a 15,000-word dissertation, completed under the supervision of one or more of the course tutors. Students will undertake a seminar based programme of research methods training in core research skills and subject specific methodologies. They will also take two option courses covering areas of medieval literature and culture related to their chosen fields, each consisting of a weekly two-hour seminar, and will write two extended essays in relation to these courses.

Training and support

The academic staff you will be working with are all active researchers or authors, many of them prize winners and leading scholars in their fields. As well as benefiting from their expert supervision, you will undertake a seminar-based programme of training in core research skills and subject-specific methodologies. You will also have the opportunity to develop other transferable skills through the University’s Institute for Academic Development

We encourage you to share your research and learn from the work of others through a vibrant programme of Work-in-Progress seminars, reading groups, visiting speakers and conferences.

Our postgraduate journal, Forum, is a valuable conduit for research findings, and provides an opportunity for editorial experience.

Facilities

On hand are all the amenities you would expect, such as computing facilities, study areas and a common room and kitchen. Our location gives you easy access to the University’s general facilities, such as the Main Library and our collections, as well as to the National Museum, National Library and National Galleries of Scotland at the heart of the city.

In addition to the impressive range of resources available at the University’s Main Library (more than two million printed volumes and generous online resources) and the nearby National Library of Scotland, we host a number of collections of rare and valuable archival materials, all of which will be readily available to you as a postgraduate student.

Among the literary treasures are the libraries of William Drummond, Lewis Grassic Gibbon, Hugh MacDiarmid, Adam Smith, Dugald Stewart and Norman MacCaig, plus the WH Auden collection, the Corson Collection of works by and about Sir Walter Scott and the Ramage collection of poetry pamphlets.

Our cultural collections are highly regarded and include a truly exceptional collection of early Shakespeare quartos and other early modern printed plays, and world-class manuscript and archival collections.



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This programme enables students to study literature in English from the eighth to the seventeenth century, including a selection of the period’s major works, such as Beowulf, The Faerie Queene, and Paradise Lost, and some of its major writers, such as Chaucer, the Gawain poet, Shakespeare and Donne, as well as non-canonical and non-literary works by lesser-known authors. Read more
This programme enables students to study literature in English from the eighth to the seventeenth century, including a selection of the period’s major works, such as Beowulf, The Faerie Queene, and Paradise Lost, and some of its major writers, such as Chaucer, the Gawain poet, Shakespeare and Donne, as well as non-canonical and non-literary works by lesser-known authors.

Course Overview

Critical attention on this programme is focused especially on continuities and discontinuities between the medieval and early modern periods. For example, Anglo-Saxon heroic literature may be studied in conjunction with the heroic mode of the English Renaissance epic, and medieval dream poetry in conjunction with early modern literary (as well as philosophical and medical) representations of psychological disorders.

The programme is underpinned by advanced research methods, the study of theoretically informed critical approaches, and the scholarly examination of manuscripts and early printed books.

The University has a well-established record of research and teaching in English. Unusually for the sector, its provision at all levels has enabled students to study Medieval and Early Modern Literature drawing on specialist staff expertise and resources, particularly the holdings of the Roderic Bowen Library: a unique resource which houses the Special Collections of the University of Wales Trinity Saint David, including over 35,000 printed works, 8 medieval manuscripts, around 100 post medieval manuscripts, and 69 incunabula.

Modules

-Research Metoods
-Comparative Critical Approaches
-Medieval Manuscript Studies

And optional modules in topics such as:
-Epic, Religion, Philosophy
-Bodily Distempers
-Beowulf and Heroic Literature
-Medieval Poetry of Dream and Debate

Key Features

The MA in Medieval and Early Modern Literature is taught on-campus and as a distance-learning programme. When delivered on the University’s campus in Lampeter, the modules are taught through seminars, small workshops and individual tutorials and supervision that enable detailed and personalised feedback. For campus-based students, access to a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) enables additional learning. Moodle, our VLE, is a live forum through which students and staff can interact, whereby students are better able to revise and explore topics and access electronic resources. It is the primary learning interface for distance-learning students.

Assessment

The MA in Medieval and Early Modern Literature involves a wide range of assessment methods. Assessment is through a mixture of assignment and presentation supported by tasks designed to enhance research skills. In addition to traditional essays, you will be assessed through bibliographical exercises, creation of research project proposals, presentations – oral and PowerPoint-based, editorial exercises, and the dissertation. This variety of assessment inculcates the development of skills in presenting academic and scholarly material in a clear, professional manner, whether orally or in writing. For the majority of assignments students choose their own topic on which to be assessed in relation to each module, always in consultation with the module tutor. The dissertation allows students to undertake a sustained research project on a topic of their choice under expert individual supervision.

Career Opportunities

-Journalism, publishing, copywrighting, media
-Editors
-Publishers
-Marketing
-Librarianship and archives management (with further professional qualifications)
-Law (with further professional qualifications)
-Human resources
-Social work
-Public sector administration, civil service

The programme provides a foundation for postgraduate research, by laying particular emphasis on the methodologies and research tools needed for independent advanced study, thus acting as training for students who intend to undertake an MPhil or PhD.

The course also provides a qualification that is useful for teachers or others seeking Continuing Professional Development.

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We are interested in hearing from students with research proposals covering all aspects of medieval and early modern history, life and culture. Read more
We are interested in hearing from students with research proposals covering all aspects of medieval and early modern history, life and culture.

Academic staff interests include: early modern material culture; late medieval art history; medieval and early modern religious history; Anglo-Saxon archaeology and liturgy; early modern politics; medieval and early modern drama; and textual editing.

At present, research topics include: the Reformation; visual and manuscript culture; community; the plays of John Lyly; medieval ecclesiastical architecture; female sexuality and transexuality; priory management; deviant and vernacular language; and kingship. You will be part of a vibrant and varied community of researchers from different disciplines.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/152/medieval-and-early-modern-studies

The Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies (MEMS)

We are an interdisciplinary centre for the study of Medieval and Early Modern periods. Our 28 teaching staff are drawn from English, History, Architecture, Classical & Archaeological Studies, History & Philosophy of Art, and the Canterbury Archaeological Trust.

MEMS offers a successful, interdisciplinary MA programme, which attracts students from across the world. A thriving community of enterprising, supportive graduate students study for research degrees and benefit from the Centre’s involvement in the prestigious EU-funded Erasmus Mundus doctoral programme, Text and Event in Early Modern Europe (TEEME). We have close relationships with Canterbury Cathedral and the Archaeological Trust, which allow our students access to a wide range of unique historical, literary and material evidence.

Study support

- Postgraduate resources

Canterbury Cathedral Archives and Library have unparalleled holdings of manuscripts and early printed books. Kent’s Templeman Library holds a good stock of facsimiles, scholarly editions, monographs and journals, and we are within easy reach of the British Library, The National Archives, and other London research libraries. There are good online computing facilities across campus and, in addition, our students have special access to postgraduate computer terminals and the postgraduate student room provided by the School of History.

The Centre runs a weekly research seminar, and special termly, public lectures to which we welcome distinguished speakers. These events are at the heart of the Centre’s activities. We also run a full programme of conferences and colloquia.

- Dynamic publishing culture

Staff publish regularly and widely in journals, conference proceedings and books. Among others, they have recently contributed to: Historical Research; English Historical Review; Renaissance Studies; Medium Aevum; Transactions of the Royal Historical Society; and Studies in the Age of Chaucer.

- Researcher Development Programme

Kent's Graduate School co-ordinates the Researcher Development Programme (http://www.kent.ac.uk/graduateschool/skills/programmes/tstindex.html) for research students, which includes workshops focused on research, specialist and transferable skills. The programme is mapped to the national Researcher Development Framework and covers a diverse range of topics, including subjectspecific research skills, research management, personal effectiveness, communication skills, networking and teamworking, and career management skills.

Research areas

The research interests of our staff cover areas as broad as: religion, ideas, material culture, theatre and performance culture, gender, economy, food and drink, legal history, war, visual culture, politics, architecture, history of books and manuscripts, environment and travel, art history, and literature.

Careers

The transferable skills gained from this postgraduate programme are enhanced by the University of Kent’s employability initiative and careers advice service. Many of our recent graduates have gone on to careers in heritage, museum or archivist work. Some go on to pursue research in the area, many continuing with PhDs at Kent or other higher education institutions.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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- Aims. It is our aim to develop in our students the skills required to submit a satisfactory MPhil thesis at the end of their chosen duration (1 year full time or 2 years part time). Read more

Overview

- Aims
It is our aim to develop in our students the skills required to submit a satisfactory MPhil thesis at the end of their chosen duration (1 year full time or 2 years part time). In order to achieve this, a student will have acquired the essential skills required to design and conduct experiments (including applying for ethics approval where necessary), to analyse results, and to communicate these both in writing and orally. These skills will include those that can be transferred successfully to their choice of academic or other career.

- Support
The MPhil at the CBU is achieved by supervised research and is under the jurisdiction of the Degree Committee for the Faculty of Biology. The provision of supervision and teaching is overseen by the Graduate School of Life Sciences. Within the CBU, the internal Graduate Committee is responsible for all aspects of the running of the degrees. A suitable project falling within the interests of the supervisor, and sustainable within the limits imposed by the facilities available at the CBU, is agreed by both student and supervisor, and endorsed by the Graduate Committee. Each graduate student has a primary Supervisor, who will supervise the main body of their research, and an Advisor who acts as a supplementary source of advice and support. We also have two pastoral tutors who offer personal support and counselling throughout a student’s time at the Unit.

- Seminars
Students attend a variety of Unit Seminars given by distinguished scientists. They are able to draw from the CBU’s panels of research volunteers, both normal and clinical, and enjoy the benefits of superb computing facilities and support staff, including a Graphics/Multimedia Officer.

- The Cambridge Graduate Programme in Cognitive and Brain Sciences
CBU students are full members of the Cambridge Graduate Programme in Cognitive and Brain Sciences, which has been jointly established by the Unit and the Departments of Psychology and Psychiatry. This consists of a weekly series of theoretical seminars presented by senior researchers from the CBU and from the University. Lectures will be held on Mondays 4-5.30pm in the West Wing Seminar Room at the MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, 15 Chaucer Road, Cambridge, CB2 7EF (unless otherwise specified), or at the Psychology department on the Downing Site in Cambridge city centre. Seminars are held during Michaelmas and Lent terms only.
All public talks are publicised on the University talks website, which also contains an archive of older lectures. All scientists at the CBU are expected to attend the two public talk series, held on Wednesdays and Thursdays.

- Facilities and Linkages
The CBU has excellent facilities for experimental behavioural studies involving normal populations and patients with brain damage, as well as institutional links with Addenbrooke’s hospital giving access to various types of patient populations, including stroke and progressive neural degenerative diseases. There is a 3 Tesla MRI scanner on the premises, as well as MEG and EEG facilities. Through its partnership with the University of Cambridge Wolfson Brain Imaging Centre, the CBU has excellent access to PET and additional fMRI (3 Tesla) facilities. The CBU also offers state of the art computing facilities, supporting Unix, PC, and Mac platforms, and handling the large volumes of neuro-imaging data as well as extensive computational modelling. All students have their own networked desktop computer, with internet access through JANET.
The Unit’s close links with the University Department of Psychology and the Department of Psychiatry are strengthened through the Cambridge Graduate Programme in Cognitive and Brain Sciences, a joint programme of termly Seminars given by members of each Department and attended by all graduate students.
The CBU is also an active member of the wider neuroscience community in Cambridge, supported by the Cambridge Neuroscience network.

- Completion on time
For MPhil students a personalised training and research programme will be agreed during the early weeks of the degree.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/blcbmpbsc

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the programme, students will have:
• a comprehensive understanding of techniques, and a thorough knowledge of the literature, applicable to their own research;
• demonstrated originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical

understanding of how research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in their field;
• shown abilities in the critical evaluation of current research and research techniques and methodologies;
• demonstrated some self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems, and acted autonomously in the planning and implementation of research.

Continuing

There is no automatic progression from a CBU MPhil degree to a CBU PhD. MPhil students will need to apply to be considered for a PhD place alongside all other candidates.

Teaching

We offer a variety of theoretical and skills based training to support our wide range of topics and streams of research. A personalised training programme will be agreed for each incoming student in the first few weeks of the degree period. This will cover an agreed timetable of attendance at the various seminars, the research project planned, amd the formal review points throughout the degree.

- Feedback
Continuous assessment and supervision. Students can expect to receive an online feedback report each term.

Funding Opportunities

For eligible applicants, several MRC funded studentships are available, which pay the University Composition Fee, and a small but liveable stipend (currently £13,726 p.a.), however it should be noted that this money has never been allocated to an MPhil student as we always have excellent eligible PhD students whose funding takes priority. In reality a MPhil would almost certainly need to be self-funded or have external funding. Hence, independently funded applications are very welcome, and we will also always nominate successful applicants for the various Cambridge University scholarships available, depending on individual eligibility.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

Find out how to apply here http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/blcbmpbsc/apply

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/blcbmpbsc

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CBU students are full members of the Cambridge Graduate Programme in Cognitive and Brain Sciences, which has been jointly established by the Unit and the Departments of Psychology and Psychiatry. Read more
CBU students are full members of the Cambridge Graduate Programme in Cognitive and Brain Sciences, which has been jointly established by the Unit and the Departments of Psychology and Psychiatry. This consists of a weekly series of theoretical seminars presented by senior researchers from the CBU and from the University. Lectures will be held on Mondays 4-5.30pm in the West Wing Seminar Room at the MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, 15 Chaucer Road, Cambridge, CB2 7EF (unless otherwise specified), or at the Psychology department on the Downing Site in Cambridge city centre. Seminars are held during Michaelmas and Lent terms only.

Visit the website: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/blcbmpbsc

Course detail

It is our aim to develop in our students the skills required to submit a satisfactory MPhil thesis at the end of their chosen duration (1 year full time or 2 years part time). In order to achieve this, a student will have acquired the essential skills required to design and conduct experiments (including applying for ethics approval where necessary), to analyse results, and to communicate these both in writing and orally. These skills will include those that can be transferred successfully to their choice of academic or other

Format

We offer a variety of theoretical and skills based training to support our wide range of topics and streams of research. A personalised training programme will be agreed for each incoming student in the first few weeks of the degree period. This will cover an agreed timetable of attendance at the various seminars, the research project planned, amd the formal review points throughout the degree.

The MPhil at the CBU is achieved by supervised research and is under the jurisdiction of the Degree Committee for the Faculty of Biology. The provision of supervision and teaching is overseen by the Graduate School of Life Sciences. Within the CBU, the internal Graduate Committee is responsible for all aspects of the running of the degrees. A suitable project falling within the interests of the supervisor, and sustainable within the limits imposed by the facilities available at the CBU, is agreed by both student and supervisor, and endorsed by the Graduate Committee. Each graduate student has a primary Supervisor, who will supervise the main body of their research, and an Advisor who acts as a supplementary source of advice and support. We also have two pastoral tutors who offer personal support and counselling throughout a student’s time at the Unit.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the programme, students will have:

• a comprehensive understanding of techniques, and a thorough knowledge of the literature, applicable to their own research;

• demonstrated originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical

understanding of how research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in their field;

• shown abilities in the critical evaluation of current research and research techniques and methodologies;

• demonstrated some self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems, and acted autonomously in the planning and implementation of research.

Assessment

Examined by thesis (20,000 words), with an oral viva to review.

Continuing

There is no automatic progression from a CBU MPhil degree to a CBU PhD. MPhil students will need to apply to be considered for a PhD place alongside all other candidates.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

For eligible applicants, several MRC funded studentships are available (see MRC eligibility details), which pay the University Composition Fee, and a small but liveable stipend (currently £13,726 p.a.), however it should be noted that this money has never been allocated to an MPhil student as we always have excellent eligible PhD students whose funding takes priority. In reality a MPhil would almost certainly need to be self-funded or have external funding. Hence, independently funded applications are very welcome, and we will also always nominate successful applicants for the various Cambridge University scholarships available, depending on individual eligibility.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.2016.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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Literature is a dynamic force for change. Hull English postgraduates gain insight into society, culture and politics by developing an understanding of the power of language. Read more

Literature is a dynamic force for change. Hull English postgraduates gain insight into society, culture and politics by developing an understanding of the power of language. And both the MA and the MRes programmes provide students with a thorough grounding in research methods and practices.

We offer dedicated routes for study and supervision in both Literary Studies and Creative Writing. There are also designated pathways allowing students to focus their studies on Medieval and Renaissance Literature and Culture, Nineteenth-Century Literature and Culture, and Modern and Contemporary Literature and Culture. Creative Writing modules allow students to focus their interests on both fiction and non-fiction prose forms, and / or poetry. Students can opt to take a combination of Literary Studies and Creative Writing modules if suitably qualified.

Staff are internationally renowned and working at the cutting edge of their disciplines, both literary and creative.

Students will be taught and supervised by experts specialising in wide-ranging chronological pathways from Chaucer to the 21st century. We make full use of tutor research interests in areas such as Shakespeare, Victorian visual culture, contemporary fiction, gender and popular culture, children’s literature, the Gothic, and creative writing. 

Study information

All MA and MRes students undertake a core training module on Research, Creativity and Engagement in the first semester. This culminates in a one-day postgraduate conference, a process through which students will be guided and supported by the module tutors and convenor. Students will also take three optional modules in their chosen subjects, which will all include elements of research / creative training.

For MA students, there is a final dissertation / creative portfolio worth 60 credits, and taught modules are worth 120 credits in total (30 credits each module). For MRes students, the final dissertation / portfolio is worth 120 credits, and the taught modules are worth 60 credits (2 x 30-credit modules).

Teaching methods will include three-hour seminars, creative writing workshops, student presentations and small group exercises.

* All modules are subject to availability.

Future prospects

You will leave Hull with enhanced communication and research skills.

Career options include writing and editing jobs, in fields such as journalism, marketing or promotions. Many students opt to pursue further research or a career in academia or teaching.



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Rutgers University offers a 30-credit general Master’s Degree in English on the Newark campus, an urban yet intimate and leafy environment near downtown easily accessible by public transportation. Read more

Rutgers University offers a 30-credit general Master’s Degree in English on the Newark campus, an urban yet intimate and leafy environment near downtown easily accessible by public transportation. Our students take six electives in addition to four required courses: Introduction to Graduate Literary Study, two in pre-1800 literatures, and one in American literature. Those choosing to concentrate in Women’s and Gender Studies take two interdisciplinary core courses in feminist theory and methods (see separate description) and two W&GS-designated literature courses in the English Program (such as Women in Medieval Literature, Jane Austen, Autobiography and Gender, or Race, Gender, and the Holocaust, three recent offerings by our strong women’s studies faculty in the English Department). All must pass an examination on a common reading list, offered in March, and a one-hour translation test, rendering a passage of literary biography or history written in a foreign language into idiomatic English. These tests are scheduled throughout the year during Department office hours at the individual’s convenience. 

Course offerings

We mount 14-16 courses a year in the literatures and cultures of the Americas, Britain, and the English-speaking world as well as literature in translation. Besides more traditional courses (Chaucer) and innovative versions of traditional subjects, like Race and Gender in the Renaissance, or Global Romanticism, we offer considerable topical variety: for example, Transnational Muslim Fiction; The Vietnam War and American Culture, 1945-2009; African Diaspora Literature; The Gilded Age; Harlem Renaissance; Empire and the Spy Novel; War Stories; various film offerings; and courses on postcolonial, feminist, marxist, narrative, or other critical theories. Courses in Rhetoric and the Teaching of Writing, in Advanced Research and Archives, and in Editing and Publishing offer professional development. We also have occasional graduate Summer Session courses.

Degree students may arrange with a professor for Independent Study or a course of Advanced Readings tailored to their interests; some choose the two-semester Master’s Thesis,although this is not required for the degree. (Tailored studies must be arranged with the professor a semester in advance.) Seminarsare small (8-15), allowing for personal attention from professors and lively exchange with peers. Three classes constitute full-time status; given their busy lives, most students are part-time, registering for one or two courses per term. Each class is held once a week, 5:30 to 8:10, Monday through Thursday, allowing people to attend school after work. Occasionally we schedule a Saturday class. Degree students who need to take time out from their studies register for Matriculation Continued, which holds their place in the Program.

Who we are

Even though most students are part-time and commute, we form a surprisingly close-knit community of 21 graduate English faculty and more than 40 students, diverse in age, interests, ethnicities, and nationalities. Some students live on campus. Our faculty are serious research scholars and writers who publish regularly, participate actively in professional organizations, receive national and international recognition for their work, and love to teach. Two of our Full Professors hold University Chairs; other colleagues both teach and provide administrative direction for other campus units, such as the M.F.A. Program in Creative Writing, Women’s and Gender Studies, and African American Studies. 

  Film and other courses are sometimes taught by experts from the Metropolitan area. A distinct advantage of studying here is the prospect of being helped along with recommendation letters, introductions, and publication advice from well-connected professionals.

Our students’ statistical profile:  In case you’re wondering, in a typical semester our degree students are 65% female; about evenly divided between the age groups of 21-34 and 35-44, with a handful of older students. In 2004, 50 identified themselves on their applications as Caucasian, 10 as Black, 3 as “Other Hispanic,” 4 as Asian, the rest unidentified. 90% or more of our degree students live in New Jersey, with some having moved here to establish NJ residency. We are also pleased to welcome international students–recently, from Japan, Turkey, France, South Africa, Syria, Saudi Arabia, and Iran. Overall R-N is the most diverse university campus in the nation.

Students’ vocational plans and interests:  The fact that our students arrive with a variety of agendas makes for an interesting mix in the classroom, and for reasons we can’t claim to understand completely, diversity really ‘works’ in our Program.

Those planning on doctoral study choose courses that ground them in literary theory and find Rutgers–Newark a superior place for conducting serious research, given the resources of the University’s many libraries, including the Dana and Rutgers Law Libraries on our campus, networked with hundreds of others nationwide. Graduates also choose to study library science or earn education Ph.D’s in Rutgers-New Brunswick’s highly-regarded graduate schools in these field.

Graduates often find college teaching work without the Ph.D.; a few find it even before they receive the M.A. A strong presence among us are seasoned, beginning, or aspiring high school teachers, who come to deepen literary learning, enhance their options in their institution, and enjoy intellectual exchange among peers. We also attract students who are pivoting for career changesworking journalists and professionals in other media fields who are hungry for literary study, people who seek intensive study of literature to feed their own creative writing, late bloomers, and the recently unemployed who’ve decided to return to school.

We do admit applicants who weren’t college English majors or are working in various business fields, computer science, public relations, or law but have been reading literature extensively on their own. Introduction to Graduate Literary Study helps all students make the transition with instruction and practice in the latest scholarly research methods and literary theories.



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