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Communication for Development is an interdisciplinary field of study and practice, combining studies on culture, communication and development and integrating them with practical fieldwork. Read more
Communication for Development is an interdisciplinary field of study and practice, combining studies on culture, communication and development and integrating them with practical fieldwork. It explores the use of communication – both as a tool and as a way of articulating processes of social change – within the contexts of globalisation.

In this programme, where the form of study strives to be conducive to the course content, progression lies in the group dynamic process as well as in the coursework itself. The multidisciplinary nature of the subject means that the same content should provide in-depth knowledge for students with different backgrounds. One major point of this pedagogical approach is to bring together different experiences. The group diversity should allow students to deepen their knowledge of their own major as well as gain a sufficient overview based on the academic backgrounds and practical experiences of other students. This will allow them to be able to work both interdisciplinary and transcultural in their future professions.

This is Communication for Development

What is the relationship between development communication and the emerging, influential nexus of communication for social change, and where does social communication fit in?

Regardless of what one calls it, communication and media strategies have been utilised in development cooperation for well over sixty years. From an early emphasis on mass media in agricultural extension work, communication for development has grown to encompass a wide array of approaches and methodologies, and has gradually increased in stature to become a key driver of contemporary debates in development. Initially, communication interventions were largely oriented around the use of mass media, and existed within a principally modernising, top-down and technocratic paradigm. Among other complex forces at play, the New World Information and Communication Order (NWICO) debates in the 70s and 80s and the rise of critical and alternative approaches to development stretched the definition of the field. In addition to mass media, practitioners began to evaluate the need for richer interpersonal communication approaches that highlight the importance of power and culture in the success of development initiatives.

Dialogue, participation and the sharing of knowledge

Some of the most significant changes to global development cooperation have come about as a result of this critical field of study. As a discipline, Communication for Development embraces a broad range of functions and practices which centre around dialogue, participation and the sharing of knowledge and information, all with a view to creating empowerment and sustainable social change. Development communication is no longer an emerging discipline but one which has established itself as an integral part of development planning. Labelled part science, part craft and part art, its multidisciplinary nature draws on aspects of anthropology, sociology, psychology and the behavioural sciences, and its implementation depends on flexibility, creativity and an understanding of communication processes. An awareness of the role media and communication have to play in development cooperation and diversity management have transformed the way development is perceived, mapped and implemented, and the field has pioneered some of the most ground-breaking improvements in global development undertakings. As the recent surge in new communications technologies demonstrates, it is not the tools themselves that make good communication, but rather a rich and theoretically informed understanding of the political, social and cultural contexts in which media and communications interventions occur.

Communication for Development as a Field of Study

Despite the fact that every year vast amounts of money are donated to developing countries, the chasm between the ‘haves’ and the ‘have-nots’ continues to widen as billions of people around the world continue to live without running water, sanitation, adequate nutrition or access to basic education.

While the poor and the marginalised have always been at the centre of development, they have been the subjects rather than the objects of communication as traditional development practices overlooked a fundamental truism: that the poor, themselves, are often the best experts on their needs. Marginalised communities, historically denied access to communication tools and channels, have traditionally been passive bystanders to their so-called development as top-down, one-sided mass communication programmes delivered information without taking into account the very important specificities of context – the cultural norms and beliefs, knowledge and folklore of target populations, and how these impact the uptake of information and the potential for social change. Due to this lack of participation by target communities, most development programmes failed to achieve their goals, and a dramatic shift in paradigm was necessary to improve the efficacy and sustainability of development cooperation methods.

Social processes rooted in the communities

This shift towards participatory social processes, rooted in the customs and traditions of communities themselves, is the most fundamental premise of communication for development. Participatory processes aim to utilise cultural specificity as a tool rather than an obstacle, starting at ‘grass-roots’ level and developing methods that are grounded in, and take local and indigenous knowledge seriously. These processes comprise an interchange of knowledge and information, empowering individuals to make choices for themselves, and place communication at the forefront of the planning process while at the same time feedback and consultative processes ensure that communication is on-going and efficacy is maximised. Through the creation of ‘bottom-up’ processes, individuals become fundamental initiates in development schemes, a factor which is strongly linked to their long-term sustainability.

ComDev addresses the gap

As the divide between the ‘connected’, developed world and developing countries grows, so does the need for new, innovative methods for addressing global inequality increase, and Communication for Development is the field devoted to the study and implementation of these processes. The power of media and the potential of Information Communication Technology (ICT) to educate and to address global crises such as the spread of HIV have led to exciting and creative innovations in development cooperation, and this dynamic field continues to grow and develop. As globalisation and the development of ICTs change world markets and pose an increasing threat to developing countries and their more vulnerable communities, practitioners schooled in contemporary mass communication theories and concepts have become a vital part of development across the globe.

Why choose Malmö University?

Despite the wider acceptance of community-driven and participatory approaches to development by large multilateral and bilateral development agencies, the field continues to struggle for institutionalisation, and to be granted sufficient resources by managers and funding agencies.

Paradoxically, the role of media and communication in development cooperation has seen a strange turn after the first World Congress on Communication for Development, held in Rome in 2006 and organized by FAO, the World Bank and the Communication Initiative, in partnership with a broad strand of important organisations in the field. The summit in Rome managed to mobilize almost a thousand participants from research and practice, government and non-government. It was supposed to mark the definite break-through of the science and practice of ComDev. Instead, what happened had more the character of an implosion of the ComDev field, which only recently is gaining a new momentum. Today, we are however actually seeing a long series of new institutional initiatives, in the world of ComDev, both in practice and university curricular development. At university level, new MAs in ComDev have developed in places like Albania, South Africa, Kenya, Spain, Paraguay, the UK and Colombia. The field is finally becoming more significantly institutionalised in the world of academia, although it is still grappling with finding its identity between media and communication studies on one side, and cultural studies, political science and not least development studies on some of the other sides. The interdisciplinarity embedded in ComDev, combined with the outlined processes of globalisation, mediatisation and the proliferation of bottom-up agency are all contributing to put ComDev at a cross-roads.

Internet-based distance-learning

Malmö University was the first to pioneer the use of an Internet-based distance-learning platform to make the education available to students globally. With its mix of online collaboration and discussion, paired with webcast seminars the entire programme can be conducted over the internet. This enables students from all corners of the globe to participate, work in their own time and attain the education. The use of the Live Lecture function in seminars makes students, equipped with microphones and webcams, able to participate in lectures and discussions online, resulting in a ‘virtual classroom’. This way, students in New Zealand and South Africa can communicate and work on projects with classmates in Fiji and India, sharing ideas and working together towards the common goal of improving development practices.

ComDev fosters teamwork

As a relatively new degree, students embarking on this specialised programme have the advantage of being schooled in the latest theories and philosophies, while being given the opportunity to apply these theories and concepts to real-life projects and problems in human development through individual assignments and group projects. Geared as it is towards individuals working in the fields of journalism, media and development, ComDev fosters teamwork and facilitates the exchange of knowledge and perspectives among participants.

Final project and field-work

The final project has always been an important element of the programme. Over the past 10 years, students of ComDev have had the opportunity to apply what they have learned theoretically to a broad range of contexts and scenarios in the process of completing their projects, and field-work has been conducted in India, South Africa, Mozambique, Kenya, Croatia and Sarajevo, to name but a few. During their project work, students have the opportunity to explore a particular research area or topic of concern at a deeper level, and the accompanying written dissertation provides a fantastic opportunity to consolidate and further the knowledge and skills gained during the education. This project work also demonstrates a solid foundation in research, which will aid those students who wish to continue into doctoral level studies. In choosing the topic for their projects, students are free to ‘think outside the box’, and employ innovativeness and creativity to their field-work endeavours, and project works have included documentaries, short films, photo essays, and a wide array of dissertations presented in interesting and original ways. Students are also encouraged to join forces and collaborate on projects, as teamwork is regarded as a vital part of effective development cooperation. For a list of all the Project Works to date, see the ComDev portal, under ‘History’.

Career opportunities

The global demand for media and communication skills continues to increase as organisations such as UNICEF have made it a policy to hire ComDev practitioners, not only for international development schemes, but for diversity management and other forms of transcultural cooperation.

The UN Inter-Agency Round Table of Communication for Development has played a big role in institutionalising the field by bringing together UN agencies and international partners to discuss and debate the broad, challenging and essential role of Development Communication has to play in worldwide development cooperation. The 12th United Nations Inter-Agency Roundtable on Communication for Development had as its theme “Advancing the Rights of Adolescent Girls through Communication for Development”. For example, UNICEF has recently revisited their C4D strategy and work, calling for a stronger linkage with the universities and building widespread capacity within their own global organisation. UNESCO equally recognises the importance of communication, and has included it as part of its mandate and vision, integrating communication in its policies, budget and hiring policy, reflecting the growing need for skilled communication professionals.

Former ComDev students end up working in a truly diverse variety of settings. Some of the UN agencies placing hiring ads seek ‘communication for development’ practitioners by name. More commonly, though, practitioners are working in positions such as information or communications officer, where their roles may include a variety of tasks, not all of which would be strictly considered ComDev. Some practitioners are able to make a living as consultants working on projects with NGOs and CSOs, bilateral aid programs (such as Sida or DFID), or with the UN and World Bank. Since skills, knowledge and aptitudes gained through an education in ComDev are relevant to a variety of job functions within the development sector, you may also find alumni working in a range of allied positions, such as conflict resolution positions or as a learning and outcomes coordinator, to name but a few.

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The MSc International Development Practice is a one-year interdisciplinary Masters degree designed to train students in both the theoretical and practical aspects of international development work. Read more

The MSc International Development Practice is a one-year interdisciplinary Masters degree designed to train students in both the theoretical and practical aspects of international development work.

Highlights

  • Combines exploration of key theoretical concepts in development studies with training in skills used by development practitioners.
  • Provides substantial introduction to quantitative and qualitative methods for assessing development programmes.
  • Targeted at students intending to follow a career in international development, and the summer research project can be undertaken in collaboration with organisations involved in development work.
  • Interdisciplinary approach means you can explore a range of methodological approaches.

The programme emphasises practical skills which will be of particular value if you are looking to develop a career in international development. Specific attention is paid to training in data methods – familiarising students with the ways in which quantitative and qualitative data methods can be used to understand and improve the effectiveness of development programmes.

Practical components are, in part, taught through hands-on workshops facilitated by experienced development practitioners. The programme also features discussion of different careers in development and a literature-based exploration of identity and development work.

Additionally, the summer research project has a strong practical focus. Subject to availability, projects may be undertaken in collaboration with an organisation involved in development work – allowing students to gain first-hand professional experience.

The MSc International Development Practice is distinguished by its interdisciplinary character and involves academic staff from the following Schools:

  • Economics and Finance
  • International Relations
  • Medicine
  • Modern Languages
  • Mathematics and Statistics
  • Philosophical, Anthropological, and Film Studies.

The interdisciplinary approach means that you can explore a range of methodological approaches and use ideas from different disciplines to illuminate development studies questions.

Teaching format

The MSc degree requires two semesters of full-time coursework, normally equivalent to six modules. 

The course involves both independent and group study. Modules have different methods of delivery, including:

  • lectures
  • seminars
  • tutorials
  • practical classes
  • field work.

Assessments include: 

  • written assignments
  • presentations
  • technical summaries.

Further particulars regarding curriculum development.

Modules

The MSc International Development Practice involves both independent and group study. Modules have different methods of delivery, including lectures, seminars, tutorials, and practical classes. Forms of assessment include written assignments, presentations, and technical summaries.

For more details of each module, including weekly contact hours, teaching methods and assessment, please see the latest module catalogue which is for the 2017–2018 academic year; some elements may be subject to change for 2018 entry.




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The MA in Anthropology and Development is an advanced degree in socio-cultural anthropology with a particular emphasis on the Critical Anthropology of Development. Read more

Overview

The MA in Anthropology and Development is an advanced degree in socio-cultural anthropology with a particular emphasis on the Critical Anthropology of Development. During their studies students shall be provided with a sophisticated introduction to the theoretical underpinnings of socio-cultural anthropology, together with a block of modules that open up and explore the conceptual and methodological core of the discipline, and a series of specialised modules in the Critical Anthropology of Development. Students are also asked to write a thesis in the Anthropology of Development. This Masters programme is primarily a scholarly degree that aims to equip students for later doctoral research or for work in third sector roles that demand academic social-scientific knowledge or the particular skills of trained ethnographic researchers.

Course Structure

Students take a total of 90 credits over 1 year.

Compulsory Modules (70 credits)
- AN651 Social Thought (10 credits)
- AN653 Writing Cultures (10 credits)
- AN649 Foundations of Anthropology & Development (5 credits)
- AN652 Key Concepts in Anthropology (10 credits)
- AN669 Topics in Anthropology & Development (5 credits)
- AN634T Thesis (30 credits)

Optional Modules
- AN646 Foundations of Linguistic Anthropology (5 credits)
- AN647 Foundations of Medical Anthropology (5 credits)
- AN648 Foundations of Material Culture and Design (5 credits)
- AN862 Ethnography Winter School (5 credits)
- AN657 Ethnographic Ireland (5 credits)
- AN630 Creole Culture (5 credits)
- AN666 Topics in Linguistic Anthropology (5 credits)
- AN667 Topics in Medical Anthropology (5 credits)
- AN668 Topics in Material Culture & Design (5 credits)
- PD606 Design Ethnography (7.5 credits)
- GY621 Dublin Urban Laboratory (10 credits)
- GY619 Public Engagement Research and Practice (10 credits)
- GY627 Places, Landscapes, Mappings (10 credits)

Students complete an intensive course of four 6-week compulsory modules in anthropological theory (10 credits each) alongside four compulsory modules in Anthropology and Development (5 credits each), as well as two Saturday workshops. Students develop a proposal for a research project during the taught year in consultation with a member of the anthropology faculty, who will advise the student and mark the project. In the summer, students register for the 30-credit Thesis, which must be completed by early September.

Career Options

An anthropology degree provides an excellent preparation for a wide variety of fields in both public and private sectors, and is an especially good foundation for an international career. Anthropology has become increasingly important as a job skill in the context of globalisation, where a deeper understanding of cultural difference is crucial, both locally and internationally. Our graduates go on to employment in a wide variety of careers in community work, education, the health professions, product design, international aid and development projects, NGO work, business and administration, and more.

How To Apply

Online application only http://www.pac.ie/maynoothuniversity

PAC Code
MHC62

The following documents should be forwarded to PAC, 1 Courthouse Square, Galway or uploaded to your online application form:

Online PAC application form
Statement of your academic and professional goals (SEE BELOW)
Names and contact details of two referees who have agreed to write letters of recommendation for you (SEE BELOW)
Official Transcripts of degrees not earned at Maynooth University**
A copy of your Birth Certificate or valid Passport (non-Maynooth University students only)
**Certified copies of all official transcripts of results for all non-Maynooth University qualifications listed MUST accompany the application. Failure to do so will delay your application being processed.

- Writing the Statement of Academic and Professional Goals (500 words)

The Statement of Academic Goals is a significant component of the application. This is the statement of purpose that presents your experience, scholarly interests and aspirations to us in the anthropology department, and therefore should be considered carefully. Ideally, your statement should include why you want to pursue postgraduate study in the discipline; what you have read recently that has inspired you to pursue anthropology (please be specific about authors and titles); your general research interests in the field and/or ideas for a potential thesis project. We would also be interested in hearing about your professional/career goals and how you hope the degree in anthropology will help you achieve them.

- Arranging for letters of recommendation

Your application requires two letters of recommendation, which should be written by academic referees (previous lecturers for example). If you do not have recent academic experience, some other type of professional reference will suffice. Personal character references are not accepted. In your application, please provide the names and contact details (preferably emails) of your referees, and the department will contact them on your behalf. Alternatively, you may ask your referees to send letters directly to : letters should be signed and on letterhead, and should be sent from the referee’s own email address. They can also be sent by post to Anthropology Department at the address below

We will endeavour to respond with decisions within 2 weeks of each closing date.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/study-maynooth/postgraduate-studies/fees-funding-scholarships

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This unique programme, one of the first of its kind in the UK, marries the related areas of property development and urban design. Read more
This unique programme, one of the first of its kind in the UK, marries the related areas of property development and urban design. As a student, you will be engaged in exploring the dynamic connections between real estate valuation and the character of the built environment in one of the most rapidly changing property markets in the UK.

Internationally recognised as a centre for industries related to property development and architecture, London provides an ideal test bed for your studies; it is arguably the ideal city within which to study the production of the built environment from both an aesthetic and a commercial perspective.

The programme draws upon a range of expertise in Architecture and Urban Planning although no prior training in either is a pre-requisite. By the completion of the course you will have covered modules in property development, design skills and project management that assume no subject specific background knowledge.


Programme Structure

Semester 1
•Property Development 1: Valuation Methods and Investment Appraisal (15 credits)
•Presenting Design Research (15 credits)
•Design Project 1* (30 credits)
•Design Appreciation 1* (15 credits)
•Urban and Planning Theory* (15 credits)


Semester 2
•Property Development 2: From Design to Delivery (15 credits)
•Research Methodology (15 credits)
•Design Project 2* (15 credits)
•Design Appreciation 2* (15 credits)
•Urban Planning Practice* (15 credits)


Semester 3
1 module from:
•Thesis: Dissertation (60 credits)
•Thesis: Research by Design (60 credits)
•Thesis: Design (60 credits)

* Optional Module


Careers

Students are expected to go on to interesting and rewarding careers in property development, urban planning, the wider construction industry, conservation and many other specialisms to be found in the built environment and the arts.

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The Master of Public Administration in International Development has been designed to support managers or potential managers of public organisations in developing countries. Read more
The Master of Public Administration in International Development has been designed to support managers or potential managers of public organisations in developing countries. While the content of the MPA and the MPA in International Development overlap in several skill areas, they differ with respect to considerations of the environmental factors that impact on the work of public managers and the ways in which those factors shape the character of governance and the management and delivery of public policy.

Participants pursue a cluster of core modules which are commensurable with the international modernising civil services agenda and indicative skills development in developed and developing administration. The core modules provide common skills training for managers in policy and operational delivery. In addition students will be able to choose one optional module in the Autumn term. In the summer term, all course participants complete a policy report.

Structure

Core Modules
-Leading & Managing Change
-Theories of the Policy Process
-Managing Public Finances
-Theories & Policies of Development Governance
-Strategic Planning
-One Option Module

During the Summer Term students start work on a Policy Report on a topic of their choice. The Report is due for submission at the end of the summer vacation.

The Masters of Public Administration in International Development may also be taken on a part-time basis over two years (24 months).

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The UK has a mature and highly successful TV industry with exports of programmes and formats worth over £1.3 billion annually. Broadcasting is still an expanding industry in many parts of the world, and is a crucial driver for the creative and cultural industries more generally. Read more
The UK has a mature and highly successful TV industry with exports of programmes and formats worth over £1.3 billion annually. Broadcasting is still an expanding industry in many parts of the world, and is a crucial driver for the creative and cultural industries more generally. This course provides the wide perspectives and specific skills that are essential for success in the broadcasting industry.

This innovative course examines the different ways in which broadcasting is organised around the world. It has a particular emphasis on the production techniques of British television, approaching them through a comparative international lens. Students study a major BBC drama series in depth (currently the Saturday evening series Casualty) from conception, through to scripting and production organisation. The course includes visits to the production base in Cardiff as well as crucial skills training in the industry-standard MovieMagic budget and schedule software.

Each student takes creative control of their own television or radio production to complete the course. The Media Arts department’s extensive range of industry-standard equipment, our TV production studio, state-of-the-art Mac Labs and location store (all of which has recently benefited from a £100,000 investment), is available to all students and training is provided in using it as part of the course.

Located near London, the course provides students with a privileged insight into the production practices of the UK television industry. You will have guest lecturers from both production and management in the broadcasting industry. The wide range of past guest lecturers include:

- Alex Graham (CEO of Wall to Wall TV, executive producer of Who Do You Think You Are),
- Karen Mullins (Project Manager for Channel 4 Racing, London Olympics, Rugby World Cup)
- James Quinn (Executive Producer My Big Fat Gypsy Wedding)
- Pip Clothier (Producer of undercover documentaries including BBC’s Panorama: Cash for Questions).

What you will study:
- The nature of television as a medium: scheduling, genres, formats
- How to produce your own short television or radio programme, using industry-standard equipment
- The changing ways in which digital programming is being produced and delivered
- The ways in which formats and programming are traded globally
- The organisation and regulation of broadcasting around the world
- The differing industrial structures of TV
- The crucial skills of scheduling and budgeting, including training on the industry standard Movie Magic software.
- TV series narrative arcs and character development
- The TV production process, planning and execution, (including lectures by the producers of BBC’s Casualty

You will be taught by world-leading scholars including:
- Professor John Ellis (author of Visible Fictions, Seeing Things; independent TV producer; formerly deputy chair of PACT, the UK independent producers’ trade organisation)

- Dr George Guo (graduate of Westminster University and Communication University of China who publishes on TV drama in China)

- Dr James Bennett (author of Television as Digital Media, Television Personalities)

- Mike Dormer (producer of The Whale (2013), Blue Murder (2007-9) New Tricks (2003-5))
a team that combines an international perspective, substantial experience in the TV industry, and innovative theoretical thinking.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/mediaarts/coursefinder/mainternationaltelevisionindustries.aspx

Why choose this course?

- You will develop an international outlook on broadcasting, equipping you to pursue a career in the broadcasting industry, both in the UK or abroad

- You'll be taught by renowned scholars and experienced practitioners

- The MA is taught in a department devoted to TV and film production and its study

- There is an in-depth focus on the UK and its excellence in broadcast production

- You will be trained and develop advanced skills in the use of our industry-standard equipment, which includes Final Cut Studio 2 editing systems, Sony HVR-V1E cameras, Sennheiser radio microphone kits and a selection of professional quality sound recording and lighting equipment.

Department research and industry highlights

The Media Arts department at Royal Holloway has a vibrant production culture. Most staff members have substantial production experience in TV and cinema. Around 300 undergraduate and 60 postgraduate students every year are engaged in making their own productions, including MA International Television Industries students.

Staff include the feature film director John Roberts (War of the Buttons, Day of the Flowers), award-winning documentary maker Marc Isaacs (All White in Barking, The Road), former controller of BBC1 and head of BBC Drama, Jonathan Powell.

You will be taught by leading independent producers Professor John Ellis (Brazil: Beyond Citizen Kane, Cinema in China) and Mike Dormer (The Whale, New Tricks, The Bill).

On completion of the programme graduates will have:

- a thorough understanding of the world broadcasting market and its organisation
- a thorough understanding of the main issues in broadcasting culture
- a deep knowledge of the main genres and forms of broadcast programming
- a detailed understanding of the nature of British TV series drama and the production processes that are involved in realising a TV drama series
- an invaluable experience of production to a broadcast standard
- a critical self-knowledge gained from analysing the process of producing their own work

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including:
- seminar presentations
- written essays
- research portfolios
- project work
- self-assessment documents

Employability & career opportunities

On graduation, you will have a range of knowledge and a portfolio of written and media work which will be invaluable in finding employment in the broadcasting industry, particularly in those territories where the business is expanding rapidly.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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Full time (Sep start). 12 months. Gamer Camp Pro (MA/MSc Video Games Development) has been created in partnership with the likes of Sony Computer Entertainment Europe,Codemasters,Rareand Exient. Read more

Course Duration

Full time (Sep start): 12 months

Course Summary

Gamer Camp Pro (MA/MSc Video Games Development) has been created in partnership with the likes of Sony Computer Entertainment Europe,Codemasters,Rareand Exient. We aim to help you become a perfect recruit for a career in the games industry- with not just the skills, but also the experience you’ll need. Our graduates have been employed by companies including Sony Evolution Studios, Ubisoft and Rockstar Games.

The course was developed in partnership with the industry to provide a ‘finishing school’ that produces work-ready graduates with the practical skills they needed to be successful. Many companies recruit directly from the course, giving you access to jobs that you would not come across elsewhere.

You will get specialist skills training, mentoring and support from leading game developers, the chance to design and build a working game that can be published, and experience at every stage of the games development cycle. You will receive real game briefs, training and mentoring from industry partners such as Sony Computer Entertainment Europe, Exient, Rare and Codemasters.

Employment Opportunity

Students leaving Gamer Camp course have gone onto work with many of the industry’s biggest names. Roles secured by our graduates include Concept Artist at Sony Evolution Studios, Character Artist at Sega Hardlight Studios, Associate Producer at Spicy Horse Games, and Environmental Artist at Rockstar. MA and MSc students have also set up their own studios.

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Taught in the critical tradition of Kent Law School, this programme examines the theory and practice of human rights law, international criminal law, humanitarian law, transitional justice, migration law and other fields in the context of different policy areas and various academic disciplines. Read more
Taught in the critical tradition of Kent Law School, this programme examines the theory and practice of human rights law, international criminal law, humanitarian law, transitional justice, migration law and other fields in the context of different policy areas and various academic disciplines.

It is particularly suited to those who currently work in, or hope to work in, international organisations, non-governmental organisations, international law firms and foreign affairs departments.

The programme is delivered at our Brussels School of International Studies (BSIS) in conjunction with our law school.

- Extended programme

The extended programme allows students the opportunity to study their subject in greater detail, choosing a wider range of modules, and also provides the opportunity to spend one term at the Canterbury campus. The extended programme is ideal for students who require extra credits, or would like to have more time to pursue an internship.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/772/human-rights-law

Course structure

We are committed to offering flexible study options at the School and enable you to tailor your degree to meet your needs by offering start dates in September and January; full- and part-time study; split-site options, and allowing students to combine two fields of study leading to a degree that reflects both disciplines.

Specialisations

The LLM in Human Rights Law allows students to choose secondary areas of specialisation from the range of programmes offered at BSIS. Thus, a focused programme of study can be constructed by studying Human Rights Law in the context of International Relations; International Conflict and Security; International Migration, and other subject areas we cover.

This leads to the award of an LLM degree in, for example, 'Human Rights Law with International Migration'.

Standard and extended versions

The LLM is offered in both a standard version (90 ECTS credits) and an extended version (120 ECTS credits) and in each case students may take the programme with or without a secondary specialisation. Those on the extended version will take more modules to gain extra credit.

Research areas

- European and Comparative Law

European and Comparative Law is being conducted both at an individual level as well as at the Kent Centre for European and Comparative Law, which was established in 2004 with a view to providing a framework for the further development of the Law School’s research and teaching activities in this area. Research and teaching reaches from general areas of comparative and European public and private law to more specialised areas and specific projects.

- Governance and Regulation

Legal research involves studying processes of regulation and governance. This research cluster focuses on the character of regulation and governance to critically understand the different modes through which governing takes place such as the conditions, relations of power and effects of governance and regulation. Work within this area is methodologically diverse.

Intellectually, it draws on a range of areas including socio-legal studies; Foucauldian perspectives on power and governmentality; Actor Network Theory; feminist political theory and political economy; postcolonial studies; continental political philosophy; and cultural and utopian studies.

- International Law

The starting point for research in international law at Kent Law School is that international law is not apolitical and that its political ideology reflects the interests of powerful states and transnational economic actors. In both research and teaching, staff situate international law in the context of histories of colonialism to analyse critically its development, doctrines and ramifications.

Critical International Law at KLS engages with theories of political economy, international relations and gender and sexuality to contribute to scholarly and policy debates across the spectrum of international law, which includes public, economic, human rights, criminal and commercial law. Scholars at the Centre for Critical International Law engage in the practical application of international law through litigation, training, research and consultancies for international organisations, NGOs and states.

- Law and Political Economy & Law and Development

Law and its relation to political economy are addressed from a variety of angles, including the exploration of the micro- and macrolevel of economic regulations as well as theoretical aspects of law and political economy.

- Legal Theories and Philosophy

Identifying the fact that several academics do work in cultural theory and political theory (including on normative concepts, religion and the state). While feminist and critical legal theories are focal points at Kent Law School, the departmental expertise also covers more essential aspects such as classical jurisprudence and the application of philosophy to law.

Other research areas within KLS include:

- human rights
- labour law
- law and culture
- law, science and technology
- legal methods and epistemology
- public law
- race, religion and the law.

Careers

Employability is a key focus throughout the University and at Kent Law School you have the support of a dedicated Employability and Career Development Officer together with a broad choice of work placement opportunities, employability events and careers talks. Details of graduate internship schemes with NGOs, charities and other professional organisations are made available to postgraduate students via the School’s Employability Blog.

Many students at our Brussels centre who undertake internships are offered contracts in Brussels immediately after graduation. Others have joined their home country’s diplomatic service, entered international organisations, or have chosen to undertake a ‘stage’ at the European Commission, or another EU institution.

Law graduates have gone on to careers in finance, international commerce, government and law or have joined, or started, an NGO or charity.

Kent has an excellent record for postgraduate employment: over 94% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2013 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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The MA in Anthropology is an advanced degree in socio-cultural anthropology in which students are given a sophisticated introduction to the theoretical underpinnings of the discipline, a block of modules that open up and explore the conceptual and methodological core of the discipline, and a series of specialised modules that show the range of socio-cultural anthropology today. Read more

Overview

The MA in Anthropology is an advanced degree in socio-cultural anthropology in which students are given a sophisticated introduction to the theoretical underpinnings of the discipline, a block of modules that open up and explore the conceptual and methodological core of the discipline, and a series of specialised modules that show the range of socio-cultural anthropology today. Students are also required to write a thesis. The MA in Anthropology is primarily a scholarly degree that aims to equip students for later doctoral research or for work in roles that demand academic social-scientific knowledge or the particular skills of trained ethnographic researchers.

Course Structure

In the autumn and spring semesters, students complete an intensive course of four 6-week compulsory modules in anthropological theory (10 credits each) alongside two professional development modules and two optional modules (5 credits each). The taught programme develops students’ core theoretical competence and combines this with the methodological tools necessary to successfully formulate an anthropological topic and carry out a research project. In the summer, students register for the 30-credit Thesis, which must be completed by early September.
Students take a total of 90 credits over 1 year.
Compulsory Modules (60 credits)
- AN651 Social Thought (10 credits)
- AN653 Writing Cultures (10 credits)
- AN652 Key Concepts in Anthropology (10 credits)
- AN634T Thesis (30 credits)

Optional Modules
- AN646 Foundations of Linguistic Anthropology (5 credits)
- AN647 Foundations of Medical Anthropology (5 credits)
- AN648 Foundations of Material Culture and Design (5 credits)
- AN649 Foundations of Anthropology & Development (5 credits)
- AN862 Ethnography Winter School (5 credits)
- AN657 Ethnographic Ireland (5 credits)
- AN630 Creole Culture (5 credits)
- AN666 Topics in Linguistic Anthropology (5 credits)
- AN667 Topics in Medical Anthropology (5 credits)
- AN668 Topics in Material Culture & Design (5 credits)
- AN669 Topics in Anthropology & Development (5 credits)
- PD606 Design Ethnography (7.5 credits)
- GY621 Dublin Urban Laboratory (10 credits)
- GY619 Public Engagement Research and Practice (10 credits)
- GY627 Places, Landscapes, Mappings (10 credits)

Career Options

An anthropology degree provides an excellent preparation for a wide variety of fields in both public and private sectors, and is an especially good foundation for an international career. Anthropology has become increasingly important as a job skill in the context of globalisation, where a deeper understanding of cultural difference is crucial, both locally and internationally. Our graduates go on to employment in a wide variety of careers in community work, education, the health professions, product design, international aid and development projects, NGO work, business and administration, and more.

How To Apply

Online application only http://www.pac.ie/maynoothuniversity

PAC Code
MHC60

The following information should be uploaded to PAC:

Online PAC application form
Statement of your academic and professional goals (SEE BELOW)
Names and contact details of two referees who have agreed to write letters of recommendation for you (SEE BELOW)
Official Transcripts of degrees not earned at Maynooth University**
A copy of your Birth Certificate or valid Passport (non-Maynooth University students only)
**Certified copies of all official transcripts of results for all non-Maynooth University qualifications listed MUST accompany the application. Failure to do so will delay your application being processed.

- Writing the Statement of Academic and Professional Goals (500 words)

The Statement of Academic Goals is a significant component of the application. This is the statement of purpose that presents your experience, scholarly interests and aspirations to us in the anthropology department, and therefore should be considered carefully. Ideally, your statement should include why you want to pursue postgraduate study in the discipline; what you have read recently that has inspired you to pursue anthropology (please be specific about authors and titles); your general research interests in the field and/or ideas for a potential thesis project. We would also be interested in hearing about your professional/career goals and how you hope the degree in anthropology will help you achieve them.


- Arranging for letters of recommendation

Your application requires two letters of recommendation, which should be written by academic referees (previous lecturers for example). If you do not have recent academic experience, some other type of professional reference will suffice. Personal character references are not accepted. In your application, please provide the names and contact details (preferably emails) of your referees, and the department will contact them on your behalf. Alternatively, you may ask your referees to send letters directly to : letters should be signed and on letterhead, and should be sent from the referee’s own email address. They can also be sent by post to Anthropology Department at the address below.

We will endeavour to respond with decisions within 2 weeks of each closing date.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/study-maynooth/postgraduate-studies/fees-funding-scholarships

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Want to focus on your animation and motion graphics skills that are in great demand within the film, television, computer games and new media industries?. Read more
Want to focus on your animation and motion graphics skills that are in great demand within the film, television, computer games and new media industries?

MA Animation at Northumbria is designed to meet the needs of the animation industry, enabling you to gain high-level technical skills while encouraging you to experiment and think creatively.

You’ll study topics including animation criticism and aesthetics, animation production methods and undertake a major project, producing an animated short film, or an equivalent piece of original work to act as a calling card for your future career.

Working in a studio-based environment with the latest technology and industry standard software, you’ll engage with live and research-led briefs, preparing you for roles in the creative industries.

As a graduate you will be able to demonstrate advanced skills in contemporary animation and digital media that are in great demand within the creative industries.

Learn From The Best

Your tutors have extensive professional experience and have worked as animators, designers and directors for film and television companies including Sky, STV, BBC and Sony Pictures Entertainment.

Their knowledge of industry practice is reflected in the real-life briefs that you’ll work on in a specialist studio environment.

Lectures from guest experts and visits to local and London studios also help to develop your understanding and experience of the animation profession.

Teaching And Assessment

You’ll learn through a mixture of lectures, seminars, tutorials and workshops that reflect professional animation industry practice. You’ll be encouraged to use the e-learning portal and blogs to document and communicate your research and design progress.

You’ll be assessed throughout the course, reflecting real-life practice in the design profession where work is informally critiqued in the studio environment by peers or formally by clients during presentations. Assessments may take the form of written and practical projects, for example, producing scripts and storyboards.

Your major project, which is usually an animated short film, or an equivalent piece of original work forms a key part of your assessment. These final pieces, which are of a professional standard, are presented during a final presentation and you will receive formative feedback from both staff and peers throughout their development.

Module Overview
MI7001 - Animation Production Methods (Core, 30 Credits)
MI7002 - Animation Research & Development (Core, 30 Credits)
MI7003 - Major Project (Core, 60 Credits)
MI7004 - Experimental Animation 1 (Core, 30 Credits)
MI7005 - Experimental Animation 2 (Core, 30 Credits)

Learning Environment

You’ll have access to a dedicated studio space, packed with high-end facilities and specialist hardware including computers, rendering facilities, stop-motion rigs and a colour 3D printer. And you’ll be working with industry standard animation software such as Maya, Houdini, Renderman, and Nuke.

You’ll have access to an e-learning portal that provides lecture materials, creative and technical support resources and reading lists together with discussion boards and notices. You’ll be encouraged to use this and write blogs to document and communicate your research and design progress.

Digital Tutors provide support for the design and technical software support you’ll be using during your course.

Research-Rich Learning

Research based learning is built into your course as part of project briefs and workshop sessions.

Your tutors are actively engaged in research which they bring into workshop sessions, reflecting contemporary animation practices and culture. You’ll get the chance to be involved in projects that help develop theory at the forefront of animation research.

Your studies will equip you with the latest theoretical, practical and professional knowledge, skills and applied thinking to prepare you for a variety of roles within the creative industries.

Guest talks, placements, live briefs, studio visits and the chance to showcase your work all help you to develop contacts and networks that will be valuable in your future career.

Give Your Career An Edge

This is an industry-focused course, designed to prepare you for a career in the animation industry.

You’ll visit design and animation studios in North East England and London as well as attending industry talks and taking part in live design projects in collaboration with commercial partners.

You may also have the opportunity to attend the Pictoplasma Conference held annually in Berlin where you can see cutting-edge, contemporary character design and animation and carry out research ahead of your major project.

Another important engagement with industry is the Design & Art Direction New Blood Showcase, (D&AD), in London in July. This gives you the chance to showcase your work and network with design, animation and production studios.

Throughout your course you’ll develop social, communication, design and management skills that are desired by employers, including team working and production management.

Your Future

The Masters in Animation is designed to give you a firm grounding in theoretical, creative, practical and professional development. You’ll graduate with advanced ideas and skills in contemporary animation and digital media that mean you’ll be well placed for roles in the film, television, computer games and new media industries.

There are a number of employment opportunities available on graduation, such as Visual Effects (VFX) and 3D Artists at Time Based Arts and Pixel Blimp, Character Animators at Jellyfish Pictures, or Motion Designers at Framestore - all London based companies, and Arcus Studios employ graduates as animators in the North East.

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The MA Programme in Education engages with education across the age range from early years to adulthood and is relevant to a wide diversity of educational settings. Read more
The MA Programme in Education engages with education across the age range from early years to adulthood and is relevant to a wide diversity of educational settings. There is a strong focus on social justice and inclusion and the opportunity to reflect on your own professional practice throughout the courses.

The course offers a unique opportunity for experienced professionals to gain a practice-focused higher degree. Specialisms in Autism and SEND are also available. Individual MA modules can also be taken as Continued Professional Development (CPD). Accreditation of Prior Learning is also possible within the all the MA programmes at LSBU. If you have completed EIC and SEND options at LSBU you are a third of the way there! (APEL from other universities is also possible).

Students will gain much from working with a diverse group of peers and tutors from a wide range of educational backgrounds. The close association between the Centre for Educational Research and the MA provides opportunities to work with like-minded research-active peers within a lively and supportive learning community. Opportunities for accreditation of prior learning are available to participants with an appropriate background and this should be discussed with the admissions tutor who will also explain the CPD processes on request.

Modes of study:

• Within a partnership school as part of a school cohort.
• As an independent student.

The programme's distinctive and innovative feature is its school-based character. For most participants their schools and colleges have always been the context of their study. This programme allows the work that participants do, as they write about issues of central concern to themselves and their institutions, to be properly valued. It places much importance upon the value of a professional practice approach to study at Masters level, allowing all aspects of this practice to inform and to be informed by critical reading of the literature, by theory and by relevant research.

Teaching and learning

Students also have the opportunity of benefiting from engagement with the research profile of the Education Department, with its particular expertise in global citizenship and sustainable development education, equality and inclusion, and the personal and social development of young people in schools.

You'll benefit from an up to date Virtual Learning Environment via Moodle and be actively encouraged to make use of the extensive range of support services across the university. You'll have access to a supervisor during the dissertation phase.

Placements

Access to the workplace (including voluntary work) is essential for most of the modules within the MA.

Professional links

The course has been designed and developed in partnership with schools, Southwark Local Authority and other Educational stakeholders in the London area. The MA would provide an excellent pathway to the LSBU's Doctorate in Education (EdD), which has a special focus on equality, diversity and sustainability.

We are continually reviewing, in partnership with participating schools and students, the provision of units, developing the course to meet the ongoing needs of participants.

Colleagues from the School of Law and Social Sciences, in particular the Families and Social Capital Group, are regular contributors as guest lecturers. Speakers from a range of external organisations also contribute to units across the course. Recent guest lectures have been given by disabled academics and parents of pupils who have experienced special education.

The department has wide professional links within and beyond the university and the UK. Examples include:

• The Equality Challenge Unit
• The Alliance for Inclusive Education
• Equality and Diversity Forum Research Network
• The Leadership Foundation
• Research Autism
• Theorising Autism Project
• Teacher Education for Equality and Sustainability Network (TEESNet)
• National Association of Disability Practitioners
• Commonworks (for a just and sustainable world)

Employability

The MA Programme in Education is designed to deepen your understanding of working with pupils /students in any educational setting, across the age range into adult education. It is therefore relevant to employment in school, college, alternative education settings and to work with disabled students at college and university. Content is applicable to teachers and staff in non- teaching roles, such as mentor, disability officer or learning support assistant. The content is also relevant to staff in strategic and operational leadership roles.

The programme is designed to complement and support all current career and professional development initiatives and frameworks. It will naturally extend to the provision of evidence required for addressing the Professional Standards for teachers and hence progression throughout the teaching profession.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

• Direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
• Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
• Mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

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The real estate markets have become global. That urges for real estate professionals who are trained in integrating financial and economic-geographic skills with knowledge of local institutions. Read more
The real estate markets have become global. That urges for real estate professionals who are trained in integrating financial and economic-geographic skills with knowledge of local institutions.

The real estate markets have become global, making the real estate profession an international enterprise. At the same time global, commercial brokers report huge differences among local real estate markets. That urges for real estate professionals who are trained in integrating financial and economic-geographic skills with knowledge of local institutions.

The Department of Economic Geography at the University of Groningen is one of the leading centres in Continental Europe in real estate. It offers a Master of Real Estate Studies that integrates financial engineering, location theory and planning.

Why in Groningen?

The master in Real Estate Studies is based on economic geography and planning, rather than financial or business studies and technical sciences. This gives the course in Groningen a unique profile compared to other master programs in real estate. The program has a multidisciplinary character.

Job perspectives

Many graduates find jobs as market researchers or real estate consultants in a company, consultancy or government agency, or become a concept or property developer at a real estate investor. Graduate students find work as a research manager or portfolio manager at a real estate investor. Several people opt for an academic career at the university. In practice, graduates mostly do policy work, both in the private sector as well as at the local, regional and national government.

Research

The program of the master in Real Estate Studies is related to the major research sub-disciplines in spatial sciences. Interim results of the research projects are integrated in to the course.

Research in geography & planning focuses on the interrelationship between property and spatial environment. Geographical and planning literature provides insight into how location decisions are made and the role of institutions. These aspects are reflected in courses like 'property and land markets' or 'real estate development'. The research in economic geography focuses on a deeper understanding of choice of locations. This choice is based on economic and financial motives. In the research in real estate development, the interests of various economic actors are important; the landowner, the developer, the builder, the investor and owner / user. The spatial economic and financial-economic research provides insight into the considerations. The business and management-oriented studies contribute to understanding the value chain and processes in real estate development. These aspects are reflected in subjects like 'finance', 'property investment' and 'property development'.

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The space sector plays an important role in economic, social, technological and scientific developments. The future of the sector and its manifold applications require highly skilled experts with a broad interdisciplinary perspective. Read more

The space sector plays an important role in economic, social, technological and scientific developments. The future of the sector and its manifold applications require highly skilled experts with a broad interdisciplinary perspective. The development of innovative space technologies is fostered by an intense symbiosis between technological sectors and the challenges set by fundamental research in exact and biomedical sciences. Additionally, the economic and social valorisation of space technologies requires an efficient relationship between project developers and the economic sector.

The large scale of space projects imposes important constraints on management. The international character of the space sector and of its broad applications, including the relevance of space for security and defence, implies a need for European and international legal and political measures.

What is the Master of Space Studies all about?

The Master of Space Studies programme is designed to prepare scientists to respond to a myriad of challenges and opportunities. In addition to coursework in space sciences, the curriculum is enriched by a Master's thesis and a series of guest lecturers from international, national and regional institutions.

This is an advanced Master's programme and can be followed on a full-time or part-time basis.

Structure

The programme is conceived as an advanced master’s programme and as such it requires applicants to have successfully completedan initial master’s programme in either the humanities and social sciences, exact sciences and technology or biomedical sciences.

  • The interdisciplinary nature of the programme is expressed by the common core of 25 ECTS in introductory coursework. These courses are mandatory for every student. They acquaint the student with the different aspects that together form the foundation of space-related activities. The backgrounds of the students in programme are diverse, but all students have the ability to transfer knowledge across disciplines.
  • Depending on their background and interests, students have the opportunity to deepen their knowledge through more domain-specific optional courses, for a total of 20 ECTS, covering the domains of (A) Space Law, Policy, Business and Management, (B) Space Sciences and (C) Space Technology and Applications, with the possibility to combine the latter two. 
  • For the master’s thesis (15 ECTS), students are embedded in a research team of one of the organising universities, or in an external institute, organisation or industrial company, in which case an academic supervisor is assigned as the coordinator of the project. The master’s thesis is the final section of the interdisciplinary programme, in which the acquired knowledge and abilities are applied to a complex and concrete project.

Department

The mission of the Department of Physics and Astronomy is exploring, understanding and modelling physical realities using mathematical, computational, experimental and observational techniques. Fifteen teams perform research at an international level. Publication of research results in leading journals and attracting top-level scientists are priorities for the department.

New physics and innovation in the development of new techniques are important aspects of our mission. The interaction with industry (consulting, patents...) and society (science popularisation) are additional points of interest. Furthermore, the department is responsible for teaching basic physics courses in several study programmes.

Objectives

The objectives of the programme are to develop students' knowledge of all aspects of space studies generally and, specifically, to impart:

  • the ability to situate the relevance of students' own curriculum in the broad field of space studies
  • specialised knowledge and attitudes in specific fields relevant to space studies;
  • insight in the development and realisation of large international projects;
  • abilities necessary for the guiding of complex projects.

Career perspectives

Graduates will be in a position to develop a career in the space sector or in space research.

Depending on his/her previous degree, the student will find opportunities in the space industry (engineers, product developers and technical-commercial functions with a high degree of technical and financial responsibilities), research institutions with activities in space (researchers and project developers), (inter)governmental bodies with responsibilities in research and development programmes related to space (project managers and directors, policy makers on national, European and international levels). The spectrum of employment possibilities encompasses not only the space sector as such, but also the broader context of companies and organisations which use or are facilitated by space missions.



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At the local, national and global level, we are witnessing an intense period of social transformation and fragmentation. Within this context, there is growing political and policy recognition of the need to better understand and thereby address social inequalities. Read more

At the local, national and global level, we are witnessing an intense period of social transformation and fragmentation. Within this context, there is growing political and policy recognition of the need to better understand and thereby address social inequalities. The social sciences have an important role to play in mapping and understanding how inequalities arise and in tackling their causes and consequences. Innovative developments in the social sciences are offering new methodological, theoretical and empirical insights into entrenched and emerging inequalities of status, resource, outcome and opportunity. This has inspired us to create an interdisciplinary programme focusing on inequality in all its forms and its social, political and economic implications.

This Masters programme equips students with the necessary knowledge and skills to engage in and contribute towards work that tackles the realities and effects of social inequality. Capitalising on academic and applied expertise in the School of Sociology and Social Policy and the Leeds Inequalities Research Network, this programme harnesses leading analytical approaches combining qualitative, quantitative and data analytic methods (in close collaboration with the School of Geography).

In addition to offering an advanced understanding of rising material inequality, the programme encourages an intersectional approach to understanding socio-economic stratification and how this links with physical (dis) ability, race, ethnicity, nationality, gender, sexuality, class and age. It provides a stimulating intellectual environment and cutting edge methodological approaches to comparing and contrasting the formation and consequences of inequalities across a range of national and international contexts. Through an examination of geopolitical and socioeconomic shifts, such as urbanisation and globalisation, students are actively supported to critically interrogate the contemporary character and extent of social inequality.

Research insight

Whilst undertaking this programme, students will join a vibrant and dynamic research led teaching and learning environment in the School of Sociology and Social Policy. You will benefit from the interdisciplinary expertise and extra-curricular activities hosted by the School and its research centres including those in Disability Studies, Ethnicity and Racism Studies, Interdisciplinary Gender Studies and Research into Families, the Life Course and Generations. You will also access events through the Leeds Social Sciences Institute (LSSI), which fosters cross-departmental collaboration, learning and impact, Students will also benefit from workshops on global inequalities by academic leaders from across campus and research seminars with external speakers; along with career development opportunities and events. As such, students can take advantage of academic and applied expertise both within and beyond the University whilst also developing specialist knowledge and transferable skills for their future career development in the public, private or third sector.

Course content

The programme bridges disciplinary divides to provide a detailed understanding of the ways in which social inequality manifests across diverse communities and contexts at the national and international level. It offers insight into the character, causes and consequences of social inequality, as well as forms of resistance and policy responses. It has a strong and innovative methodological focus, including traditional qualitative and quantitative approaches to the social analysis of inequality, as well as new approaches to data visualisation and analytics from across the social sciences. The programme uses a range of teaching methods, including lectures, seminars and workshops, complemented by a range of co-curricular activities partly facilitated through the Leeds Inequalities Research Network.

Course structure

The core modules of the programme introduce students to contemporary research on global inequalities of social difference and disadvantage, emphasizing a diversity of theoretical and research design strategies, including international evidence surrounding the shifting nature and extent of inequality. Students are able to tailor the programme according to their interests and needs by choosing from a specially selected range of optional modules, which address major social and economic inequalities across diverse social science subjects and substantive issues. As such, students can choose to develop in-depth specialist knowledge on a particular area and/or focus more generally on the social processes and arrangements that give rise to inequalities.

Compulsory modules

  • Inequalities: Exploring causes, Consequences and Interventions 30 credits
  • Geographic Data Analysis and Visualisation 15 credits
  • Dissertation 60 credits

PLUS TWO OF THE BELOW:

  • Quantitative Research Methods 15 credits
  • Qualitative Research Methods 15 credits
  • Applied Population and Demographic Analysis

For more information on typical modules, read Inequalities and Social Science MSc Full Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

We use a range of teaching and learning methods including presentations, seminars, workshops, tutorials and lectures. However, independent study is crucial to this degree – it allows you to prepare for taught sessions, develop your research interests and build a range of skills. This is particularly the case for the dissertation/applied project module of this programme.

Supported through workshops and supervision, students develop their research dissertation or an applied project in partnership with external organisations. This offers students an exciting opportunity to gain experience of applying their knowledge and skills to policy and practice.

Assessment

Your core modules will be assessed using essays. Optional modules may use other forms of assessment that reflect the diversity of the topics you can study, including presentations, book and literature reviews, research proposals and reports among others.

Career opportunities

This programme prepares students for policy, research and applied careers across the private, public and third sectors. The interdisciplinary and dynamic nature of the programme equips students with the critical, analytical and methodological skills to deploy their specialist expertise in a clear, efficient and effective manner. You will develop transferable skills in research, analysis and communication, as well as in-depth knowledge that can be applied across a range of domains and contexts.

Due to the rigorous and applied nature of our teaching, graduates might pursue careers across a diverse range of organisational settings such as in government, NGOS, charities, think tanks, social enterprises and business. The programme also offers excellent development opportunities to pursue a career in social research or undertake research at PhD level.

Irrespective of your future career intentions, we offer tailored guidance and support through ESSL Faculty staff and the Leeds Careers Centre.



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​MA Managing Community Practice. This programme is designed to enhance the professional practice of experienced practitioners by facilitating a critical and reflective approach to management, staff development, innovatio​n and researching practice. Read more

Course Overview

​MA Managing Community Practice: This programme is designed to enhance the professional practice of experienced practitioners by facilitating a critical and reflective approach to management, staff development, innovatio​n and researching practice. Many of the modules are taught interprofessionally including colleagues from community work, youth work, teaching, PRUs and health in both voluntary and statutory sectors. This provides for rich interprofessional learning and reflects the practice realities of interprofessional working.

PgD in Youth and Community Work: This professionally endorsed award is particularly suitable for graduates who have increasingly found themselves working in the field of youth and community work and who wish to gain a professional qualification. The programme requires students to undertake two separate supervised placements in the field of youth and community work. Students attend university on one evening a week where they undertake taught modules and tutorials. Students on this programme tend to develop into a highly supportive, friendly and analytical professional group.

See the website https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/education/courses/Pages/Youth-and-Community-Work---PgD--Managing-Community-Practice---MA-.aspx

​Course Content​​

MA Managing Community Practice:
The programme consists of three core and one optional module, followed by a dissertation. Most students choose to take two modules per year over two years (one evening per week during term time) followed by the dissertation, although full-time and accelerated modes of attendance may be negotiated.

MA Core Modules:
- Researching Practice
- Reflective Practice
- Managing and Leading Community Practice

MA Optional Modules:
- Mentoring
- Leading and Facilitating Reflective Practice
- Education: Character and Context

PG Dip in Youth and Community Work:
The taught and fieldwork elements of the programme are part time and can be completed in two years. Once both taught and fieldwork elements of the programme are satisfactorily completed it is possible to continue onto the MA. Students will need to attend taught sessions and tutorials on one evening a week.

PgD Core modules:
- Principles and Practice of Youth and Community Work
- Management in the Youth and Community Sector
- The Community Context of Practice (Fieldwork and Tutorials)
- The Social Context of Practice (Fieldwork and Tutorials).​

Learning & Teaching​

​MA:
Most of the modules have a strong application to professional practice and often involve the undertaking of practice-based projects.

PgD:
Students will be expected to undertake a considerable amount of self-study to enhance the collective learning process. It is envisaged that students will utilise their experiences to enhance the level of analysis in all collective sessions. Students are expected to engage in reflective learning processes throughout the duration of the programme.

Teaching methods will tend to emphasise small group discussions and informal lectures.

Assessment

Students will be assessed on both their youth and community work-based practice and their academic assignments through a range of assessment types including essays, presentations, group exercises, portfolios, reflective writing, and viva voce.

Employability & Careers​

MA:
The programme is aimed at practitioners and managers in the generic and expanding field of youth and community development work. It aims to enable people to develop their professional understanding and skills through a supportive and challenging learning environment.
The programme will be of particular interest to experienced practitioners who manage aspects of youth or community development provision and who wish to develop their analytical and professional capabilities. It is one of the pathways on the Master's CPD framework.

PgD:
The PgD is a programme leading to professional qualification in youth and community work which is endorsed by the Wales ETS. As such it enables graduates to qualify in this growing occupational area while enhancing their academic profile.

​Successful Post Graduate Diplomats may wish to continue with their studies to obtain the MA.

Contact for MA:
Jan Huyton:
Email:
Tel: 029 2041 6499​​

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/scholarships

Find out how to apply here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/howtoapply

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