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Masters Degrees (Celtic)

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The MA in Celtic Studies is a unique distance learning programme which offers students interested in Welsh and Celtic Studies the opportunity to study various aspects of the history, literature and cultural heritage of the Celtic regions in their own homes. Read more
The MA in Celtic Studies is a unique distance learning programme which offers students interested in Welsh and Celtic Studies the opportunity to study various aspects of the history, literature and cultural heritage of the Celtic regions in their own homes.

Course Overview

This multidisciplinary Master's degree allows students to study a wide variety of subjects in the following fields: early and late medieval history and literature, folklore, gender studies, the sociology of language, Arthurian literature, religion, spirituality and iconography.

In Part One students will be introduced to the study and research methodology skills required to undertake a postgraduate programme and they will complete modules on the history of the Celts and the legends of the Mabinogi. In addition to these three compulsory modules students will choose from one of the following pathways:
-Culture and society (Welsh Folk Life, the Sociology of the Welsh Language)
-Medieval (the Celtic Arthur, Women in the Middle Ages: sources from the Celtic regions)
-Sanctity and Spirituality (The Cult of Saints in Wales, Celtic Otherworlds – from the druids to the monastic voyage tale)

Students will then be allowed to take any other module from one of the above pathways or Beginners' Welsh (a total of six modules in all). In Part Two students are given the opportunity to research in detail a topic which has particularly appealed to them and write an extended dissertation. They will be allocated a supervisor to help guide them through their dissertations.

No previous knowledge of the Celtic languages is required for this programme, as students study texts in translation and the programme is taught through the medium of English. However, students may choose to study Welsh as part of the programme and it is also possible for students who are fluent in Welsh to study their modules entirely through the medium of Welsh (see MA Astudiaethau Celtaidd) or receive supervision and communication in Welsh, but opt to write their assignments in English.

Modules

-CYCS7020 Conceptualizing the Celts
-CYCS7015 Y Mabinogi
-CYCS7021 The Celtic Arthur and the Matter of Britain
-CYCS7005 Women in the Middle Ages
-CYCS7004 Welsh Folk Life
-CYCS7016 The Sociology of the Welsh Language
-CYCS7007 The Female Saints of Wales
-CYCS7019 Celtic Otherworlds
-CYCS7018 Welsh for Beginners

Key Features

If you would like to learn more about the history, literature, religion and cultural heritage of the Celtic regions, this course is ideal for you. You’ll be able to choose from a wide range of interesting topics and choose to specialise in a pathway that suits you. Since the course is a distance learning programme, you do not need to move to Lampeter and sacrifice your day job, as you can study from the comfort of your own home using our VLE (virtual learning environment) and the course content and reading material we provide.

We’ll guide you through some of the most important texts ever written in the Celtic languages and help you read critically. You’ll learn where to find the most important sources on the Celtic peoples, Arthurian literature, modern folklore, druids and Celtic saints and how to question the various versions of the past that have been put forward by historians, linguists, folklorists and archaeologists. You’ll gain research skills which will be a sound basis for further study, as well as a range of important skills which can be easily transferred to the workplace.

If you would like to work quickly, you can register on the programme on a full-time basis, but if you have a full-time job and family commitments, you can complete as few as two modules per year. This also allows you to spread the cost over a number of years and makes the course very affordable. If you are interested in learning one of the Celtic languages, you can choose to learn Welsh with us and you will be able to attend our intensive language residentials if this suits you.

We have students in America, Canada, New Zealand, Australia, Belgium and Mongolia, as well as many in Wales, England, Scotland and Ireland. You do not have to come to Lampeter to follow this course, but you are always very welcome to come and meet your tutors. We also collaborate with the University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh and Celtic Studies and some of our MA students are supervised by staff from the centre who also offer great expertise in Celtic Studies.

Assessment

The modules are assessed by a variety of assessment methods: 5,000-word essays, short assignments, linguistic exercises, reviews, reports and one 15,000-word dissertation.

Career Opportunities

This course is ideal for those who want to learn more about the history, literature and cultural heritage of Wales and the Celtic regions in order to improve their job prospects. Many of the students who undertake the course on a part-time basis are already in employment and wish to gain a postgraduate qualification as a possible means to promotion or change of job role. Former students include journalists, writers, storytellers, teachers, lecturers, editors and people who work in the tourist or heritage industries. Many of our students have also gone on to further research in Celtic Studies at PhD level.

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This Masters in Celtic Studies is an interdisciplinary programme specialising in the medieval Celtic languages, literature, history and archaeology covering the whole span of the Middle Ages from the 6th to the 16th centuries. Read more
This Masters in Celtic Studies is an interdisciplinary programme specialising in the medieval Celtic languages, literature, history and archaeology covering the whole span of the Middle Ages from the 6th to the 16th centuries.

Why this programme

◾The wide-ranging curriculum can be tailored to your own undergraduate experience. This means the programme is suitable whether you have a Celtic Studies degree or you come from a related subject such as history, literature, or archaeology.
◾This programme will provide you with a highly stimulating environment, learning from internationally renowned scholars.
◾You will participate in the lively research culture of the Centre for Scottish and Celtic Studies, including weekly research seminars across the academic session.
◾You will enjoy easy access to our research archive, the MacLean Room, which houses our range of books, periodicals and other printed material relating to Celtic and Gaelic.
◾At Glasgow, you are uniquely well placed to study the medieval Celts in the context of Scottish Gaelic. Through the work of its Gaelic Officer and the Gà[email protected] initiative, Celtic and Gaelic provides you an unparalleled opportunity to work and socialise in a bilingual environment and to experience the music and culture of contemporary Gaelic Scotland.

Programme structure

You will take two core courses, choose two optional courses (one per semester) and study a Celtic Language. You will also produce a 10,000-15,000 word dissertation on a specialist topic agreed with your supervisor.

Core courses

◾Skills and scholarship in Celtic studies (Semester 1)
◾Themes and debates in Celtic studies (Semester 2)

You will also take a course in one of the medieval Celtic languages at introductory or advanced level. You may, if appropriate, take a course in Scottish Gaelic instead.
◾Introduction to Early Gaelic (Old and Middle Irish)
◾Introduction to Middle Welsh.

Optional courses from a wide range of specialist courses including:
◾Celtic Art: An Interdisciplinary Approach
◾Celtic Place-names of Scotland
◾Critical Issues in Early Gaelic Literature
◾Finn in Gaelic Literature
◾Legal traditions in Medieval Ireland and Wales
◾Literacy in Celtic Culture and Society: An Interdisciplinary Approach
◾Picts: An Interdisciplinary Approach
◾Special Option (Semester 1 or 2) This is a course of guided reading, directed by a specialist in a field of your choice, designed to produce a research essay of c. 5,000 words.

You may alternatively, with the approval of the programme organiser, take a taught course from a related Master’s programme or take another language course.

Dissertation

You will write a dissertation of 10,000-15,000 words on a topic of your choice, benefitting from the expert supervision of our staff.

Career prospects

Graduates have secured jobs in academia, museums and government heritage bodies; publishing and book marketing; primary and secondary teaching, and teaching English as a foreign language abroad.

The programme also provides an excellent platform for you to move onto PhD studies and an academic career.

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Programme description. This unique, interdisciplinary programme provides students with a professional grounding in the fields of Celtic and Scottish Studies. Read more

Programme description

This unique, interdisciplinary programme provides students with a professional grounding in the fields of Celtic and Scottish Studies. It caters for a wide range of interests, with pathways in Traditional Arts and Culture, Medieval and Early Modern Celtic and Gaelic Development and Policy.

You will have the opportunity to gain knowledge and understanding in professional research methods and inquiry, language skills, literary and textual analysis or fieldwork and archiving, and a range of core topics in Celtic and Scottish studies.

You will undertake full research training in Celtic and Scottish studies. You will learn to analyse and synthesise this knowledge in an interdisciplinary context, question assumptions about the primacy of one specific discipline over others and receive an introduction to subjects which you may not have experienced at undergraduate level. You will also have the opportunity to take courses offered by the School of History, Classics & Archaeology.

Programme structure

The programme takes one academic year (12 months) of full-time study, or two years (24 months) of part-time study (part-time options are only available for UK or EU students).

You will complete one core course (20 credits total), five option courses (100 credits total) and a dissertation of 15,000 words (60 credits).

Compulsory courses:

  • Research Skills and Methods in Celtic and Scottish Studies

Option courses may include:

  • Celtic & Scottish Studies Internship
  • The Supernatural World
  • Material Culture in Scotland
  • Scottish Emigrant Traditions

Work placement/internship opportunities

The internship is an opportunity for students to gain valuable work experience in an area relevant to their studies. The economic environment is challenging for many graduates, and evidence of an internship is often a decisive factor in hiring decisions.

The internship has three main elements:

  • a work plan agreed between the host institution, the student, and the programme director
  • the work itself
  • an assessed final report

The precise nature of the internship will depend on agreements with the host institution, but it is likely to involve archival work, research assistance, curatorial work, or work in public relations.

Participating institutions may include Storytelling Centre, the National Library of Scotland Special Collections and Manuscripts departments, the National Sound Archive, the National Museums of Scotland, The School of Scottish Studies Archives, and the special collections of Edinburgh University.

Learning outcomes

You will develop the critical skills to evaluate and compare texts and a historical understanding of literature and culture, as well as transferable skills such as carrying out academic research, writing commentaries and essays, improving your analytical thought, using electronic resources and giving oral presentations.

You will gain:

  • familiarity with the broad context of Celtic and Scottish Studies
  • a solid understanding of bibliography and study methods
  • the ability to engage at a high level with the subject material
  • an awareness of current issues and concerns within selected research fields
  • the ability to engage in original research resulting in a dissertation in an area of specialism
  • opportunities for engagement with the professional field through an internship, if desired
  • the opportunity to study modern Scottish Gaelic or medieval Celtic languages

Career opportunities

There are a wide range of sectors within which you could apply your knowledge and skills such as journalism; social, government or cultural research; publishing; higher education; advertising; arts administration; information work; or programme research in broadcasting.



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The MA in Welsh and Celtic Studies offers you the chance to explore the relationship between literature, language, culture and identity across the centuries. Read more
The MA in Welsh and Celtic Studies offers you the chance to explore the relationship between literature, language, culture and identity across the centuries. From medieval literature to contemporary language planning and policy, the exact content of the course will be tailored to suit your individual research interests and based on our areas of expertise.

The areas of research that we offer and which are available to you include: creative writing through the medium of Welsh, language policy and planning, language acquisition, sociolinguistics, performance theory, medieval and modern prose and poetry, translation theory and methodology, ethnology and folk studies, creative writing, children’s literature, gender studies and literary theory and criticism. Great emphasis is set on placing the School’s academic research within a comparative international context.

Working with leading experts in these fields will allow you to develop advanced academic skills in your chosen area of study and undertake original research. Examples of ground-breaking MA research in recent years include linguistic landscape mapping, creative literary criticism, intertextuality and medieval Welsh literature, and digital technologies and minority languages.

Distinctive features

• Work with leading experts in Welsh and Celtic literature, culture and language in Wales’s capital city.

• Develop an understanding of minority-language cultural and linguistic issues that can be related to other international contexts.

• Gain research and professional transferable skills of the highest quality.

• Experience working at one of Cardiff’s cultural, educational, commercial or political institutions integrated as part of the MA’s work placement programme.

• Choose to study through the medium of Welsh, English or bilingually.

• Benefit from a wide range of Welsh language modules available to learn Welsh or improve your skills in the language, free of charge.

• Participate in regular research seminars with postgraduate research students and staff.

Structure

The course can be completed in one year with full-time study or in two years by part-time study.

For a list of modules for the FULL-TIME route, please see website:

http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught/courses/course/welsh-and-celtic-studiesastudiaethau-cymreig-a-cheltaidd-ma

For a list of the modules for the PART-TIME route, please see website:

http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught/courses/course/welsh-and-celtic-studiesastudiaethau-cymreig-a-cheltaidd-ma-part-time

Teaching

This MA degree uses many different methods of teaching and learning. During your degree you will attend lectures, seminars and workshops, complete practical tasks, undertake a work placement and complete extended pieces of independent work under your tutor’s supervision.

The learning sessions will be interactive and practical and you are therefore expected to attend every class (be they workshops, seminars, tutorials, lectures or other sessions). In some cases, for example maternity or disability, we may make alternative arrangements for you.

Assessment

This MA programme is innovative in its use of a variety of methods of assessment. As well as developing essential research and essay/dissertation-writing skills, you will give a 15 minute seminar presentation on an area of your research, undertake a period of work placement (and produce a reflective report of the experience in the context of your academic and professional skills and career plans), and form a detailed research proposal (for the extended research project).

In part one, you will follow three core modules and complete the following assessments:

• Academic and Professional Research (40 credits) - seminar paper presentation, work experience report and research project outline

• Special Subject 1 (a subject of your choice related to Welsh and Celtic Studies) (40 credits) - critical review (2,000 words) + essay (6,000 words)

• Special Subject 2 (a subject of your choice related to Welsh and Celtic Studies) (40 credits) - essay (8,000 words)

In Part 2, you will work on an extended research project (60 credits) and complete a dissertation (12,000 words). This dissertation can take the form of an essay, project or creative portfolio.

Career Prospects

This degree offers academic training of the highest standard in Welsh and Celtic Studies to those interested in a career in language, planning, media, heritage, government, management, public relations, marketing, the creative industries, education and research. You will develop knowledge and skills regarded as assets in a wide variety of posts and undertake a work placement as part of the Academic and Professional Skills module.

Placements

Work experience is a core requirement of the MA programme, forming a part of the Academic and Professional Research module. A five-day placement will allow you to explore how your academic and personal skills relate to the requirements of a professional workplace in an area related to your research. You will write a report to evaluate and reflect on your experience. Previous MA students have undertaken placements with organisations such as the National Assembly of Wales, Glamorgan Archives, translation services, media companies and schools.

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Develop a critical understanding of the Celtic world in this interdisciplinary programme drawing on archaeological, historical, literary and mythological sources. Read more
Develop a critical understanding of the Celtic world in this interdisciplinary programme drawing on archaeological, historical, literary and mythological sources.

Studying in a modern Celtic capital with experts from Archaeology, English, History and Welsh, you are additionally well-placed to access key specialist collections and western Britain’s major Celtic sites.

You will be able to critically assess the work of others and of your own, to engage effectively in debate at an advanced level, to plan, design and carry out a coherent research strategy, and to produce detailed and coherent reports and presentations.

The wide-range of non-transferable skills acquired are a particular strength for the pursuit of careers outside of archaeology and the heritage sector.

You will develop a critical understanding of people to whom the term Celtic has been applied, from the earliest European evidence through to the historical and literary evidence of early medieval Britain.

Distinctive features:

• Detailed concentration on the Celtic world.
• Literary, historical and archaeological approaches.
• Opportunities for interdisciplinary approaches.
• Expert supervision of dissertation topics.
• You may have the opportunity to build on your existing skill-set through participation in projects and excavations.
• Specialist library facilities.
• Cardiff's location in western Britain makes it geographically central to much of the material under discussion.

Structure

You take a total of 180 credits of modules over one year (full-time) or three years (part-time) consisting of:

• core skill modules (40 credits)
• your choice of option modules (80 credits)
• dissertation (60 credits)

Following successful completion of the taught stage you will progress to the dissertation (60 credits).

For this element of the programme you research and write your 20,000 words on a subject of your choice, approved in consultation with academic staff.

Core modules:

Postgraduate Skills in Archaeology and Conservation
Skills and Methods for Postgraduate Study
Dissertation

Optional modules:

Pwnc Arbennig 1 / Special Subject 1
Pwnc Arbennig 2 / Special Subject 2
Special Period/ Topic Study 1
Special Period/ Topic Study 2
Later Prehistory of Britain
Post-Roman Britain and Ireland
The Early Celts
Celtic Mythology and Religion

Teaching

You will be taught through a mix of seminars, lectures and tutorials (depending on modules chosen).

On successful completion of the taught elements of the programme you will progress to a dissertation of up to 20,000 words on a topic or theme of your choice (subject to the approval of your supervisor).

Teaching is through the medium of English though there are many opportunities to learn Welsh.

Assessment

Taught stage assessment is via essays, presentation and coursework. As part of the programme, you will deliver presentations to your fellow MA students within our supportive community.

Career prospects

Graduates of this and similar degree programmes have embarked on careers in a range of professions from academia, the heritage sector, journalism and law to media research (media, commercial, academic), teaching and publishing. A significant number choose to continue studies at PhD level.

Recent graduate destinations include CADW, Church in Wales, Council for British Archaeology, Glamorgan Archives, Heritage Lottery Fund, National Trust, Tate Gallery, Welsh Assembly Government and a range of universities in the UK and overseas.

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Research profile. Our area of study is the languages, literatures and cultures of the Celtic and Gaelic peoples, from Iron Age Europe to the present. Read more

Research profile

Our area of study is the languages, literatures and cultures of the Celtic and Gaelic peoples, from Iron Age Europe to the present.

As a postgraduate research student, you will benefit not only from our highly regarded academic staff and impressive collection of research resources but also from our commitment to enhancing your research skills through a mandatory comprehensive training programme.

Our field of research spans a number of disciplines. Recent work has encompassed archaeology, divinity, education and linguistics, with thesis topics including Gaelic oral literature and Celtic history.

Our research interests include:

  • Scottish, Irish and Welsh Celtic literature and literary tradition in the Medieval and modern periods
  • the Gaelic languages and dialects
  • Celtic sociolinguistics and language policy

Training and support

A comprehensive training programme by the department of Celtic and Scottish Studies and generic training offered by the School and College is mandatory for all students. Generic training offered by the School and College is optional.

We use a combination of traditional and innovative methods to impart research training. Students are encouraged to make direct contact with original sources and to gain hands-on experience, whether in reading medieval manuscripts or in handling electronically stored data.

Research training and expert research supervision are provided, linked to the specific research topic. Primary sources are emphasised and the combination of archive work and fieldwork particularly encouraged.

Facilities

You will have access to an outstanding range of facilities and resources for your research. The Celtic Class Library, which holds a wide range of specialist materials, and the larger Scottish Studies Library are situated within the department, and the National Library of Scotland is within a short walk. The School of Scottish Studies Archives include songs, tales and the Linguistic and Place-names Surveys of Scotland.

You will be given comprehensive training in the use of these resources, and will be encouraged to use original sources, and to gain hands-on experience, whether in reading Medieval manuscripts or in handling electronically stored data.



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This course is designed to allow students to further their undergraduate interest in archaeology or a related subject, and to develop the skills and knowledge needed if they decided to undertake further research into the past. Read more
This course is designed to allow students to further their undergraduate interest in archaeology or a related subject, and to develop the skills and knowledge needed if they decided to undertake further research into the past. The modular degree scheme includes a choice of specialist modules in aspects of Celtic Archaeology, Theory and Interpretation in Celtic Archaeology and training modules to develop relevant skills.

The programme aims to deepen knowledge of archaeology beyond undergraduate level, with particular emphasis on Celtic archaeology. It provides the opportunity for students to specialise in a particular academic area, so as to gain a close understanding of the archaeological debates around it. The programme acquaints students with relevant archaeological theoretical issues and methods of interpretation and the use of evidence. It also provides the student with the necessary research skills to produce an original piece of work on a chosen topic, under supportive supervision.

Courses
ONE Special Option module chosen from the following:

The Prehistoric Archaeology of the Irish Sea Zone
Celtic Societies in Europe
The Archaeology of the Early Medieval Celtic Churches
Compulsory modules:

Theory and Interpretation in Celtic Archaeology
Initiating a Research Project
Various Skills Option module(s)
One 20,000 word dissertation

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Your programme of study. More and more of us want to know about how people lived in the UK and Europe, what sort of cultures existed and why these cultures were named Celtic or Anglo Saxon. Read more

Your programme of study

More and more of us want to know about how people lived in the UK and Europe, what sort of cultures existed and why these cultures were named Celtic or Anglo Saxon. Why did these people travel or move to the UK as we know it now, what other people were on the scene and how did they influence these people? We know that the Celts came to Britain 500 years ago and Anglo Saxons from 400-1066, joining the Jutes and Frisians from Demark with the language we know today in Northumbria, Mercia, East Anglia, Wessex. The programme allows you to learn more about specific areas of the UK and their influences and folk tales plus history. If you enjoy history you will be fascinated with this discipline and subject areas.

You learn about European Celts, German invaders with Roman culture and legacy. There are in-depth insights of kingdoms, cultures, invasions and accounts of who we really are. The programme offers theories, method and languages, history and literature.

Courses listed for the programme

Semester 1

Celtic and Anglo-Saxon Research Seminar

Optional Courses

Modern Gaelic for Postgraduates

Modern Irish Language for Postgraduates

M.Litt Special Study in Language and Literature 1

Modern Gaelic for Postgraduates

M.Litt Special Study in Language and Literature

Semester 2

Celtic & Anglo- Saxon Research Seminar

Dissertation Preparation

Optional Courses

Modern Gaelic for Postgraduates

Modern Irish Language for Postgraduates

M.Litt Special Study in Language and Literature 1

Modern Gaelic for Postgraduates

M.Litt Special Study in Language and Literatures 1

Semester 3

15000 word dissertation

Why Study at Aberdeen?

  • If you enjoy learning about language, history and literature the university (1495) is steeped in history and you can enjoy the museums on site
  • You can enjoy activities on site whilst you study such as events, seminars and festivals relevant to your programme
  • The university is multidisciplinary in subjects and many overlap in relevance to your degree with plenty of seminars you can attend
  • You are taught be experts in the discipline from the Centre for Celtic and Anglo Saxon Studies and Centre for Linguistic Research

Where you study

  • University of Aberdeen
  • 12 Months Full Time or 24 Months Part Time
  • September start

International Student Fees 2017/2018

Find out about fees:

https://www.abdn.ac.uk/study/international/tuition-fees-and-living-costs-287.php

*Please be advised that some programmes have different tuition fees from those listed above and that some programmes also have additional costs.

Scholarships

View all funding options on our funding database via the programme page

https://www.abdn.ac.uk/study/postgraduate-taught/finance-funding-1599.php

https://www.abdn.ac.uk/funding/

Living in Aberdeen

Find out more about:

  • Your Accommodation
  • Campus Facilities
  • Aberdeen City
  • Student Support
  • Clubs and Societies

Find out more about living in Aberdeen:

https://abdn.ac.uk/study/student-life

Living costs

https://www.abdn.ac.uk/study/international/finance.php



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The Masters in Celtic & Viking Archaeology provides an introduction to both theory and practice in approaches to early medieval archaeology, based on our particular research strengths in the settlements and material culture of Celtic, Pictish and Viking peoples, and in the archaeology of kingship and political development. Read more
The Masters in Celtic & Viking Archaeology provides an introduction to both theory and practice in approaches to early medieval archaeology, based on our particular research strengths in the settlements and material culture of Celtic, Pictish and Viking peoples, and in the archaeology of kingship and political development.

Why this programme

◾If you want to further your career in archaeology, our new approaches to early medieval studies bring fresh insights into the life and ideas of the period and provide you with a stimulating environment, learning from internationally-renowned scholars
◾You will have the opportunity to take fieldtrips to a number of sites relevant to your studies.
◾Our programme has strong links with the University's Hunterian Museum, and Glasgow Life giving you access to primary source material, including objects and archives.

Programme structure

You will take two core courses and three optional courses. For the MLitt you will produce a dissertation on a specialist topic agreed with the course convenor.

The core courses provides you with a theoretical background to the study of early medieval archaeology, examining themes such as burial, settlement, material culture, religion through a series of case studies. You will also get training and support in a wide variety of research methods including library skills, humanities computing, writing and presenting papers.

Core courses

◾Approaches to Celtic and Viking Archaeology
◾Research Skills

Optional courses

Three optional courses must be selected, two of which from the following
◾Themes in Early Medieval Scottish archaeology
◾Early Christian monuments of Scotland
◾Early Medieval artefacts
◾Viking and late Norse artefacts
◾Norse in the North Atlantic, AD 800–1500
◾Viking and late Norse British Isles.

You may also choose one of the following options
◾Thematic studies: any one of the thematic courses offered via other MLitt programmes, by agreement with the course convener. These may include courses available via other Masters programmes within the University (most relevant are those offered as part of Celtic Studies and Scottish Medieval Studies)
◾Independent study on a topic agreed with the course convenor.
◾Artefact studies: any one of the specialist courses offered in the MLitt Material Culture & Artefact Studies
◾Multimedia analysis and design or 2D digitisation.

Career prospects

Graduates have gone on to work for various heritage bodies such as the National Museum of Scotland, and for UK-based commercial archaeology firms.

The programme provides an excellent platform for you to move onto PhD studies and an academic career. The wide variety of specialist optional courses allow you to tailor your particular programme experience towards a direction that best suits your future plans upon completion.

Positions held by recent graduates include Field Archaeologist, Open Learning Tutor, University lectureships and research managers.

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The MPhil in Anglo-Saxon, Norse, and Celtic is designed for students who have already done a first degree incorporating work in some of the subjects encompassed by the Department. Read more
The MPhil in Anglo-Saxon, Norse, and Celtic is designed for students who have already done a first degree incorporating work in some of the subjects encompassed by the Department. Our MPhil programme provides a 9-month course (October to June) in the scholarly methods and disciplines relevant to the study of the history, languages, literatures, and material culture of the peoples of Britain and Ireland, Brittany and Scandinavia in the earlier Middle Ages.

The course enables candidates to achieve an understanding of early Insular culture as a whole, as well as specialising in aspects of particular interest, whether historical, palaeographical, literary, or linguistic. Training is given in scholarly methods and practices, complemented by instruction in the particular fields of the candidate's interests.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/elasmpanc

Course detail

During the MPhil, students should have:

(1) developed a deeper knowledge of their chosen area within Anglo- Saxon, Norse & Celtic and of the critical debates within it;
(2) developed an understanding of critical debates which allows the evaluation of current research in their dissertation field;
(3) shown independent judgement based on their own research.
(4) acquired and/or consolidated linguistic, palaeographical or other scholarly skills;
(5) participated effectively in seminar discussions and made an oral presentation of their research;
(6) learnt how to schedule independent research to produce written work of a high standard to a strict deadline.

Format

After two weeks of orientation and study-skills training, MPhil students meet for a weekly hour-long text-seminar throughout the first two terms of the course. The text-seminar focuses on a sequence of literary texts (studied in translation), including key Latin and vernacular texts from all the fields within ASNC, preceded by a group of earlier works that provided the intellectual background to the medieval world.

Alongside this core seminar, students are expected to attend the two courses they have chosen to pursue from among the selection of linguistic/literary and historical subjects offered in the Department, which are taught through a varying combination of lectures, classes and seminars. In this way, a significant proportion of the taught element of this MPhil is tailored to the individual needs of each student, hence the possible variation in weekly hours of seminars, classes and lectures.

Assessment

The MPhil dissertation (between 10,000 and 15,000 words) makes up 50% of the total mark for the course, and is submitted in the last week of the third term (mid-June). Students are required to submit a dissertation title, with abstract, by the mid-point of the second term (February).

At the end of the first term of the course (December), students are required to submit a 5000-word Review of Scholarship essay, intended as a survey and assessment of scholarship on the topic of the projected MPhil dissertation. The mark for the Review of Scholarship essay constitutes 10% of the overall MPhil grade.

Over the course of four days in the first week of the third term (April), students write a 3000-word take-home essay, on a broad topic chosen from a selection, and drawing on at least three of the works of literature discussed during the course of the MPhil text-seminar, which runs throughout the first two terms of the course. The mark for the take-home essay makes up 10% of the overall mark.

Students are required to take two 3-hour written examinations which assess knowledge and skills acquired during the first two terms of the academic year, in two courses chosen from among those taught in the Department. Courses on offer include Anglo-Saxon history, Scandinavian history, Brittonic and Gaelic history, Old English, Old Norse, Medieval Welsh, Medieval Irish, Insular Latin, and palaeography, most of which can be pursued at beginner, intermediate or advanced level; Germanic philology, Celtic philology, and textual criticism are further options for students with the appropriate prior knowledge. Each written examination is worth 15% of the total MPhil mark, and is assessed independently by two examiners.

Continuing

MPhil students may apply to continue to a PhD in ASNC; the academic condition for continuation is an overall mark of 70 or more in the MPhil course, and 70 or more for the dissertation. A viva on the dissertation is compulsory for all students who have been made an offer for continuation to PhD.

Find out how to apply here http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/elasmpanc/apply

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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Few words are as evocative and intriguing as ‘Celtic’, bringing to mind the intricacies of Bronze Age jewellery, the massive structures of Stonehenge and Newgrange, the legends of Arthur and Cú Chulainn and the Bardic craft of medieval kings and princes. Read more
Few words are as evocative and intriguing as ‘Celtic’, bringing to mind the intricacies of Bronze Age jewellery, the massive structures of Stonehenge and Newgrange, the legends of Arthur and Cú Chulainn and the Bardic craft of medieval kings and princes. But ‘Celtic’ is also about the Renaissance, the Enlightenment and the New World; Romanticism, Revolution and the struggles for survival in modernity of languages, literatures and entire national identities.

This new course from Bangor University gives students the opportunity and ability to sift fact and fiction, and to answer in detail the question:

‘Who were – and who are – the Celts?’

Over a single academic year, modules will be taught by experts in the Schools of Welsh, History, and Music, focusing on literature, archaeology, religion, mythology, antiquarianism, art history and music, to explore the culture and identity of the Celtic peoples from the hillforts of prehistory to the devolved and independent parliaments of today.

Students on the course will also be guided as they perform their own research towards a Master’s thesis on a topic of their choice.

All instruction is available through English or Welsh, and comprehensive ESOL support is available where necessary.

Major issues covered on the MA ‘Y Celtiaid – The Celts’ include:

Do ‘The Celts’ actually exist, and if so, who and what are they? How can we discuss such questions, with what methodology and with what evidence?
How has the word itself (‘Celt’, ‘Keltoi’, etc.) been used through the centuries, from Classical historians to modern pop musicians?
What are the strengths and weaknesses of ‘Celtomania’ and ‘Celtoscepticism’? How has the concept of the ‘Celt’ has been discovered and discarded in various fields such as Literature, Archaeology, Linguistics, Music, Religion?
How did nineteenth-century Continental scholars contribute to the creation of the ‘Celt’?
How do and how did the Celtic-speaking peoples negotiate their own identities? What do the medieval texts (Laws, Legends, Court Poetry, Saints’ Lives) and archaeological findings tell us, and what does recent history have to say?
What are the main sources of evidence for the histories and identities of the ‘Celtic’ peoples (i.e. those speaking Celtic languages in the modern period)? How do we use these sources? Can Arthur and Cú Chulainn tell us anything useful?
How have the ethnic and national identities of the modern ‘Celts’ been represented and negotiated with reference to this concept of the ‘Celtic’?
What has been – and what is – the political and ideological relevance of the ‘Celt’?
With issues such as these in mind, the MA ‘Y Celtiaid – The Celts’ is designed to develop participants’ skills through a scheme of specialist advanced study. An important objective is to provide participants with relevant analytical training, so that they are familiar with the latest theoretical and practical developments relating to Celtic Studies. On completing this course, students will have a solid grounding in the main methods and sources of the discipline, and will also have developed widely-transferrable skills which will be of clear relevance to a broad range of careers.

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This programme offers you the opportunity to explore the ancient world from a multicultural and interdisciplinary perspective from the Near-East to North-Western Europe. Read more
This programme offers you the opportunity to explore the ancient world from a multicultural and interdisciplinary perspective from the Near-East to North-Western Europe. It is based in Classics, with the participation of Archaeology, Egyptology, Celtic and Gaelic, and Theology and Religious Studies.

Why this programme

◾The programme makes extensive use of the unique collections in the University of Glasgow's Hunterian Museum as well as collections in other Glasgow museums such as the Burrell Collection and the Glasgow Museums Resource Centre.
◾Hands-on sessions in a range of museums and libraries can be tailor-made to suit your interests.
◾You will have the opportunity to take up an ancient language (Greek, Latin, Egyptian, Coptic, Hebrew, early Gaelic, Welsh) from scratch, or continue it at advanced level.

Programme structure

The ancient world was both multicultural and highly interconnected, with trade routes running from the Middle East through Greece and Italy to Celtic Britain, with peoples of diverse cultures, faiths, and ethnicities living together in bustling cities such as Athens, Rome, and Alexandria.

Core courses
◾Approaching the Ancient World through Text
◾Approaching the Ancient World through Material Culture

Both core courses include handling sessions with ancient objects taking advantage of the unique resources of the University of Glasgow in the shape of the university library, the Hunterian Museum, and the Glasgow Museums Resource Centre.

Optional courses may include
◾Languages at all levels: Ancient Greek, Latin, early Gaelic, Welsh, Hebrew, Ancient Egyptian (hieroglyphs), Coptic
◾Democracy and Government in the Ancient World
◾Explorations in the Classical Tradition
◾Rituals, Feasts and Festivals – Power, Community and Consumption in the East Mediterranean and the Near East
◾Mediterranean Landscapes
◾Climate and Civilisation
◾Celtic Art
◾Jewish Contexts of Early Christianity
◾Early Church History and Theology
◾Ancient Egyptian Art and Archaeology
◾Courses on Celtic and Viking archaeology
◾Courses in Museum Studies

You must take courses from at least two subject areas. The course convener will offer guidance and approve your choices to ensure their feasibility and intellectual cogency.

Please note that you can only study one language at beginner’s level.

You will also complete a dissertation of 12,000-15,000 words on a research topic of your choice. Your dissertation will be supervised in individual subjects or jointly between subjects as appropriate.

Our research environment

You will enjoy the use of the excellent postgraduate facilities offered by Classics in Glasgow. There is a dedicated postgraduate study space, which makes available an extensive research collection, now augmented by a bequest from the late Professor Douglas MacDowell.

The subjects, Classics, Archaeology, Celtic and Gaelic, and Theology and Religious Studies, all run a programme of research seminars which provide Ancient Cultures students with a wide range of stimulating events to choose from.

Career prospects

The programme provides excellent technical and linguistic skills for further postgraduate study in any of the subjects involved. It is also well suited for those considering a career in heritage, teaching, archives, or libraries.

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The course is available in Standard Track and in Special Track. Course Structure. Part 1 (Diploma). In addition to the Principal Subject, in which the student specialises; up to three additional subjects can be studied. Read more
The course is available in Standard Track and in Special Track

Course Structure
Part 1 (Diploma):

In addition to the Principal Subject, in which the student specialises; up to three additional subjects can be studied. Total of 120 credits.

Part 2 (MA):

Normally consists of a dissertation, composition portfolio, or critical edition (in the area of the Principal Subject). Total of 60 credits.

Course description
Standard Track:

The course combines specialisation in one area (including Historical Musicology, Editorial Musicology, Composition, Solo Performance) with further training in up to three complimentary areas.

The range of choice on this course makes it one of the most flexible MA programmes in the UK. Students can make their education as broad or narrow as they wish. For those with a single-minded interest in one area specialised degrees are available.

The programme is divided into two parts: two semesters of taught study (Part I, 120 credits) and a substantial independent piece of work in the main area, produced over the summer (Part II, 60 credits).

Part 1 is centred on the Principal Subject module (WMM4044, 40 credits) in the student’s main area of interest. It lays the foundations of a Part 2 project in the same area. The following subjects are available:

Historical Musicology
Editorial Musicology
Ethnomusicology
Celtic Traditional Music
Music in Wales
Music and the Christian Church
Composition
Electroacoustic Composition
Composing Film Music
Studying Film Music
Solo Performance
Sacred Music Studies
Early Music
20th-/21st-century Music
WMP4052 Preparing for the Part 2 project (10 credits) acts as a bridge between Parts 1 and 2.

An additional 40 credits will be gained through submissions in other fields through either one Major Open Submission (WXM4046, 40 credits) or two Minor Open Submissions (WMP4047 and WMP4048, 20 credits each). Students can select from a number of subject areas, including, but not restricted to, those listed above. Additional offerings include modules in Arts Administration, Music in the Community, Ethnomusicology and Analysis.

Depending on the main area of specialism, students will attend a core module in musicology (WMP4041 Current Musicology, 30 credits) or composition (WMP4042 Contexts and Concepts in Composition, 30 credits). During these modules students will became familiar with up-to-date research and creative techniques and methodologies in the selected disciplines.

Subject-specific teaching is provided through a combination of individual tuition and seminar session in small groups. Within each of the chosen subject areas, students can identify their own projects, for which they will receive expert supervision.

Special Track:

The MA in Music (Special Track) allows students to specialise in any one of the following areas: Historical Musicology, Editorial Musicology, Celtic Traditional Music, Music in Wales, Studying Film Music.

All the training will be centred on the student’s main area, aided by a broader look at the methodological foundation of the discipline as a whole (through the core module in musicology).

The programme is divided into two parts: two semesters of taught study (Part 1, 120 credits) and a substantial independent piece of work in the main area, produced over the summer (Part 2, 60 credits).

Part 1 is centred on the Principal Subject module (WMM4045, 60 credits) in the student’s area of specialism. Another aspect of the same area will be explored in the Independent Special Study (WMP4049, 20 credits).

WMP4052 Preparing for the Part 2 project (10 credits) acts as a bridge between Parts 1 and 2.

Depending on the main area of specialism, students will attend a core module in musicology (WMP4041 Current Musicology, 30 credits) or composition (WMP4042 Contexts and Concepts in Composition, 30 credits). During these modules students will became familiar with up-to-date research and creative techniques and methodologies in the selected disciplines.

Subject-specific teaching is provided through a combination of individual tuition and seminar session in small groups. Within each of the chosen subject areas, students can identify their own projects, for which they will receive expert supervision.

Compulsory modules:

Standard Track

Principal Subject, to be chosen from the published list for that Academic Year (40 Credits). Study areas currently offered are: Historical Musicology, Editorial Musicology, Ethnomusicology, Celtic Traditional Music, Music in Wales, Music and the Christian Church, Composition, Electroacoustic composition / Sonic arts, Composing Film Music, Studying Film Music, Solo Performance, Music in the Community, Sacred Music Studies, Early Music, 20th-/21st-century Music.
Compulsory Core Module: either Current Musicology (for musicologists) or Concepts of Composition (for composers) (depending on the Principal Subject) (30 Credits).
Open submissions: to be chosen from the optional modules (40 credits).
Preparing for the Part Two Project (10 credits).
(Total of 120 credits)

Special Track

Principal Subject, to be chosen from the published list for that Academic Year (60 Credits). Study areas currently offered: Historical Musicology; Editorial Musicology; Music in the Christian Church; Celtic Traditional Music; Music in Wales; Studying Film Music).
Compulsory Core Module: either Current Musicology (for musicologists) or Concepts of Composition (for composers) (depending on the Principal Subject) (30 Credits).
Independent Special Study (must be in the same area as the Principal Subject) (20 credits)
Preparing for the Part Two Project (10 credits)
(Total of 120 credits)

Optional modules:

Standard Track

Open Submissions (40 or 20 credits) may be chosen in any of the following study areas (but have to be different from the Principal Subject): Historical Musicology; Editorial Musicology; Ethnomusicology; Celtic Traditional Music; Music in Wales; Music and the Christian Church; Composition; Electroacoustic Composition / Sonic Arts; Composing Film Music; Studying Film Music; Solo Performance; Sacred Music Studies; Early Music; 20th-/21st-century Music; Analysis, Arts Administration, Music Studio Techniques, Popular Music Studies, Techniques and Practice of Instrumental or Vocal Teaching (20 credits only), Performance Practice (20 credits only), Music for Instruments and Electronics (20 credits only), Supporting Studies (20 credits only), ELCOS Language Skills (20 credits, international students only.ded study (e.g. portfolio of compositions, performance recital).

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The Research Master's programme in Ancient, Medieval and Renaissance Studies focuses on interdisciplinary study of the material, social, and intellectual developments in Europe (including the Mediterranean region) from Antiquity through the Middle Ages to the Renaissance. Read more
The Research Master's programme in Ancient, Medieval and Renaissance Studies focuses on interdisciplinary study of the material, social, and intellectual developments in Europe (including the Mediterranean region) from Antiquity through the Middle Ages to the Renaissance. Within this long period you can focus on your academic interests by choosing one of four tracks:

1. Ancient Studies
2. Medieval Studies
3. Medieval Celtic Studies
4. Renaissance Studies.

Within each track, you will work with source materials in their original languages, including in manuscript form. The Ancient Studies track has a keen interest in archaeology. The Medieval Studies and Renaissance Studies tracks go beyond a solely historical approach by including courses in literature, linguistics, art history, musicology, and history. In the Medieval Studies track, you may specialize in either Medieval History, Medieval Art History, Medieval Literature, or Medieval Musicology. Medieval Celtic Studies combines literary studies with historical linguistics.

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Taught jointly by the Schools of Welsh and English, the Literatures of Wales MA is the first course anywhere in the world which focuses on the study and comparison of texts from the two main literary traditions in Wales (where necessary in English translation). Read more
Taught jointly by the Schools of Welsh and English, the Literatures of Wales MA is the first course anywhere in the world which focuses on the study and comparison of texts from the two main literary traditions in Wales (where necessary in English translation). Wales is the only one of the British Celtic nations to retain a widely-spoken, viable indigenous language and a vibrant contemporary literature. It is also the only British nation whose distinctive Anglophone literature remains marginalised within its own education system. At university level, the linguistic divide of the twentieth century encouraged the separate study of the two literatures, a schism which modern scholarship has only recently started to overcome. Bangor – a genuinely bilingual cultural centre – is an ideal place in which to study these two literary traditions from Wales, and to consider the question of what happens to English-language literature when it is not the principal tradition.

Part One:

The first part of the course comprises three modules which seek to provide students with an understanding of modern Welsh literary and cultural history, enable them to develop their understanding of key issues in modern Welsh literary scholarship and consider key issues across both literary traditions, from a cross-community perspective.

Introduction: ‘Who Speaks for Wales?’: In this introductory module, students will be asked to consider how issues of identity pertinent to Wales from 1840 to the present have been understood. Typically, students will study internal difference within Wales, Britishness, notions of Celtic identity, Wales as a postcolonial nation, parallels with other ‘dominated’ British nations, nationalist movements. Work by the following writers might be studied: Hywel Teifi Edwards, Saunders Lewis, Raymond Williams, Matthew Arnold, J.R. Jones, M. Wynn Thomas, Tony Conran, Dai Smith, Kirsti Bohata.
Welsh Modernity: Students will be asked to consider the ways in which literature across both linguistic traditions registers the arrival of modernity, and the changes subsequently wrought. Themes might include industry, class, urbanisation, capitalism, rural culture, religion, linguistic change and exile. Writers to be studied might include Caradoc Evans, Lynette Roberts, Caradog Pritchard, Dylan Thomas, Kate Roberts, R.S. Thomas, Arthur Machen, Emyr Humphreys, Idris Davies.
Gender and Wales: Students will study the relation between gender and the Welsh nation, and how gender roles have changed over the last century. Themes might include sexuality, masculinity and industry, gendered representations of the colonised space, the male body, women and representations of land. Writers to be studied might include: Elin ap Hywel, Jan Morris, John Sam Jones, Glyn Jones, Jane Aaron, Lewis Jones, Gwyneth Lewis, Rhys Davies, Amy Dillwyn, Menna Gallie.
Part Two:

Preparation of a 20,000-word Dissertation, written in English or Welsh, on any aspect of the literatures in which the student is interested a subject of your choice, researched and written under the individual supervision of a subject specialist.

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