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Masters Degrees (Ccs)

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Our Energy programmes allow you to specialise in areas such as bio-energy, novel geo-energy, sustainable power, fuel cell and hydrogen technologies, power electronics, drives and machines, and the sustainable development and use of key resources. Read more
Our Energy programmes allow you to specialise in areas such as bio-energy, novel geo-energy, sustainable power, fuel cell and hydrogen technologies, power electronics, drives and machines, and the sustainable development and use of key resources.

We can supervise MPhil projects in topics that relate to our main areas of research, which are:

Bio-energy

Our research spans the whole supply chain:
-Growing novel feedstocks (various biomass crops, algae etc)
-Processing feedstocks in novel ways
-Converting feedstocks into fuels and chemical feedstocks
-Developing new engines to use the products

Cockle Park Farm has an innovative anaerobic digestion facility. Work at the farm will develop, integrate and exploit technologies associated with the generation and efficient utilisation of renewable energy from land-based resources, including biomass, biofuel and agricultural residues.

We also develop novel technologies for gasification and pyrolysis. This large multidisciplinary project brings together expertise in agronomy, land use and social science with process technologists and engineers and is complemented by molecular studies on the biology of non-edible oilseeds as sources for production of biodiesel.

Novel geo-energy

New ways of obtaining clean energy from the geosphere is a vital area of research, particularly given current concerns over the limited remaining resources of fossil fuels.

Newcastle University has been awarded a Queen's Anniversary Prize for Higher Education for its world-renowned Hydrogeochemical Engineering Research and Outreach (HERO) programme. Building on this record of excellence, the Sir Joseph Swan Centre for Energy Research seeks to place the North East at the forefront of research in ground-source heat pump systems, and other larger-scale sources of essentially carbon-free geothermal energy, and developing more responsible modes of fossil fuel use.

Our fossil fuel research encompasses both the use of a novel microbial process, recently patented by Newcastle University, to convert heavy oil (and, by extension, coal) to methane, and the coupling of carbon capture and storage (CCS) to underground coal gasification (UCG) using directionally drilled boreholes. This hybrid technology (UCG-CCS) is exceptionally well suited to early development in the North East, which still has 75% of its total coal resources in place.

Sustainable power

We undertake fundamental and applied research into various aspects of power generation and energy systems, including:
-The application of alternative fuels such as hydrogen and biofuels to engines and dual fuel engines
-Domestic combined heat and power (CHP) and combined cooling, heating and power (trigeneration) systems using waste vegetable oil and/or raw inedible oils
-Biowaste methanisation
-Biomass and biowaste combustion, gasification
-Biomass co-combustion with coal in thermal power plants
-CO2 capture and storage for thermal power systems
-Trigeneration with novel energy storage systems (including the storage of electrical energy, heat and cooling energy)
-Engine and power plant emissions monitoring and reduction technology
-Novel engine configurations such as free-piston engines and the reciprocating Joule cycle engine

Fuel cell and hydrogen technologies

We are recognised as world leaders in hydrogen storage research. Our work covers the entire range of fuel cell technologies, from high-temperature hydrogen cells to low-temperature microbial fuel cells, and addresses some of the complex challenges which are slowing the uptake and impact of fuel cell technology.

Key areas of research include:
-Biomineralisation
-Liquid organic hydrides
-Adsorption onto solid phase, nano-porous metallo-carbon complexes

Sustainable development and use of key resources

Our research in this area has resulted in the development and commercialisation of novel gasifier technology for hydrogen production and subsequent energy generation.

We have developed ways to produce alternative fuels, in particular a novel biodiesel pilot plant that has attracted an Institution of Chemical Engineers (IChemE) AspenTech Innovative Business Practice Award.

Major funding has been awarded for the development of fuel cells for commercial application and this has led to both patent activity and highly-cited research. Newcastle is a key member of the SUPERGEN Fuel Cell Consortium. Significant developments have been made in fuel cell modelling, membrane technology, anode development and catalyst and fuel cell performance improvements.

Facilities

As a postgraduate student you will be based in the Sir Joseph Swan Centre for Energy Research. Depending on your chosen area of study, you may also work with one or more of our partner schools, providing you with a unique and personally designed training and supervision programme.

You have access to:
-A modern open-plan office environment
-A full range of chemical engineering, electrical engineering, mechanical engineering and marine engineering laboratories
-Dedicated desk and PC facilities for each student within the research centre or partner schools

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GRADUATES OF THE MFA PROGRAM IN TRANSPORTATION DESIGN WILL BE INNOVATORS, IN AUTOMOTIVE DESIGN AND ALL ASPECTS OF MOBILITY, ALWAYS WITH AN EYE TOWARD THE FUTURE. Read more
GRADUATES OF THE MFA PROGRAM IN TRANSPORTATION DESIGN WILL BE INNOVATORS, IN AUTOMOTIVE DESIGN AND ALL ASPECTS OF MOBILITY, ALWAYS WITH AN EYE TOWARD THE FUTURE

Building on your art and creativity, the College’s MFA program in Transportation Design will bring you together with other bright, forward-thinking students from design and engineering disciplines who want to delve into the invention and entrepreneurial aspects of transportation design.

In this program, you will take on the role of “designer as inventor,” and learn how to integrate innovation with real-world business strategy, including business practices, research, brand identity, vehicle architecture and mobility as a system. The curriculum will lead you through a complete design process – extensive research, sketching and 3D rendering, animation, core competencies analysis and more – and will include special projects that explore innovation through forms and materials, functionality and engineering. It’s a unique approach that will teach you how to combine creativity and research with business realities to create new brand value.

Studying at CCS will put you at the very center of transportation design. In the College’s studios and labs – housed in the same building where Harley Earl, the first modern automotive designer, and other renowned researchers and designers pioneered groundbreaking vehicles – an automotive executive or other industry leader is very likely to stop in to engage informally with students. The College’s alumni are designers at every major car manufacturer and nearly all the Tier 1 auto suppliers, at racing and defense companies like Pratt & Miller, and consulting in firms as far away as Vietnam and Abu Dhabi. You will participate in design competitions, internships and sponsored projects from the Big 3 and Tier 1 and 2 suppliers. With these exceptional networking advantages, CCS is the ideal place to develop the knowledge, skills and entrepreneurial outlook that will enable you to influence the future of transportation.

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This MA introduces you to recent debates on gender in the disciplines of sociology and media and communications studies, and to the interdisciplinary domains of feminist social and cultural theory. Read more

This MA introduces you to recent debates on gender in the disciplines of sociology and media and communications studies, and to the interdisciplinary domains of feminist social and cultural theory.

Drawing on the internationally recognised and pioneering expertise of staff in the Department of Sociology and Department of Media and Communications, as well as the Centre for Feminist Research (CFR), the programme offers you the opportunity to develop cutting-edge critical skills in relation to cultural approaches to gender formation and gender theory.

As well as these theoretical and analytical points of orientation, the MA in Gender, Media and Culture aims to help you grasp the importance of epistemology and methodology for the evaluation of empirical investigations of gender formations.

The programme therefore introduces you to, and offers training in, the key socio-cultural methods for the study of gender in the contemporary world, including methods for the study of visual culture; the body and affect; and memory.

These two elements of the programme are brought together in a dissertation study, which involves tailored supervision in the application of research methods to a specific topic.

This programme relates to the following disciplines:

  • Sociology
  • Media and Communications
  • Humanities
  • Science and Technology Studies
  • Philosophy

Overall the programme has the following interrelated aims

  • to provide in-depth interdisciplinary knowledge of contemporary gender formations
  • to provide theoretical, analytical and methodological points of orientation for understanding gender and culture transnationally and across different societies and geo-political regions
  • to offer skilled supervision in the development and completion of a small research project which tests thoroughly a range of research skills
  • to expose students to a lively research environment and the relevant expertise of the research-led Departments of Sociology and Media and Communications

Modules & structure

Core components of the programme will familiarise you with the wide range of debates integral to the fields of gender studies, feminist theory, and cultural studies. These include:

  • questions about sexual difference and the performativity of gender
  • gender, science, debates on affect and emotion
  • gender and migration and the new international division of labour
  • feminism

You complete one core module and one option module each term, as well as a dissertation module in the spring term. The first core module introduces key debates and developments in feminist theory, cultural theory and, in particular, feminist cultural theory. It introduces both early debates which defined these fields and contemporary developments and departures. More specifically, you will be introduced to social constructivist and post-structuralist perspectives, to ‘new materialism’, to debates on feminism and the critique of universalism; to key questions in relation to feminism and biology; to debates on psycho-analysis and the emergence of queer theory and its intersection with feminist theory.

The second core module examines the place of gender, affect and the body in feminist theory and feminist practice. The course offers you different angles on what has become known as “the affective turn,” placing a strong emphasis on the history of feminist contributions to the study of affect and emotion as well as the body. We ask how bodies are constructed, experienced and lived from a variety of feminist perspectives, attending to questions of corporeal difference, as well as the intimacy of bodies, spaces, objects and technologies. We also reflect on the significance of affect and the body for feminist and queer cultural practices, as well feminist and queer activisms. This module therefore offers instruction in some of the most cutting edge issues in contemporary feminist theory. A team of leading feminist scholars based in the departments of Sociology and Media Communications at Goldsmiths teach this module on the basis of their research specialisms. 

There will be a series of dissertation workshops to help you plan and develop your dissertation, especially in regard to issues of methodology and method. Each student will be assigned a supervisor who will work with you to develop your proposal and undertake independent research.

Core modules

Option modules

You have 60 credits at your disposal, you can choose any 30 credit modules related to gender from postgraduate modules across the University. You can choose either a regular option (30 credits) or two ‘mini-options’ (2 x 15 credits).

For your other options, you can choose modules from either the Department of Sociology or the Department of Media and Communications as they co-convene the programme. You can also choose from the following departments across Goldsmiths:

Please note that not all modules are suitable for students from all academic backgrounds; you will discuss your choices with the Programme Convenor at the start of your degree.

Assessment

Assessment consists of coursework, extended essays, reports, presentations, practice based projects or essays/logs, group projects, reflective essays, and seen and unseen written examinations.

Skills

Graduates from this programme gain conceptual and methodological knowledge of the key concepts and debates in the study of gender and culture; the skills of critical analysis; the ability to distinguish and appraise a range of socio-cultural research methodologies; the skills to design and develop a research project; and the ability to recognise and account for sensitive ethical issues relating to research and representation.

The two core courses provide you with the necessary skills to understand the relationships between early debates in the fields of gender studies, feminist theory and feminist cultural theory, and the ability to critically engage with new developments in these fields. Furthermore, you will gain a critical appreciation of the role and place of the body and affect in the development of feminist cultural theory and gender theory, and the challenges that contemporary socio-cultural changes bring to the theorisation of the body.

Careers

Previous graduates have embarked on professional careers in social research, think tanks, the arts and cultural sectors, government and public administration, development, human rights, NGOs, and in media and communications globally. They have also progressed to PhD study.

Find out more about employability at Goldsmiths



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This course focuses on the Catholic theological tradition, within the more general context of Christian theology. Durham has a strong interest in and engagement with contemporary Catholicism, with a . Read more

This course focuses on the Catholic theological tradition, within the more general context of Christian theology. Durham has a strong interest in and engagement with contemporary Catholicism, with a Centre for Catholic Studies and the Bede Chair in Catholic Theology.

Course Structure

  • Classic Texts in Christian Theology core module
  • Three option modules
  • Dissertation.

Core Modules

  • Classic Texts in Christian Theology 
  • Dissertation.

Optional Modules

Optional Modules in previous years have included:

2-3 choices from:

  • Twentieth-Century Catholic Theology
  • Conceiving Change in Contemporary Catholicism
  • Christian Gender
  • Principles of Theological Ethics
  • Patristic Ecclesiology
  • Patristic Exegesis
  • Catholic Social Thought

Plus up to 1 choice from:

  • The Anglican Theological Vision
  • Liturgy and Sacramentality
  • Ritual, Symbolism and Belief in the Anthropology of Religion
  • Paul and his Interpreters
  • Gospels and Canon
  • The Bible and Hermeneutics
  • Christian Northumbria 600-750
  • Theology, Ethics and Medicine
  • Social Scientific Methods in the Study of Religion
  • Literature and Religion
  • Advanced Hebrew Texts
  • Advanced Aramaic
  • Middle Egyptian
  • The Old Testament Pseudepigrapha and the New Testament
  • Ecclesiology and Ethnography
  • Doctrine of Creation
  • Selected modules from the MA in Theology and Ministry programme
  • Level 3 undergraduate module, or any Level 1 – 2 language module offered by the Department of Theology and Religion, taken in conjunction with the Extended Study in Theology & Religion module
  • 30 credits from another Board of Studies (including appropriate credit-bearing language modules offered by the University’s Centre for Foreign Language Study)

Course Learning and Teaching

Most MA teaching is delivered through small group seminars and tutorials. These exemplify and encourage the various skills and practices required for independent scholarly engagement with texts and issues. Teaching in the Department of Theology & 

Most MA teaching is delivered through small group seminars and tutorials. These exemplify and encourage the various skills and practices required for independent scholarly engagement with texts and issues. Teaching in the Department of Theology & Religion is ‘research led’ at both BA and MA levels, but particularly at MA level. Research led teaching is informed by staff research, but more importantly it aims to develop students as independent researchers themselves, able to pursue and explore their own research interests and questions. This is why the independently researched MA dissertation is the culmination of the MA programme. Such engagement with texts and issues is not only an excellent preparation for doctoral research, it also develops those skills of critical analysis, synthesis and presentation sought and required by employers.

Many MA classes will contain a ‘lecture’ element, conveying information and exemplifying an approach to the subject-matter that will enable students to develop a clear understanding of the subject and improve their own ability to analyse and evaluate information and arguments. Seminars enhance knowledge and understanding through preparation and interaction with other students and staff, promoting awareness of and respect for different viewpoints and approaches, and developing skills of articulacy, advocacy and interrogation. Through small group discussions and tutorials, feedback is provided on student work, with the opportunity to discuss specific issues in detail, enhancing student knowledge and writing skills.

The Dissertation module includes training in generic research skills, from the use of the Library to issues in referencing and bibliography. The subject specific core module introduces students to questions of interpretation and argument in the disciplines encompassed by theology and religion, and helps them to develop their own interests and questions that will issue in the MA dissertation. The latter is a piece of independent research, but it is fostered and guided through individual tutorials with a supervisor, with whom students meet throughout the academic year.

Career Opportunities

A significant number of our graduates find employment in academic institutions (universities and seminaries) around the world. Others go into teaching, church ministry, the caring professions, and many other professional fields.



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The course addresses lawyers, legal practicioners and economists who want to gain in-depth, special knowledge in the field of international and European energy law. Read more
The course addresses lawyers, legal practicioners and economists who want to gain in-depth, special knowledge in the field of international and European energy law. Students will become acquainted with the technical and economic foundations of the energy markets as well as with all legal topics relevant for the whole value chain in the energy sector. The curriculum comprises of competition law, regulatory law and economic fundamentals among others.

Lectures come from the international community (Germany, USA, Switzerland, Belgium, Norway, Russia) and are experts from universities, European and national authorities, international and national energy companies, major law firms, and courts. To name a few, technical universities, the European Commission, the German regulatory authority BNetzA.

The course is also supported by the Institute for Energy and Regulatory Law Berlin (enreg.eu) and benefits from experts‘ knowledge of the European and German energy sector which is the largest one in Europe. The academic director is Professor Dr. iur. Dr. rer. pol. Dres. h.c. Franz Jürgen Säcker who is the editor and author of leading publications in the field of energy law.

Course Structure
The first Semester is dedicated to the fundamentals of energy Regulation. The technical and economic characteristics of the electricity and gas sector will be taught. Students will become acquainted with the technical and economic fundamentals to follow the second semester.
In the second semester, energy law will be taught. This includes the legal framework relevant for the building and the operation of plants generating electricity from fossil and from renewable sources, for the operation of grids as well as for the supply of energy. In the second semester furthermore negotiation strategies will be taught. The theoretical knowledge will be supplemented by excursions, e.g. to a power plant, a CCS-plant and to the EEX which is largest electricity stock exchange in Continental-Europe.

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GRADUATES OF THE INTERACTION DESIGN PROGRAM WILL CREATE RICHLY INTERACTIVE PRODUCTS AND SERVICES THAT ENHANCE MEANING AND EXPAND POSSIBILITIES IN PEOPLE’S DAILY LIVES. Read more
GRADUATES OF THE INTERACTION DESIGN PROGRAM WILL CREATE RICHLY INTERACTIVE PRODUCTS AND SERVICES THAT ENHANCE MEANING AND EXPAND POSSIBILITIES IN PEOPLE’S DAILY LIVES

Interaction Design brings together students of design, art and technology who have a strong portfolio in concepts, work process, aesthetic execution and passion for serving human needs through interactive experiences.

Your studies at CCS will be grounded in human-centered design practices that will prepare you for the changing nature of work and collaboration in the 21st century. Through the College’s unique curriculum, you will develop deep systems literacy – a timeless framework for understanding rapidly changing technology platforms and economic, market and social challenges. You will become adept with models of interaction and conversation that sharpen your insights and enable you to increase choice for all of your users. You will learn how value creation has evolved in today’s networked, information-driven global economy and how to innovate through design.

Upon graduation, you will be qualified to work inside of tech companies and design firms, from established players to startups. You will know how to design websites and apps for the delight of the experience and effectiveness in achieving users’ goals. You might design a professional online network for consultants who want to work together flexibly, and enhance their skills and reputations along the way. You might prototype a mobile app for small businesses that need real-time alerts and coordinated schedules to keep productivity high and costs low. Or you might invent entirely new experiences for sharing rides in a self-driving car.

The College’s unique program balances research, systems modeling and making, teaching you how to step beyond the limits of today’s technology and market demands to shape desired futures through design. For your career, you can choose where you want to contribute: from designing products to coding prototypes to running product strategy or a combination. You will have the skills to persuade and influence your co-workers, who will be experts in technology, marketing and business, by understanding their language and working as their peer. You will have an appreciation for the challenges of innovation and for what is required to start your own enterprise.

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Programme description. This MSc is aimed at students who wish to pursue a geosciences-related career in the future energy sector, as it transitions from fossil fuels to a low carbon economy. Read more

Programme description

This MSc is aimed at students who wish to pursue a geosciences-related career in the future energy sector, as it transitions from fossil fuels to a low carbon economy. The aim is to offer a programme that uses subsurface (geological) knowledge opening a diverse range of career pathways in lower carbon geoenergy technologies; the disposal of energy-related wastes and the hydrocarbon industry.

This MSc programme builds on the strength and reputation of the research groups operating in the School of GeoSciences on uses of the subsurface: carbon capture and storage (CCS); radioactive waste disposal; energy storage and extraction; unconventional and conventional hydrocarbons; wet and dry geothermal heat; and subsurface fluid tracing using noble gases and stable isotopes.

Programme structure

Compulsory courses (for students who have accredited prior learning, elective courses are taken in lieu) – 90 credits

  • Future Geoenergy Resources
  • Applied Hydrogeology and Near surface Geophysics
  • Hydrogeology 2
  • Environmental Geochemistry
  • Project Design and Literature Analysis
  • Carbon Storage and Monitoring

Compulsory Courses – for those with Geoscience background – 20 credits

  • Subsurface Reservoir Quality

Compulsory Courses – for those without Geoscience background – 20 credits

  • Geology for Earth Resources
  • Hydrocarbons

Optional courses: choice of 10 credits from following

  • Ore Mineralogy, Petrology & Geochemistry
  • Seismic Reflection Interpretation
  • Carbon Capture and Transport
  • Helmsdale MSc Field Excursion
  • Environmental Problems and Issues
  • Nuclear Waste Management: Principles, Policies & Practice

Compulsory Dissertation

  • Dissertation in Applied Geoscience (Geoenergy)

Career opportunities

This programme will train students in the use of subsurface geological knowledge opening a diverse range of career pathways in lower carbon geoenergy technologies and the disposal of energy-related wastes. These include radioactive waste disposal; carbon capture and storage; geothermal energy and subsurface energy storage including compressed air energy storage.

Other pathways include working in environmental and regulatory aspects of energy storage involving potential pollution; tracking subsurface fluids in the event of leakage from subsurface facilities and ground water resources.



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The Global Environmental Change and Policy course focuses on 4 key questions. What are the nature and causes of global environmental change (GEC)?. Read more

The Global Environmental Change and Policy course focuses on 4 key questions:

  • What are the nature and causes of global environmental change (GEC)?
  • What do we know and not know about GEC - and why?
  • What are the biological, physico-chemical and human implications of GEC?
  • What can and should be done about mitigating and adapting to GEC?

Structure and Objectives

By addressing those four questions the overall aim of the course is to provide students with a comprehensive and broad understanding of the scientific, legal and policy concerns informing the GEC field, and to guide students towards applying, independently, the necessary tools to address GEC questions, analytically and critically. This is done through small group seminars, lectures and case studies arranged into four main strands:

Strand I - Climate Change Science, Environmental and Health Impacts and Adaptation 

This strand explores the analysis and prediction of change in the earth's physical and chemical systems and their impact based on scientific evidence. Sessions include analysis, prediction and impact of changes such as climate change and acidification in the atmosphere, oceans, the water cycle and global land cover and use. In light of the projections of scientific bodies such as the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), students become acquainted with different global warming scenarios and their likely impact on water management, vegetation, soil, health and other relevant sectors, and the correlated adaptation policies required in different parts of the globe in order to manage environmental change. It also addresses specific adaptation policies necessary in areas that are most likely to be affected by climate change, such as in Africa.

Strand II – Climate Change Mitigation, Business Strategies and Innovation

This strand focuses on climate change mitigation (non-LULUCF) and related business strategies and the development of technologies in the transition towards a low-carbon economy. A number of greenhouse gas mitigation and alternative energy policies – including renewable energy deployment and Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) - are selected for analysis. It examines the social and economic causes of the environmental changes with respect to population, urbanisation, energy policy, and pollution and addresses the policy options to mitigate climate change. It includes a study of international and regional schemes, carbon markets and alternative policies such as carbon or fuel taxes. In addition, this strand assesses the broader question of quantifying the costs and benefits of mitigation and adaptation in light of the developmental priorities of different regions of the globe, as well as possible business solutions towards low carbon economic growth.

Strand III – Biodiversity, Land Use Change and Forestry, and Conservation Strategies

This strand explores biodiversity loss, conservation strategies, the monitoring and prediction of change in the earth's ecosystems and their response to a range of environmental changes including climate change, and the impact of these changes on humans, ecosystems and the management of natural resources. The different mechanisms proposed or already applied to protect biodiversity broadly and in relation to climate change are covered in this part of the course. Among other things, we may critique mitigation policies applicable to the agricultural sector and look at the sustainability of biofuels as cleaner sources of energy.

Strand IV – Law and Governance 

The strand draws together some of the issues outlined above. The role of international law and policy in developing innovative solutions for global environmental problems, such as climate change and biodiversity loss, is emphasised. It addresses the law and politics behind the negotiation of, inter alia, global climate change agreements, the international framework for climate change, environmental governance, examines the role of compliance and monitoring, asks bigger philosophical questions related to rights, equity and justice in an environmental context and looks at the fundamental principles and norms of the international environmental law regime and their utility in going forwards. 

Learning and Teaching

The course structure, individual seminars and activities are designed to enable each student to attain the following:

Understanding of:

  • the current state of knowledge about GEC and the uncertainties surrounding it;
  • the similarities and differences between the problems raised by GEC and other environmental problems;
  • the key processes, drivers and interrelationships involved;
  • the principal impacts of GEC on natural and human systems; and the principal ethical, legal and socio-economic issues raised;
  • particular problems faced by developing countries;
  • interregional and regional institutional mechanisms and scientific organisations;
  • the social, economic and environmental objectives for the global environment.

Skills in:

  • the analysis of the global dimension of environmental problems, and the extent to which GEC raises distinctive challenges;
  • the location, handling, critical evaluation, interpretation and analysis of GECP information;
  • the application and appraisal of selected analytical techniques;
  • the design and execution of a GEC-related project; communicating clear, unambiguous information, evidence or advice.

Capabilities in:

  • applying global perspectives to complex environmental problems; 
  • analysing the key drivers of GEC and their interrelationships;
  • developing independent judgement in relation to GEC-related issues and evidence;
  • participating in the formulation, implementation or evaluation of GEC-related policies;
  • participating effectively in competent consultancy or advisory work.

Coursework

Understanding, skills and capabilities are developed and assessed through active participation in coursework which comprises research and presentation, negotiation and conflict management and a panel group exercise. Panel Meetings run throughout the option term. The aims of these sessions are to establish and coordinate research, discussion, presentation and negotiation in respect of selected global environmental change issues, leading ultimately to the formal conclusion or agreed policy and scientific statement on one or more aspects of GECP.

Examples of GECP Student Destinations

  • UK Department for Business, Energy and Innovation
  • Greenstone
  • Royal Borough of Greenwich
  •  Natural Capital Partners
  • ERM
  • ShareAction
  • Ricardo Energy & Environment
  • UK Department for Transport
  • PwC


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