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This two year part-time master's level programme is known as the Diploma in Bovine Reproduction continuing the tradition started when the programme commenced in the 1980’s and reflects the academic comparability to Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons (RCVS) Diploma qualifications. Read more
This two year part-time master's level programme is known as the Diploma in Bovine Reproduction continuing the tradition started when the programme commenced in the 1980’s and reflects the academic comparability to Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons (RCVS) Diploma qualifications. The qualification is recognised by both the RCVS and European College of Animal Reproduction (ECAR). It provides postgraduate education in an important aspect of the bovine health. The overall aims of the programme are to enable veterinary surgeons in regular contact with cattle to:

achieve a widely-based and deep understanding of bovine reproduction, which will enable them to provide sound scientific advice to the cattle industry;
develop appropriate skills; and
maintain a critical approach to their own work.

The programme is modular in structure, with eight residential weeks spaced over two years. Learning methods include lectures, demonstrations, videos, practical work, discussions, field visits and directed reading. Participants will be expected to satisfy essay and work based continual assessments for each module during the course; to pass written, practical and oral examinations of the final module at the end of the programme; and to present a dissertation, not exceeding 10,000 words, before the award of the Diploma.

Guidance is given by staff of the University of Liverpool and by invited contributors, each a recognised authority in a specialised field. Teaching takes place mainly at Leahurst, the University of Liverpool’s rural campus.

Although mainly restricted to the study of reproduction in cattle, the programme includes reference to other species to establish biological principles or to illustrate concepts for which information is not available in cattle and also covers key areas impinging on fertility such as nutrition and infectious disease.

Module Code Module Title Credits

Module DBRM611 Normal Non-Pregnant Female 15

Module DBRM612 Nutrition and Fertility 15

Module DBRM613 Fertility in Post-Partum Period 15

Module DBRM614 The Male 15

Module DBRM615 Genetics 15

Module DBRM616 Early Pregnancy 15

Module DBRM617 Late Pregnancy and Parturition 5

Module DBRM618 Synopsis and the Future 15

Module DBRM621 Dissertation 60

Key Facts

RAE 2008
In the latest Research Assessment Exercise, 45% of the School’s research activity was deemed world-leading or internationally excellent and a further 45% internationally recognised.

Facilities
The School has two bases: the University’s main campus in Liverpool and the Leahurst campus in Wirral. Leahurst has highly equipped research laboratories, which are shared with the research institutes of the Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, as well as being home to the Philip Leverhulme Equine Hospital, the Farm Animal Practice and the Small Animal Teaching Hospital.

Our clinics provide numerous cases for clinical investigation, as do our co-operating veterinary surgeons in private practice. The School also has excellent relationships with farming enterprises and Chester Zoo.

Individual topics within the DBR are also offered as CPD for those who do not wish to attend the whole programme.
Why School of Veterinary Science?

Excellent reputation

The DBR has been successfully completed by over 100 vets whilst working in full time clinical practice. It has an academic and support structure proven to achieve a high completion rate whilst maintaining academic rigour validated by RCVS and ECAR external observers.

Many leading cattle clinicians have obtained the qualification and feedback from past students is excellent.

Consistently strong League Table and National Student Survey performance

Veterinary Science at Liverpool is consistently highly rated in The Times Good University Guide (rated 2nd in the UK in 2011), the Complete University Guide (rated 1st in the UK 2011), and in the National Student Survey (rated first or second for several years).

Collaboration across academic disciplines

Our staff work closely with colleagues from medicine, life sciences, and the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, not only on animal disease and welfare, but on human health too – taking a ‘one health’ approach from long before the phrase was invented. We also collaborate with colleagues from social sciences to exploit fully the comparative nature of veterinary science. This greatly extends the postgraduate study and research opportunities at Liverpool.

Wide coverage across the postgraduate programmes

The School of Veterinary Science at the University of Liverpool provides excellent postgraduate scientific and clinical training, from population to whole animal studies to the molecular level.

Recognised by the European College of Animal Reproduction

Successful reproduction is the cornerstone of the dairy industry. The DBR has been rin for nearly 30 years and has been completed by some of the leading farm animal vets practicing in the U.K. They have also contributed back into the course to maintain its relevance to modern Cattle Practice.

The DBR is recognised as a Diploma level qualification by RCVS and a recognised training course by the European College of Animal Reproduction.

Career prospects

Course participants are in employment as veterinary surgeons and most become employed in specialist private practice. Some have moved to academia internationally.

Many practices are using the fact they have DBR holders and support such study when advertising for new staff and to gain farmer clients. Candidates use the qualification as a springboard to specialisation.

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The MSc Food Quality Management programme offers an integrated approach to the study and assessment of quality processes in the agrifood chain through an exclusively developed techno-managerial approach. Read more

MSc Food Quality Management

The MSc Food Quality Management programme offers an integrated approach to the study and assessment of quality processes in the agrifood chain through an exclusively developed techno-managerial approach. The whole supply chain is studied from the primary sector to the final consumer. Food, flowers and cattle are also discussed.

Programme summary

Food quality management assures the health and safety of food and other perishable products (e.g. flowers) and has become increasingly important in today’s society, this is due to changing consumer requirements, increasing competition, environmental issues and governmental interests. This has resulted in a turbulent situation on the food market and in the agro-food production chain. The situation is further complicated by the complex characteristics of food and food ingredients, which include aspects such as variability, restricted shelf life and potential safety hazards; as well as many chemical, biochemical, physical and microbiological processes. To face this challenge, continuous improvement in food quality management methods is required wherever knowledge of modern technologies and management methods plays a crucial role.

Quality issues in food and other perishable products are generally tackled using either a technological or a managerial approach. At Wageningen, a concept has been developed that combines both aspects. This ‘technomanagerial’ approach forms the basis of the Food Quality Management programme. It provides a comprehensive and structured overview of quality management for predicting food systems’ behaviour and generating adequate improvements in these systems from a food chain perspective.

The programme prepares graduates to understand and work together with the different players in the food industry (management, Research & Development) in order to ensure high quality products.

Specialisations

You will combine Food Quality Management courses with several courses based on your educational background and interest. These courses can be in fields of food technology (e.g. product design, process design), food safety (e.g. food safety management, microbiology), management (e.g. case studies management, entrepreneurship) or logistics (e.g. food logistics management, supply chain management). The programme is thesis oriented and tailor-made to your specific interests. The thesis and internship in the second year of the programme are carried out in cooperation with the food industry.

Your future career

Graduates from this programme will be experts in the field of food quality management and can enter careers in agribusiness, research and public administration:
• Typical positions include quality assurance manager (responsible for the quality of the ingredients for a specific product).
• Designer/specialist (working on the quality aspects of fresh products in the development process), advisor/consultant (advising companies on certification).
• Researcher (studying the improvement of existing quality assurance systems in the food industry).

Student Tasioudis Dimitrios.
"It was my desire to combine my scientific background with management studies that resulted in my decision to do the Master Food Quality Management. The master gives you a useful tool in understanding the meaning of every result in a real life situation and enables you to select the best solutions to tackle specific problems. Wageningen University is a great university where science flourishes and research is of utmost importance. It is the ideal environment to gain knowledge and to accomplish your goals."

Related programmes:
MSc Management, Economics and Consumer Studies
MSc Food Technology
MSc Food Safety

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Research in the Division of Genetics and Genomics aims to advance understanding of complex animal systems and the development of improved predictive models… Read more

Research profile

Research in the Division of Genetics and Genomics aims to advance understanding of complex animal systems and the development of improved predictive models through the application of numerical and computational approaches in the analysis, interpretation, modelling and prediction of complex animal systems from the level of the DNA and other molecules, through cellular and gene networks, tissues and organs to whole organisms and interacting populations of organisms.

The biology and traits of interest include: growth and development, body composition, feed efficiency, reproductive performance, responses to infectious disease and inherited diseases.

Research encompasses basic research in bioscience and mathematical biology and strategic research to address grand challenges, e.g. food security.

Research is focussed on, but not restricted to, target species of agricultural importance including cattle, pigs, poultry, sheep; farmed fish such as salmon; and companion animals. The availability of genome sequences and the associated genomics toolkits enable genetics research in these species.

Expertise includes genetics (molecular, quantitative), physiology (neuroendocrinology, immunology), ‘omics (genomics, functional genomics) with particular strengths in mathematical biology (quantitative genetics, epidemiology, bioinformatics, modelling).

The Division has 18 Group Leaders and 4 career track fellows who supervise over 30 postgraduate students.

Training and support

Studentships are of 3 or 4 years duration and students will be expected to complete a novel piece of research which will advance our understanding of the field. To help them in this goal, students will be assigned a principal and assistant supervisor, both of whom will be active scientists at the Institute. Student progress is monitored in accordance with School Postgraduate (PG) regulations by a PhD thesis committee (which includes an independent external assessor and chair). There is also dedicated secretarial support to assist these committees and the students with regard to University and Institute matters.

All student matters are overseen by the Schools PG studies committee. The Roslin Institute also has a local PG committee and will provide advice and support to students when requested. An active staff:student liaison committee and a social committee, which is headed by our postgraduate liaison officer, provide additional support.

Students are expected to attend a number of generic training courses offered by the Transkills Programme of the University and to participate in regular seminars and laboratory progress meetings. All students will also be expected to present their data at national and international meetings throughout their period of study.

Facilities

In 2011 The Roslin Institute moved to a new state-of-the-art building on the University of Edinburgh's veterinary campus at Easter Bush. Our facilities include: rodent, bird and livestock animal units and associated lab areas; comprehensive bioinformatic and genomic capability; a range of bioimaging facilities; extensive molecular biology and cell biology labs; café and auditorium where we regularly host workshops and invited speakers.

The University's genomics facility Edinburgh Genomics is closely associated with the Division of Genetics and Genomics and provides access to the latest genomics technologies, including next-generation sequencing, SNP genotyping and microarray platforms (genomics.ed.ac.uk).

In addition to the Edinburgh Compute and Data Facility’s high performance computing resources, The Roslin Institute has two compute farms, including one with 256 GB of RAM, which enable the analysis of complex ‘omics data sets.

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MPhil - full time. minimum 12 months, part time. minimum 24 months. PhD - full time. minimum 36 months, part time. minimum 72 months. Read more

Course Description

MPhil - full time: minimum 12 months, part time: minimum 24 months
PhD - full time: minimum 36 months, part time: minimum 72 months

MPhil and PhD supervision covers a number of research topics supported by research active academic staff. Our range of research areas relate to animal health and welfare, environmental impact of livestock systems, and safety and quality of livestock products.

The school of Agriculture, Food and Rural Development has an internationally recognised centre of excellence in Animal Sciences, drawing on fundamental research and applying it to areas of societal, industrial and policy importance.

Our research primarily involves:
•farm livestock, domesticated animal and wildlife applied research
•integrated livestock system development and evaluation
•animal behaviour, health and welfare
•survival, health and efficiency of nutrient utilisation

Opportunities are available for postgraduate research in the following areas:

Animal health and welfare:
Work ranges from understanding animal behaviour and behavioural problems, through development of practical on-farm monitoring and assessment methods to mechanistic studies of health and disease at the molecular level.

Environmental impact of livestock systems:
Our work examines the consequences of modifications in nutrition and husbandry and alterations in breeding strategies to improve the efficiency of resource use.

Safety and quality of livestock products, including milk, meat and eggs:
Our 'field to fork' expertise allows us to study the relationships between husbandry systems and nutritional inputs of animals and the composition of their products, with further implications for human diet and health.


Delivery

We offer a number of different routes to a research degree qualification, including full-time and part-time supervised research projects. We attract postgraduates via non-traditional routes, including mature students and part-time postgraduates undertaking study as part of their continuing professional development. Off-campus (split) research is also offered, which enables you to conduct trials in conditions appropriate to your research programme.

Facilities:

Farms:
Our multi-purpose farms provide demonstration facilities for teaching purposes, land-based research facilities (especially in the area of organic production) and they are viable farming businesses.

Cockle Park Farm is a 262ha mixed farm facility that includes the Palace Leas Plots hay meadow experiment and an anaerobic digestion plant that will generate heat, electricity and digestate - an organic fertiliser - from pig and cattle manure.

Nafferton Farm is a 300ha farm with two main farm units covering conventional and organic farming systems. The two systems are primarily focussed upon dairying and arable cropping. Both also operate beef production enterprises as a by-product of their dairy enterprises, although the organic system is unique in maintaining a small-scale potato and vegetable production enterprise.

Laboratories:
Our modern laboratories provide important teaching and research environments and are equipped with analytical equipment such as HPLCs, GCs, CNS analyser, centrifuges, spectrophotometers and molecular biology equipment. Our specialist research facilities include:
•tissue culture laboratory
•plant growth rooms
•class II laboratory for safe handling of human biological samples
•taste panel facilities and test kitchen
•thin section facility for soils analysis

We operate closely with other schools, institutes and the University's Central Scientific Facilities for access to more specialist analytical services. For work with human subjects we use a purpose built Clinical Research Facility which is situated in the Royal Victoria Infirmary teaching hospital and is managed jointly by us and the Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust.

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at the Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies. A fully funded studentship is available for 1-year research training in Veterinary Genetics and Disease Control aimed at studying the susceptibility of British deer to chronic wasting disease, a member of the prion disease family. Read more

Masters by Research in Veterinary Genetics and Disease Control

at the Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies

A fully funded studentship is available for 1-year research training in Veterinary Genetics and Disease Control aimed at studying the susceptibility of British deer to chronic wasting disease, a member of the prion disease family. The successful candidate will register for a masters by research degree. This research training position is funded by The British Deer Society.

The Roslin Institute at the Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies, is a centre of expertise for prion diseases creating an ideal environment for postgraduate training.

Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a prion disease of cervid species, similar to bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE, or "mad cow disease") in cattle. Until recently, CWD was found only in captive and free-ranging cervids in North America, but since the beginning of 2016, cases of CWD have been identified in reindeer and moose in Norway. This raises concerns that the disease has established in Europe and may become widespread, as it has in the US and Canada, with serious implications for wildlife and the environment, agriculture/trade and public health. The main purpose of the proposed project is to estimate the susceptibility of the British deer population to CWD, which will inform mathematical modelling approaches aiming to predict the spread of disease in the UK (collaboration with Professor Rowland Kao, University of Glasgow). The methodologies will include genetic analysis by DNA sequencing, protein biochemistry, tissue culture and the candidate is encouraged to participate in the modelling. The expected outputs will be a survey of PRNP gene (the gene which predominantly influences genetic susceptibility to prion diseases) variants in some of the major UK deer species, and a prediction of the association of the most frequent variants with susceptibility to CWD. Results will be analysed in the context of deer population size / density, distribution, movements and behaviour to model the spread and potential impact of CWD in the British deer population.

The ideal candidate will have an enthusiasm for genetics and animal health, strong work ethic, and the ability to work as part of a team. Funding is for UK and EU applicants only.

Enquiries

Informal enquiries are encouraged and should be directed to Fiona Houston () or Wilfred Goldmann ().

How to apply

Applications including a full CV with names and addresses (including email addresses) of two academic referees, should be emailed to Postgraduate Research Student Administration at . When applying for the studentship please state that your application is for the 1 year MScR in Deer CWD Genetics with Dr Houston.

The scholarship is available from May 2017. Closing date for applications: 25th April 2017.

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