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Applications for PGDE Primary Teaching in English have re-opened for Argyll College UHI, Lews Castle College UHI, Moray College UHI, and North Highland College UHI. Read more
Applications for PGDE Primary Teaching in English have re-opened for Argyll College UHI, Lews Castle College UHI, Moray College UHI, and North Highland College UHI

THE DEADLINE FOR APPLICATIONS IS 5PM, MONDAY 29 MAY AND INTERVIEWS WILL BE HELD AT THE END OF JUNE 2017

This course will prepare you for life as a primary teacher, with the skills and knowledge, to influence the lives of children you teach.

The PGDE consists of 18 weeks study at the university, plus 19 weeks in professional practice in schools. The placements in schools are arranged nationally and you will be placed in schools within travelling distance of your home or term-time address. You will be able to choose from two pathways, English and Gaelic.

If you wish to apply for the Gaelic pathway you must be a fluent Gaelic speaker, your language proficiency will be assessed at interview. On this pathway, parts of the course are delivered through the medium of Gaelic and you will complete the majority of your school practice in a Gaelic setting.

Graduates of the course will hold provisional registration as a primary teacher with the General Teaching Council for Scotland.

You will benefit from studying in small, locally-based groups while collaborating remotely with other student teachers and tutors across the university’s network of colleges. The programme overlaps significantly with the PGDE Secondary to offer a cross-sector
perspective.

A three-day residential induction is held at the start of the course with a further one in March which focuses on outdoor learning. Each local cohort will also organise a showcase event at the end of the course, as part of developing leadership.

Further information about studying on our PGDE programmes at https://www.uhi.ac.uk/en/t4-media/one-web/university/study-at-uhi/uhi-pgde-faqs.pdf

Special features

• Loans for tuition fees are available from the Students Award Agency for Scotland (SAAS) for eligible Scotland domiciled and EU students, and loans for living costs for eligible Scottish students.
• Opportunity to follow a teacher education programme across the Highlands and Islands
• Gaelic pathway available at Inverness College UHI; Lews Castle College UHI, Stornoway;and Argyll College UHI, Oban for fluent Gaelic speakers
• The course will prepare you for life as a reflective professional, supporting high quality learning for the children you teach
• The course also offers the option of gaining 40 masters level credits by submission of three assignments at level 11.

Where can I study my course?

Start Date is in August

Argyll College UHI - Oban (English and Gaelic pathway available)
Inverness College UHI - (English and Gaelic pathway available)
Lews Castle College UHI - (English and Gaelic pathway available)
Moray College UHI
North Highland College UHI - Thurso
Orkney College UHI
Perth College UHI - Subject to approval
Shetland College UHI

Taught modules:

• The critical and enquiring professional
• Children, Young people and their curriculum
• Children, Young people and their learning
Plus professional practice (60 credits, four placements) in schools in Argyll and Bute, Comhairle nan Eilean Siar, Highland, Moray, Orkney, Perth and Kinross and Shetland.
All modules are compulsory, There is the option to submit three assignments at level 11 to gain 40 Masters level credits.

Funding

From 2017, eligible Scotland domiciled students studying full time can access loans up to 10,000 from the Student Awards Agency for Scotland (SAAS).This comprises a tuition fee loan up to £5,500 and a non-income assessed living cost loan of £4,500. EU students studying full time can apply for a tuition fee loan up to £5500.

Part-time students undertaking any taught postgraduate course over two years up to Masters level who meet the residency eligibility can apply for a for a tuition fee loan up to £2,750 per year.

See Scholarships tab below for full details

Top five reasons to study at UHI

1. Do something different: our reputation is built on our innovative approach to learning and our distinctive research and curriculum which often reflects the unique environment and culture of our region and closely links to vocational skills required by a range of sectors.
2. Flexible learning options mean that you can usually study part time or full time. Some courses can be studied fully online from home or work, others are campus-based.
3. Choice of campuses – we have campuses across the Highlands and Islands of Scotland. Each campus is different from rich cultural life of the islands; the spectacular coasts and mountains; to the bright lights of our city locations.
4. Small class sizes mean that you have a more personal experience of university and receive all the support you need from our expert staff
5. The affordable option - if you already live in the Highlands and Islands of Scotland you don't have to leave home and incur huge debts to go to university; we're right here on your doorstep

How to apply

If you want to apply for this postgraduate programme click on the ‘visit website’ button below which will take you to the relevant course page on our website, from there select the Apply tab to complete our online application.
If you still have any questions please get in touch with our information line by email using the links beow or call on 0845 272 3600.

English Language Requirements

Our programmes are taught and examined in English. To make the most of your studies, you must be able to communicate fluently and accurately in spoken and written English and provide certified proof of your competence before starting your course. Please note that English language tests need to have been taken no more than two years prior to the start date of the course. The standard English Language criteria to study at the University of the Highlands and Islands are detailed on our English language requirements page http://www.uhi.ac.uk/en/studying-at-uhi/international/how-to-apply-to-uhi/english-language-requirements

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The course is geared towards developing the social, organisational and technical competencies of existing and potential business leaders, thereby enabling them to be effective change agents in the transition towards a low-carbon economy and to manage corporate sustainability. Read more

Reasons to study MBA Sustainable Business at De Montfort University:

The course is geared towards developing the social, organisational and technical competencies of existing and potential business leaders, thereby enabling them to be effective change agents in the transition towards a low-carbon economy and to manage corporate sustainability.
•Excellent Teaching Staff
Modules are taught by academics involved in world-leading research from the Institute of Energy and Sustainable Development and the Leicester Castle Business School.
•Accentuate your knowledge
You will have the opportunity to develop your existing knowledge by challenging normal conventions and developing innovative solutions to contemporary challenges.
•State-of-the-art learning environment
You will have access to dedicated quiet study spaces and facilities such as the exclusive Postgraduate Pod open to Leicester Castle Business School postgraduate students.

Course Modules:

Business Creation and Innovation
Leadership and Culture in Organisational Contexts
Sustainable Development
Resource Efficient Design
Entrepreneurial Finance and Financial Management
Strategic Management
Green Business
Choice of: Entrepreneurship Project or Executive Company Project

Graduate careers:

Enhance your existing qualifications and global career prospects with a specialist master’s in business economics and business finance. This course will provide advanced preparation for careers in the policy making, organisational decision making and the financial world.

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Intensive critical and creative study in poetry or in a variety of prose forms, including fiction, life writing and playwriting. An emphasis on best practice in recent and contemporary writing. Read more

MLitt in Creative Writing

• Intensive critical and creative study in poetry or in a variety of prose forms, including fiction, life writing and playwriting.
• An emphasis on best practice in recent and contemporary writing.
• Encourages the development of your work, in either prose, poetry or writing for performance.
• You should be adept at academic study as well as your own writing, and will be taught by published writers who are familiar with the problems, pressures and pleasures of writing.
• Writing for Performance students will require to participate in a number of theatre visits and will be required to meet costs of approximately £200.

Features

* The School admits around 30 new taught postgraduate students each year.

* Research excellence in all periods of English literature from Old English to the present day.

* Members of the School include winners of the Queen’s Gold Medal for Poetry, Whitbread Prize, T S Eliot Prize for Poetry, the Forward Poetry Prize, the Geoffrey Faber Prize, the Somerset Maugham Award, the Canongate Prize, the Petrarca Preis, the Prix Zepter Prize and a Commonwealth Writers Prize for fiction.

* The University has one of the highest concentrations of mediaevalists in the UK, united by the St Andrews Institute of Mediaeval Studies (SAIMS).

* The School is home to the Cambridge University Press edition of Virginia Woolf edited by Susan Sellers and Jane Goldman (University of Glasgow), making St Andrews a prestigious international centre for Woolf studies.

* Members of the School sit on the editorial board of Forum for Modern Language Studies, a humanities journal published by Oxford University Press.

* The School offers Creative Writing classes taught by some of the most highly regarded novelists, poets and playwrights in the UK – John Burnside, Robert Crawford, Oliver Emanuel, Lesley Glaister, Zinnie Harris, Don Paterson, Susan Sellers and Ruth Thomas.

Postgraduate community

The School has a vibrant postgraduate community of around 80 students (full and part time) with a dedicated administrator who manages and advises on all postgraduate matters from admissions queries to PhD vivas, ensuring continuity for both postgraduates and staff.

Postgraduates meet regularly at the School’s Postgraduate Forum and at various voluntary seminar series organised by English or other Schools within the Faculty of Arts. The crossfertilisation of ideas between traditional literary / theoretical research and creative writing provides a uniquely stimulating environment supporting the usual individual meetings between postgraduate students and their supervisors. All taught postgraduates have access to research funds to help offset the costs of attending conferences or other research libraries.

Students are part of a welcoming and lively academic community. There is an active student-run Literary Society and the Postgraduate Forum, where postgraduates meet to present and discuss their ongoing work. Each semester, the School invites distinguished visiting academics and creative writers to lead seminars, lectures and workshops as part of our regular research events.

Facilities

The teaching rooms and staff offices of the School of English are housed in two nineteenth-century stone buildings, Castle House
and Kennedy Hall, opposite St Andrews Castle and overlooking the sea. 66 North Street, the School’s dedicated Centre for research students, is only a few minutes’ walk away. It offers bench rooms with PC workstations for all postgraduates, both taught and research. This lovely nineteenth-century building also has a well-used kitchen, common room and sunny garden. The encouragement of postgraduate study is a special concern of ours, and the number of postgraduate students has grown markedly in recent years.

The University Library has outstanding resources for research in English. The Copyright Deposit Collection contains approximately 40,000 volumes, covering the whole subject area from 1709 to 1837, and approximately 5,000 volumes of periodicals which ceased publication before 1841. Some of this material is not held in the National Library of Scotland. The print collection therefore offers an impressive range of opportunities for research in eighteenth-century literature, the Scottish Enlightenment and Romanticism.

The University Library also subscribes to a wide variety of online databases, including JISC Historic Books for access to almost all printed books to 1800, and Defining Gender 1450- 1910 for material supporting the School’s work in gender and sexuality studies. Manuscript collections extend from mediaeval archives through some of the world’s most detailed records of eighteenth and nineteenth-century reading to the papers of the contemporary poet Douglas Dunn. Postgraduates have the opportunity to work with expert Library staff in areas ranging from palaeography to digital humanities.

Additional application information

All MLitt applicants should submit a sample of written work of around 2,000 words. This must be a critical academic essay (or extract) related to the proposed field of study. Applicants for the MLitt programme in Creative Writing should also include a typed portfolio of original verse, prose or play/ screenwriting (around 10 poems or 10-15 pages of prose or play/screenwriting). In addition, all applicants should submit a Supplementary Application Form in place of a personal statement. The form may be downloaded from the website at: http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/english/postgraduate/applying/documents/

Funding: investing in your future

The School of English normally offers a small number of its own awards for suitably qualified applicants who have been accepted for an MLitt. These are open to both home/EU and overseas students. Up-to-date information can be found at: http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/english/postgraduate/funding/

Recent School of English taught postgraduate students have also succeeded in obtaining funding from a variety of external sources in order to study here, including the Marshall Scholarship, the Ransome Trust and Scotland’s Saltire Scholarship fund.

Details of these and other scholarship opportunities and initiatives can be found on the University’s scholarships webpages: http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/study/pg/fees-and-funding/scholarships/taught/

Careers

Following a taught postgraduate course in English at the University, students go on to pursue careers in a range of sectors including journalism, marketing, publishing and teaching. Others continue in academia, moving on to a PhD. The Careers Centre offers one-to-one advice to all students on a taught postgraduate course and offers a programme of events to assist students to build their employability skills.

Read less
Develop the various intellectual and practical skills necessary for research in the field of mediaeval literature. The opportunity to extend and deepen knowledge of English and Scottish literature from the earliest Old English writings through to the close of the Middle Ages. Read more

MLitt in Mediaeval English

• Develop the various intellectual and practical skills necessary for research in the field of mediaeval literature.
• The opportunity to extend and deepen knowledge of English and Scottish literature from the earliest Old English writings through to the close of the Middle Ages.

Teaching methods: Seminar (and some didactic classes and hands-on practical sessions).
Assessment: Coursework essays, assessed exercises, Dissertation.
Contact hours: Variable from module to module: see individual module descriptions for details.

See the website http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/english/postgraduate/

Features

* The School of English currently has 32 permanent members of staff, as well as several Teaching Fellows, Honorary Lecturers/Senior Lecturers, and Honorary Professors.

* The School admits around 30 new taught postgraduate students each year.

* Research excellence in all periods of English literature from Old English to the present day.

* Members of the School include winners of the Queen’s Gold Medal for Poetry, Whitbread Prize, T S Eliot Prize for Poetry, the Forward Poetry Prize, the Geoffrey Faber Prize, the Somerset Maugham Award, the Canongate Prize, the Petrarca Preis, the Prix Zepter Prize and a Commonwealth Writers Prize for fiction.

* The University has one of the highest concentrations of mediaevalists in the UK, united by the St Andrews Institute of Mediaeval Studies (SAIMS).

* The School is home to the Cambridge University Press edition of Virginia Woolf edited by Susan Sellers and Jane Goldman (University of Glasgow), making St Andrews a prestigious international centre for Woolf studies.

* Members of the School sit on the editorial board of Forum for Modern Language Studies, a humanities journal published by Oxford University Press.

Postgraduate community

The School has a vibrant postgraduate community of around 80 students (full and part time) with a dedicated administrator who manages and advises on all postgraduate matters from admissions queries to PhD vivas, ensuring continuity for both postgraduates and staff.

Postgraduates meet regularly at the School’s Postgraduate Forum and at various voluntary seminar series organised by English or other Schools within the Faculty of Arts. The crossfertilisation of ideas between traditional literary / theoretical research and creative writing provides a uniquely stimulating environment supporting the usual individual meetings between postgraduate students and their supervisors. All taught postgraduates have access to research funds to help offset the costs of attending conferences or other research libraries.

Students are part of a welcoming and lively academic community. There is an active student-run Literary Society and the Postgraduate Forum, where postgraduates meet to present and discuss their ongoing work. Each semester, the School invites distinguished visiting academics and creative writers to lead seminars, lectures and workshops as part of our regular research events.

Facilities

The teaching rooms and staff offices of the School of English are housed in two nineteenth-century stone buildings, Castle House
and Kennedy Hall, opposite St Andrews Castle and overlooking the sea. 66 North Street, the School’s dedicated Centre for research students, is only a few minutes’ walk away. It offers bench rooms with PC workstations for all postgraduates, both taught and research. This lovely nineteenth-century building also has a well-used kitchen, common room and sunny garden. The encouragement of postgraduate study is a special concern of ours, and the number of postgraduate students has grown markedly in recent years.

The University Library has outstanding resources for research in English. The Copyright Deposit Collection contains approximately 40,000 volumes, covering the whole subject area from 1709 to 1837, and approximately 5,000 volumes of periodicals which ceased publication before 1841. Some of this material is not held in the National Library of Scotland. The print collection therefore offers an impressive range of opportunities for research in eighteenth-century literature, the Scottish Enlightenment and Romanticism.

The University Library also subscribes to a wide variety of online databases, including JISC Historic Books for access to almost all printed books to 1800, and Defining Gender 1450- 1910 for material supporting the School’s work in gender and sexuality studies. Manuscript collections extend from mediaeval archives through some of the world’s most detailed records of eighteenth and nineteenth-century reading to the papers of the contemporary poet Douglas Dunn. Postgraduates have the opportunity to work with expert Library staff in areas ranging from palaeography to digital humanities.

Additional application information

All MLitt applicants should submit a sample of written work of around 2,000 words. This must be a critical academic essay (or extract) related to the proposed field of study. Applicants for the MLitt programme in Creative Writing should also include a typed portfolio of original verse, prose or play/ screenwriting (around 10 poems or 10-15 pages of prose or play/screenwriting). In addition, all applicants should submit a Supplementary Application Form in place of a personal statement. The form may be downloaded from the website at: http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/english/postgraduate/applying/documents/

Funding: investing in your future

The School of English normally offers a small number of its own awards for suitably qualified applicants who have been accepted for an MLitt. These are open to both home/EU and overseas students. Up-to-date information can be found at: http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/english/postgraduate/funding/

Recent School of English taught postgraduate students have also succeeded in obtaining funding from a variety of external sources in order to study here, including the Marshall Scholarship, the Ransome Trust and Scotland’s Saltire Scholarship fund.

Details of these and other scholarship opportunities and initiatives can be found on the University’s scholarships webpages: http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/study/pg/fees-and-funding/scholarships/taught/

Careers

Following a taught postgraduate course in English at the University, students go on to pursue careers in a range of sectors including journalism, marketing, publishing and teaching. Others continue in academia, moving on to a PhD. The Careers Centre offers one-to-one advice to all students on a taught postgraduate course and offers a programme of events to assist students to build their employability skills.

Read less
Students have the opportunity to explore the key developments in modern and contemporary literary studies in dialogue with leading scholars in the fields… Read more

MLitt in Modern and Contemporary Literature and Culture

Students have the opportunity to explore the key developments in modern and contemporary literary studies in dialogue with leading scholars in the fields of Modernism, including T S Eliot and Virginia Woolf; women’s writing and gender studies; crime fiction; contemporary critical theory; modern and contemporary poetry; postcolonialism; Scottish literature; war writing; literature of the 1940s; British cinema and music.
• Detailed exploration of a range of topics and texts from the period.
• Enhance textual knowledge.
• Promote thinking about the interconnections between modern and contemporary literature and its historical, cultural and theoretical context.

Teaching methods: Seminar (and some didactic classes and hands-on practical sessions).
Assessment: Coursework essays, assessed exercises, Dissertation.
Contact hours: Variable from module to module: see individual module descriptions for details.

See the website http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/english/postgraduate/

Features

* The School admits around 30 new taught postgraduate students each year.

* Research excellence in all periods of English literature from Old English to the present day.

* Members of the School include winners of the Queen’s Gold Medal for Poetry, Whitbread Prize, T S Eliot Prize for Poetry, the Forward Poetry Prize, the Geoffrey Faber Prize, the Somerset Maugham Award, the Canongate Prize, the Petrarca Preis, the Prix Zepter Prize and a Commonwealth Writers Prize for fiction.

* The University has one of the highest concentrations of mediaevalists in the UK, united by the St Andrews Institute of Mediaeval Studies (SAIMS).

* The School is home to the Cambridge University Press edition of Virginia Woolf edited by Susan Sellers and Jane Goldman (University of Glasgow), making St Andrews a prestigious international centre for Woolf studies.

* Members of the School sit on the editorial board of Forum for Modern Language Studies, a humanities journal published by Oxford University Press.

Postgraduate community

The School has a vibrant postgraduate community of around 80 students (full and part time) with a dedicated administrator who manages and advises on all postgraduate matters from admissions queries to PhD vivas, ensuring continuity for both postgraduates and staff.

Postgraduates meet regularly at the School’s Postgraduate Forum and at various voluntary seminar series organised by English or other Schools within the Faculty of Arts. The crossfertilisation of ideas between traditional literary / theoretical research and creative writing provides a uniquely stimulating environment supporting the usual individual meetings between postgraduate students and their supervisors. All taught postgraduates have access to research funds to help offset the costs of attending conferences or other research libraries.

Students are part of a welcoming and lively academic community. There is an active student-run Literary Society and the Postgraduate Forum, where postgraduates meet to present and discuss their ongoing work. Each semester, the School invites distinguished visiting academics and creative writers to lead seminars, lectures and workshops as part of our regular research events.

Facilities

The teaching rooms and staff offices of the School of English are housed in two nineteenth-century stone buildings, Castle House
and Kennedy Hall, opposite St Andrews Castle and overlooking the sea. 66 North Street, the School’s dedicated Centre for research students, is only a few minutes’ walk away. It offers bench rooms with PC workstations for all postgraduates, both taught and research. This lovely nineteenth-century building also has a well-used kitchen, common room and sunny garden. The encouragement of postgraduate study is a special concern of ours, and the number of postgraduate students has grown markedly in recent years.

The University Library has outstanding resources for research in English. The Copyright Deposit Collection contains approximately 40,000 volumes, covering the whole subject area from 1709 to 1837, and approximately 5,000 volumes of periodicals which ceased publication before 1841. Some of this material is not held in the National Library of Scotland. The print collection therefore offers an impressive range of opportunities for research in eighteenth-century literature, the Scottish Enlightenment and Romanticism.

The University Library also subscribes to a wide variety of online databases, including JISC Historic Books for access to almost all printed books to 1800, and Defining Gender 1450- 1910 for material supporting the School’s work in gender and sexuality studies. Manuscript collections extend from mediaeval archives through some of the world’s most detailed records of eighteenth and nineteenth-century reading to the papers of the contemporary poet Douglas Dunn. Postgraduates have the opportunity to work with expert Library staff in areas ranging from palaeography to digital humanities.

Additional application information

All MLitt applicants should submit a sample of written work of around 2,000 words. This must be a critical academic essay (or extract) related to the proposed field of study. Applicants for the MLitt programme in Creative Writing should also include a typed portfolio of original verse, prose or play/ screenwriting (around 10 poems or 10-15 pages of prose or play/screenwriting). In addition, all applicants should submit a Supplementary Application Form in place of a personal statement. The form may be downloaded from the website at: http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/english/postgraduate/applying/documents/

Funding: investing in your future

The School of English normally offers a small number of its own awards for suitably qualified applicants who have been accepted for an MLitt. These are open to both home/EU and overseas students. Up-to-date information can be found at: http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/english/postgraduate/funding/

Recent School of English taught postgraduate students have also succeeded in obtaining funding from a variety of external sources in order to study here, including the Marshall Scholarship, the Ransome Trust and Scotland’s Saltire Scholarship fund.

Details of these and other scholarship opportunities and initiatives can be found on the University’s scholarships webpages: http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/study/pg/fees-and-funding/scholarships/taught/

Careers

Following a taught postgraduate course in English at the University, students go on to pursue careers in a range of sectors including journalism, marketing, publishing and teaching. Others continue in academia, moving on to a PhD. The Careers Centre offers one-to-one advice to all students on a taught postgraduate course and offers a programme of events to assist students to build their employability skills.

Read less
The Shakespeare and Renaissance Literary Culture MLitt offers an all-round introduction to the literature of the sixteenth and seventeenth-centuries. Read more

MLitt in Shakespeare and Renaissance Literary Culture

The Shakespeare and Renaissance Literary Culture MLitt offers an all-round introduction to the literature of the sixteenth and seventeenth-centuries. It covers both elite and popular writing, the influence of other continental vernaculars, and the importance of print and manuscript media. Students who choose to study at St Andrews will be taught by expert scholars in small groups. The School of English prides itself on its support of student work through detailed feedback and commentary.
Our aim is that students should leave the programme more fluent and accomplished writers than they entered it, better informed about the literature of the English Renaissance, and capable of producing interpretative prose of the highest quality.

• Fully explore the literature and culture of the English Renaissance (c. 1500-1700).
• A particular focus on the work of William Shakespeare.
• A range of critical and interpretative perspectives, selecting from a range of available module options.
• Manuscript, print, speech, and the editing of Renaissance texts.
• All foreign language texts will be taught in translation.

Teaching methods: Seminar.
Assessment: Coursework essays, Dissertation.
Contact hours: Weekly seminars for core modules, each lasting 90 minutes; for Special Topics, six hour-long meetings over the course of one semester.

Features

* Research excellence in all periods of English literature from Old English to the present day.

* Members of the School include winners of the Queen’s Gold Medal for Poetry, Whitbread Prize, T S Eliot Prize for Poetry, the Forward Poetry Prize, the Geoffrey Faber Prize, the Somerset Maugham Award, the Canongate Prize, the Petrarca Preis, the Prix Zepter Prize and a Commonwealth Writers Prize for fiction.

* St Andrews is one of only three universities outside the USA in the Folger Institute consortium.

Postgraduate community

The School has a vibrant postgraduate community of around 80 students (full and part time) with a dedicated administrator who manages and advises on all postgraduate matters from admissions queries to PhD vivas, ensuring continuity for both postgraduates and staff.

Postgraduates meet regularly at the School’s Postgraduate Forum and at various voluntary seminar series organised by English or other Schools within the Faculty of Arts. The crossfertilisation of ideas between traditional literary / theoretical research and creative writing provides a uniquely stimulating environment supporting the usual individual meetings between postgraduate students and their supervisors. All taught postgraduates have access to research funds to help offset the costs of attending conferences or other research libraries.

Students are part of a welcoming and lively academic community. There is an active student-run Literary Society and the Postgraduate Forum, where postgraduates meet to present and discuss their ongoing work. Each semester, the School invites distinguished visiting academics and creative writers to lead seminars, lectures and workshops as part of our regular research events.

Facilities

The teaching rooms and staff offices of the School of English are housed in two nineteenth-century stone buildings, Castle House
and Kennedy Hall, opposite St Andrews Castle and overlooking the sea. 66 North Street, the School’s dedicated Centre for research students, is only a few minutes’ walk away. It offers bench rooms with PC workstations for all postgraduates, both taught and research. This lovely nineteenth-century building also has a well-used kitchen, common room and sunny garden. The encouragement of postgraduate study is a special concern of ours, and the number of postgraduate students has grown markedly in recent years.

The University Library has outstanding resources for research in English. The Copyright Deposit Collection contains approximately 40,000 volumes, covering the whole subject area from 1709 to 1837, and approximately 5,000 volumes of periodicals which ceased publication before 1841. Some of this material is not held in the National Library of Scotland. The print collection therefore offers an impressive range of opportunities for research in eighteenth-century literature, the Scottish Enlightenment and Romanticism.

The University Library also subscribes to a wide variety of online databases, including JISC Historic Books for access to almost all printed books to 1800, and Defining Gender 1450- 1910 for material supporting the School’s work in gender and sexuality studies. Manuscript collections extend from mediaeval archives through some of the world’s most detailed records of eighteenth and nineteenth-century reading to the papers of the contemporary poet Douglas Dunn. Postgraduates have the opportunity to work with expert Library staff in areas ranging from palaeography to digital humanities.

Additional application information

All MLitt applicants should submit a sample of written work of around 2,000 words. This must be a critical academic essay (or extract) related to the proposed field of study. Applicants for the MLitt programme in Creative Writing should also include a typed portfolio of original verse, prose or play/ screenwriting (around 10 poems or 10-15 pages of prose or play/screenwriting). In addition, all applicants should submit a Supplementary Application Form in place of a personal statement. The form may be downloaded from the website at: http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/english/postgraduate/applying/documents/

Funding: investing in your future

The School of English normally offers a small number of its own awards for suitably qualified applicants who have been accepted for an MLitt. These are open to both home/EU and overseas students. Up-to-date information can be found at: http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/english/postgraduate/funding/

Recent School of English taught postgraduate students have also succeeded in obtaining funding from a variety of external sources in order to study here, including the Marshall Scholarship, the Ransome Trust and Scotland’s Saltire Scholarship fund.

Details of these and other scholarship opportunities and initiatives can be found on the University’s scholarships webpages: http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/study/pg/fees-and-funding/scholarships/taught/

Careers

Following a taught postgraduate course in English at the University, students go on to pursue careers in a range of sectors including journalism, marketing, publishing and teaching. Others continue in academia, moving on to a PhD. The Careers Centre offers one-to-one advice to all students on a taught postgraduate course and offers a programme of events to assist students to build their employability skills.

Read less
Introduction to key issues in the contemporary discussion of gender. Detailed exploration of theoretical, critical and creative writing through a range of historical periods. Read more

MLitt in Women, Writing and Gender

• Introduction to key issues in the contemporary discussion of gender.
• Detailed exploration of theoretical, critical and creative writing through a range of historical periods.
• Examine the diversity of women’s literary practices across a range of centuries and genres.
• Consider broader historical and contemporary debates in feminism and gender studies.

Teaching methods: Seminar.
Assessment: Coursework essays, oral presentation, Dissertation.
Contact hours: Fortnightly or weekly seminars for core modules, each lasting 90-120 minutes; for Special Topics, six hour-long meetings over the course of one semester.

See the website http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/english/postgraduate/

Features

* The School of English currently has 32 permanent members of staff, as well as several Teaching Fellows, Honorary Lecturers/Senior Lecturers, and Honorary Professors.

* The School admits around 30 new taught postgraduate students each year.

* Research excellence in all periods of English literature from Old English to the present day.

* Members of the School include winners of the Queen’s Gold Medal for Poetry, Whitbread Prize, T S Eliot Prize for Poetry, the Forward Poetry Prize, the Geoffrey Faber Prize, the Somerset Maugham Award, the Canongate Prize, the Petrarca Preis, the Prix Zepter Prize and a Commonwealth Writers Prize for fiction.

* The University has one of the highest concentrations of mediaevalists in the UK, united by the St Andrews Institute of Mediaeval Studies (SAIMS).

* The School is home to the Cambridge University Press edition of Virginia Woolf edited by Susan Sellers and Jane Goldman (University of Glasgow), making St Andrews a prestigious international centre for Woolf studies.

* Members of the School sit on the editorial board of Forum for Modern Language Studies, a humanities journal published by Oxford University Press.

Postgraduate community

The School has a vibrant postgraduate community of around 80 students (full and part time) with a dedicated administrator who manages and advises on all postgraduate matters from admissions queries to PhD vivas, ensuring continuity for both postgraduates and staff.

Postgraduates meet regularly at the School’s Postgraduate Forum and at various voluntary seminar series organised by English or other Schools within the Faculty of Arts. The crossfertilisation of ideas between traditional literary / theoretical research and creative writing provides a uniquely stimulating environment supporting the usual individual meetings between postgraduate students and their supervisors. All taught postgraduates have access to research funds to help offset the costs of attending conferences or other research libraries.

Students are part of a welcoming and lively academic community. There is an active student-run Literary Society and the Postgraduate Forum, where postgraduates meet to present and discuss their ongoing work. Each semester, the School invites distinguished visiting academics and creative writers to lead seminars, lectures and workshops as part of our regular research events.

Facilities

The teaching rooms and staff offices of the School of English are housed in two nineteenth-century stone buildings, Castle House
and Kennedy Hall, opposite St Andrews Castle and overlooking the sea. 66 North Street, the School’s dedicated Centre for research students, is only a few minutes’ walk away. It offers bench rooms with PC workstations for all postgraduates, both taught and research. This lovely nineteenth-century building also has a well-used kitchen, common room and sunny garden. The encouragement of postgraduate study is a special concern of ours, and the number of postgraduate students has grown markedly in recent years.

The University Library has outstanding resources for research in English. The Copyright Deposit Collection contains approximately 40,000 volumes, covering the whole subject area from 1709 to 1837, and approximately 5,000 volumes of periodicals which ceased publication before 1841. Some of this material is not held in the National Library of Scotland. The print collection therefore offers an impressive range of opportunities for research in eighteenth-century literature, the Scottish Enlightenment and Romanticism.

The University Library also subscribes to a wide variety of online databases, including JISC Historic Books for access to almost all printed books to 1800, and Defining Gender 1450- 1910 for material supporting the School’s work in gender and sexuality studies. Manuscript collections extend from mediaeval archives through some of the world’s most detailed records of eighteenth and nineteenth-century reading to the papers of the contemporary poet Douglas Dunn. Postgraduates have the opportunity to work with expert Library staff in areas ranging from palaeography to digital humanities.

Additional application information

All MLitt applicants should submit a sample of written work of around 2,000 words. This must be a critical academic essay (or extract) related to the proposed field of study. Applicants for the MLitt programme in Creative Writing should also include a typed portfolio of original verse, prose or play/ screenwriting (around 10 poems or 10-15 pages of prose or play/screenwriting). In addition, all applicants should submit a Supplementary Application Form in place of a personal statement. The form may be downloaded from the website at: http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/english/postgraduate/applying/documents/

Funding: investing in your future

The School of English normally offers a small number of its own awards for suitably qualified applicants who have been accepted for an MLitt. These are open to both home/EU and overseas students. Up-to-date information can be found at: http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/english/postgraduate/funding/

Recent School of English taught postgraduate students have also succeeded in obtaining funding from a variety of external sources in order to study here, including the Marshall Scholarship, the Ransome Trust and Scotland’s Saltire Scholarship fund.

Details of these and other scholarship opportunities and initiatives can be found on the University’s scholarships webpages: http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/study/pg/fees-and-funding/scholarships/taught/

Careers

Following a taught postgraduate course in English at the University, students go on to pursue careers in a range of sectors including journalism, marketing, publishing and teaching. Others continue in academia, moving on to a PhD. The Careers Centre offers one-to-one advice to all students on a taught postgraduate course and offers a programme of events to assist students to build their employability skills.

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At least 55 million people world wide claim Scots descent. Read more
At least 55 million people world wide claim Scots descent. This exciting and unique postgraduate course allows the culture of the Highlands and Islands to be explored wherever you are, whether you are part of the Scots diaspora keen to find out about your heritage or just want to find out more about the Highlands and Islands of Scotland.

Students will be studying folklore, customs, belief systems, music, song, literary heritage and much, much more. Come and immerse yourself in the lived experience of Highlands and islands communities!

Special Features

• Loans for tuition fees are available from the Students Award Agency for Scotland (SAAS) for eligible Scotland domiciled and EU students, and loans for living costs for eligible Scottish students.
• Unique course content not available anywhere else
• You are taught by international experts in the field, including the team at the Centre for Nordic Studies
• We use video conferencing and a virtual learning environment to deliver the course so you can study from anywhere in the world
• Small class sizes
• You can also choose unique options in palaeography, creative writing and the North Atlantic World
• You can study individual modules for personal or professional development, or work towards the PgCert, PgDip, or full Masters degree

Modules

PgCert

Core modules are:

The Gaelic Legacy
The Highlands and Islands Story
Traditional Customs and Beliefs of the Highlands and Islands

PgDip

The core module is:

Highlands and Islands Voices

You will also choose two option modules which may include:

The North Atlantic World
Early Scottish and Norse Literature
The Orkney and Shetland Tongues
Orkney and Shetland Literature
Introduction to Screenwriting
Exploring Creative Writing
Celts and Vikings in the North Atlantic
Picts: Revealing the painted past

MLitt

To achieve the award of MLitt Highlands and Islands Culture you must complete a research dissertation.

Locations

This course is available at:
Orkney College UHI, East Road, Kirkwall, KW15 1LX
Lews Castle College UHI, Stornoway, Isle of Lewis, HS2 0XR

Study Options

You will study this course through a combination of video conferenced seminars and learning via the university's virtual learning environment (VLE), with support from your tutors and student advisor.
International students requiring a Tier 4 visa to study with us must be based at Orkney College UHI during their studies. International students undertaking the course from their home country can study online and by video conference, in real-time or recordings.
All other students can choose to study at Orkney College UHI or Lews Castle College UHI in Stornoway, or from their own location studying online and by video conference in real-time or recordings.
An online induction will be offered at the start of your course.

Access routes

Students can access the programme from a range of UHI undergraduate programmes including:


BA (Hons) Culture and Heritage
BA (Hons) Scottish History
BA (Hons) Scottish History and Archaeology
BA (Hons) Scottish History and Literature
BA (Hons) Social Sciences
BA (Hons) Literature
BA (Hons) Archaeology
And externally from humanities degrees generally

Funding

From 2017, eligible Scotland domiciled students studying full time can access loans up to 10,000 from the Student Awards Agency for Scotland (SAAS).This comprises a tuition fee loan up to £5,500 and a non-income assessed living cost loan of £4,500. EU students studying full time can apply for a tuition fee loan up to £5500.

Part-time students undertaking any taught postgraduate course over two years up to Masters level who meet the residency eligibility can apply for a for a tuition fee loan up to £2,750 per year.

See Scholarships tab below for full details

Top reasons to study at UHI

Do something different: our reputation is built on our innovative approach to learning and our distinctive research and curriculum which often reflects the unique environment and culture of our region and closely links to vocational skills required by a range of sectors.
Choice of campuses – we have campuses across the Highlands and Islands of Scotland. Each campus is different from rich cultural life of the islands; the spectacular coasts and mountains; to the bright lights of our city locations.
Small class sizes mean that you have a more personal experience of university and receive all the support you need from our expert staff
The affordable option - if you already live in the Highlands and Islands of Scotland you don't have to leave home and incur huge debts to go to university; we're right here on your doorstep

How to apply

If you want to apply for this postgraduate programme click on the ‘visit website’ button below which will take you to the relevant course page on our website, from there select the Apply tab to complete our online application.
If you still have any questions please get in touch with our information line by email using the links beow or call on 0845 272 3600.

International Students

If you would like to study in a country of outstanding natural beauty, friendly communities, and cities buzzing with social life and activities, the Highlands and Islands of Scotland should be your first choice. We have campuses across the region each one with its own special characteristics from the rich cultural life of the islands to the bright city lights of Perth and Inverness. Some courses are available in one location only, for others you will have a choice; we also have courses that can be studied online from your own home country. .http://www.uhi.ac.uk/en/studying-at-uhi/international

English Language Requirements

Our programmes are taught and examined in English. To make the most of your studies, you must be able to communicate fluently and accurately in spoken and written English and provide certified proof of your competence before starting your course. Please note that English language tests need to have been taken no more than two years prior to the start date of the course. The standard English Language criteria to study at the University of the Highlands and Islands are detailed on our English language requirements page http://www.uhi.ac.uk/en/studying-at-uhi/international/how-to-apply-to-uhi/english-language-requirements

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The Vikings have been incredibly influential in world history and culture. The Centre for Nordic Studies' team will be using their recognised expertise in this area to create this unique and exciting course on offer to students all over the world and to re-evaluate the Vikings past, present, and future. Read more
The Vikings have been incredibly influential in world history and culture. The Centre for Nordic Studies' team will be using their recognised expertise in this area to create this unique and exciting course on offer to students all over the world and to re-evaluate the Vikings past, present, and future.

Students will be able to critically evaluate key historical, economic, and social developments in the Viking world and analyse the significance and legacy of the cultural history of the Vikings both in isolation and in a wider context temporally and geographically. We'll look at Viking iconography in text and film, the role of women, and the significance of runes among other fascinating topics.

As part of the degree, students will study a set of core modules and also have the opportunity to choose from a range of optional modules, bringing the study of the Viking period into a wider perspective

Special Features

• Loans for tuition fees are available from the Students Award Agency for Scotland (SAAS) for eligible Scotland domiciled and EU students, and loans for living costs for eligible Scottish students.
• Unique course content not available anywhere else
• You are taught by international experts in the field
• We use video conferencing and a virtual learning environment to deliver the course so you can study from anywhere in the world
• Small class sizes
• You can also choose unique options in palaeography, creative writing and the North Atlantic World
• You can study individual modules for personal or professional development, or work towards the PgCert, PgDip, or full Masters degree

This course has been approved for in-country international delivery. It may also be studied by international students based within the UK.
You will study this course through a combination of video conferenced seminars and learning through the university's virtual learning environment (VLE), with support from your tutors and student advisor.
Students, including international students, can study at Orkney College UHI and Lews Castle College UHI in Stornoway, or from their own locations, studying online and by video conference, in real-time or recordings.
An online induction will be offered at the start of your course.

Modules

PgCert

Core modules are: Vikings in the Scottish Islands and the Irish Sea region; Gender in Viking Society; Runology and Old Norse

PgDip

Core module is: Visualising the Vikings: the Vikings in Popular Culture

You will also choose two option modules which may include: The North Atlantic World; Early Scottish and Norse Literature; The Orkney and Shetland Tongues; Orkney and Shetland Literature; Introduction to Screenwriting; Exploring Creative Writing; Celts and Vikings in the North Atlantic; Picts: Revealing the painted past.

MLitt

To achieve the award of MLitt Viking Studies you must complete a research dissertation.

Locations

This course is available online with support from
Lews Castle College UHI, Stornoway, Isle of Lewis, HS2 0XR
Orkney College UHI, East Road, Kirkwall, KW15 1LX

Funding

From 2017, eligible Scotland domiciled students studying full time can access loans up to 10,000 from the Student Awards Agency for Scotland (SAAS).This comprises a tuition fee loan up to £5,500 and a non-income assessed living cost loan of £4,500. EU students studying full time can apply for a tuition fee loan up to £5500.

Part-time students undertaking any taught postgraduate course over two years up to Masters level who meet the residency eligibility can apply for a for a tuition fee loan up to £2,750 per year.

See Scholarships tab below for full details

Top reasons to study at UHI

1. Do something different: our reputation is built on our innovative approach to learning and our distinctive research and curriculum which often reflects the unique environment and culture of our region and closely links to vocational skills required by a range of sectors.
2. Choice of campuses – we have campuses across the Highlands and Islands of Scotland. Each campus is different from rich cultural life of the islands; the spectacular coasts and mountains; to the bright lights of our city locations.
3. Small class sizes mean that you have a more personal experience of university and receive all the support you need from our expert staff
4. The affordable option - if you already live in the Highlands and Islands of Scotland you don't have to leave home and incur huge debts to go to university; we're right here on your doorstep

How to apply

If you want to apply for this postgraduate programme click on the ‘visit website’ button below which will take you to the relevant course page on our website, from there select the Apply tab to complete our online application.
If you still have any questions please get in touch with our information line by email using the links below or call on 0845 272 3600.

International Students

If you would like to study in a country of outstanding natural beauty, friendly communities, and cities buzzing with social life and activities, the Highlands and Islands of Scotland should be your first choice. We have campuses across the region each one with its own special characteristics from the rich cultural life of the islands to the bright city lights of Perth and Inverness. Some courses are available in one location only, for others you will have a choice; we also have courses that can be studied online from your own home country. http://www.uhi.ac.uk/en/studying-at-uhi/international

English Language Requirements

Our programmes are taught and examined in English. To make the most of your studies, you must be able to communicate fluently and accurately in spoken and written English and provide certified proof of your competence before starting your course. Please note that English language tests need to have been taken no more than two years prior to the start date of the course. The standard English Language criteria to study at the University of the Highlands and Islands are detailed on our English language requirements page http://www.uhi.ac.uk/en/studying-at-uhi/international/how-to-apply-to-uhi/english-language-requirements

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Welcome to one of the most exciting periods of English literature and history. Read more
Welcome to one of the most exciting periods of English literature and history. The transformations in religion, politics, the technologies of writing and publication, science, and global exploration that took place during these turbulent years, and which continue to resonate today, prompted some of the most vibrant, difficult, and rewarding writing ever produced.

We invite you to join a team of world-leading scholars, working at the cutting edge of our discipline to explore this extraordinary world, and trace some of its local, European, and global contexts. In our core seminars, research events, trips, and collaborations you will build up a comprehensive set of research skills, whilst our ambitious and imaginative option modules will extend your current interests, and open up a novel set of perspectives upon both canonical and little-known texts.

York’s long history and prime location makes it an excellent place to study this period, and you can choose to take classes in the beautiful Minster Library, learn palaeography in one of the biggest archive repositories outside London, study Latin or a range of other languages or join us for trips – destinations have included a behind-the-scenes look at the Castle Museum, and the magnificent Fountains Abbey, Castle Howard, Burton Agnes Hall, and Hardwick Hall.

You will have the opportunity to work with distinguished scholars across a variety of fields. In particular, we specialise in:
-History of the book and textual cultures
-Religion, literature, and politics
-The reception and transformation of the Classics
-The poetics and pragmatics of translation
-Shakespeare, Heywood, and the drama of the English Renaissance
-The history and literature of science and medicine
-Material culture
-Women and literary production
-The history of emotions

Many of our students go on to PhD study; others have pursued a diverse range of careers including publishing, arts management, librarianship, and education.

Assessment

-Four assessed essays of 4,500 words
-A 14,000-16,000 word dissertation, written in consultation with a supervisor on an agreed topic

Careers

We have an excellent employment record for our postgraduates who are highly prized by top level employers, both in the UK and on the international stage. A combination of outstanding teaching and a supportive collegiate environment enable our students to develop their creativity, intellectual independence and ability to filter complex information and present it persuasively in person and in writing. These are important transferable skills which will always hold their value at the top end of the jobs market.

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This exciting taught postgraduate literature course allows you to study the writers and literatures of the Highlands and Islands, in the communities to which they belong. Read more
This exciting taught postgraduate literature course allows you to study the writers and literatures of the Highlands and Islands, in the communities to which they belong. Trace the footsteps of these inspirational creatives, explore the literary heritage of the area and experience, first hand, the diverse culture of the region.

You will study three main themes throughout the course, namely:

landscape and identity
the literary and linguistic legacy for the modern period
the place of Highlands and Islands literature in the wider context

You will benefit from lectures and seminars by local writers, and the team at the Centre for Nordic Studies. Our small classes will give you a more personal study experience during this Masters course in Highlands and Islands Literature.

Special Features

• Loans for tuition fees are available from the Students Award Agency for Scotland (SAAS) for eligible Scotland domiciled and EU students, and loans for living costs for eligible Scottish students.
• Lectures and seminars by local writers
• A creative writing module
• The chance to study and explore the Highland and Islands at the same time
• You can study individual modules for personal or professional development, or work towards the PgCert, PgDip or full Masters degree
• You can attend the course full time or part time or from a distance using our online and video conference technologies, which means you can fit your studies around your personal and professional commitments

Modules

PgCert

Core modules are: The Gaelic Legacy; Writers and Place;Literary Iconographies

PgDip

Core modules are:

Modern Scottish Gothic
A Tour of the Highlands

You will also choose one option module which may include:

Exploring creative writing
The North Atlantic World
The Highlands and Islands Story
Traditional Customs and Beliefs of the Highlands and Islands
Picts: revealing the painted past.

MLitt

To achieve the award of MLitt Highlands and Islands Literature you must complete a research dissertation.

Locations

This course is available online with support from Lews Castle College UHI, Stornoway or Orkney College UHI, Kirkwall

Study Options

You will study this course through a combination of video conferenced seminars and learning via the university's virtual learning environment (VLE), with support from your tutors and student advisor.
International students requiring a Tier 4 visa to study with us must be based at Orkney College UHI during their studies. International students undertaking the course from their home country can study online and by video conference, in real-time or recordings.
All other students can choose to study at Orkney College UHI or Lews Castle College UHI in Stornoway, or from their own location studying online and by video conference in real-time or recordings.
An online induction will be offered at the start of your course.

Access routes

Students can access the programme from a range of UHI undergraduate programmes including:
BA (Hons) Literature
BA (Hons) Scottish History and Literature
BA (Hons) Culture and Heritage
And externally from humanities degrees generally

Funding

From 2017, eligible Scotland domiciled students studying full time can access loans up to 10,000 from the Student Awards Agency for Scotland (SAAS).This comprises a tuition fee loan up to £5,500 and a non-income assessed living cost loan of £4,500. EU students studying full time can apply for a tuition fee loan up to £5500.

Part-time students undertaking any taught postgraduate course over two years up to Masters level who meet the residency eligibility can apply for a for a tuition fee loan up to £2,750 per year.

See Scholarships tab below for full details

Top reasons to study at UHI

Do something different: our reputation is built on our innovative approach to learning and our distinctive research and curriculum which often reflects the unique environment and culture of our region and closely links to vocational skills required by a range of sectors.
Choice of campuses – we have campuses across the Highlands and Islands of Scotland. Each campus is different from rich cultural life of the islands; the spectacular coasts and mountains; to the bright lights of our city locations.
Small class sizes mean that you have a more personal experience of university and receive all the support you need from our expert staff
The affordable option - if you already live in the Highlands and Islands of Scotland you don't have to leave home and incur huge debts to go to university; we're right here on your doorstep

How to apply

If you want to apply for this postgraduate programme click on the ‘visit website’ button below which will take you to the relevant course page on our website, from there select the Apply tab to complete our online application.
If you still have any questions please get in touch with our information line by email using the links beow or call on 0845 272 3600.

International Students

If you would like to study in a country of outstanding natural beauty, friendly communities, and cities buzzing with social life and activities, the Highlands and Islands of Scotland should be your first choice. We have campuses across the region each one with its own special characteristics from the rich cultural life of the islands to the bright city lights of Perth and Inverness. Some courses are available in one location only, for others you will have a choice; we also have courses that can be studied online from your own home country. .http://www.uhi.ac.uk/en/studying-at-uhi/international

English Language Requirements

Our programmes are taught and examined in English. To make the most of your studies, you must be able to communicate fluently and accurately in spoken and written English and provide certified proof of your competence before starting your course. Please note that English language tests need to have been taken no more than two years prior to the start date of the course. The standard English Language criteria to study at the University of the Highlands and Islands are detailed on our English language requirements page http://www.uhi.ac.uk/en/studying-at-uhi/international/how-to-apply-to-uhi/english-language-requirements

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The MA Health and Wellbeing is designed to meet the career development needs of health and social care professionals in the UK. Read more
The MA Health and Wellbeing is designed to meet the career development needs of health and social care professionals in the UK.

The course will increase your awareness of the social, technological, economic, political and environmental changes taking place within health and social care, whether in the public, private or voluntary sectors, enabling you to take your career to the next stage.

You will study core modules in the development of national and international health and social care policy, the influence of sociology, psychology and ethics on our understanding of health and wellbeing, the issues of health and social care provision in remote and rural areas as well as gaining skills in research methods.

Special Features

Loans for tuition fees are available from the Students Award Agency for Scotland (SAAS) for eligible Scotland domiciled and EU students, and loans for living costs for eligible Scottish students.

The course is part time delivered online which means you can fit your studies around your work and personal committments wherever you are in the world

The course content contributes to the development of the core dimensions in the NHS Knowledge and Skills Framework (KSF): communication; personal and people development; health, safety and security; service improvement; quality; and equality and diversity

You will also have the opportunity to study modules in more specialised areas, such as child and adolescent mental health, diabetes, infomatics in health and social care, and patient safety in health and social care environments.

Lews Castle College UHI are registering with Embedding Clinincal Informatics in Education (eICE) to deliver CPD Informatics training for staff working in a Clinical setting or students who aim to be working in a Clinical setting within Primary, Secondary or Health and Social care agencies.

Successful candidates will be entitled to affiliate registration with UK Council for Health Informatics Professions (UKCHIP)

Students are encouraged to undertake research in relation to their specific interest or in relation to their employment for the dissertation module.

Students can complete the university’s Skills and Employability Award where by you gain recognition (not academic credit) for a range of activities you take part in addition to your studies to help you stand out from the crowd and demonstrate the skills you have, prepare for a real interview and impress prospective employers.

Modules

PgCert

Core modules are: Policy into practice; Individual and social influences on health; You will also choose from an option module from the list below in the PgDip option modules

PgDip

If you wish to progress to the MA, the core modules are: Challenges and Practice Solutions in Remote and Rural Areas; Qualitative Inquiry; You will also choose one option from the list below.

Alternatively, if you do not wish to continue to Masters level you can study the first core module and two options from the list below.
Option modules include: Advanced Diabetes; Child and Adolescent Mental Health; Developing Communities; Disability and Society; Enabling Self-Management: Developing Practice; Enabling Self-Management: Leading Change; Ethics in Health and Wellbeing; Informatics in Health and Social Care; Introduction to Patient Safety in Integrated Health and Social Care Environment

MA

To achieve the award of MA Health and Wellbeing you must complete a research dissertation

Locations

This course is available Online supported by Lews Castle College UHI, Stornoway, Isle of Lewis, HS2 0XR

Funding

From 2017, eligible Scotland domiciled students studying full time can access loans up to 10,000 from the Student Awards Agency for Scotland (SAAS).This comprises a tuition fee loan up to £5,500 and a non-income assessed living cost loan of £4,500. EU students studying full time can apply for a tuition fee loan up to £5500.

Part-time students undertaking any taught postgraduate course over two years up to Masters level who meet the residency eligibility can apply for a for a tuition fee loan up to £2,750 per year.

See Scholarships tab below for full details

How to apply

If you want to apply for this postgraduate programme click on the ‘visit website’ button below which will take you to the relevant course page on our website, from there select the Apply tab to complete our online application.
If you still have any questions please get in touch with our information line by email using the links beow or call on 0845 272 3600.

International Students

If you would like to study in a country of outstanding natural beauty, friendly communities, and cities buzzing with social life and activities, the Highlands and Islands of Scotland should be your first choice. We have campuses across the region each one with its own special characteristics from the rich cultural life of the islands to the bright city lights of Perth and Inverness. Some courses are available in one location only, for others you will have a choice; we also have courses that can be studied online from your own home country. .http://www.uhi.ac.uk/en/studying-at-uhi/international

English Language Requirements

Our programmes are taught and examined in English. To make the most of your studies, you must be able to communicate fluently and accurately in spoken and written English and provide certified proof of your competence before starting your course. Please note that English language tests need to have been taken no more than two years prior to the start date of the course. The standard English Language criteria to study at the University of the Highlands and Islands are detailed on our English language requirements page http://www.uhi.ac.uk/en/studying-at-uhi/international/how-to-apply-to-uhi/english-language-requirements

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Explore Romanticism and Victorian-period literature through the study of literary culture from the 1760s to 1900. Examine the various conceptions and dimensions of British Romantic-period and Victorian literature and culture, and Romantic and Victorian criticism and theory, up to the present. Read more

MLitt in Romantic / Victorian Studies

• Explore Romanticism and Victorian-period literature through the study of literary culture from the 1760s to 1900.
• Examine the various conceptions and dimensions of British Romantic-period and Victorian literature and culture, and Romantic and Victorian criticism and theory, up to the present.
• Study various ideologies, such as the idea of childhood and discourses of emancipation in the Romantic period in relation to literary culture, and debates about gender, colonialism, Gothic and aestheticism in the Victorian period.

This MLitt is currently being redesigned for the 2016-2017 session. For up-to-date information on course content, please contact:

Teaching methods: Seminar: group discussion and individual presentations.
Assessment: Coursework essays, Dissertation.
Contact hours: Fortnightly or weekly seminars for core modules, each lasting 90 minutes; for Special Topics, six hour-long meetings over the course of one semester

Features

* The School admits around 30 new taught postgraduate students each year.

* Research excellence in all periods of English literature from Old English to the present day.

* Members of the School include winners of the Queen’s Gold Medal for Poetry, Whitbread Prize, T S Eliot Prize for Poetry, the Forward Poetry Prize, the Geoffrey Faber Prize, the Somerset Maugham Award, the Canongate Prize, the Petrarca Preis, the Prix Zepter Prize and a Commonwealth Writers Prize for fiction.

* The University has one of the highest concentrations of mediaevalists in the UK, united by the St Andrews Institute of Mediaeval Studies (SAIMS).

* The School is home to the Cambridge University Press edition of Virginia Woolf edited by Susan Sellers and Jane Goldman (University of Glasgow), making St Andrews a prestigious international centre for Woolf studies.

* Members of the School sit on the editorial board of Forum for Modern Language Studies, a humanities journal published by Oxford University Press.

Postgraduate community

The School has a vibrant postgraduate community of around 80 students (full and part time) with a dedicated administrator who manages and advises on all postgraduate matters from admissions queries to PhD vivas, ensuring continuity for both postgraduates and staff.

Postgraduates meet regularly at the School’s Postgraduate Forum and at various voluntary seminar series organised by English or other Schools within the Faculty of Arts. The crossfertilisation of ideas between traditional literary / theoretical research and creative writing provides a uniquely stimulating environment supporting the usual individual meetings between postgraduate students and their supervisors. All taught postgraduates have access to research funds to help offset the costs of attending conferences or other research libraries.

Students are part of a welcoming and lively academic community. There is an active student-run Literary Society and the Postgraduate Forum, where postgraduates meet to present and discuss their ongoing work. Each semester, the School invites distinguished visiting academics and creative writers to lead seminars, lectures and workshops as part of our regular research events.

Facilities

The teaching rooms and staff offices of the School of English are housed in two nineteenth-century stone buildings, Castle House
and Kennedy Hall, opposite St Andrews Castle and overlooking the sea. 66 North Street, the School’s dedicated Centre for research students, is only a few minutes’ walk away. It offers bench rooms with PC workstations for all postgraduates, both taught and research. This lovely nineteenth-century building also has a well-used kitchen, common room and sunny garden. The encouragement of postgraduate study is a special concern of ours, and the number of postgraduate students has grown markedly in recent years.

The University Library has outstanding resources for research in English. The Copyright Deposit Collection contains approximately 40,000 volumes, covering the whole subject area from 1709 to 1837, and approximately 5,000 volumes of periodicals which ceased publication before 1841. Some of this material is not held in the National Library of Scotland. The print collection therefore offers an impressive range of opportunities for research in eighteenth-century literature, the Scottish Enlightenment and Romanticism.

The University Library also subscribes to a wide variety of online databases, including JISC Historic Books for access to almost all printed books to 1800, and Defining Gender 1450- 1910 for material supporting the School’s work in gender and sexuality studies. Manuscript collections extend from mediaeval archives through some of the world’s most detailed records of eighteenth and nineteenth-century reading to the papers of the contemporary poet Douglas Dunn. Postgraduates have the opportunity to work with expert Library staff in areas ranging from palaeography to digital humanities.

Additional application information

All MLitt applicants should submit a sample of written work of around 2,000 words. This must be a critical academic essay (or extract) related to the proposed field of study. Applicants for the MLitt programme in Creative Writing should also include a typed portfolio of original verse, prose or play/ screenwriting (around 10 poems or 10-15 pages of prose or play/screenwriting). In addition, all applicants should submit a Supplementary Application Form in place of a personal statement. The form may be downloaded from the website at: http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/english/postgraduate/applying/documents/

Funding: investing in your future

The School of English normally offers a small number of its own awards for suitably qualified applicants who have been accepted for an MLitt. These are open to both home/EU and overseas students. Up-to-date information can be found at: http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/english/postgraduate/funding/

Recent School of English taught postgraduate students have also succeeded in obtaining funding from a variety of external sources in order to study here, including the Marshall Scholarship, the Ransome Trust and Scotland’s Saltire Scholarship fund.

Details of these and other scholarship opportunities and initiatives can be found on the University’s scholarships webpages: http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/study/pg/fees-and-funding/scholarships/taught/

Careers

Following a taught postgraduate course in English at the University, students go on to pursue careers in a range of sectors including journalism, marketing, publishing and teaching. Others continue in academia, moving on to a PhD. The Careers Centre offers one-to-one advice to all students on a taught postgraduate course and offers a programme of events to assist students to build their employability skills.

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This course will prepare you for life as a secondary teacher in Gaelic Medium Education (GME), with the skills and knowledge, to influence the lives of the young people you teach. Read more
This course will prepare you for life as a secondary teacher in Gaelic Medium Education (GME), with the skills and knowledge, to influence the lives of the young people you teach.

The PGDE (Secondary) consists of 18 weeks study at the university (based at Lews Castle College, Stornoway and at the Nicolson Institute in Stornoway), plus 19 weeks in professional practice in schools.
You must be a fluent Gaelic speaker, your language proficiency will be assessed through interview. On this pathway parts of the course are delivered through the medium of Gaelic, all written assessments will be done in Gaelic and you will complete the majority of your school practice in a GME setting, plus one placement in an English speaking classroom.

Special features

• Loans for tuition fees are available from the Students Award Agency for Scotland (SAAS) for eligible Scotland domiciled and EU students, and loans for living costs for eligible Scottish students.
• Opportunity to undertake secondary teacher training in GME within the Western Isles.
• Input from experienced teachers within the Nicolson Institute throughout the programme.
• Opportunity to enhance your understanding of Gaelic culture and to develop language competence.
• The course will prepare you for life as a reflective professional, supporting high quality learning for the young people you teach.

Course Content

Taught modules: The Critical and Enquiring Professional Teacher; Children, Young People and their Curriculum; Children, Young People and their Learning.
Professional Practice: in the Nicolson Institute, other secondary schools in the Western Isles and other Gaelic Medium Education settings.

Location

Lews Castle College UHI, Stornoway, Isle of Lewis, HS2 0XR

Please note

: There are subject specific entry guidelines for secondary teaching stipulated by GTC Scotland. These are available from the GTC Scotland website: Memorandum on Entry Requirements to Programmes of Initial Teacher Education in Scotland, 2013

Funding

From 2017, eligible Scotland domiciled students studying full time can access loans up to 10,000 from the Student Awards Agency for Scotland (SAAS).This comprises a tuition fee loan up to £5,500 and a non-income assessed living cost loan of £4,500. EU students studying full time can apply for a tuition fee loan up to £5500.

Part-time students undertaking any taught postgraduate course over two years up to Masters level who meet the residency eligibility can apply for a for a tuition fee loan up to £2,750 per year.

See Scholarships tab below for full details

Top five reasons to study at UHI

1. Do something different: our reputation is built on our innovative approach to learning and our distinctive research and curriculum which often reflects the unique environment and culture of our region and closely links to vocational skills required by a range of sectors.
2. Flexible learning options mean that you can usually study part time or full time. Some courses can be studied fully online from home or work, others are campus-based.
3. Choice of campuses – we have campuses across the Highlands and Islands of Scotland. Each campus is different from rich cultural life of the islands; the spectacular coasts and mountains; to the bright lights of our city locations.
4. Small class sizes mean that you have a more personal experience of university and receive all the support you need from our expert staff
5. The affordable option - if you already live in the Highlands and Islands of Scotland you don't have to leave home and incur huge debts to go to university; we're right here on your doorstep

How to apply

If you want to apply for this postgraduate programme click on the ‘visit website’ button below which will take you to the relevant course page on our website, from there select the Apply tab to complete our online application.
If you still have any questions please get in touch with our information line by email using the links below or call on 0845 272 3600.

English Language Requirements

Our programmes are taught and examined in English. To make the most of your studies, you must be able to communicate fluently and accurately in spoken and written English and provide certified proof of your competence before starting your course. Please note that English language tests need to have been taken no more than two years prior to the start date of the course. The standard English Language criteria to study at the University of the Highlands and Islands are detailed on our English language requirements page http://www.uhi.ac.uk/en/studying-at-uhi/international/how-to-apply-to-uhi/english-language-requirements

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The Business Management in Sport MSc will explore the evolving and multi-faceted area of management in sport through core modules from business and bespoke sport modules. Read more
The Business Management in Sport MSc will explore the evolving and multi-faceted area of management in sport through core modules from business and bespoke sport modules.
This programme focuses on governance structures, ethical considerations, major competitions, sports marketing and sport’s political, social, economic, and cultural contexts.
You will develop knowledge of business management and sport on local, national, international and global levels to prepare for a career in the sector. You may choose to pursue a career within governing bodies, federations, clubs, sponsors, marketing organisations, the media, local and central government or legacy and heritage organisations.
There are also ways for you to tailor your university experience to your interests. You will have opportunities to get involved with a #DMUglobal experience and choose a language study option.

Reasons to study Business Management and Sport MSc at Leicester Business School:
•Valuable industry links in the UK and overseas, including established DMU relationships with: Leicester City Football Club, Leicester Tigers Rugby Football Club, and Leicestershire County Cricket Club
•Option to pursue an in-company project, social internship, live practice project or entrepreneurship project
•Personal leadership mentoring and career coaching
•World-leading academics from the faculties of business and art, design and technology
•Access to business research that is cited as world leading and internationally excellent by the independent and peer assessed Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014)
•Unique learning environment headquartered in the Great Hall of Leicester Castle
•Regular presentations by leading business figures
•Networking and peer support as a result of being part of a small, exceptionally talented tutor group
•Modules that have been developed in partnership with business, with the objective of providing students with key skills needed to lead and succeed in today’s global business environment
•Access to the postgraduate wing of the £35million Hugh Aston Building which has its own café and store
•Access to a high tech 24/7 high-tech library with a choice of learning environments. This in addition to new amenities such as the QEII Diamond Jubilee Leisure Centre
•Mentoring and one-to-one academic support from leading academics, at the forefront of their fields
•Excellent contact hours of 15 or more hours per week
•Emphasis on the development of business-relevant cultural awareness, including optional language study

Teaching and Assessment

You will be taught through a combination of lectures, tutorials, seminars, group work and self-directed study. Assessment is through coursework (presentations, essays and reports) and usually an exam or test.
Your precise timetable will depend on the optional modules you choose to take, however you will normally attend around 15 hours of timetabled taught sessions (lectures and tutorials) each week. We expect you to undertake at least 15 further hours of independent study to complete project work and research.

Course Modules

• Leadership and Talent Management
• Strategic Management
• Business Creation and Innovation
• Ethics in Sports Management and Governance
• Entrepreneurial Finance and Financial Management
• Mega-Events: Global Sport in Perspective
• Sports Heritage and Legacy Management
• Global Sports Marketing
• Executive In-Company Project
• Entrepreneurship Project

Graduate Careers

A degree in Business Management and Sport will open up a wide range of career opportunities within sports management industries as you develop a broad base of skills that are in demand with global employers.
Students may choose to progress to careers in governing bodies, federations, clubs, sponsors, marketing organisations, the media, local and central government, events and legacy and heritage organisations.
You will benefit from access to DMU’s established Careers and Employability Team, who offer employability sessions and workshops and can advise you on your options.

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