• University of Surrey Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Northampton Featured Masters Courses
  • Northumbria University Featured Masters Courses
  • Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University Featured Masters Courses
  • Cardiff University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Bristol Featured Masters Courses
  • Birmingham City University Featured Masters Courses
De Montfort University Featured Masters Courses
Cranfield University Featured Masters Courses
EURECOM Featured Masters Courses
Nottingham Trent University Featured Masters Courses
University of Bath Featured Masters Courses
"caribbean"×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Caribbean)

We have 91 Masters Degrees (Caribbean)

  • "caribbean" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 91
Order by 
This MA offers students the opportunity to develop an understanding of the diverse societies of both the South American continent and the Caribbean from a multidisciplinary and comparative perspective. Read more

This MA offers students the opportunity to develop an understanding of the diverse societies of both the South American continent and the Caribbean from a multidisciplinary and comparative perspective. The programme's graduates have established careers in research, journalism, teaching and policy formulation and implementation in both government agencies and NGOs.

About this degree

Students will gain a broad empirical knowledge of the diverse societies of Latin America and the Caribbean from the perspective of at least two disciplines, together with an awareness of the general patterns of differences and commonalities in the histories, politics, economies and cultures of the different linguistic territories of the region.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (30 credits), four optional modules (60 credits), and the research dissertation (90 credits). Please note: All optional modules are subject to availability.

Core modules

  • The Caribbean from the Haitian Revolution to the Cuban Revolution
  • Researching the Americas: Latin America and the Caribbean

Optional modules

Students choose four optional modules from a selection that includes the following:

  • Politics, Society and Development in the Modern Caribbean
  • Democratisation in Latin America
  • Histories of Exclusion: Race and Ethnicity in Latin America
  • Money and Politics in Latin America
  • The Politics of Human Rights in Latin America: Transitional Justice
  • The Politics of Human Rights in Latin America: Challenges to Democratization
  • Sustainable Development in Latin America and the Caribbean
  • Latin American Economics
  • Globalisation and Latin American Development
  • The International Politics of Latin America
  • State and Society in Latin America: Ethnographic Perspectives
  • The Latin American City: Social Problems and Social Change in Urban Space
  • From Slavery to Freedom? Race, Class, Gender and Union in the Nineteenth Century United States

Students may choose elective modules up to a maximum of 30 credits from other UCL departments or University of London colleges, subject to the Programme Director's approval.

Dissertation/report

All students write a dissertation of 15,000 words (90 credits) on a topic relating to the Caribbean, or Latin America and the Caribbean.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of seminars, lectures, presentations, independent reading and research. Assessment is through varied assignments including essays, an oral presentation and the dissertation.

Fieldwork

Many of our Master's students undertake fieldwork in order to carry out research for their dissertation projects.

There may be travel costs associated with fieldwork. The institute has limited funds available to students to help towards the costs of fieldwork. These funds are awarded on a competitive basis on the criteria of academic performance to date, the quality of the research proposal and the importance of fieldwork for completing the research.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Caribbean and Latin American Studies MA

Careers

Graduates of this programme will be well placed to use their skills and knowledge to find employment in government, business, journalism, finance and international NGOs, teaching, or for further research in this field.

Employability

Students will have excellent opportunities to expand professional networks enhancing their future employability. Through institute staff members' extensive contacts in the region, and through participating in the institute's extremely active events programme, students will meet potential colleagues in government and the diplomatic service, development agencies and the international NGO community, business and finance, and print and electronic media. On the basis of such contacts, recent graduates have found employment in government (Foreign & Commonwealth Office), NGOs (Amnesty International, Caritas) and political risk-analysis firms, while others have undertaken PhD research.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The Institute of the Americas occupies a unique position at the core of academic study of the region in the UK, promoting research and postgraduate teaching on the Americas, including Canada, the Caribbean, Latin America and the United States.

The institute actively maintains and builds ties with cultural, diplomatic, third sector and business organisations with interests in the Americas, and provides resources to the wider academic community, serving and strengthening national networks of North Americanist, Latin Americanist and Caribbeanist scholars.

Students benefit from tuition by world-leading scholars in an academic environment at the cutting-edge of research in the humanities and social sciences.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



Read less
This pathway of the MA in Literary Studies aims to introduce you to a wide range of texts and issues in the literature of the Caribbean and the Caribbean diaspora to highlight significant movements relative to the social, political and historical contexts impacting upon these new literatures. Read more

This pathway of the MA in Literary Studies aims to introduce you to a wide range of texts and issues in the literature of the Caribbean and the Caribbean diaspora to highlight significant movements relative to the social, political and historical contexts impacting upon these new literatures.

In particular, the core module at the centre of this pathway (Literature of the Caribbean and its Diasporas), will trace the developments within the main forms of literary and artistic expression in the literature of the Caribbean to study how literary texts, forms and genres veered between consolidation and experimentation from beginnings marked by the slave narrative.

The preoccupation with history and memory and the close affinity of the literary with the aural/ oral will also be examined, alongside the influence and textual embodiment of intellectual and cultural developments in the region's literature and that of its diaspora, including the impacts of Colonialism, post-Colonialism, Negritude, and Globalisation.

These developments are studied through the analysis of representative texts either in English or in English translation.

Thanks to the flexible structure of the MA, you will have the opportunity to pursue your wider interests by studying three options from the large provision of the department, choosing at least one of these in an area that is relevant to Caribbean, diasporic, or post-colonial literature.

Both the core module and the options are taught by leading specialists of the subject.

You will be able to further develop your interest in the literature of the Caribbean and its diasporas through a 15,000-word dissertation to be submitted at the end of your programme of study.

In studying for this pathway, you will be able to rely on the expertise and materials available at Goldsmiths’ Caribbean Centre.

The convenor of this pathway is Professor Joan Anim-Addo who has recently been honoured with a Lifetime Achievement Award for ‘invaluable contributions to literature and to literary and cultural studies’ by leading US literary quarterly journal, Callaloo.

Modules & structure

Core module

In addition to the core module and dissertation, you also choose three option modules. Please visit the website for more information

Skills

You'll develop transferable skills, including:

  • enhanced communication and discussion skills in written and oral contexts
  • the ability to analyse and evaluate different textual materials
  • the ability to organise information; the ability to assimilate and evaluate competing arguments

Careers

Graduates of this programme have gone on to pursue careers in:

  • publishing
  • journalism
  • public relations
  • teaching
  • advertising
  • the civil service
  • business
  • industry
  • the media

Find out more about employability at Goldsmiths



Read less
Our Centre’s aim is to stimulate teaching and research on the Caribbean, helping you to develop your awareness of the region and of its historically interdependent linkages with Britain and the world. Read more
Our Centre’s aim is to stimulate teaching and research on the Caribbean, helping you to develop your awareness of the region and of its historically interdependent linkages with Britain and the world. We encourage the study of the Caribbean in an Atlantic context, emphasising African, North and South American, Asian and European influences from a comparative, cross-cultural and interdisciplinary perspective.

The Centre is an umbrella unit of academics drawn from different departments. If you are writing Caribbean dissertations supervised by these academics, you may be registered at the Centre or in the departments of the respective academics.

Research Areas

Current areas of research expertise are: Slavery and empire in the 18th and 19th centuries; Caribbean maritime worlds and networks; white identities; Caribbean writing in French and Spanish; postcolonial Caribbean texts; pre-1900 English Caribbean literatures; women's writing and feminist theory; disaster law and culture; slavery and law; the Haitian Revolution; postcolonial studies, world literature, literary and cultural theory; gender and slavery; enslaved runaways and maroons. Students will be supervised by faculty members with expertise in these areas.

Regular term-time seminars in Caribbean Studies and Comparative Caribbean Literatures are run within the Faculty of Arts, and form a compulsory element of our research degrees.

Read less
Our Centre’s aim is to stimulate teaching and research on the Caribbean, helping you to develop your awareness of the region and of its historically interdependent linkages with Britain and the world. Read more
Our Centre’s aim is to stimulate teaching and research on the Caribbean, helping you to develop your awareness of the region and of its historically interdependent linkages with Britain and the world. We encourage the study of the Caribbean in an Atlantic context, emphasising African, North and South American, Asian and European influences from a comparative, cross-cultural and interdisciplinary perspective.

The Centre is an umbrella unit of academics drawn from different departments. If you are writing Caribbean dissertations supervised by these academics, you may be registered at the Centre or in the departments of the respective academics.

Read less
Gain a rich understanding of the variety and interconnections of American writing, exploring major poetic, fictional, non-fictional and dramatic works. Read more
Gain a rich understanding of the variety and interconnections of American writing, exploring major poetic, fictional, non-fictional and dramatic works. American literature is topical and contemporary; Author Junot Díaz’s book The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao was declared the best novel of the 21st century (so far!). This is just one of the novels that you will have the opportunity to study on this course.

At Essex, we challenge the study of the United States as a territorially bound space by embracing an expanded conception of ‘America’, which explores the richness of U.S. and Caribbean literatures in dialogue. This allows you to formulate sophisticated analyses of the role of space and place in the production of American writing and identities.

You explore how cultural geography may be integrated into literary history, concentrating on American literatures topics including:
-How violence and conflict have shaped writing across the American tropics
-The difference between reality and the “American Dream”
-Caribbean modernities and post-colonialism
-US nationalism and regionalism in literature
-African American literature

Our department is ranked Top 20 in the UK (Guardian University Guide 2015) and in the Top 200 worldwide (QS World University Rankings), and three-quarters of our research is rated ‘world-leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’ (REF 2014).

This course is also available on a part-time basis.

Our expert staff

At Essex, we have an impressive literary legacy. Our history comprises staff (and students) who have shaped writing as we know it and has included Nobel Prize winners, Booker Prize winners, and Pulitzer Prize winners.

This course reflects our longstanding strengths in the literatures and cultures of the Americas, particularly the US South and Caribbean regions. You are taught by leading area specialists who have researched and published extensively on Caribbean and US literatures:
-Professor Maria Cristina Fumagalli has published widely on Caribbean literature and culture, including her recent book On the Edge: Writing the Border between Haiti and the Dominican Republic
-Dr Owen Robinson is a US literature specialist with particular interests in William Faulkner and the US South; forthcoming publications include Myriad City: Towards a Literary Geography of New Orleans
-Dr Jak Peake has broad interests across Caribbean and US writing, with particular expertise in Trinidadian literature; forthcoming publications include Between the Bocas: A Literary Geography of Western Trinidad

We are an interdisciplinary department and our academic staff have expertise in literature, film theory and practice, drama, creative writing and journalism.

Specialist facilities

-Meet fellow readers at the student-run Literature Society or at our department’s Myth Reading Group
-Write for our student magazine Albert or host a Red Radio show
-View classic films at weekly film screenings in our dedicated 120-seat film theatre
-Learn from leading writers and literature specialists at weekly research seminars
-Our on-campus Lakeside Theatre has been established as a major venue for good drama, staging both productions by professional touring companies and a wealth of new work written, produced and directed by our own staff and students
-Improve your playwriting and performance skills at our Lakeside Theatre Workshops
-Our Research Laboratory allows you to collaborate with professionals, improvising and experimenting with new work which is being tried and tested

Your future

A good literature degree opens many doors.

We offer supervision for PhD, MPhil and MA by dissertation in different literatures and various approaches to literature, covering most aspects of early modern and modern writing in English, plus a number of other languages.

Our University is one of only 11 AHRC-accredited Doctoral Training Centres in the UK. This means that we offer funded PhD studentships which also provide a range of research and training opportunities. A number of our Department of Literature, Film, and Theatre Studies graduates have gone on to undertake successful careers as writers, and others are now established as scholars, university lecturers, teachers, publishers, publishers’ editors, journalists, arts administrators, theatre artistic directors, drama advisers, and translators.

We work with our Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Example structure

Postgraduate study is the chance to take your education to the next level. The combination of compulsory and optional modules means our courses help you develop extensive knowledge in your chosen discipline, whilst providing plenty of freedom to pursue your own interests. Our research-led teaching is continually evolving to address the latest challenges and breakthroughs in the field, therefore to ensure your course is as relevant and up-to-date as possible your core module structure may be subject to change.

MA American Literartures
-Research Methods in Literary and Cultural Analysis
-War, Violence & Conflict in the American Tropics
-US Nationalism and Regionalism
-"There is a Continent Outside My Window" : United States and Caribbean Literatures in Dialogue
-Dissertation
-The New Nature Writing (optional)
-Writing the Novel (optional)
-Memory Maps: Practices in Psychogeography (optional)
-Dramatic Structure (optional)
-Literature and Performance in the Modern City
-Early Modern to Eighteenth Century Literature
-Georgian and Romantic Literature and Drama
-Adaptation
-Documentary and the Avant-garde: Film, Video, Digital
-Film and Video Production Workshop
-Advanced Film and Industry: Production and Industry
-African American Literature (optional)
-Sea of Lentils: Modernity, Literature, and Film in the Caribbean
-Writing Magic (optional)
-Literature and the Environmental Imagination: 19th to 21st Century Poetry and Prose (optional)

Read less
As Latin American and Caribbean Countries (LAC) experience economic development, concerns on environmental degradation and contamination continue to grow. Read more
As Latin American and Caribbean Countries (LAC) experience economic development, concerns on environmental degradation and contamination continue to grow. The region faces serious challenges such as climate change and natural disasters; and under conditions of population growth, social conflict, urbanization and industrialization efficient environmental policies and programs are required to sustainably manage the natural resources.

The objective of the double degree master program is to qualify professionals and experts in the field of environmental and natural resources management with the necessary skills, tools and methods in the context of international cooperation with a clear focus on German/European Latin American cooperation. Graduates are able to analyze and solve complex environmental problems in their specific socio-cultural and political contexts, given the technical and economic potentials of both regions.

The ENREM program is based on the curricula of the two accredited master programs:

• “Maestria en Ciencias Ambientales”at the Programa Multidisciplinario de Posgrado en Ciencias Ambientales (PMPCA) at University San Luis Potosí (UASLP) in Mexico and
• “Natural Resources Management and Development” at the Institute for Technology and Resources Management in the Tropics and Subtropics (ITT) at TH Köln - University of Applied Sciences in Germany.

The ENREM Master program targets professionals of different academic backgrounds with experience related to the natural resources sector. They seek to deepen their knowledge in Environment and Resources Management and wish to acquire management and leadership skills as well as regional and intercultural competences within the context of international – especially German-Latin American cooperation – and at the same time provide their work experience and regional knowledge to the mutual learning and intercultural environment.

In an interdisciplinary learning environment, students diversify their knowledge and build the capacity to think transdisciplinarily and laterally, as well as team and leadership skills, among them intercultural abilities. These competencies shall equip the graduates with the ability to analyze, characterize and solve complex problems of environmental and natural resources management and well as foster sustainable development, all in line with the SDGs agenda.

Contents

The double degree master program runs for four semesters and starts in winter term (august) of each year. The first two semesters will take place in San Luis Potosí (Mexico), the third in Cologne (Germany) and the last semester is exclusively for the development of the master thesis project either in Mexico, another Latin American Country or Germany depending in the thesis topic.

Courses in Mexico are mainly implemented in Spanish while the official teaching language at ITT is English.

The course is structured through mandatory and elective modules, and is accompanied by practical experiences, exercises, team projects and seminars throughout the program.

The mandatory modules are organized in Core Modules and Project Modules, these modules provides the student with a general overview of different disciplines relevant to natural resources. The elective modules in the second and third semester are organized into two blocks, one in their area of “specialization elective related to the topics of natural resources management” and the other from the “Methods and Tools”.

Each of the two partner universities has a different focus related to the following areas:
• UASLP, Mexico: Prevention and Control, Environmental Assessment, Renewable Natural Resources, Environmental Management, Environmental and Health.
• TH Köln, Germany: Environmental and Land use Management, Urban and Regional Management complemented by Integrated Water Resources Management and/ or Renewable Energy Management

Tuition

Basic course fees for field trips, conference participation and course material,
Registration fees at both universities

Funding

The limited numbers of scholarship for covering living expenses are provided by:
• The Mexican national Council for Science and Technology (CONACYT): partial scholarship
• The German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD): full scholarship

There is no additional application required to apply for the scholarships. Acceptance to the master’s program does not guarantee a scholarship.

Read less
The MSc in Globalisation and Latin American Development focuses on the study of economic development in Latin America and the Caribbean and it is designed to prepare a new generation of regional leaders in international development. Read more

The MSc in Globalisation and Latin American Development focuses on the study of economic development in Latin America and the Caribbean and it is designed to prepare a new generation of regional leaders in international development. The programme focuses on the challenges and opportunities that globalisation and democracy offer to developing countries in the Americas and their impact for sustainable and equitable economic development.

About this degree

We encourage our students to understand development studies from an interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary approach. Our main focus is on historical and contemporary patterns of economic development and the social impact of economic growth and redistribution. Consequently, our programme provides the students with high-quality training in theories of economic development, social science methods, and principles of policy analysis.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (30 credits), four optional modules (60 credits), and the research dissertation (90 credits).

Please note: All optional modules are subject to availability.

Core modules

Our core module on Latin American Development examines different theories of economic growth, identifies some potential explanations of the current patterns of economic development in Latin America, and analyses how the region has responded to challenging global transformations.

Students also take a core module in research methods that includes sessions on research design, qualitative and quantitative methods, and fieldwork preparation.

  • Globalisation and Latin American Development
  • Researching the Americas: Latin America and the Caribbean

Optional modules

Additional to the core modules, students can take a number of optional modules that examine the political, sociological, historical, and anthropological aspects of development. Students choose four optional modules from a selection that includes the following:

  • Latin American Economics
  • Sustainable Development in Latin America and the Caribbean
  • Democratization in Latin America
  • The Latin American City: Social Problems and Social Change in Urban Space
  • Money and Politics in Latin America
  • The International Politics of Latin America
  • State and Society in Latin America: Ethnographic Perspectives
  • Histories of Exclusion: Race and Ethnicity in Latin America
  • The Politics of Human Rights in Latin America: Transitional Justice
  • The Politics of Human Rights in Latin America: Challenges to Democratization
  • The Caribbean from the Haitian Revolution to the Cuban Revolution

Students may choose elective modules up to a maximum of 30 credits from other UCL departments or University of London colleges, subject to the Programme Director's approval.

Dissertation/report

All students write a dissertation of 15,000 words (90 credits) on a research topic of their choice related to globalisation and economic development in Latin America.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, independent reading and research, seminar discussions and research skills training. Assessment is through essays, term papers, presentations, analytical exercises and the dissertation.

Fieldwork

Many of our MSc students undertake fieldwork in order to carry out research for their dissertation projects.

There may be travel costs associated with fieldwork. The institute has limited funds available to students to help towards the costs of fieldwork. These funds are awarded on a competitive basis on the criteria of academic performance to date, the quality of the research proposal and the importance of fieldwork for completing the research.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Globalisation and Latin American Development MSc

Careers

After completing the programme, our students generally go into careers in the development sector in the UK, Europe, and and Latin America. Our recent graduates have found jobs in international organisations, government institutions (UK and Latin America), NGOs, charitable organisations, think tanks, global news agencies, media groups, higher education institutions, and development consultancy organisations.

Some of our MSc graduates have also successfully gone on to PhD studies in top universities in the UK and the US.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Government Intern, Department of Corporate Strategy and Politics
  • Policy Officer, Green Party
  • Regulation Manager, City Credit Capital
  • Economist Editor, The Economist
  • Research and Policy Analyst, UK Collaborative on Development Sciences (UKCDS)

Employability

Our MSc graduates will have excellent opportunities to expand their professional networks and establish personal contacts that enhance their future employability. Through institute staff members' extensive professional and personal contacts in the region, and through participating in the institute's extremely active events programme, students will meet potential colleagues in government and the foreign service, development agencies and the international NGO community, business and finance, and print and electronic media. Numerous programme graduates have found employment in industry, state agencies and the third sector via these routes.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL is one of the world's top ten universities and the UCL Institute of the Americas has the largest programme of teaching, research and events on the Americas in the UK, covering Latin America, the Caribbean, Canada and the United States.

In addition to tuition by world-leading scholars, students benefit from access to a wide range of events, seminars, and conferences on the Americas delivered by scholars, policy-makers, diplomats, activists and other experts on the region.

The institute provides a unique environment in which to study the Americas and excellent networking opportunities are available through our strong links with academic, cultural, diplomatic, policy and business institutions with interests in the region.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



Read less
The Latin American Politics MSc provides students with an opportunity to develop their general and specialist knowledge of major issues in the politics of Latin America. Read more

The Latin American Politics MSc provides students with an opportunity to develop their general and specialist knowledge of major issues in the politics of Latin America. The programme's graduates have established careers in research, journalism, teaching, and policy formulation and implementation in both government agencies and NGOs.

About this degree

Students will develop a detailed understanding of the political histories of major Latin American countries, key public policy issues, the challenges of democratisation and democratic consolidation, and the domestic and international influences on political developments in the region. They will gain the key research and analysis skills necessary for professional development in the field of Latin American politics.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (15 credits each), four optional modules (60 credits in total), and the research dissertation (90 credits).

Please note: All optional modules are subject to availability

Core modules

  • Researching the Americas: Latin America and the Caribbean
  • Democratization in Latin America

Optional modules

Students choose four optional modules from a selection that includes the following:

  • Histories of Exclusion: Race and Ethnicity in Latin America
  • The International Politics of Latin America
  • Latin American Economics
  • Politics, Society and Development in the Modern Caribbean
  • State and Society in Latin America: Ethnographic Perspectives
  • Money and Politics in Latin America
  • The Politics of Human Rights in Latin America: Transitional Justice
  • The Caribbean from the Haitian Revolution to the Cuban Revolution
  • The Latin American City: Social Problems and Social Change in Urban Space
  • Globalisation and Latin American Development
  • Sustainable Development in Latin America and the Caribbean
  • The Politics of Human Rights in Latin America: Challenges to Democratization

Students may choose a maximum of 30 credits from other departments or from other University of London colleges, subject to the Programme Director's approval.

Dissertation/report

All students write a dissertation of 15,000 words on a research topic of their choice (linked to the subject area of one of their taught modules), provided that it contains a substantial politics focus.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of seminars, lectures, presentations, research skills training, and independent reading and research. There is a range of assessments including essays and a short oral presentation, and the dissertation.

Fieldwork

Many of our Master’s students undertake fieldwork in order to carry out research for their dissertation projects.

There may be travel costs associated with fieldwork. The institute has limited funds available to students to help towards the costs of fieldwork. These funds are awarded on a competitive basis on the criteria of academic performance to date, the quality of the research proposal and the importance of fieldwork for completing the research.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Latin American Politics MSc

Careers

Graduates of this programme will be well placed to use their skills and knowledge to find employment in government, business, journalism, finance, international NGOs, teaching, or for further research in this field.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Research Fellow, Institute for Statecraft
  • Researcher and Consultant, Verisk Maplecroft
  • Television News Producer, Channel 4
  • Risk Consultancy Intern, Control Risks
  • Project Manager, World Energy Council (WEC)

Employability

Students on this degree will have excellent opportunities to expand their professional networks and establish personal contacts that enhance their future employability. Through institute staff members' extensive professional and personal contacts in the region, and through participating in the institute's extremely active events programme, students will meet potential colleagues in government and the foreign service, development agencies and the international NGO community, business and finance, and print and electronic media. On the basis of such contacts, recent programme graduates have found employment in government (the Foreign and Commonwealth Office), NGOs (Amnesty International, Caritas) and political risk-analysis firms, while others have undertaken PhD research.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

In the UK the Institute of the Americas occupies a unique position in the academic study of the region in promoting, co-ordinating and providing a focus for research and postgraduate teaching on the Americas, including Canada, the Caribbean, Latin America and the United States.

The institute actively maintains and builds ties with cultural, diplomatic and business organisations with interests in the Americas, and it provides resources to the wider academic community, serving and strengthening national networks of North Americanist, Latin Americanist and Caribbeanist scholars.

Students benefit from tuition by world-leading scholars in an academic environment at the cutting-edge of research in the social sciences and the humanities.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



Read less
This multidisciplinary Master's programme provides a comprehensive overview of social sciences and humanities in Latin America. The programme's graduates have established careers in research, journalism, teaching, and policy formulation and implementation in both government agencies and NGOs. Read more

This multidisciplinary Master's programme provides a comprehensive overview of social sciences and humanities in Latin America. The programme's graduates have established careers in research, journalism, teaching, and policy formulation and implementation in both government agencies and NGOs.

About this degree

Depending on their chosen areas of specialisation, students will develop analytical and critical perspectives on multidisciplinary aspects of Latin American history, politics and international relations, anthropology, geography and environmental issues, and economics, as well as cultural studies. They will gain key research skills, together with in-depth knowledge of current debates in the field of Latin American Studies.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of one core module (15 credits), five optional modules (75 credits), and the research dissertation (90 credits).

Please note: All optional modules are subject to availability.

Core module

  • Researching the Americas: Latin America and the Caribbean

Optional modules

Students choose five option modules from a selection that includes the following:

  • Confronting the Colossus: US Anti-imperialism, 1945-present
  • Democratization in Latin America
  • Histories of Exclusion: Race and Ethnicity in Latin America
  • Globalisation and Latin American Development
  • The International Politics of Latin America
  • Latin American Economies
  • State and Society in Latin America: Ethnographic Perspectives
  • The Caribbean from the Haitian Revolution to the Cuban Revolution
  • Money and Politics in Latin America
  • The Politics of Human Rights in Latin America: Transitional Justice
  • Politics, Society and Development in the Modern Caribbean
  • The Latin American City: Social Problems and Social Change in Urban Space
  • Sustainable Development in Latin America and the Caribbean
  • The Politics of Human Rights in Latin America: Challenges to Democratisation

Students may choose a maximum of 30 credits from other departments or from other University of London colleges, subject to the Programme Director's approval.

Dissertation/report

All students write a dissertation of 15,000 words on a research topic of their choice linked to the subject area of one of their taught modules.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of seminars, lectures, presentations, research skills training, and independent reading and research. There is a range of assessments including essays and a short oral presentation, and the dissertation.

Fieldwork

Many of our Master’s students undertake fieldwork in order to carry out research for their dissertation projects.

There may be travel costs associated with fieldwork. The institute has limited funds available to students to help towards the costs of fieldwork. These funds are awarded on a competitive basis on the criteria of academic performance to date, the quality of the research proposal and the importance of fieldwork for completing the research.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Latin American Studies MA

Careers

Graduates of this programme will be well placed to use their skills and knowledge to find employment in government, business, journalism, finance, international NGOs, teaching, or for further research in this field.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • ESOL (English for Speakers of Other Languages) Teacher, Union Jack Services
  • Global Events Director, FC Business Intelligence
  • Production Manager, Red Bee Media

Employability

Students on this degree will have excellent opportunities to expand their professional networks and establish personal contacts that enhance their future employability. Through institute staff members' extensive professional and personal contacts in the region, and through participating in the institute's extremely active events programme, students will meet potential colleagues in government and the foreign service, development agencies and the international NGO community, business and finance, and print and electronic media. On the basis of such contacts, recent programme graduates have found employment in government (Foreign and Commonwealth Office), NGOs (Amnesty International, Caritas) and political risk-analysis firms, while others have undertaken PhD research.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

In the UK the Institute of the Americas occupies a core position in the academic study of the region in promoting, co-ordinating and providing a focus for research and postgraduate teaching on the Americas, including Canada, the Caribbean, Latin America and the United States.

The institute actively maintains and builds ties with cultural, diplomatic and business organisations with interests in the Americas, and provides resources to the wider academic community, serving and strengthening national networks of North Americanist, Latin Americanist and Caribbeanist scholars.

Students benefit from tuition by world-leading scholars in an academic environment at the cutting-edge of research in the humanities and social sciences.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



Read less
This exciting, intellectually rigorous programme gives you the opportunity to develop the study of literature from a variety of perspectives through a number of flexible pathways. Read more

This exciting, intellectually rigorous programme gives you the opportunity to develop the study of literature from a variety of perspectives through a number of flexible pathways.

The pathways you can take are:

These enable you to combine theoretical angles with the close reading of a wide range of texts, from different media (literary, filmic, visual), periods, and cultural, geographic and linguistic backgrounds – though all texts will be studied in English, in English translation, or with English subtitles.

Modules & structure

Each of the seven pathways centres around a core module which will ground you in the specific features of the period/region/theoretical discipline covered.

Pathway

Core Module

Pathway in Comparative Literature & Criticism - Studies in Comparative Literature & Criticism

Pathway in Modern Literary Theory - Theories of Literature & Culture

Pathway in Modern Literature - Modern Literary Movements

Pathway in Literature of the Caribbean & its Diasporas - Literature of the Caribbean & it Diasporas

Pathway in American Literature & Culture - American Literature & Culture: Critical & Theoretical Concepts

Pathway in Romantic and Victorian Literature & Culture - Nineteenth-Century Literature: Romanticisms

Pathway in Shakespeare: Early & Modern - Shakespeare and the Early Modern

A Study Support Workshop will run a number of sessions throughout the year, including sessions on, for example, resources, essay-writing at Master's level, planning and developing dissertation projects.

You will also be able to take part in GLITS, the department's weekly research seminar; in LINKS, the London Intercollegiate Network for Comparative Studies; and in the many activities organised by the Graduate School and other Goldsmiths departments.

Option modules

Around the core module you choose three option modules from the wide range of options taught in the Department to reflect your own particular interests. You may also take the core module of another pathway as one of your options.

In addition, you also undertake a dissertation.

For core and option module details, see the pathway pages.

Assessment

Extended course essays; dissertation of 15,000 words.

Skills

You'll develop transferable skills, including:

  • enhanced communication and discussion skills in written and oral contexts
  • the ability to analyse and evaluate different textual materials
  • the ability to organise information; the ability to assimilate and evaluate competing arguments

Careers

Graduates of this programme have gone on to pursue careers in:

  • publishing
  • journalism
  • public relations
  • teaching
  • advertising
  • the civil service
  • business
  • industry
  • the media

Find out more about employability at Goldsmiths



Read less
Our department offers a distinctively comparative approach to the study of literature; at Essex you don’t just study English literature, you study world literature in English. Read more
Our department offers a distinctively comparative approach to the study of literature; at Essex you don’t just study English literature, you study world literature in English. You explore literature across time, geography, and genre, combining scholarly research with innovative, practical ways of engaging with texts.

You grapple with the challenges of conducting research into Shakespeare and other early modern literature, acquiring specialist skills in archival research, palaeography, and the study of rare and antiquated books. You study materials on 18th century drama and literature, visiting the UK’s only surviving Regency Theatre to investigate how architecture affected the content of drama, and how drama reflected Georgian society. You have the opportunity to explore the history of genres such as the novel and lyric poetry, and study a truly extensive range of work; your reading takes you from African American literature, through Caribbean literatures, to the literature and performance of New York, Paris, Berlin, Vienna, Moscow and London.

Our department is ranked Top 20 in the UK (Guardian University Guide 2015), and three-quarters of our research is rated ‘world-leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’ (REF 2014).

This course is also available on a part-time basis.

Our expert staff

At Essex, we have an impressive literary legacy. Our history comprises staff (and students) who have been Nobel Prize winners, Booker Prize winners, and Pulitzer Prize winners.

Our Department is a vibrant conservatoire of scholars and practitioners who are committed to unlocking creative personal responses to literature. This distinctive environment is possible because we are a community of award-winning novelists, poets and playwrights, as well as leading literature specialists.

Our academic staff specialise in a range of areas including modernism, comparative and world literature, Shakespeare, the Renaissance, modernism, travel writing, nature writing, translated literature, cultural geography, Irish and Scottish writing, U.S. and Caribbean literatures, and the history of reading.

Specialist facilities

-Meet fellow readers at the student-run Literature Society or at our department’s Myth Reading Group
-Write for our student magazine Albert or host a Red Radio show
-View classic films at weekly film screenings in our dedicated 120-seat film theatre
-Learn from leading writers and literature specialists at weekly research seminars
-Our on-campus Lakeside Theatre has been established as a major venue for good drama, staging both productions by professional touring companies and a wealth of new work written, produced and directed by our own staff and students
-Improve your playwriting and performance skills at our Lakeside Theatre Workshops
-Our Research Laboratory allows you to collaborate with professionals, improvising and experimenting with new work which is being tried and tested

Your future

A good literature degree opens many doors.

We offer supervision for PhD, MPhil and MA by Dissertation in different literatures and various approaches to literature, covering most aspects of early modern and modern writing in English, plus a number of other languages.

Our University is one of only 11 AHRC-accredited Doctoral Training Centres in the UK. This means that we offer funded PhD studentships which also provide a range of research and training opportunities.

A number of our Department of Literature, Film, and Theatre Studies graduates have gone on to undertake successful careers as writers, and others are now established as scholars, university lecturers, teachers, publishers, publishers’ editors, journalists, arts administrators, theatre artistic directors, drama advisers, and translators.

We work with our Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Example structure

-Dissertation
-Research Methods in Literary and Cultural Analysis
-Georgian and Romantic Literature and Drama
-Early Modern to Eighteenth Century Literature
-The New Nature Writing (optional)
-Writing the Novel (optional)
-Memory Maps: Practices in Psychogeography (optional)
-Dramatic Structure (optional)
-Literature and Performance in the Modern City (optional)
-Adaptation
-Documentary and the Avant-garde: Film, Video, Digital
-Film and Video Production Workshop
-Advanced Film and Industry: Production and Industry
-US Nationalism and Regionalism (optional)
-African American Literature (optional)
-Sea of Lentils: Modernity, Literature, and Film in the Caribbean (optional)
-Writing Magic (optional)
-"There is a Continent Outside My Window" : United States and Caribbean Literatures in Dialogue (optional)
-Literature and the Environmental Imagination: 19th to 21st Century Poetry and Prose (optional)

Read less
Our MRes programme provide a personalised and focused introduction to postgraduate research allowing you to develop as an independent researcher with the support of an expert in Latin American Studies. Read more
Our MRes programme provide a personalised and focused introduction to postgraduate research allowing you to develop as an independent researcher with the support of an expert in Latin American Studies. It provides a rigorous overview of the current state of scholarship in your selected field, guides you, through a programme of directed, individualised reading, to the selection of a feasible research project, and allows you to complete a substantial piece of research.

As an MRes student you will benefit from your membership of the university research community, both students and academic staff. You will also have access to facilities available to doctoral students e.g. free Interlibrary loans, a print allowance and a research allowance.

Key Facts

REF 2014
We're ranked in top 50% for 4* and 3* research with 90% of environment at 4* and 3* (world leading and internationally excellent).

French
Since 2001, the Department has housed three major AHRC-funded projects in French; it also continues to be one of the leading centres in French studies for innovation in the application of IT and new technology to text-based research and the creation of international research networks. A major new monograph series, Liverpool University Press’s ‘Contemporary French and Francophone Cultures’, is co-edited within Modern Languages and Cultures.

German
Research in German studies at Liverpool continues to develop its breadth and vitality, through new appointments, and through a strategy directed towards promoting cooperation among staff in different subject areas. Colleagues are actively involved in interdisciplinary research centres, namely the Research Centre in Eighteenth-Century Studies, the Centre for the Study of International Slavery, and CAVA (The Centre for Architecture and the Visual Arts). These research centres provide a dynamic context for the development of staff and postgraduate research, and underpin and vitalise interdisciplinary research within the section and department as a whole.

Hispanic Studies
We continue to extend research activity over a broad range of areas in Iberian and Latin American Studies. The School is now at the forefront of high profile research in literary, historical, linguistic and cultural studies. Our research emphasises our understanding of ‘Hispanic studies’ in the broadest sense, as relating to the multiple geographical and linguistic contexts that make up the Hispanic and Lusophone worlds.

Latin American Studies and Italian Studies
The section has recently made new appointments including a new post extending our expertise to North America and the Caribbean. We have consolidated research clusters in American, Brazilian, Hispanic and Caribbean Studies, enhancing the research environment by providing institutional support to colleagues with related and overlapping interests. A University-wide research centre Research Institute of Latin American Studies (RILAS) fosters a robust research environment based in the Department.
Research in Italian studies is a recent addition to the School’s portfolio. The focus is on the contemporary and staff are involved in interdisciplinary research projects which feature, amongst others, the Linguistic Landscape, Italian political cinema and European cinema.

Why Department of Modern Languages and Cultures?

Introduction to Modern Languages and Cultures

We are a smaller department than many, but manage at the same time to maintain a variety of very distinctive areas of strength in research. As a result we are uniquely placed to offer taught programmes which are tailored to the individual in a friendly, supportive atmosphere and, for research students, close contact with your supervisors from the outset.

There is a high degree of interdisciplinary activity, with students and staff from all disciplines interacting through institutional research centres, cross-School reading groups, research groups and seminars.

We offer an MA in Latin American Studies and an MA in Modern Languages (French / German / Hispanic Studies/Italian) and supervision on a wide range of topics for both MPhil and PhD study.

Applications are welcome for both full-time and part-time study. Postgraduate students form an integral part of our research culture, and are encouraged to become involved in conference, workshops and seminar series, in addition, we have postgraduate reading groups and a regular programme of postgraduate workshops involving leading scholars visiting the institution. We have an active and vibrant research community, with staff engaging in research covering eight language areas consisting of French, German, Italian, Spanish, Galician, Catalan, Portuguese and Corsican. Research interests range from medieval manuscripts to contemporary cyber literature, and cover a wide geographical remit, with staff working on American, Latin American, and Caribbean, African and Indian contexts as well as European ones.

We are home to three scholarly journals: Bulletin of Hispanic Studies, Bulletin of Latin American Research, and Migrations and Identities as well as a number of prominent book series.

Research Overview

Our research activities are broadly organised around four research groups in addition to the Research Institute of Latin American Studies. The groups are engaged in interdisciplinary work, taking in literary, visual and historical sources, and collaborating across the language areas.

Latin American Studies

Latin American Studies is one of Modern languages and Cultures' major research specialisms. The six permanent members of staff have research interests in the following domains of Latin American Studies: anthropology, cultural studies, history, literature, politics, and sociology and extend to Brazil, Argentina, Chile, Central America, the Caribbean and southern USA. The Sydney Jones Library is an acknowledged centre of excellence for collections in Latin American Studies. Additional facilities for all postgraduates include access to regular seminars and short conferences, language tuition, and use of the University’s networked computer facilities.

Career prospects

Former postgraduates in French, German and Hispanic Studies are currently employed in senior positions at the universities of: Aberdeen, Sussex, Leeds, Sheffield, Kings College London, Loughborough, Salford and Liverpool, as well as in a variety of careers.

Read less
The MRes in Latin American Studies is a specialised degree that provides a unique opportunity for students interested in Latin American history, anthropology, geography, and culture to broaden and deepen their knowledge of Latin America and to develop an independent research project on a topic of their choice. Read more
The MRes in Latin American Studies is a specialised degree that provides a unique opportunity for students interested in Latin American history, anthropology, geography, and culture to broaden and deepen their knowledge of Latin America and to develop an independent research project on a topic of their choice.

Students gain an in-depth overview of key research problems and debates in the field of Latin American studies as well as an introduction to a range of research methods particularly useful for undertaking scholarly work on Latin America. Students are taught by leading scholars in the field of Latin American studies.

Students who successfully complete the programme receive a University of London Master of Research degree.

Degree Highlights

In their first term, students take Research Themes and Debates in Latin America, a 30-credit module that provides a historical introduction to key research problems and debates in the field of Latin American studies. Students learn how to recognise, problematise, and analyse themes and tropes within Latin American studies and identify where gaps in knowledge exist or where new approaches could enrich the field. In developing these skills, students become independent scholars. In their second term, students complete Research Methods in Latin American Studies, a 30-credit module that introduces the range of methods that can be applied in humanities and social science research in Latin American studies. Students are introduced to the practical issues that may be encountered in the field while conducting research in Latin America. Over the summer term, students complete a dissertation of 30,000 words based on their own independent research.

Resources

The Institute offers students a range of resources in Latin American studies that are unparalleled in the field. The ILAS Library collections, which have been integrated with the Senate House Latin American and Caribbean Studies collection, include more than
90,000 volumes. The holdings cover most aspects of Latin America and the Caribbean: the geographical spread covers all territories of Central and South America and the islands of the Caribbean, as well as the islands of the South Atlantic and Antarctic territories administered by Chile and Argentina. Most of the material is focused on the humanities and cognate social sciences. Through the ILAS collections, students also have access to primary materials that will be useful for their dissertations—for example, the material of the Political Archives, which includes pamphlets, posters, and reports from every country in the region. The ILAS Special Collections also contain many rare materials that are difficult to find elsewhere in the UK; some items are difficult to access even within Latin America itself, and are frequently in better condition than those in Latin American libraries and archives.

Why Study with Us?

The Institute of Latin American Studies is an internationally recognised centre of excellence for research. It has an extensive range of networks and contacts in the field of Latin American Studies as well as substantial library and digital resources. The Institute hosts hundreds of events every year and students will have the opportunity to work with leading visiting scholars and be part of a close-knit research community within ILAS.

Teaching is provided by core academic staff and features guest lectures from experts in the field for specific topics.

The ILAS Library collections are unparalleled and provide access to primary and secondary material related to most aspects of Latin America and the Caribbean.

Students also have access to Senate House Library, with its millions of books and journals, digital resources, special collections, beautiful study spaces and laptop loans.

Read less
This unique interdisciplinary degree will allow you to study race and strategies of resistance from a variety of historical and theoretical approaches. Read more

This unique interdisciplinary degree will allow you to study race and strategies of resistance from a variety of historical and theoretical approaches.

A broad transnational framework allows you to combine African, U.S., Caribbean, British and Southeast Asian history under the guidance of leading researchers in English, History, Gender Studies, Spanish, and Latin American studies. You’ll be trained in historical research methods and use varied materials such as novels, films, speeches, newspapers and organisational records to explore issues of race and resistance across very different periods and cultures.

Supported by the Institute for Colonial and Postcolonial Studies, you could study the slave trade, Mexican-American identity, race and feminism in the US, political violence in India or apartheid, among many others. It’s a fascinating and vital opportunity to gain an understanding of the roles that race and resistance have played in shaping the modern world – and how this complex relationship is evolving.

More Information

We have a wide range of resources to help you explore the topics that interest you. Among our library resources are microfilm collections of American, Indian and South African newspapers as well as journals relating to US civil rights. British and US government papers are also on microfilm, and an extensive set of British documents on end of empire and foreign affairs.

The Church Missionary Society Archives, the Black Power Movement archive and the Curzon papers are all available, and we have access to extensive online resources to access original material for your independent research.

With the chance to participate in our active research groups – such as Identity, Power and Protest; Women, Gender and Sexuality; and Health, Medicine and Society – and benefit from an impressive range of expertise among our tutors, you’ll find that the University of Leeds is a fantastic place to gain the knowledge and skills you need.

This degree is also available to study part-time over 24 months.

Course content

The first semester will lay the foundations of your studies, introducing you to historical research methods and approaches to the study of race and resistance. You’ll explore issues such as diasporas and migration, the legacy of non-violence and sexuality and race.

In Semester Two, you’ll build on this knowledge with your choice from a wide range of optional modules across different subject areas, on issues such as the Black Atlantic, postcolonial literature, British settler colonies in Africa and more.

Throughout the programme, you’ll develop your knowledge across a variety of areas as well as key skills in research and critical analysis. You’ll showcase these when you complete your dissertation, which will be independently researched on a topic of your choice and submitted by the end of the programme in September.

You’ll also have the opportunity to work collaboratively with partner organisations, such as the West Yorkshire Archive Service, by studying the ‘Making History: Archive Collaborations’ optional module

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll study over a longer period and take fewer modules in each year.

Course structure

These are typical modules/components studied and may change from time to time. Read more in our Terms and conditions.

Compulsory modules

  • Research Methodology in History 30 credits
  • Approaches to Race 30 credits
  • MA Race and Resistance: Dissertation 60 credits

Optional modules

  • Caribbean and Black British Writing 30 credits
  • Something Rotten: Transatlantic Capitalism and the Literature of Waste 1945-Present 30 credits
  • Race, Empire, Romanticism 30 credits
  • Turks, Moors, and Jews: Staging the Exotic in the Renaissance 30 credits
  • Global Genders30 creditsMaking History: Archive Collaborations 30 credits
  • Women, Gender and Sexuality: Archives and Approaches 30 credits
  • Black Internationalism 30 credits
  • India since 1947: Community, Caste and Political Violence 30 credits
  • Sexuality and Disease in African History 30 credits
  • Contesting Patriarchy: Debating Gender Justice in Colonial and Post-Colonial India.30 credits
  • Latin America and the Caribbean from Rebellion to Revolution, 1765-184530 credits
  • Insurgency and Counterinsurgency 30 credits
  • Anti-Apartheid: Cultures of the Struggle 30 credits
  • Race and Second Wave Feminism in the US 30 credits
  • 'Race', Identity and Culture in the Black Atlantic 30 credits
  • Researching Inequality in the Media 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Race and Resistance MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Race and Resistance MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

Independent study is an important part of this degree, allowing you to develop your own ideas and improve your skills in research and analysis. You’ll then come together with tutors and other students for weekly seminars where you’ll discuss issues and themes in each of your modules.

Assessment

All of the modules on this programme are assessed by coursework. This can take a range of forms, including essays, discursive writing, bibliographies, reviews and presentations among others. Optional modules are usually assessed by two 3,000-word essays.

Career opportunities

This MA will give you a deeper understanding of how conceptions of race have shaped and been shaped by the world we live in, as well as the ways in which individuals and communities have employed different strategies of resistance. Crucially, it will equip you with sound intercultural awareness and allow you to look at situations from different points of view, as well as advanced skills in research, analysis, interpretation and written and oral communication.

Graduates have found success in a wide range of careers where they have been able to use their knowledge. These have included teaching and education, research and policy work for NGOs, think tanks and the charity sector. Many others have pursued PhD level study in related fields.

We offer different forms of support to help you reach your career goals. You’ll have the chance to attend our career groups, meeting students with similar plans, or you could become a paid academic mentor to an undergraduate completing their final-year dissertation. You could also apply for one of the internships we offer each year.



Read less
Should translated literature be entirely faithful to the original text, or should the translation be creative in its attempt not to lose the poetry of the work? How can translation account for double entendre or other wordplay? Is it possible to translate experimental literature which ignores conventional grammar rules?. Read more
Should translated literature be entirely faithful to the original text, or should the translation be creative in its attempt not to lose the poetry of the work? How can translation account for double entendre or other wordplay? Is it possible to translate experimental literature which ignores conventional grammar rules?

Building on the internationally recognised expertise of both our Departments of Language and Linguistics, and our Department of Literature, Film and Theatre Studies, our MA Translation and Literature course will allow you to further specialise in literature and general translation. In the second term you will also learn techniques of professional literary translation. You develop your own personal translation skills, allowing you to translate a literary work accurately and creatively from one language to another for your dissertation.

Our course is offered with the combination of English and one of Arabic, French, German, Italian, Portuguese and Spanish. You can be a native or near-native speaker of any of these languages, as you learn to translate to and from both languages. You work with native speakers in developing your ability to move accurately and quickly between your chosen language and English.

Explore our hands-on, practical modules, including:
-Principles of Translation
-US and Caribbean literatures in dialogue
-Translation Portfolios
-Technologies of Translation

We are one of the largest and most prestigious language and linguistics departments in the world, a place where talented students become part of an academic community in which the majority of research is rated ‘world-leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’, placing us firmly within the top 10 departments in the UK (REF 2014)

Our Department of Language and Linguistics is ranked among the top 150 departments on the planet and our Department of Literature, Film, and Theatre Studies is ranked among the top 200 departments on the planet, according to the QS World [University] Rankings [2016].

If you want a global outlook, are interested in human communication, and want to study for a degree with real-world practical value in a world-class department, welcome to Essex.

Our expert staff

Our lecturers are skilled interpreters and translators, experienced in training students with the necessary skills for professional practice. We maintain excellent student-staff ratios with capped language-specific seminars.

Our lecturers come from around the world including France, Belgium, Germany, Italy, Brazil, Spain, Cuba, China, and the UK. They will share their expertise with you in the areas of professional translation.

Within our Department of Literature, Film and Theatre Studies, Professor Karin Littau specialises in book and film history, reception, adaptation and translation studies, and is especially interested in the effects of print, cinematograph, and computers on practices of reading, writing and translation. Dr Clare Finburgh has translated several plays from French into English, and worked as dramaturg for productions of British plays in France, and French works in the UK.

Specialist facilities

-24-hour self-access to our translation lab dedicated to translation students
-Use specialist software such as SDL Trados Studio 2015
-Meet fellow readers at the student-run Literature Society or at the department’s Myth Reading Group
-Access the University’s Media Centre, equipped with state-of-the-art studios, cameras, audio and lighting equipment, and an industry-standard editing suite
-Weekly multilingual workshops led by internationally renowned experts from the industry
-Our Languages for All programme offers you the opportunity to study an additional language alongside your course at no extra cost

Your future

If you love literature and languages and would like to acquire professional translation skills, then our MA Translation and Literature is for you. Takers of our courses in translation can use the skills gained to further their future career in this area.

You develop a range of key employability skills including researching, writing for specific purposes, and translation. Our course typically leads to a career in translation, but could also lead to a career in education, publishing and administration.

We work with the University’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Within our Department of Language and Linguistics, we also offer supervision for PhD and MPhil. We offer supervision in areas including language acquisition, language learning and language teaching, culture and communication, psycholinguistics, language disorders, sociolinguistics, and theoretical and descriptive linguistics.

Our graduates are successful in a wide variety of career paths. They leave Essex with a unique set of skills and experience that are in demand by employers.

Example structure

-Principles of Translation and Interpreting
-Technologies of Translation
-Dissertation
-Translation Portfolio I (French) (optional)
-Translation Portfolio II (French) (optional)
-Translation Portfolio I (German) (optional)
-Translation Portfolio II (German) (optional)
-Translation Portfolio I (Portuguese) (optional)
-Translation Portfolio II (Portuguese) (optional)
-Translation Portfolio I (Spanish) (optional)
-Translation Portfolio II (Spanish) (optional)
-Translation Portfolio I (Italian) (optional)
-Translation Portfolio II (Italian) (optional)
-Writing the Novel (optional)
-Memory Maps: Practices in Psychogeography (optional)
-The Tale: Tellings and Re-Tellings (optional)
-Dramatic Structure (optional)
-Literature and Performance in the Modern City
-Early Modern to Eighteenth Century Literature
-Georgian and Romantic Literature and Drama
-Adaptation (optional)
-Documentary and the Avant-garde: Film, Video, Digital (optional)
-Film and Video Production Workshop (optional)
-Advanced Film and Industry: Production and Industry
-US Nationalism and Regionalism (optional)
-African American Literature
-Sea of Lentils: Modernity, Literature, and Film in the Caribbean
-Writing Magic (optional)
-"There is a Continent Outside My Window" : United States and Caribbean Literatures in Dialogue (optional)
-Literature and the Environmental Imagination: 19th to 21st Century Poetry and Prose

Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page



Cookie Policy    X