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The MSc programme draws on knowledge and skills acquired in many years of providing specialist classes in local history, and profits from close links with local, social and economic historians elsewhere in the University. Read more
The MSc programme draws on knowledge and skills acquired in many years of providing specialist classes in local history, and profits from close links with local, social and economic historians elsewhere in the University. The programme is overseen by the University’s Continuing Education Board, and admission is through the Department for Continuing Education. All graduate students must apply also for membership of a college. Most choose to become members of Kellogg College, which caters particularly for part-time mature students and which is closely associated with the Department.

The Critchley Scholarship for 2015 entry:
We are pleased to announce a new scholarship which will be awarded to the applicant with the greatest academic potential who is applying for the course for entry in September 2015. The award will fund half of the EU/UK tuition fees for the course. All applicants will be considered for the award.

Visit the website https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/msc-in-english-local-history

Introduction

Teaching and supervision on the MSc programme is provided by the Department’s University Lecturer, Dr Mark Smith, and specialist tutors from the Department and elsewhere in Oxford and further afield. An impression of the interests represented in the Department’s teaching and research supervision can be gained from the Advanced Papers currently offered as part of the Master’s course: Power and patronage in the later medieval localities; Kinship, culture and community: Provincial elites in early modern England; Poverty and the Poor Law in England, 1660-1800; Enclosure and rural change, 1750-1850; Religion and community in England, 1830-1914; The social history of English architecture, 1870-1940; the English suburb, 1800-1939.

The Department’s graduate students are members of the Continuing Education Graduate School and have access to the full range of Oxford University’s library, archive and computing facilities.

The course is designed to combine a systematic training in historical research techniques with the study of a range of major local historical themes and the chance to undertake an individually researched dissertation. It will be relevant to potential or practising teachers, archaeologists, environmental planners, archivists, librarians, museum professionals and teachers in adult education, and indeed anyone wishing to pursue the subject for its own sake.

IT skills

Please note that most Departmental courses require assignments to be submitted online, and although the online submission system is straightforward and has step by step instructions, it does assume students have access to a PC and a sufficient level of computing experience and skill to upload their assignments. Applicants should be familiar with the use of computers for purposes such as word-processing, using e-mail and searching the Internet.

College Affiliation

It is a requirement of Oxford University that Master of Science students are matriculated members of the University and one of its colleges. Masters students based in the Department for Continuing Education are encouraged to apply to become members of Kellogg College. In previous intakes almost all students on this course have chosen to join Kellogg. Continuing education and life-long learning in Oxford have been formally linked to the collegiate system of the University since 1990, when Kellogg College, the University’s 36th college, was established. Kellogg College is specifically geared to the needs of mature and part-time students

Libraries and computing facilities

Registered students receive an Oxford University card, valid for one year at a time, which acts as a library card for the Departmental Library at Rewley House and provides access to the unrivalled facilities of the Bodleian Libraries which include the central Bodleian, major research libraries such as the Sackler Library, Taylorian Institution Library, Bodleian Social Science Library, and faculty libraries such as English and History. Students also have access to a wide range of electronic resources including electronic journals, many of which can be accessed from home. Students on the course are entitled to use the Library at Rewley House for reference and private study and to borrow books. The loan period is normally two weeks and up to eight books may be borrowed. Students will also be encouraged to use their nearest University library. More information about the Continuing Education Library can be found at http://www.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/conted

The University card also provides access to facilities at Oxford University Computing Service (OUCS), 13 Banbury Road, Oxford. Computing facilities are available to students in the Students'Computing Facility in Rewley House and at Ewert House.

Assessment

Assessment is based on a mix of coursework assignments and a dissertation. The assessment falls into two parts, the first of which is called by the University a Qualifying Test and the second of which is called the Final Examination.

The Qualifying Test

The Qualifying Test, which must be passed in order to proceed to the rest of the degree, consists of a total of three assignments related to the work of the first term.

Assignment 1: A review of a work of local history (500 words). 10% of the marks for the test.

Assignment 2: An essay on issues relating to the nature of local history (2,000-2,500 words). 40% of the marks for the test.

Assignment 3: An essay on issues relating to the sources and practices of local history, especially the relationship of fieldwork and/or quantification to other sources and approaches (2,500-3,000 words). 50% of the marks for the test.

The Final Examination
The second part of the assessment determines the final classification of the MSc and comprises eight written assignments and a dissertation.

There will be 2 x 2,500 word assignments for each of the Sources, Methods and Foundations papers. (In total the assignments for the Sources, Methods and Foundations papers comprise 10% of the marks for the final examination.)

There will be 2 x 5,000 word essays for each of the Advanced Papers. (In total the essays for the Advanced Papers comprise 40% of the marks for the final examination.)

There will be a dissertation of 15,000 words (The dissertation counts as 50% of the marks for the final examination.)

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The Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies offers an exciting new opening for graduates of all disciplines to pursue a taught postgraduate qualification in historical studies. Read more
The Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies offers an exciting new opening for graduates of all disciplines to pursue a taught postgraduate qualification in historical studies. This one-year part-time course offers a unique opportunity for students to combine focused study of key historical themes and concepts in British and Western European history with either a broad-based approach to history or with the opportunity to specialise by period or in a branch of the discipline (political, social, economic, art, architectural and local). The course culminates in the research and preparation of a substantial dissertation.

The Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies forms part of a two-year Master's programme. Students who successfully complete the Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies are eligible to apply to the Master's of Study in Historical Studies (https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/mst-in-historical-studies).

This Historical Studies course offers a stimulating and supportive environment for study. As a student of Oxford University you will also be entitled to attend History Faculty lectures and to join the Bodleian Library. The University’s Museums and Art Galleries are within easy walking distance.

Visit the website https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/postgraduate-certificate-in-historical-studies

Course content

Unit 1: Princes, States, and Revolutions
The first unit examines the interaction between the state and the individual from medieval to modern times and focuses upon authority, resistance, revolution and the development of political institutions. It introduces the development of scholarly debate, key historical themes and the critical analysis of documentary sources. Students explore disorder and rebellion in medieval and early modern England; the causes and impact of the British Civil Wars; and the causes and impact of the French Revolution.

Unit 2: European Court Patronage c.1400
The second unit explores cultural patronage in late medieval Europe and examines the diverse courtly responses to shared concerns and experiences, including the promotion of power and status; the relationship between piety and power; and the impact of dominant cultures. It introduces comparative approaches to history, the critical analysis of visual sources and the methodological issues surrounding the interpretation of material culture and the translation of written sources. Students compare the courts of Richard II of England, Philip the Bold and John the Fearless of Burgundy, Charles V and Charles VI of France, and Giangaleazzo Visconti of Milan.

Unit 3: Religious Reformations and Movements
The third unit examines the role of organised religion and religious movements in the lives of people in the past. It utilises case studies from different historical periods to explore the impact of local circumstances upon the reception and development of new ideas and further encourages engagement with historical debate and the interpretation of documentary and visual sources. Students explore: medieval monasticism; the English and European reformations of the sixteenth century; and religion and society in nineteenth-century England, including the rise of nonconformity, secularism and the Oxford Movement.

Unit 4: Memory and Conflict
The fourth unit focuses upon a central theme in the study of twentieth-century European history: how societies have chosen to remember (and forget) violent conflicts, and the relationship between public and private memory. It explores the challenges faced by historians when interpreting documentary, visual and oral sources in the writing of recent history. Students examine the theoretical context and methodological approaches to the study of memory and consider two case studies: World War I and the Spanish Civil War.

Unit 5: Special Subjects
In the final unit, students study a source-based special subject and research and write a dissertation on a related topic of their own choice. A range of subjects will be offered, varying from year to year, allowing specialization across both time periods and the historical disciplines. Examples include:

- Visualising Sanctity: Art and the Culture of Saints c1150-1500
- The Tudor Court
- The English Nobility c1540-1640
- The Great Indian Mutiny and Anglo-Indian Relations in the Nineteenth Century
- The British Empire
- Propaganda in the Twentieth Century

The on-line teaching modules

The first module provides a pre-course introduction to history and post-graduate study skills. The second focuses upon the analysis and interpretation of material sources, such as buildings and images and the third upon the analysis and interpretation of a range of documentary sources. All include a range of self-test exercises.

Libraries and computing facilities

Registered students receive an Oxford University card, valid for one year at a time, which acts as a library card for the Departmental Library at Rewley House and provides access to the unrivalled facilities of the Bodleian Libraries which include the central Bodleian, major research libraries such as the Sackler Library, Taylorian Institution Library, Bodleian Social Science Library, and faculty libraries such as English and History. Students also have access to a wide range of electronic resources including electronic journals, many of which can be accessed from home. Students on the course are entitled to use the Library at Rewley House for reference and private study and to borrow books. The loan period is normally two weeks and up to eight books may be borrowed. Students will also be encouraged to use their nearest University library. More information about the Continuing Education Library can be found at http://www.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/conted.

The University card also provides access to facilities at Oxford University Computing Service (OUCS), 13 Banbury Road, Oxford. Computing facilities are available to students in the Students' Computing Facility in Rewley House and at Ewert House.

Course aims

The Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies course is designed to:

- provide a structured introduction to the study of medieval and modern British and European history;

- develop awareness and understanding of historical processes, such as continuity and change, comparative perspectives and the investigation of historical problems;

- provide the methodology required to interpret visual arts as historical evidence;

- equip students to evaluate and interpret historical evidence critically;

- promote interest in the concept and discipline of history and its specialisms;

- enable students to develop the analytical and communication skills needed to present historical argument orally and in writing;

- prepare students for progression to study at Master's level.

By the end of the course students will be expected to:

- display a broad knowledge and understanding of the themes and methodologies studied;

- demonstrate a detailed knowledge and understanding of key topics, the historical interpretation surrounding them and the relationship between local case-studies and the national perspective;

- utilise the appropriate critical and/or technical vocabulary associated with the disciplines, periods and themes covered;

- identify underlying historical processes, make cross-comparisons between countries and periods and explore historical problems;

- assess the relationship between the visual arts and the cultural framework within which they were produced;

- evaluate and analyse texts and images as historical evidence and utilise them to support and develop an argument;

- develop, sustain and communicate historical argument orally and in writing;

- reflect upon the nature and development of the historical disciplines and their contribution to national culture;

- demonstrate the skills needed to conduct an independent research project and present it as a dissertation within a restricted timeframe.

Assessment methods

The Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies is assessed through coursework. This comprises: four essays of 2,500 words each, two source-based exercises of 1,500 words each and a dissertation of 8,000 words. Students will write one essay following each of the first four units and the dissertation following unit 5. There will be a wide choice of assignment subjects for each unit and students will select a dissertation topic relating to their special subject with the advice of the course team. Students will be asked to write a non-assessed book review following the first pre-course online module and the source-based exercises will follow the second and third online modules.

Assignment titles, submission deadlines and reading lists will be supplied at the start of the course.

Tuition and study

A variety of teaching methods will be used in both the face-to-face and online elements of the course. In addition to lectures, PowerPoint slide presentations and tutor-led discussion, there will be opportunities for students to undertake course exercises in small groups and to give short presentations on prepared topics.

University lectures

Students are taught by the Department’s own staff but are also entitled to attend, at no extra cost, the wide range of lectures and research seminars organised by the University of Oxford’s History Faculty. Students are able to borrow books from both the Department’s library and the History Faculty Library, and are also eligible for membership of the Bodleian Library.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/applying-to-oxford

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This programme welcomes you to a lively intellectual and cultural scene, at a university ranked in the world’s top 50 for English Literature (QS World University Rankings 2017). Read more

This programme welcomes you to a lively intellectual and cultural scene, at a university ranked in the world’s top 50 for English Literature (QS World University Rankings 2017). You will study with world-class experts in Victorian literature whose interests range across many aspects of literature and culture. You’ll be able to draw on the extraordinary resources of Glasgow’s museums and libraries and have the opportunity to meet with visiting scholars from around the UK, Europe and the United States.

Why this programme

  • At the height of the nineteenth century, during the two Great Exhibitions of 1881 and 1901 in Kelvingrove Park, Glasgow was often called the ‘Second City of the Empire’. This M.Litt. offers a chance to come and study Victorian literature in this impressive historical city with its fantastic heritage.
  • You will be taught by a team of highly qualified researchers and lecturers with an international reputation for research and teaching in Victorian literature.
  • You will benefit from direct access to our outstanding holdings of Victorian primary and critical sources within the Special Collections of the University Library and the Hunterian Gallery and Museum.
  • We offer an exciting series of workshops tailored to research on Victorian topics, including tours of Glasgow University’s Special Collections, workshops on electronic resources, and field trips to sites of special interest such as the Murray Collection in the National Library of Scotland, Robert Owen’s New Lanark, and the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons.

Programme structure

You’ll take:

  • Three core courses
  • Three optional courses

You’ll also write a 15,000 word dissertation.

Semester 1: September to December

  • Victorian 1: Writing the Times
  • Research Training Course
  • Optional course

Semester 2: January to March

  • Victorian 2: Writers, Readers, Publishers
  • Optional course
  • Optional course

Summer: April to September

Dissertation

Find out more about core and optional courses.

Part-time students: programme structure

Teaching methods

Teaching will be by a combination of 90-minute seminars for the core and option courses and 45-minute supervisions for the dissertation. You will also be given the opportunity to attend relevant lectures in the undergraduate programme, particularly where your first degree has not given you a wide background in Victorian literature. There may be occasional workshops on humanities computing in the STELLA laboratory. The teaching sessions will be designed throughout to maximise student involvement, and there will be a range of opportunities for informal contact among staff and students outside teaching hours.

Career prospects

You’ll develop a wide range of skills sought by many employers, including:

  • the ability to find, select and manage large quantities of information 
  • confident and persuasive oral and written communication
  • problem solving through creative and critical thinking.

The programme also provides an excellent platform for PhD studies.



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This course provides graduates of other degrees with the opportunity to qualify for a teaching profession in one year of full-time study. Read more

Professional Recognition

This course provides graduates of other degrees with the opportunity to qualify for a teaching profession in one year of full-time study. Successful graduates can register with the Queensland College of Teachers. International students should consult the relevant authority in their home country.

Who will I teach?

The Graduate Diploma of Education (Secondary) focuses on the education of students in Years 7 to 12. The junior secondary years (Years 7-10) is an exciting phase of learning, while the senior secondary years (Years 11-12) are a critical time for young people as they develop their plans for post-secondary education and work.
You will learn to teach two secondary areas of teaching in Years 7 to 10, specialising in one related secondary area of teaching in Years 11 and 12.

Professional Experience

An integral part of becoming a teacher is gaining practical experience in schools. You will be required to complete 55 days of professional experience in secondary school settings during the course plus an additional 20 days of wider professional education. Placements are allocated in government and non-government schools.

Blue card

You will need a Blue Card (a working with children check issued by the Queensland Commission for Children and Young People and Child Guardian) before commencing your professional experience.

Course learning outcomes

On successful completion of the Graduate Diploma of Education (Secondary), graduates will be able to:
*Demonstrate broad and coherent understanding of professional knowledge, practice and engagement with depth in the National Professional Standards for Teachers
*Demonstrate broad and coherent understanding of underlying principles and concepts, and teaching and learning approaches for the tropics in the areas of Indigenous education, education for sustainability, rural and regional education
*Review critically, analyse, evaluate, consolidate and synthesise professional knowledge, practice and engagement and apply the findings to enhance outcomes for diverse students
*Communicate professional knowledge clearly and coherently through oral and written modes to students and key stakeholders in professional practice and engagement
*Identify and solve problems and make informed decisions in diverse professional contexts with well-developed judgement and initiative
*Demonstrate dispositions required for effective teaching that embrace responsibility and accountability for professional knowledge, practice and engagement including collaboration with stakeholders.

Award title

GRADUATE DIPLOMA OF EDUCATION (SECONDARY) GDipEd(Secondary)

Minimum English language proficiency requirements

Applicants of non-English speaking backgrounds must meet the following English language proficiency requirements:
An overall IELTS of 7.5 with no component lower than 8 in Speaking and Listening and no score below 7 in Reading and Writing.
Note: All students must attain an overall IELTS (or equivalent) score of 7.5 (with no score below 7 in any of the four skills areas, and a score of no less than 8 in speaking and listening) upon completion as required by the Queensland College of Teachers. The cost of the testing will be met by the applicant. English test results must be no more than two years old.

Why JCU?

James Cook University offers professional development opportunities, student flexibility through course design and structure, as well as a successful history in securing funding for major research programs.

Application deadlines

Last Friday in October the year before commencement

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This taught degree programme has a unique focus, offering training in all aspects of filmmaking, from concept and creative development through the filmmaking process and on to distribution and marketing. Read more
This taught degree programme has a unique focus, offering training in all aspects of filmmaking, from concept and creative development through the filmmaking process and on to distribution and marketing. By the end of the degree, students will have developed a competition and festival-ready calling-card short film, together with transferrable skills in developing and marketing their product and an understanding of the nature of the film industry.

Teaching on this degree conforms to current industry practice, and includes training and mentoring in standard development documents, such as screenplay, treatment and storyboards, and in areas such as risk assessment and budget management. Visiting guest speakers from various areas of the film industry provide an essential context on changing practices, as well as offering useful information of their own experiences in film. The programme does not include training in basic production techniques, and successful applicants will have a first degree in Media Studies or a related discipline, and/or equivalent industry experience.

All students on this programme receive a production budget.

Modules:

The Film Industry: The aim of this module is to foster an understanding of the workings of the international film industry; film production, distribution, exhibition, marketing and consumption will all be examined. There will be an initial focus on the historical development of the film industry on an international scale, with a particular emphasis on Hollywood and its relationship with the rest of the world. Various aspects and traditions within the modern day film industry will be examined, including ‘independent’ and ‘world’ cinema, and the situation in the UK, as well as Hollywood today.

Concept Development: This module introduces students to the practical and theoretical aspects of developing concepts for film, as well as the craft of screenwriting including script formatting, style, structure, genre, plotting, characterisation and dialogue. Students will be encouraged to develop professional writing habits and to give and receive critically constructive comment and advice, as well an understanding of storytelling in visual media at postgraduate level.

Film Production: The micro short: This module aims to develop students’ knowledge of the technical aspects of filmmaking, including direction, camera-work, lighting, music and editing, with the aim of producing a high-quality two-minute short film. Students will also gain understanding of the economic forces that frame the film industry and an understanding of the role of technology in production, content manipulation, distribution, access and use.

Writing the Short Film: This module expands students’ practical experience of screenwriting, and advances core theories on the synthesis of creative and industry practice, as well as focusing specifically on the history, format, aesthetics and demands of the short film. Students will also learn how to present and communicate their concepts in industry standard documents such as beat sheets, treatments and storyboards, in order to facilitate the filming of short film screenplays in the latter part of the MA course.

Pre-Production: The short film: This module aims to develop knowledge on the practical and budgetary aspects of pre-producing a festival quality short film, including commissioning strategies, casting, rehearsals, risk assessment, location scouting, and the managing and co-ordination of a production crew. Students will also manage a production budget in order to understand the economic practicalities of filmmaking and the importance of the commissioning and funding structures of the creative industries.

Film Production - Dissertation: This module utilises the skills and knowledge developed during the previous modules on this MA; providing students with funding and the opportunity to recruit a crew from undergraduate students to produce a short film. Students will generate work that displays exceptional capability in operational aspects of media production technologies, systems, techniques and professional practices to produce a competition and festival-ready calling-card short film.

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Develop the technical skills and understanding of business, operations and strategy to prepare you for a career in engineering management. Read more

Develop the technical skills and understanding of business, operations and strategy to prepare you for a career in engineering management.

This course is new for 2018 and subject to final approval. Register your interest nowand we will let you know when you can apply.

Our course builds your skills in leadership and management and teaches you how to apply them in an engineering context. You'll explore the impact of new technologies and how they relate to management in the engineering sector. Your studies will cover business analysis, product development and supply chain management.

In your first semester, you’ll learn management essentials including finance, operations, project management and strategy. You'll have the opportunity to focus on areas of management that are most relevant to you.

You will apply your core management skills and learn more about engineering business in your second semester. You’ll explore emerging trends such as next generation manufacturing approaches, new product and service development, and environmental management. Throughout the course, you'll be challenged to apply your learning and use analytical skills.

We give you the choice of completing your degree with a dissertation or group project. The dissertation focuses on an area that interests you and draws on current management practice. The group project challenges you to tackle a real business management problem relevant to engineering industries. Working in teams gives you the opportunity to build leadership, communication and negotiation skills.

Our course is delivered by the Faculty of Engineering & Design and School of Management. This collaborative approach bridges the gap between the two disciplines. You’ll learn from academics with expertise in engineering, innovation, management and business. Their research activities and industrial collaborations will enhance your learning experience. You will benefit from our links to business through guest lectures, site visits and opportunities to work with partner companies on research projects.

The skills you graduate with will help you achieve your career aims. You could work in engineering companies, technology consultancies, research agencies and other organisations worldwide.

You may also want to look at our related course, MSc in Innovation and Technology Management.

COURSE STRUCTURE

This course lasts 1 year. It starts in October 2018 and ends in 2019. Induction week starts on 24 September 2018.

Occasionally we make changes to our programmes in response to, for example, feedback from students, developments in research and the field of studies, and the requirements of accrediting bodies. You will be advised of any significant changes to the advertised programme, in accordance with our Terms and Conditions.

LEARNING AND ASSESSMENT

Learning

  • Lectures
  • Practical sessions
  • Seminars
  • Tutorials
  • Workshops

Assessment

  • Coursework
  • Dissertation
  • Essay
  • Oral assessment
  • Portfolio
  • Practical work
  • Seminar
  • Written examination

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

QUALIFICATIONS                  

UNITED KINGDOM QUALIFICATIONS

You should have a bachelor’s honours degree or international equivalent, typically a high 2:2 or above.

To apply for this course, you should have an undergraduate degree in engineering or management.

If your first language is not English but within the last 2 years, you completed your degree in the UK, you may be exempt from our English language requirements.

We may make an offer based on a lower grade if you can provide evidence of your suitability for the degree.

ENGLISH LANGUAGE REQUIREMENTS

  • IELTS: 6.5 overall with no less than 6.0 in all components
  • The Pearson Test of English Academic (PTE Academic): 62 with no less than 59 in any element
  • TOEFL IBT: 90 overall with a minimum 21 in all 4 components

FEES AND FUNDING

Payment options

You can pay your tuition fees by Direct Debit, debit card, credit card, cheque, bank transfer or cash. You may also be eligible for a student loan to help you pay your fees.

Read more about your payment options

Fees

Your tuition fees and how you pay them will depend on whether you are a Home, EU, Island or Overseas student.

Learn how we decide fee status

TUITION FEES

See the most recent fees for postgraduate courses.

Budgeting

You will need to budget at least £100 for the cost of photocopying, printing and binding. You will also need to budget for the cost of text books.

Some courses involve visits away from campus and you may be required to pay some or all of the costs of travel, accommodation and food and drink.

  • If you’re on a placement, you’re responsible for your own travel, accommodation and living costs. You should also consider the financial implications if you go on an unpaid or overseas placement.

APPLICATION INFORMATION

  • Course title
  • Engineering Business Management
  • Final award
  • MSc
  • Mode of study
  • Full-time
  • UK/EU application deadline
  • 31 August 2018
  • Overseas deadline
  • 30 June 2018
  • Application eligibility
  • UK and Overseas students are eligible to apply

COURSE ENQUIRIES

PGT Admissions

+441225385115



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Course content. The course has been developed in close consultation with the industry, so we are teaching you the skills your future employers want you to have. Read more

Course content

The course has been developed in close consultation with the industry, so we are teaching you the skills your future employers want you to have.

It’s a strongly project focused course and you will develop an effective workflow, remote working and collaboration and a clear understanding of what’s expected of the game composer as a member of the game audio team.

All your tutors are working professional video game composers.

You will work on an inspiring range of games, including commercial releases, provided as part of your course materials.

You will learn not only how to create inspiring interactive music but also how to implement your score inside the game using industry standard middleware like FMOD and WWise.

There are plenty of music production schools yet, despite increasing interest in video games soundtracks, almost none who specialize in scoring computer games.

This is currently the only online master’s degree in composing for video games. So if you enjoy working in a vibrant and rapidly evolving area of music production, if you embrace the technical and creative challenges that scoring computer games will involve, then come and join us.

Our MA will bring you the real-world professional tuition you need to lay the solid foundations of a career composing music for video games.

Teaching and assessment

  • Personal 1-to-1 tuition from top professional composers and sound designers.
  • Learn by working through projects. The workload is challenging but it’s only through hard work that you will truly reach the next level.. The workload is challenging but it’s only through hard work that you will truly reach the next level.
  • Detailed feedback from a range of tutors, online workshops and tutorial groups, forum discussions and exclusive webinars.
  • Telephone and direct email support.

Hardware and software

You will be uploading and downloading a large quantity of material so you should have access to a reliable broadband with a speed of at least 5Mbs or more.

We have found that the Google Chrome browser is the most compatible with the Adobe Connect webinar software we use which will also be an important part of your course.

All your assignments are uploaded through the Student Portal on our website. This can also be accessed with any standard FTP client, for example CuteFTP on a PC or Transmit on a Mac.

HARDWARE

You will need a computer, software and ancillary equipment (MIDI keyboard, monitors, hard drives both internal and external), Mac or PC, capable of producing professional quality music and audio, and recording equipment. This is the overriding principle and the following minimum technical specifications are given for guidance.

PC

  • Windows 7 or above PC laptop / desktop
  • Quad core 2.3 GHz processor +
  • 16 GB RAM +
  • Graphics card, 1GB GPU (EVGA Nvidia GT 610 or equivalent), we recommend 2GB+

MAC

  • OSX 10.8 or above
  • MacBook Pro, iMac or Mac Pro
  • Quad core 2.3 GHz processor +
  • 16 GB of RAM +
  • Graphics card, 1GB GPU, we recommend 2GB+

SOFTWARE

This is an intensive course with strict deadlines in order to mirror a real-world professional working environment. As such, students must be have acquired and be competent in the use of the minimum technical requirements prior to starting the course to get the most out of it. Students may be eligible for significant educational discounts.

DAW (Digital Audio Workstation):

We expect you to have a good knowledge of one computer based DAW:

  • Logic
  • Cubase
  • Nuendo
  • Sonar
  • Digital Performer
  • Reaper

Game Software: 

You need to have a copy of the following programs but we do not expect you to know how to use them. The exact version number of this software is important, and the version we support may change. Full information on the current approved course software version is available through the VLE.

  • Unity
  • Fmod

Recommended Additional Software:

  • Pro Tools
  • Kontakt
  • Sound Forge


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Course content. The course has been developed in close consultation with the industry so we know we are teaching you the skills your future employers want you to have. Read more

Course content

The course has been developed in close consultation with the industry so we know we are teaching you the skills your future employers want you to have.

It’s a strongly project focused course and you will develop an effective workflow, remote working and collaboration and a clear understanding of what’s expected of a professional member of the game audio team.

You need to be technically literate and learn software easily.

This course does not require you to learn to code but you will be developing a powerful combination of creative and technical abilities that are market-focused.

Working in games is all about finding new ways of doing things and creative problem solving. This postgraduate course accurately reflects the working life of a games composer working as part of remote working team.

All your tutors are working professional video game sound designers.

You will work on a inspiring range of games, including commercial releases, provided as part of your course materials.

You will learn not only how to create inspiring interactive sound but also how to implement your audio inside the game using industry standard middleware like FMOD and WWise.

Whether you are a composer looking to increase your chances of employment or an audio professional with a passion a for sound design, our MA will bring you real-world professional tuition you need to lay the solid foundations of a career in video game sound design and audio.

Working specifically on creating great audio for video games, you will be tasked with recording, manipulating and implementing audio using the same tools you will be expected to use in the industry.

Sound Design for Video Games students are trained in the practical audio of games such as foley, dynamic game states and the many technical challenges that face professional sound designers working today.

Whilst you will learn how to edit music for video games, Sound Design for Video Games students won’t be assessed on their own compositional skills.

Teaching and assessment

  • Personal 1-to-1 tuition from top professional composers and sound designers.
  • Learn by working through projects. The workload is challenging but it’s only through hard work that you will truly reach the next level.
  • Detailed feedback from a range of tutors, online workshops and tutorial groups, forum discussions and exclusive webinars.
  • Telephone and direct email support.

Hardware and software

You will be uploading and downloading a large quantity of material so you should have access to a reliable broadband with a speed of at least 5Mbs or more.

We have found that the Google Chrome browser is the most compatible with the Adobe Connect webinar software we use which will also be an important part of your course.

All your assignments are uploaded through the Student Portal on our website. This can also be accessed with any standard FTP client, for example CuteFTP on a PC or Transmit on a Mac.

HARDWARE

You will need a computer, software and ancillary equipment (MIDI keyboard, monitors, hard drives both internal and external), Mac or PC, capable of producing professional quality music and audio, and recording equipment. This is the overriding principle and the following minimum technical specifications are given for guidance.

PC

  • Windows 7 or above PC laptop / desktop
  • Quad core 2.3 GHz processor +
  • 16 GB RAM +
  • Graphics card, 1GB GPU (EVGA Nvidia GT 610 or equivalent), we recommend 2GB+

MAC

  • OSX 10.8 or above
  • MacBook Pro, iMac or Mac Pro
  • Quad core 2.3 GHz processor +
  • 16 GB of RAM +
  • Graphics card, 1GB GPU, we recommend 2GB+

SOFTWARE

This is an intensive course with strict deadlines in order to mirror a real-world professional working environment. As such, students must be have acquired and be competent in the use of the minimum technical requirements prior to starting the course to get the most out of it. Students may be eligible for significant educational discounts.

DAW (Digital Audio Workstation):

We expect you to have a working knowledge of one computer based DAW:

  • Logic
  • Cubase
  • Nuendo
  • Sonar
  • Digital Performer
  • Reaper

Game Software: 

You need to have a copy of the following programs but we do not expect you to know how to use them. The exact version number of this software is important, and the version we support may change. Full information on the current approved course software version is available when on the course. Both Unity and Fmod are able to be downloaded for free.

  • Unity
  • Fmod

Recommended Additional Software:

  • Pro Tools
  • Kontakt
  • Sound Forge


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Promoting the scientific study of health, illness and healthcare to improve health outcomes for patients and the public. Read more
Promoting the scientific study of health, illness and healthcare to improve health outcomes for patients and the public.

Who is it for?

The course is for highly motivated students who have intellectual curiosity to learn about complex problems of health and healthcare and the ambition to conduct research that may lead to a solution to these problems. The programme is especially suited to students who want to go on to do doctoral studies – either a DPsych Health Psychology (for practitioner training) or a PhD (for research training).

The Health Psychology course is also for those who have an undergraduate degree that is accredited by the British Psychological Society. If you are an international student and would like to undertake a Masters degree in this subject but do not have the BPS accreditation, we offer the MSc Psychology and Health as an alternative programme (with identical modules) for students who have not achieved the Graduate Basis for Registration with the British Psychological Society.

Objectives

Health psychology explores the psychological and behavioural processes that influence the development of illness, the promotion of health, and the delivery of healthcare through rigorous research that feeds into evidence-based practice.

Teaching at City promotes the scientist-practitioner model in which research influences how we practice, while allowing our experiences in practice to shape the research questions we ask.

We recognise that great research will not make a difference to people’s lives unless the insights feed into evidence-based practice. You will therefore learn how to make research evidence accessible to help maximise its impact. Taught by a team of leading research-active academics, who are members of the Centre for Health Services Research (CHSR), the MSc Health Psychology programme is designed to give you the foundations that will propel you to an exciting career in the discipline.

Here are some examples of the kinds of questions the course poses:
-How can we help people cope with a diagnosis?
-What are the main challenges facing individuals living with long-term conditions?
-What is psychological theory and how can this be used to understand health and illness behaviours?
-How can we make complex interventions more effective by using theory and empirical evidence?

Academic facilities

City University has recently opened the TECS Lab, a dedicated ‘smart home’, to showcase some of the exciting technologies that are being implemented around the UK to support patients with long-term conditions and complex health and social care needs.

This is a one-of-a-kind resource that is already being used for teaching and research purposes. You will visit the TECS Lab in the spring term and the resource will be available to conduct your own dissertation research on a related topic. As part of the University of London you can also become a member of Senate House Library for free with your student ID card.

Teaching and learning

The course uses a range of teaching methods including classroom teaching, seminars and workshops. You will be assessed through a varied combination of formats throughout the programme including coursework, examination, a diary component, online discussion forums and a significant piece of empirical research.

The assessment for the Doctorate includes:
-A reflective report (3,000 words) detailing how supervised practice has enabled you to fulfil the generic professional competence.
-A report (1,000 words) summarising the involvement of service users and/or carers in your training.
-Log of experiences that enabled you to gain competence in each component of all core units over the equivalent of two years’ full-time supervised practice (this should include a record of your attendance at core CPD workshops)
-A case study (3,000 words excluding appendices) with supporting evidence in appendices.
-A contract and working agreement conditions document (3,000 words, excluding appendices) with supporting evidence in appendices.
-Two teaching and training case studies (1 x 1,000 & 1 x 2,000 words, excluding appendices) with supporting evidence in appendices. One of the populations must be health care professionals and an observer’s report (500 words)
-A case study describing the process of conducting a psychological intervention that has been implemented through face-to-face work with an individual client (3000 words, excluding appendices) with supporting evidence in appendices.
-A case study (2,000 words, excluding appendices) describing the process of conducting a psychological intervention that has been delivered through a medium other than face-to-face with an individual client with a reflective report on delivering this intervention included in the appendices.
-A research thesis (approximately 15,000 words, excluding appendices) to be written to a standard acceptable for publication in peer-reviewed academic journals.
-A systematic review (6,000 words excluding appendices) to be written to a standard acceptable for publication in peer-reviewed academic journals.

You will also be able to learn from our on-site TECS lab. This is a dedicated smart home equipped with tele-health and tele-care applications and an adjacent monitoring system.

The purpose of the TECS lab is to enable researchers to monitor long-term conditions, and use technology to track an individual’s health in real time. For example seat and bed occupancy sensors enable health psychologists to monitor physical movement and intervene when routine behaviours are disrupted.

Modules

The programme consists of eight compulsory modules and all the teaching takes place in the first two terms. In term one you will be introduced to behavioural medicine, lifestyle, gender and culture, theoretical foundations of health psychology and research design and statistics. In the second term you study understanding and managing long term conditions, developing complex interventions, professional practice and contextual issues in health psychology and advanced research design and statistics. The third term is dedicated to the dissertation.

You may have the opportunity to interact directly with patients or healthcare professionals at the dissertation stage of this Masters degree. You will be conducting your own independent research and this may, for example, involve interviewing patients or professionals about a particular subject, or delivering behaviour change interventions.

To become a qualified researcher and practitioner, you will need to be able to understand and critique published research and to understand practitioner issues, so you can conduct your own research from scratch. At City we will encourage you to conduct research on the front line working on projects that require ethical approval, where you are engaging with real people so you can have a direct impact on their lives.

Core modules
-Theoretical foundations of health psychology (15 credits)
-Behavioural medicine (15 credits)
-Understanding and managing long-term conditions (15 credits)
-Lifespan, gender & culture (15 credits)
-Developing complex interventions (15 credits)
-Professional and contextual Issues in health psychology (15 credits)
-Introduction to research design & statistics (15 credits)
-Advanced research design & statistics (15 credits)
-Dissertation (60 credits)

Career prospects

Health psychologists work in academia as researchers and within the NHS and the wider healthcare sector. The nature of the work means you will be trying to influence public health policy in terms of the way that health care is practised. You will also be evaluating how health care professionals do their work while adhering to the best clinical standards.

As a UK student, because the Health Psychology MSc is accredited, it is known as Stage 1 of the standard training in healthcare psychology. By successfully completing this course you will be able to move on to Stage 2 training (a doctoral level qualification in health psychology). This leads to becoming a fully recognised health psychologist whereby you can apply for Chartered Membership of the British Psychological Society (BPS) and apply for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC).

Full membership of the Division of Health Psychology means you will also be eligible to apply for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) as a Chartered Health Psychologist. You can only use the protected title ‘Health Psychologist’ by registering with the HCPC, the statutory regulator.

Graduates of the MSc in Health Psychology and MSc in Psychology & Health take a variety of career paths across the NHS and wider public sector. Here are some examples of the kinds of roles our graduates go on to do:
-A PhD student studying a Professional Doctorate in Health Psychology.
-A research assistant in higher education, NHS or the private sector.
-An assistant psychologist in an applied setting.
-An NHS or third sector healthcare professional, such as a smoking cessation officer, or a public health and health promotion practitioner.

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Strengthen your knowledge and skills in legal practice through in-depth research on a topic of your choice. This course is for students who have completed their LPC at The City Law School, are looking to enhance their CVs, and demonstrate commitment to legal practice. Read more
Strengthen your knowledge and skills in legal practice through in-depth research on a topic of your choice.

Who is it for?

This course is for students who have completed their LPC at The City Law School, are looking to enhance their CVs, and demonstrate commitment to legal practice.

Objectives

After finishing the LPC at City, through the LLM programme, students can demonstrate their commitment to a specific area of legal practice by completing research and a dissertation. The course aims to strengthen students’ CV and enhance employability.

Students will develop a dissertation proposal, and subject to acceptance, carry out research and writing with the support of an experienced supervisor from within The City Law School.

Choice of topic is entirely down to the student, although LPC tutors can provide guidance on this. Previous topics have included:
-The case for medical negligence tribunals.
-Company directors’ statutory duties.
-Insider dealing.
-Pre-nuptial contracts.
-Sharia law.

Academic facilities

As a City Law School student you will benefit from everything the Institution has to offer including the Learning Success department and Lawbore, an online resource designed to help you find the information you need for the course modules. All course modules have online depositories through Moodle.

The City Law School has its own dedicated administration team and you also have access to two legal libraries, one at the Gray’s Inn campus and the other based on site at our Northampton Square campus. As part of the University of London you can also become a member of Senate House Library for free with your student ID card.

Our excellent location in London puts us within walking distance of the British Library which has a collection of over 150 million items and extensive law resources.

Teaching and learning

This is a distance learning module with no taught lessons. However an induction session will be provided around the time of registration for each cohort. This session will give guidance on research methods, resources and the supervision process.

Students will be provided with ongoing supervisor support throughout the research process and dissertation writing. Students complete a 15,000 to 20,000 word dissertation which is submitted online at one of three submission dates.

Career prospects

The course has been developed to enhance the employability of its graduates. Students who have a training contract can use the dissertation to demonstrate commitment to an area of practice. Students seeking a training contract or pursuing an alternative legal career can use the qualification to strengthen their CV.

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The Specialist LLM in Professional Advocacy provides a unique opportunity to acquire the relevant knowledge and skills to manage litigation and dispute resolution successfully and effectively. Read more
The Specialist LLM in Professional Advocacy provides a unique opportunity to acquire the relevant knowledge and skills to manage litigation and dispute resolution successfully and effectively.

Who is it for?

This specialist degree should interest and benefit a broad range of students. If you are already professionally qualified having taken the Bar Professional Training Course (BPTC) or Legal Practice Course (LPC) it will develop your understanding of practice and enhance your career. If you have legal qualifications in another jurisdiction it will provide understanding of legal process in England. You can join the course straight after a law degree, but some experience of legal practice is an advantage.

Objectives

The course offers you a skills-based and practice-focused approach to the subject of advocacy in a legal professional setting. You will have the opportunity to study how inquiry and dispute resolution procedures in the civil and criminal justice systems are best managed to produce the best outcome for stakeholders.

Academic facilities

As a City Law School student you will benefit from everything the Institution has to offer including the Learning Success department and Lawbore, an online resource designed to help you find the information you need for the course modules. All course modules have online depositories through Moodle.

The City Law School has its own dedicated administration team and you also have access to two legal libraries, one at the Gray’s Inn campus and the other based on site at our Northampton Square campus. As part of the University of London you can also become a member of Senate House Library for free with your student ID card.

Our excellent location in London puts us within walking distance of the British Library which has a collection of over 150 million items and extensive law resources.

Placements

Each year a small number of internships become available and you will be provided with information about such opportunities and how to apply during the year of your study.

Teaching and learning

This course is taught by leading academics as well as visiting practitioners including barristers and solicitors who work in private practice and in legal departments of major companies.

Assessment

All modules are structured as 10 weekly two-hour seminars which comprise both lectures as well as interactive tutorials. All modules are supported by our online learning platform - Moodle. Assessment is by way of coursework which comprises 100% of the final mark in each module. Each module carries the same weight in terms of the overall qualification.

You will be allocated a dedicated supervisor for your dissertation who will help you develop a specific topic and provide support in terms of resources, content and structure.

Modules

As with all LLM specialisms at City, University of London, you may take either five modules and a shorter dissertation (10,000 words) or four modules and a longer dissertation (20,000 words).

All modules are of the same duration and are taught per term (September – December or January – April) rather than the whole academic year. If you take four modules you will take two per term in each term and if you take five modules you will have three in one term and two in the other.

Dissertations are written during the summer term when there are no classes. In order to obtain this specialism, you must choose at least three modules from within this specialism and write your dissertation on a subject within the specialism.

Specialism modules
-Mediation and Negotiation
-Advocacy: Trial Stories
-Advocacy in the Criminal Trial
-Professional Ethics for Commercial Legal Practice
-Criminal Trials: Evidence and Proof
-Forensic Psychology for the Legal Practitioner

For your remaining modules you can choose from more than 50 modules covering a diverse range of subjects.

Career prospects

As a graduate of this specialist LLM you will be well placed to pursue careers in this area of law in private practice, in-house in a law firm, policy and government, non-governmental organisations and a wide range of non-legal careers in the field of advocacy.

With so much competition for those seeking to enter and develop a career in the legal profession, this LLM is designed to provide a depth of understanding and a range of skills that can make a real difference in building your career.

The City Law School has a vibrant Pro Bono programme including our award-winning commercial law clinic for tech start-ups Start-Ed.

Students who complete the LLM may wish to continue their academic studies by enrolling in a PhD offered by The City Law School.

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The course structure is designed to enable you to undertake a comprehensive, searching, in depth examination of advertising practice. Read more
The course structure is designed to enable you to undertake a comprehensive, searching, in depth examination of advertising practice. One of the course’s key features is to take you not only through the rigorous and demanding stages of research, strategy and planning procedures, but to expose you to the functions and processes of the creative department. Giving you a full overview of advertising practice and a key insight into the creative process.

The course comes from the School of Communication Design within Falmouth University; synonymous with excellent teaching, fuelled by industry contacts and recognised for having an international alumni body.

Visit the website http://flexible.falmouth.ac.uk/courses/ma-advertising--marketing.htm

Summary

- Accelerate your career trajectory within the global advertising & marketing industry
- Acquire the skills to operate seamlessly within the world of advertising & marketing

Who is this course for?

This international-facing course delivers not only knowledge, but enhances career opportunities through extended networks, in an industry where being connected is essential. The flexible mode of delivery will enable you to continue your work, while developing new skills directly related to your current role, or to enhance your employability.

This course is suitable for applicants who may be:

- Working in a marketing or brand manager role who want to have a greater insight into advertising, agency functions, the creative process, how to deliver a brief, evaluate creative concepts and understand contemporary media channels

- Working within an advertising agency in a junior capacity who are looking to enhance their job performance and accelerate their career path

- Individuals with experience or aspirations in the creative departments of advertising agencies

- Individuals who are currently working within broad marketing roles (client side) who wish to establish a change in career path and seek employment in advertising (agency side)

Course content

You will need to complete four 30-credit modules and one 60-credit project (180 credits in total).

- Core Modules
Principles of marketing & brand strategy
Communication strategy & creative development
Media strategy & channels
Agency practice & management
Major project

Assessments

- Written assignments(no examinations)
- Combination of visual, verbal and written works, tailored specifically to each module e.g. essays, briefs, marketing plans, individual reports, collaborative presentations and advertising campaigns

How you study

You may choose to:

1. Study entirely online without attending any face-to-face workshops.
2. Study online and attend optional residential workshops, held biannually at various locations such as the UK, Asia or the Middle East.

A typical workshop will start on Friday and end on Monday. Students will be informed at least 4 months in advance giving you plenty of time to arrange your attendance. Attendance is strongly encouraged although not compulsory.

Taught by industry experts

Designed with employer-focused learning at the core, our courses work with global organisations, staff and alumni to provide you with the breadth of experience and networks needed to accelerate your career.

Learning activities

There will be guided learning activities consisting of:

- Concise online presentations to introduce key concepts
- Small group and class discussions and crits to facilitate interaction and dialogue
- Online critiques to test assumptions, ideas and to receive feedback from peers and tutors
- Individual and group tutorials throughout the course
- Independent study
- Self-evaluation and peer feedback

Support

As a Falmouth student, you enjoy an equal status to students studying on campus:
- Your own student ID card
- Access to online software tutorials at lynda.com
- 24/7 online access to library resources
- Students’ Union community

Find out how to apply here - https://myfalmouth.falmouth.ac.uk/urd/sits.urd/run/siw_ipp_lgn.login?process=siw_ipp_app&code1=MAADMAPO_102&code2=0001

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Mobile apps are now ubiquitous, delivering solutions to modern life. They are a medium for creative and artistic expression, answering everyday problems with clever design and user insights. Read more
Mobile apps are now ubiquitous, delivering solutions to modern life. They are a medium for creative and artistic expression, answering everyday problems with clever design and user insights. As an evolving arena that reacts quickly to technological advances, app development offers a wealth of creative opportunity.

Falmouth’s MA Creative App Development responds to these shifts. Designed with industry experts, it provides the chance to expand upon your creative skills and take advantage of the opportunities available in this growing field.

Structured according to workplace demands, you’ll find an emphasis on live briefs and the application of practical skills. Modules are taught by specialists in creative computing, interactive and design practice; while online software tutorials will enable you to develop projects and assemble your professional portfolio ahead of graduation.

Visit the website http://flexible.falmouth.ac.uk/courses/ma-creative-app-development.htm

Summary

- Build your skills by devising creative apps both in solo and co-creative contexts
- Be taught by specialists in creative computing, interactive and design practice
- Join our international community of professionals, researchers and creatives

Who is this course for?

This course prepares you for the demands of app development, whether you want to break into the industry, or already work in the software sector. Here we promote creative solutions to meet a range of platform and audience needs. Informed by critical thinking and research, our approach helps deliver high impact apps.

Typical applicants may be:
- Working in computing and software development and looking to explore new possibilities
- Artists, audio specialists and designers interested in technology focused content creation are also welcome

The course enables you to respond creatively to change and has been designed to support a wide range of career aspirations within the field of app development and beyond.

Course content

You will need to complete four 30-credit modules and one 60-credit project (180 credits in total).

Core Modules:
App development synergies
Individual design and development project
Co-creation design and development project
Live brief design and development project
Major project

Assessments

- Coursework assessment with no formal examinations
- Portfolios, projects and live online presentations
- Assessments are designed to support creative and professional practice

How you study

You may choose to:

1. Study entirely online without attending any face-to-face workshops
2. Study online and attend optional residential workshops held biannually at various locations such as the UK, Asia or the Middle East.

A typical workshop will start on Friday and end on Monday. Students will be informed at least 4 months in advance giving you plenty of time to arrange your attendance. Attendance is strongly encouraged although not compulsory.

Taught by industry experts

Designed with employer-focused learning at the core, our courses work with global organisations, staff and alumni to provide you with the breadth of experience and networks needed to accelerate your career.

Learning activities

There will be guided learning activities consisting of:

- Concise online presentations to introduce key concepts
- Small group and class discussions and crits to facilitate interaction and dialogue
- Online critiques to test assumptions, ideas and to receive feedback from peers and tutors
- Individual and group tutorials throughout the course
- Independent study
- Self-evaluation and peer feedback

Support

As Falmouth student, you enjoy an equal status to students studying on campus:
- Your own student ID card
- Access to online software tutorials at lynda.com
- 24/7 online access to library resources
- Students’ Union community

Find out how to apply here - http://myfalmouth.falmouth.ac.uk/urd/sits.urd/run/siw_ipp_lgn.login?process=siw_ipp_app&code1=MACRADPO_102&code2=0001

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Events play a decisive role across business, culture and sport. Managing increasingly discerning audiences, developments in technology and market shifts, demands skills and insight. Read more
Events play a decisive role across business, culture and sport. Managing increasingly discerning audiences, developments in technology and market shifts, demands skills and insight. The MA Creative Events Management is designed to meet this need. Harnessing international events expertise paired with academic rigour, we aim to enhance your professional practice, creative perspectives and approaches, while encouraging the critical evaluation of current industry norms.

Designed in consultation with industry experts, the MA empowers you as a creative and entrepreneurial management practitioner to produce pioneering events, whether at a local or international level, adding value to business.

Visit the website http://flexible.falmouth.ac.uk/courses/ma-creative-events-management.htm

Summary

- Develop skills to design, plan, produce and manage events across the creative and corporate sectors
- Extend your career into event management

Who is this course for?

This course is designed to accelerate your career, offering professional insight into the rapidly expanding events management sector. Aimed at current practitioners looking to enhance their knowledge, or those in allied fields seeking a route into events, the MA Creative Events Management at Falmouth offers flexible learning, delivered by experts.

This course is suitable for applicants who may be:

- Corporate events managers who wish to be more effective and creative in event creation, production and marketing
- Working in creative event management companies in a junior capacity and planning to enhance their careers
- Currently working in the hotel, hospitality or MICE sectors
- Graduates looking to develop their specialist knowledge
- Individuals who wish to build a business in events

Course content

You will need to complete four 30-credit modules and one 60-credit project (180 credits in total).

Core Modules:
Principles of event management & research
Creative practice in event design
Digital futures for events and events marketing
Sustainable practice
Major project

Assessments

- Evaluation takes the form of either practical or written coursework
- Typical assignments include group work, projects, events, presentations, placements, essays, case studies, blogs and strategies

How you study

You may choose to:

1. Study entirely online without attending any face-to-face workshops
2. Study online and attend optional residential workshops, held biannually at various locations such as the UK, USA, Asia or the Middle East.

A typical workshop will start on Friday and end on Monday. Students will be informed at least 4 months in advance giving you plenty of time to arrange your attendance. Attendance is strongly encouraged although not compulsory.

Taught by industry experts

Designed with employer-focused learning at the core, our courses work with global organisations, staff and alumni to provide you with the breadth of experience and networks needed to accelerate your career.

Learning activities

There will be guided learning activities consisting of:

- Concise online presentations to introduce key concepts
- Small group and class discussions and crits to facilitate interaction and dialogue
- Online critiques to test assumptions, ideas and to receive feedback from peers and tutors
- Individual and group tutorials throughout the course
- Independent study
- Self-evaluation and peer feedback

Support

As a Falmouth student, you enjoy an equal status to students studying on campus:
- Your own student ID card
- Access to online software tutorials at lynda.com
- 24/7 online access to library resources
- Students’ Union community

Find out how to apply here - http://myfalmouth.falmouth.ac.uk/urd/sits.urd/run/siw_ipp_lgn.login?process=siw_ipp_app&code1=MACREMPO_102&code2=0001

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This course will equip you with the knowledge, understanding and skills to meaningfully engage with a technologically and socially evolving medium, and succeed within the increasingly complex and competitive creative industries. Read more
This course will equip you with the knowledge, understanding and skills to meaningfully engage with a technologically and socially evolving medium, and succeed within the increasingly complex and competitive creative industries.

Throughout the course you will realise the potential of your own ideas and practice by locating your individual specialism within the creative industries, enabling you to succeed and make significant contributions within a range of professional contexts.

This course brings together talented practitioners on an international scale with the ambition to succeed, innovate and lead, allowing for the dynamic cross pollination of approaches in photography and exploration of critical perspectives. On successful completion of this course, in addition to having an internationally recognised postgraduate qualification, you will have an individual, or group of, sophisticated projects of a publishable standard that you will be able to use as the foundation to take you to the next stage in your career and sustain your practice beyond.

Visit the website http://flexible.falmouth.ac.uk/courses/ma-photography.htm

Summary

- Study with talented practitioners in photography on an international scale
- Be part of a global community of like-minded professionals

Who is this course for?

The aim of this course is to enhance the creative, critical and professional skills of practitioners who are at an early stage in their careers, as well as to give those who have already established themselves within the professional arena an opportunity to interrogate their practice and deepen the quality and sophistication of their creative output.

It is designed to accommodate a broad range of practitioners, from those who use photography to question the world around them to those whose practice interrogates the medium itself. Typical applicants may be working as photojournalists, critics in photography, curators, freelancers, or business or studio owners.

Course content

You will need to complete four 30-credit modules and one 60-credit project (180 credits in total).

Core Modules:
Positions and practice
Informing contexts
Surfaces and strategies
Sustainable prospects
Final major project

Assessments

- Coursework assessment with no formal examinations
- Projects, individual reports and live online presentations

How you study

You may choose to:

1. Study entirely online without attending any face-to-face workshops
2. Study online and attend optional residential workshops, held biannually at various locations such as the UK, USA, Asia or the Middle East.

A typical workshop will start on Friday and end on Monday. Workshops are organised to coincide with major festivals and events. Students will be informed at least 4 months in advance giving you plenty of time to arrange your attendance. Attendance is strongly encouraged although not compulsory.

Taught by industry experts

Designed with employer-focused learning at the core, our courses work with global organisations, staff and alumni to provide you with the breadth of experience and networks needed to accelerate your career.

Learning activities

There will be guided learning activities consisting of:

- Concise online presentations to introduce key concepts
- Small group and class discussions and crits to facilitate interaction and dialogue
- Online critiques to test assumptions, ideas and to receive feedback from peers and tutors
- Individual and group tutorials throughout the course
- Independent study
- Self-evaluation and peer feedback

Support

As a Falmouth student, you enjoy an equal status to students studying on campus:

- Your own student ID card
- Access to online software tutorials at lynda.com
- 24/7 online access to library resources
- Students’ Union community

Find out how to apply here - http://myfalmouth.falmouth.ac.uk/urd/sits.urd/run/siw_ipp_lgn.login?process=siw_ipp_app&code1=MAPHOTPO_102&code2=0001

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