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The MSc programme draws on knowledge and skills acquired in many years of providing specialist classes in local history, and profits from close links with local, social and economic historians elsewhere in the University. Read more
The MSc programme draws on knowledge and skills acquired in many years of providing specialist classes in local history, and profits from close links with local, social and economic historians elsewhere in the University. The programme is overseen by the University’s Continuing Education Board, and admission is through the Department for Continuing Education. All graduate students must apply also for membership of a college. Most choose to become members of Kellogg College, which caters particularly for part-time mature students and which is closely associated with the Department.

The Critchley Scholarship for 2015 entry:
We are pleased to announce a new scholarship which will be awarded to the applicant with the greatest academic potential who is applying for the course for entry in September 2015. The award will fund half of the EU/UK tuition fees for the course. All applicants will be considered for the award.

Visit the website https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/msc-in-english-local-history

Introduction

Teaching and supervision on the MSc programme is provided by the Department’s University Lecturer, Dr Mark Smith, and specialist tutors from the Department and elsewhere in Oxford and further afield. An impression of the interests represented in the Department’s teaching and research supervision can be gained from the Advanced Papers currently offered as part of the Master’s course: Power and patronage in the later medieval localities; Kinship, culture and community: Provincial elites in early modern England; Poverty and the Poor Law in England, 1660-1800; Enclosure and rural change, 1750-1850; Religion and community in England, 1830-1914; The social history of English architecture, 1870-1940; the English suburb, 1800-1939.

The Department’s graduate students are members of the Continuing Education Graduate School and have access to the full range of Oxford University’s library, archive and computing facilities.

The course is designed to combine a systematic training in historical research techniques with the study of a range of major local historical themes and the chance to undertake an individually researched dissertation. It will be relevant to potential or practising teachers, archaeologists, environmental planners, archivists, librarians, museum professionals and teachers in adult education, and indeed anyone wishing to pursue the subject for its own sake.

IT skills

Please note that most Departmental courses require assignments to be submitted online, and although the online submission system is straightforward and has step by step instructions, it does assume students have access to a PC and a sufficient level of computing experience and skill to upload their assignments. Applicants should be familiar with the use of computers for purposes such as word-processing, using e-mail and searching the Internet.

College Affiliation

It is a requirement of Oxford University that Master of Science students are matriculated members of the University and one of its colleges. Masters students based in the Department for Continuing Education are encouraged to apply to become members of Kellogg College. In previous intakes almost all students on this course have chosen to join Kellogg. Continuing education and life-long learning in Oxford have been formally linked to the collegiate system of the University since 1990, when Kellogg College, the University’s 36th college, was established. Kellogg College is specifically geared to the needs of mature and part-time students

Libraries and computing facilities

Registered students receive an Oxford University card, valid for one year at a time, which acts as a library card for the Departmental Library at Rewley House and provides access to the unrivalled facilities of the Bodleian Libraries which include the central Bodleian, major research libraries such as the Sackler Library, Taylorian Institution Library, Bodleian Social Science Library, and faculty libraries such as English and History. Students also have access to a wide range of electronic resources including electronic journals, many of which can be accessed from home. Students on the course are entitled to use the Library at Rewley House for reference and private study and to borrow books. The loan period is normally two weeks and up to eight books may be borrowed. Students will also be encouraged to use their nearest University library. More information about the Continuing Education Library can be found at http://www.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/conted

The University card also provides access to facilities at Oxford University Computing Service (OUCS), 13 Banbury Road, Oxford. Computing facilities are available to students in the Students'Computing Facility in Rewley House and at Ewert House.

Assessment

Assessment is based on a mix of coursework assignments and a dissertation. The assessment falls into two parts, the first of which is called by the University a Qualifying Test and the second of which is called the Final Examination.

The Qualifying Test

The Qualifying Test, which must be passed in order to proceed to the rest of the degree, consists of a total of three assignments related to the work of the first term.

Assignment 1: A review of a work of local history (500 words). 10% of the marks for the test.

Assignment 2: An essay on issues relating to the nature of local history (2,000-2,500 words). 40% of the marks for the test.

Assignment 3: An essay on issues relating to the sources and practices of local history, especially the relationship of fieldwork and/or quantification to other sources and approaches (2,500-3,000 words). 50% of the marks for the test.

The Final Examination
The second part of the assessment determines the final classification of the MSc and comprises eight written assignments and a dissertation.

There will be 2 x 2,500 word assignments for each of the Sources, Methods and Foundations papers. (In total the assignments for the Sources, Methods and Foundations papers comprise 10% of the marks for the final examination.)

There will be 2 x 5,000 word essays for each of the Advanced Papers. (In total the essays for the Advanced Papers comprise 40% of the marks for the final examination.)

There will be a dissertation of 15,000 words (The dissertation counts as 50% of the marks for the final examination.)

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The Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies offers an exciting new opening for graduates of all disciplines to pursue a taught postgraduate qualification in historical studies. Read more
The Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies offers an exciting new opening for graduates of all disciplines to pursue a taught postgraduate qualification in historical studies. This one-year part-time course offers a unique opportunity for students to combine focused study of key historical themes and concepts in British and Western European history with either a broad-based approach to history or with the opportunity to specialise by period or in a branch of the discipline (political, social, economic, art, architectural and local). The course culminates in the research and preparation of a substantial dissertation.

The Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies forms part of a two-year Master's programme. Students who successfully complete the Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies are eligible to apply to the Master's of Study in Historical Studies (https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/mst-in-historical-studies).

This Historical Studies course offers a stimulating and supportive environment for study. As a student of Oxford University you will also be entitled to attend History Faculty lectures and to join the Bodleian Library. The University’s Museums and Art Galleries are within easy walking distance.

Visit the website https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/about/postgraduate-certificate-in-historical-studies

Course content

Unit 1: Princes, States, and Revolutions
The first unit examines the interaction between the state and the individual from medieval to modern times and focuses upon authority, resistance, revolution and the development of political institutions. It introduces the development of scholarly debate, key historical themes and the critical analysis of documentary sources. Students explore disorder and rebellion in medieval and early modern England; the causes and impact of the British Civil Wars; and the causes and impact of the French Revolution.

Unit 2: European Court Patronage c.1400
The second unit explores cultural patronage in late medieval Europe and examines the diverse courtly responses to shared concerns and experiences, including the promotion of power and status; the relationship between piety and power; and the impact of dominant cultures. It introduces comparative approaches to history, the critical analysis of visual sources and the methodological issues surrounding the interpretation of material culture and the translation of written sources. Students compare the courts of Richard II of England, Philip the Bold and John the Fearless of Burgundy, Charles V and Charles VI of France, and Giangaleazzo Visconti of Milan.

Unit 3: Religious Reformations and Movements
The third unit examines the role of organised religion and religious movements in the lives of people in the past. It utilises case studies from different historical periods to explore the impact of local circumstances upon the reception and development of new ideas and further encourages engagement with historical debate and the interpretation of documentary and visual sources. Students explore: medieval monasticism; the English and European reformations of the sixteenth century; and religion and society in nineteenth-century England, including the rise of nonconformity, secularism and the Oxford Movement.

Unit 4: Memory and Conflict
The fourth unit focuses upon a central theme in the study of twentieth-century European history: how societies have chosen to remember (and forget) violent conflicts, and the relationship between public and private memory. It explores the challenges faced by historians when interpreting documentary, visual and oral sources in the writing of recent history. Students examine the theoretical context and methodological approaches to the study of memory and consider two case studies: World War I and the Spanish Civil War.

Unit 5: Special Subjects
In the final unit, students study a source-based special subject and research and write a dissertation on a related topic of their own choice. A range of subjects will be offered, varying from year to year, allowing specialization across both time periods and the historical disciplines. Examples include:

- Visualising Sanctity: Art and the Culture of Saints c1150-1500
- The Tudor Court
- The English Nobility c1540-1640
- The Great Indian Mutiny and Anglo-Indian Relations in the Nineteenth Century
- The British Empire
- Propaganda in the Twentieth Century

The on-line teaching modules

The first module provides a pre-course introduction to history and post-graduate study skills. The second focuses upon the analysis and interpretation of material sources, such as buildings and images and the third upon the analysis and interpretation of a range of documentary sources. All include a range of self-test exercises.

Libraries and computing facilities

Registered students receive an Oxford University card, valid for one year at a time, which acts as a library card for the Departmental Library at Rewley House and provides access to the unrivalled facilities of the Bodleian Libraries which include the central Bodleian, major research libraries such as the Sackler Library, Taylorian Institution Library, Bodleian Social Science Library, and faculty libraries such as English and History. Students also have access to a wide range of electronic resources including electronic journals, many of which can be accessed from home. Students on the course are entitled to use the Library at Rewley House for reference and private study and to borrow books. The loan period is normally two weeks and up to eight books may be borrowed. Students will also be encouraged to use their nearest University library. More information about the Continuing Education Library can be found at http://www.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/conted.

The University card also provides access to facilities at Oxford University Computing Service (OUCS), 13 Banbury Road, Oxford. Computing facilities are available to students in the Students' Computing Facility in Rewley House and at Ewert House.

Course aims

The Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies course is designed to:

- provide a structured introduction to the study of medieval and modern British and European history;

- develop awareness and understanding of historical processes, such as continuity and change, comparative perspectives and the investigation of historical problems;

- provide the methodology required to interpret visual arts as historical evidence;

- equip students to evaluate and interpret historical evidence critically;

- promote interest in the concept and discipline of history and its specialisms;

- enable students to develop the analytical and communication skills needed to present historical argument orally and in writing;

- prepare students for progression to study at Master's level.

By the end of the course students will be expected to:

- display a broad knowledge and understanding of the themes and methodologies studied;

- demonstrate a detailed knowledge and understanding of key topics, the historical interpretation surrounding them and the relationship between local case-studies and the national perspective;

- utilise the appropriate critical and/or technical vocabulary associated with the disciplines, periods and themes covered;

- identify underlying historical processes, make cross-comparisons between countries and periods and explore historical problems;

- assess the relationship between the visual arts and the cultural framework within which they were produced;

- evaluate and analyse texts and images as historical evidence and utilise them to support and develop an argument;

- develop, sustain and communicate historical argument orally and in writing;

- reflect upon the nature and development of the historical disciplines and their contribution to national culture;

- demonstrate the skills needed to conduct an independent research project and present it as a dissertation within a restricted timeframe.

Assessment methods

The Postgraduate Certificate in Historical Studies is assessed through coursework. This comprises: four essays of 2,500 words each, two source-based exercises of 1,500 words each and a dissertation of 8,000 words. Students will write one essay following each of the first four units and the dissertation following unit 5. There will be a wide choice of assignment subjects for each unit and students will select a dissertation topic relating to their special subject with the advice of the course team. Students will be asked to write a non-assessed book review following the first pre-course online module and the source-based exercises will follow the second and third online modules.

Assignment titles, submission deadlines and reading lists will be supplied at the start of the course.

Tuition and study

A variety of teaching methods will be used in both the face-to-face and online elements of the course. In addition to lectures, PowerPoint slide presentations and tutor-led discussion, there will be opportunities for students to undertake course exercises in small groups and to give short presentations on prepared topics.

University lectures

Students are taught by the Department’s own staff but are also entitled to attend, at no extra cost, the wide range of lectures and research seminars organised by the University of Oxford’s History Faculty. Students are able to borrow books from both the Department’s library and the History Faculty Library, and are also eligible for membership of the Bodleian Library.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/applying-to-oxford

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The aim of this degree is to give students the opportunity to develop an advanced understanding of Scriptwriting as a craft. The expertise of our team allows our students to choose whether to write for film, theatre, TV, trans-media or radio. Read more
The aim of this degree is to give students the opportunity to develop an advanced understanding of Scriptwriting as a craft. The expertise of our team allows our students to choose whether to write for film, theatre, TV, trans-media or radio.

During your time with us you will be following a programme of study that is designed to connect practice with theory, with the eventual aim of providing you with an extensive portfolio of work that could serve as a calling card for the industry. Here you can write short scripts, adaptations and feature length scripts in the medium of your choice.

Our Scriptwriting degree is a valuable opportunity to achieve a high level academic qualification that combines vocational training with analytical skills. We can help you forge working relationships with professional writers and academics, and to explore potential vocational pathways in writing and/or academia.

If you choose to study on a creative postgraduate course at the University of South Wales, you will also benefit from being part of a vibrant international student community.

See the website http://courses.southwales.ac.uk/courses/136-ma-scriptwriting

What you will study

The MA Scriptwriting course will include the following elements, though you can choose to specialise in writing for film, theatre, TV or radio:

Script Analysis – The module will identify various methods of script analysis from classical structure to more post-structural models equipping you to differentiate between approaches then apply the approach more suited your personal needs.

Short Script – In this module you are required to write a short drama script – either for theatre, radio or for the screen. As part of the module you will visit a specific location as a creative stimulus; this will form the basis for developing the initial idea and writing the final piece.

Adaptation – The module focuses initially on analysis of case studies of adaptations that will include readings of both the original texts and sources as well as the final adapted forms, before offering approaches to allow students to generate their own adaptations.

Major Project Treatment – This module is designed to teach students how to conceive, structure and write a treatment or outline for their final project. It includes analysis of story structure as well as comprehensive guidance on the techniques of writing and presenting an industry-ready package including a pitch, synopsis and treatment.

Major Project – Students will work with their supervisor through the process of evolving their treatment into a final draft, full-length script. Because the story has already been developed, with structure and character arcs already in place, the emphasis at this stage will be more on writing scenes and crafting dialogue

You will be tutored through these modules, which culminate in a full-length script that showcases the skills you have gained during the course and can potentially act as an industry calling card.

Common Modules:
The Faculty understands the importance of a strong grounding in research knowledge and skills, enterprise and innovation as part of a balanced postgraduate education.

We also recognise that each student has different requirements of their postgraduate experience.

You can choose to study one of the following three, 20 credit common modules. Each of these has a different focus, enabling you to select the module that will be most beneficial to you.

- Creative and Cultural Entrepreneurship
This module aims to develop your knowledge of the methods to identify, develop and manage enterprise and innovation in the creative sector. It will then help you apply this to your own entrepreneurial project.

- Research and Practice in the Creative and Cultural Industries
The focus of this module is on the development of research knowledge and skills, while also encouraging critical engagement with approaches to creative practice. You will also explore ideas, debates and issues in the creative and cultural industries.

- Research Paradigms
This module focuses on research paradigms and their theoretical underpinnings. It also looks at key conceptual tools drawn from a wide range of subject areas relevant to postgraduate research in the creative industries.

Learning and teaching methods

The Full Time course is taught through lectures and seminars held at the Atrium Building coupled and one to one tutorials. We also combine with the Part Time students during a series of intensive residential sessions and master-classes with industry professionals.

Following up from the weekend master-classes the Part Time course employs distance-learning practises, things like Skype tutorials or tutorials via phone or written feedback via e-mail.

The MA Scriptwriting may also be studied through the medium of Welsh.

Work Experience and Employment Prospects

USW’s MA Scriptwriting will introduce students to industry professionals and generate a range of networking opportunities. The skills acquired on this scriptwriting course lead either to a career as a writer in film, theatre, TV or radio, or to further academic study at PhD level.

Assessment methods

Learning Through Employment:
Learning Through Employment is a University of South Wales framework that offers students who are already in employment the opportunity to gain credits towards a postgraduate qualification.

The programme is structured so that the majority of learning takes place through active and reflective engagement with your work activities, underpinned by the appropriate academic knowledge and skills.

All postgraduate courses at the University of South Wales’ Cardiff Campus offer students the opportunity to undertake a 60 credit Learning Through Employment Research Project as an alternative to a traditional final dissertation, major project or production.

The focus of the project is an individual, organisational problem solving, knowledge-based approach.

As such, it has been is designed for practising professionals to provide them with the tools to succeed in the workplace.

This truly flexible approach means that projects can be based on an agreed area of work, benefitting students and employers, and because the majority of the project is carried out in the workplace, it can potentially be undertaken anywhere in the world.

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This course provides graduates of other degrees with the opportunity to qualify for a teaching profession in one year of full-time study. Read more

Professional Recognition

This course provides graduates of other degrees with the opportunity to qualify for a teaching profession in one year of full-time study. Successful graduates can register with the Queensland College of Teachers. International students should consult the relevant authority in their home country.

Who will I teach?

The Graduate Diploma of Education (Secondary) focuses on the education of students in Years 7 to 12. The junior secondary years (Years 7-10) is an exciting phase of learning, while the senior secondary years (Years 11-12) are a critical time for young people as they develop their plans for post-secondary education and work.
You will learn to teach two secondary areas of teaching in Years 7 to 10, specialising in one related secondary area of teaching in Years 11 and 12.

Professional Experience

An integral part of becoming a teacher is gaining practical experience in schools. You will be required to complete 55 days of professional experience in secondary school settings during the course plus an additional 20 days of wider professional education. Placements are allocated in government and non-government schools.

Blue card

You will need a Blue Card (a working with children check issued by the Queensland Commission for Children and Young People and Child Guardian) before commencing your professional experience.

Course learning outcomes

On successful completion of the Graduate Diploma of Education (Secondary), graduates will be able to:
*Demonstrate broad and coherent understanding of professional knowledge, practice and engagement with depth in the National Professional Standards for Teachers
*Demonstrate broad and coherent understanding of underlying principles and concepts, and teaching and learning approaches for the tropics in the areas of Indigenous education, education for sustainability, rural and regional education
*Review critically, analyse, evaluate, consolidate and synthesise professional knowledge, practice and engagement and apply the findings to enhance outcomes for diverse students
*Communicate professional knowledge clearly and coherently through oral and written modes to students and key stakeholders in professional practice and engagement
*Identify and solve problems and make informed decisions in diverse professional contexts with well-developed judgement and initiative
*Demonstrate dispositions required for effective teaching that embrace responsibility and accountability for professional knowledge, practice and engagement including collaboration with stakeholders.

Award title

GRADUATE DIPLOMA OF EDUCATION (SECONDARY) GDipEd(Secondary)

Minimum English language proficiency requirements

Applicants of non-English speaking backgrounds must meet the following English language proficiency requirements:
An overall IELTS of 7.5 with no component lower than 8 in Speaking and Listening and no score below 7 in Reading and Writing.
Note: All students must attain an overall IELTS (or equivalent) score of 7.5 (with no score below 7 in any of the four skills areas, and a score of no less than 8 in speaking and listening) upon completion as required by the Queensland College of Teachers. The cost of the testing will be met by the applicant. English test results must be no more than two years old.

Why JCU?

James Cook University offers professional development opportunities, student flexibility through course design and structure, as well as a successful history in securing funding for major research programs.

Application deadlines

Last Friday in October the year before commencement

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This taught degree programme has a unique focus, offering training in all aspects of filmmaking, from concept and creative development through the filmmaking process and on to distribution and marketing. Read more
This taught degree programme has a unique focus, offering training in all aspects of filmmaking, from concept and creative development through the filmmaking process and on to distribution and marketing. By the end of the degree, students will have developed a competition and festival-ready calling-card short film, together with transferrable skills in developing and marketing their product and an understanding of the nature of the film industry.

Teaching on this degree conforms to current industry practice, and includes training and mentoring in standard development documents, such as screenplay, treatment and storyboards, and in areas such as risk assessment and budget management. Visiting guest speakers from various areas of the film industry provide an essential context on changing practices, as well as offering useful information of their own experiences in film. The programme does not include training in basic production techniques, and successful applicants will have a first degree in Media Studies or a related discipline, and/or equivalent industry experience.

All students on this programme receive a production budget.

Modules:

The Film Industry: The aim of this module is to foster an understanding of the workings of the international film industry; film production, distribution, exhibition, marketing and consumption will all be examined. There will be an initial focus on the historical development of the film industry on an international scale, with a particular emphasis on Hollywood and its relationship with the rest of the world. Various aspects and traditions within the modern day film industry will be examined, including ‘independent’ and ‘world’ cinema, and the situation in the UK, as well as Hollywood today.

Concept Development: This module introduces students to the practical and theoretical aspects of developing concepts for film, as well as the craft of screenwriting including script formatting, style, structure, genre, plotting, characterisation and dialogue. Students will be encouraged to develop professional writing habits and to give and receive critically constructive comment and advice, as well an understanding of storytelling in visual media at postgraduate level.

Film Production: The micro short: This module aims to develop students’ knowledge of the technical aspects of filmmaking, including direction, camera-work, lighting, music and editing, with the aim of producing a high-quality two-minute short film. Students will also gain understanding of the economic forces that frame the film industry and an understanding of the role of technology in production, content manipulation, distribution, access and use.

Writing the Short Film: This module expands students’ practical experience of screenwriting, and advances core theories on the synthesis of creative and industry practice, as well as focusing specifically on the history, format, aesthetics and demands of the short film. Students will also learn how to present and communicate their concepts in industry standard documents such as beat sheets, treatments and storyboards, in order to facilitate the filming of short film screenplays in the latter part of the MA course.

Pre-Production: The short film: This module aims to develop knowledge on the practical and budgetary aspects of pre-producing a festival quality short film, including commissioning strategies, casting, rehearsals, risk assessment, location scouting, and the managing and co-ordination of a production crew. Students will also manage a production budget in order to understand the economic practicalities of filmmaking and the importance of the commissioning and funding structures of the creative industries.

Film Production - Dissertation: This module utilises the skills and knowledge developed during the previous modules on this MA; providing students with funding and the opportunity to recruit a crew from undergraduate students to produce a short film. Students will generate work that displays exceptional capability in operational aspects of media production technologies, systems, techniques and professional practices to produce a competition and festival-ready calling-card short film.

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A theoretical grounding in topics such as narrative and storytelling underpins technical training in the latest software and hardware, which will give you the tools to turn your ideas into reality. Read more
A theoretical grounding in topics such as narrative and storytelling underpins technical training in the latest software and hardware, which will give you the tools to turn your ideas into reality. You will also be encouraged to develop critical perspectives on the changing media industry and to challenge current practice, developing the analytical skills required to reflect, learn and grow as a successful editor.

This course builds towards a final production project. This showreel will be your calling card for the industry; it will allow you to explore and develop ideas beyond industry expectations, and produce evidence of your editorial approach, style and storytelling. As an alternative, you can choose a research-based option to present at a final exhibition of work. Working in your own postgraduate base room, you will have your own cutting-edge technology at your fingertips.

You are required to have your own Apple laptop with Avid Media Composer 6.5 or above. The Faculty of Media & Communication provides further technical tools to aid your development, including extensive network support and two Avid Media Composer Finishing Suites, where you will build your realworld skills through role-play scenarios of industry practice. We’re also proud to announce our Learning Partnership with AVID, a collaboration that will ensure graduates of this course carry even greater relevance and credibility when it comes to finding employment..

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These courses provide a broad understanding of infectious diseases through the core modules in public health, biostatistics and epidemiology, and the biology and control of infectious diseases which are taken by all students, together with the subsequent opportunities for specialised study in areas of the student’s own choice. Read more
These courses provide a broad understanding of infectious diseases through the core modules in public health, biostatistics and epidemiology, and the biology and control of infectious diseases which are taken by all students, together with the subsequent opportunities for specialised study in areas of the student’s own choice. Most of the students are in-service health professionals working for example as doctors or laboratory staff, who take the courses in order to acquire new knowledge in infectious diseases, or to update their current expertise.

The Infectious Diseases courses draw upon the School’s long tradition in the study of clinical and epidemiological aspects of infectious and tropical diseases. Providing a broad understanding of infectious diseases, together with developing strategies for their control and treatment, the courses will be of particular relevance to in-service health professionals, such as doctors or laboratory staff who either wish to acquire new knowledge in infectious diseases or update their current expertise.

These courses are aimed both at recent graduates who wish to pursue an advanced degree, and at people who took their first training some time ago and wish to update their knowledge in this rapidly evolving field or who wish to change career direction.

- Full programme specification (pdf) (http://www.londoninternational.ac.uk/sites/default/files/progspec-infectiousdiseases.pdf)
- Distance Learning prospectus (pdf) (http://www.londoninternational.ac.uk/sites/default/files/prospectus/lshtm-prospectus.pdf)

Visit the website http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/masters/dmsid.html

English Language Requirements

You will meet the English language requirement if you have passed, within the past three years:

- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English when a minimum overall score of B or 190 is achieved;

- (IELTS) International English Language Testing System when an overall score of at least 7.0 is achieved with a minimum of 7.0 in the Written sub-test and a minimum of 5.5 in Listening, Reading and Speaking; or

- Pearson Test of English (Academic) overall score of 68 or above, with a minimum of 68 in Writing and a minimum of 59 in Listening, Reading and Speaking

- (TOEFL) iBT Test of English as a Foreign Language overall score of 100 or above with at least 24 in Writing, 23 in Speaking, 22 in Reading and 21 in Listening

Course objectives

Students will develop:

- a comprehensive understanding of the role of biology of infective agents and hosts on the outcome of infection

- the use of this knowledge, in combination with epidemiological and public health approaches, to develop rational strategies for the control and treatment of infection

Method of assessment

All distance learning modules are assessed by means of a two-hour unseen written examination (with 15 minutes planning/reading time at the start of the examination).

Elective modules (i.e. modules other than the IDM1 modules) are assessed partly by the two-hour unseen written examination (70%) and partly by an assessed assignment (30%), submitted electronically to the School by a set deadline.

Examinations take place once a year in June (please note: it is not possible to hold examinations at other times of year). These are normally held in a student’s country of residence. Details of available examination centres (http://www.londoninternational.ac.uk/community-support-resources/current-students/examinations/examination-centres).

They are arranged mainly through Ministries of Education or the British Council. Students taking distance learning examinations will need to pay a fee to their local examination centre. Please note that if you fail an examination at the first entry you will be allowed one further attempt, if you have failed the module overall.

Study materials

You receive your study materials after you register. Study materials may include Subject guides, Readers, Textbooks, CD-ROMs/additional computer software (e.g. Stata), Past examination papers and Examiners’ reports, and Handbooks. You also have access to the School’s online library resources. We also provide all students with a student registration card.

Flexible study

We know that if you have a full-time job, family or other commitments, and wish to study at a distance, you will have many calls on your time. The course allows you to study independently, at a time and pace that suits you (subject to some course-specific deadlines) using the comprehensive study materials provided, with support available from academic staff.You have between 1-5 years in which to complete the Postgraduate Certificate, and between 2-5 years in which to complete the Postgraduate Diploma or the MSc.

The study year for most modules runs from the beginning of October through to the June exams, while two modules run from the beginning of January through to assignment submission at the end of August. Tutorial support is available throughout this time. Students carrying out projects are assigned personal supervisors to support their project work which is mostly carried out between June and the end of September in their final year.

Blended learning: taking modules in London

After successful completion of a minimum number of core modules, Postgraduate Diploma and MSc students may also be eligible for the 'blended learning option', which allows for the study of up to two modules only (from a restricted list) at the School in London during the Spring or Summer terms in place of distance learning modules. Please note that these options, and the dates when the modules are held at the School, are subject to change - full details will be sent to all distance learning students in July each year.

Support

- a web-based learning environment (including web conferencing, allowing you to engage in academic discussions with tutors and fellow students)

- personalised feedback from teaching staff and advice on assignments

- tutors are allocated to each module and are available to answer queries and promote discussion during the study year, through the online Virtual Learning Environment

- communicate with other distance learning students, either individually or through learning support groups

Find out how to apply here - http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/masters/dmsid.html#seventh

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These courses provide students with the knowledge and skills to contribute to the improved health of populations and particular groups within them through the promotion of health and prevention of diseases; the development and evaluation of care practices; and the investigation and control of environmental threats to health. Read more
These courses provide students with the knowledge and skills to contribute to the improved health of populations and particular groups within them through the promotion of health and prevention of diseases; the development and evaluation of care practices; and the investigation and control of environmental threats to health. Students are instructed in the development, use and critical evaluation of conceptual models, evidence, methods of analysis, and practical interventions.

The courses enable students to deepen their understanding of public health issues and to increase their potential career development in health-related fields in high-, middle- and low-income settings. Students come from diverse backgrounds; many are health professionals working at a service or policy level, while others wish to obtain public health skills that they can apply to their work in development, community services, government, research or teaching.

- Full programme specification (pdf) (http://www.londoninternational.ac.uk/sites/default/files/progspec-public-health.pdf)
- Distance Learning prospectus (pdf) (http://www.londoninternational.ac.uk/sites/default/files/prospectus/lshtm-prospectus.pdf)

This course is accredited by the Agency for Accreditation of Public Health Education in the European Region (APHEA) which is the accreditation body of the Association of Schools of Public Health in the European Region (ASPHER).

Visit the website http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/masters/dmsph.html

Course objectives

Students will develop:

- the knowledge and skills to contribute to the health of populations, communities and disadvantaged groups

- the ability to apply the core disciplines of public health (statistics, epidemiology, health economics and social research) to real world health problems

- a deeper understanding of public health issues and an academic qualification that will enhance your career development in health-related fields

Students can choose a more general course or specialise in one of the following areas:
- Environment & Health
- Health Promotion
- Health Services Management

Method of assessment

All distance learning modules are assessed by means of a two-hour unseen written examination (with 15 minutes planning/reading time at the start of the examination).

PHM2 modules and elective modules from the other distance learning courses - EPM2, IDM2, IDM3 and IDM5 modules - are assessed partly by the two-hour unseen written examination (70%) and partly by an assessed assignment (30%), submitted electronically to the School by a set deadline.

Examinations take place once a year in June (please note: it is not possible to hold examinations at other times of year). These are normally held in a student’s country of residence. Details of available examination centres.

They are arranged mainly through Ministries of Education or the British Council. Students taking distance learning examinations will need to pay a fee to their local examination centre. Please note that if you fail an examination at the first entry you will be allowed one further attempt, if you have failed the module overall.

Study materials

You receive your study materials after you register. Study materials may include Subject guides, Readers, Textbooks, CD-ROMs/additional computer software (e.g. Stata), Past examination papers and Examiners’ reports, and Handbooks. You also have access to the School’s online library resources. We also provide all students with a student registration card.

Flexible study

We know that if you have a full-time job, family or other commitments, and wish to study at a distance, you will have many calls on your time. The course allows you to study independently, at a time and pace that suits you (subject to some course-specific deadlines) using the comprehensive study materials provided, with support available from academic staff.You have between 1-5 years in which to complete the Postgraduate Certificate, and between 2-5 years in which to complete the Postgraduate Diploma or the MSc.

The study year for most modules runs from the beginning of October through to the June exams, while two modules run from the beginning of January through to assignment submission at the end of August. Tutorial support is available throughout this time. Students carrying out projects are assigned personal supervisors to support their project work which is mostly carried out between June and the end of September in their final year.

Blended learning: taking modules in London

After successful completion of a minimum number of core modules, Postgraduate Diploma and MSc students may also be eligible for the 'blended learning option', which allows for the study of up to two modules only (from a restricted list) at the School in London during the Spring or Summer terms in place of distance learning modules. Please note that these options, and the dates when the modules are held at the School, are subject to change - full details will be sent to all distance learning students in July each year.

Support

- a web-based learning environment (including web conferencing, allowing you to engage in academic discussions with tutors and fellow students)

- personalised feedback from teaching staff and advice on assignments

- tutors are allocated to each module and are available to answer queries and promote discussion during the study year, through the online Virtual Learning Environment

- communicate with other distance learning students, either individually or through learning support groups

Find out how to apply here - http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/masters/dmsph.html#seventh

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Develop your knowledge, design and analysis skills, engage with modern challenges in structural engineering and transform your professional profile with this accredited technical MSc in Civil Engineering Structures. Read more
Develop your knowledge, design and analysis skills, engage with modern challenges in structural engineering and transform your professional profile with this accredited technical MSc in Civil Engineering Structures.

Who is it for?

This course is for professional engineers who want to specialise in structural engineering or move into this area of expertise to advance their career. Normally students have an undergraduate degree in engineering or a related discipline. Students who don’t have qualifications in civil engineering usually have relevant work experience in civil engineering structures so they are familiar with working within the specific technical domain.

Objectives

From analysing how carbon nanofibers can reduce the effect of corrosion in concrete to gaining insight from experts developing the new Forth Bridge, this MSc in Civil Engineering Structures has been designed to be broad in scope so you can develop your own area of structural engineering expertise.

As a department, we have broad interests from defining new structural forms to practical application of new materials. We believe civil engineering is a creative and collaborative profession, as much as a technical one. This course gives you the tools to immerse yourself in both the analytical and experimental side of the subject, so you can investigate diverse problems to generate your own structural solutions.

The Civil Engineering Structures MSc mirrors industry practice, so you will work in groups with your peers from the first term onwards and learn from a group of world-leading engineers with diverse research strengths. From earthquake engineering to sustainable construction, you have the opportunity to learn in breadth and depth using high-end industry software to develop safe solutions for real-world projects.

Academic facilities

There is a large dedicated lab on site equipped with facilities to investigate different structures and construction materials from concrete to timber. You also have access to other workshops where you can liaise with mechanical or electrical engineers to develop innovative scale models. There is access to specialist soil labs and large-scale equipment including wind tunnels.

We have an extensive library housing all the references, journals and codes of practice that you will need during your studies.

As part of the University of London you can also become a member of Senate House Library for free with your student ID card.

Teaching and learning

You will be taught by the staff team within the School of Mathematics, Computer Science and Engineering and also from visiting industry experts from around the world.

Teaching mainly takes the form of lectures, but IT sessions and seminars also form part of the Masters degree. Modules are shared between two ten-week teaching terms running from October to December and January to March. Although work for the MSc dissertation starts during the second term, you will conduct most of the research work during the summer months.

The length of the full-time degree is 12 months. A part-time route is also available where you can spend either two or three years completing the programme. If you follow the two-year part-time study route, you will need to attend lectures for up to two days each week. Alternatively, you can complete the degree over three years by attending a single day each week. The timetable has been designed to offer flexibility for part-time students.

In the first term you will consider core technical topics and be introduced to new concepts such as structural reliability. In the second term you will begin to focus your studies by selecting your dissertation topic and by selecting options getting involved in a specific areas of your own interest. Spread over the year you will have design presentations, class tests and reports.

If you select an experimental dissertation you will have the opportunity to use a range of materials. Skilled technical support is available in the workshop and you have access to recently refurbished facilities, including specialist geotechnical labs which accommodate a large flexible laboratory space used for centrifuge model preparation and testing. Adjacent to this you have concrete mixing and casting facilities, a temperature-controlled soil element testing laboratory and a concrete durability laboratory.

Assessment

For the theoretical modules, you will be assessed through a combination of examinations and coursework. Examinations are shared between the January and April/May examination periods. For the design-oriented modules you are normally assessed by coursework only, where you will work both in groups and individually on challenging projects.

Modules

There are six core modules which give you a strong technical foundation and three elective modules from which you can choose two. These reflect the specialist expertise on offer within the academic team. These modules will give you unique insight into computer analysis of structures for blast and fire, bridge engineering, and earthquake analysis where you may look at techniques for analysing structures and safe design. In the final part of the programme you undertake a dissertation in which you can explore an area of interest from a proposed list of themes, some of which are industry-related.

Core modules and dissertation
-Advanced structural analysis and stability (20 credits)
-Finite element methods (15 credits)
-Dynamics of structures (15 credits)
-Structural reliability and risk (10 credits)
-Design of concrete structures (15 credits)
-Design of steel and composite structures (15 credits)
-Dissertation for MSc degree (Research Skills and Individual Project) (60 credits)

Elective modules - you will be able to study two of the following elective modules:
-Earthquake analysis of structures (15 credits)
-Analysis of steel and concrete structures for blast and fire exposure (15 credits)
-Bridge engineering (15 credits)

Career prospects

Graduates have secured employment with leading civil engineering consultants, research institutes and government agencies and pursued doctoral studies both in the UK and internationally. The cohort of 2014 have moved on to jobs and further study working within the following organisations:
-WSP Consultant Engineers
-Tully De'Ath Consultant Civil and Structural Engineers
-SSA Consulting Engineers
-Bradbrook Consulting
-Clarke Nicholls Marcel

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Discover the real-world career opportunities in the energy sector with this MSc in Energy and Environmental Technology and Economics. Read more
Discover the real-world career opportunities in the energy sector with this MSc in Energy and Environmental Technology and Economics.

Who is it for?

Wherever you are, energy has an implication. This course is for students who want to engage with different types of settings to research and establish the energy, environmental and technological implications that exist within them. Energy and Environmental Technology and Economics students will care for the environment as a sustainable system and ultimately have a desire to improve conditions for the wider population.

Students come from a range of backgrounds including engineering, finance and economics – and from within the energy industry itself.

Objectives

This Masters degree has been designed to give you a wide perspective when it comes to analysing and forecasting the future for energy, environmental technology and economics. We engage with the industry so you gain a real-world understanding of the problems that exist, and we consider our own ethical responsibilities in relation to energy use.

Imagine a Grade 1-listed building such as the Guildhall in London. As an energy consultant your task is to analyse the site to make it more efficient. But there is a caveat: you cannot make any structural changes to the walls or the windows. The MSc Energy and Environmental Technology and Economics course gives you the tools to examine and address these kinds of challenges.

The MSc Energy and Environmental Technology and Economics course is not about learning academic theories. Instead we focus on the breadth of the subject in the real world. By engaging with practising businesses and trade associations we identify a range of perspectives, and look at the influence of a myriad of other forces at play, from regulation and government funding, to behavioural psychology and emerging technologies. Here are some of the questions the course poses:
-Does this new form of technology operate as it should?
-How does the UK relate to other European countries when it comes to energy efficiency?
-How does organisational psychology affect energy use within a company?
-How do you decide which energy contract to choose?
-What is the impact of a consumer society on personal energy use?

Placements

There is no formal requirement to do an industry-based placement as part of the programme. However, some students arrange to undertake their dissertation research within a company or within their part of the world. A recent student investigated the future of coal-fired generation in Turkey, and another student is combining a work placement at The World Energy Council with their dissertation.

Academic facilities

As part of the University of London you can become a member of Senate House Library for free with your student ID card.

Teaching and learning

Teaching is organised into modules comprising four consecutive day courses taken at a rate of one a month or so. This format makes the programme accessible for students who want to study part time while working.

Full-time students are also welcome. Whether you choose to take the course as a part-time or full-time student, we will offer a great deal of support when it comes to helping you prepare for the modules and project work. You will be expected to devote a significant part of your non-taught hours to project work as well as private study.

Our course is led by an exceptional group of experts in energy, supply, demand management and policies. As an example, one of our module leaders leads the UK contribution to writing international energy management standards and informing policy through the European Sector Forum for Energy Management. This forum looks at methodologies across the continent. There is also input to global standards development through the International Standards Organisation (ISO). At City we bring on board people with well-established academic careers as well as leaders from the energy industry. The programme has strong links with industry and commerce and involves many visiting lecturers who hold senior positions in their fields.

The Energy and Environmental Technology and Economics MSc gives you the opportunity to consider the role of International Energy Management Standards. You will explore the opportunities these standards provide for global service users and providers in relation to reducing energy costs and the environmental impact of energy use.

You will discover the range of current European and International Standards, explore why they are needed and how they are developed, and examine the benefits they deliver through case studies.

The UK has had a leading role in developing these standards in terms of both their writing and implementation. For example the Energy Audit standard, which forms part of the EU Energy Efficiency Directive, Article 8, mandates audits for private sector, non-SME organisations. In the UK this has been implemented as the Energy Savings Opportunities Scheme (ESOS).

Modules

Each course module is taught over four consecutive days of teaching with one module each month. Alongside the teaching you will have coursework to complete for each module. The modules run from October to April, and in the remaining time, you will concentrate on your dissertation, which forms a significant part of the programme.

The dissertation gives you the opportunity to create your own questions and to decide on your own area of interest. It should be a detailed investigation into a subject on energy supply and/or demand, with your own analysis and conclusions outlining the way forward. You may see the focus of your dissertation as a future career path, but whatever your area of study, these final few months of the degree should embody your vision of the future.

You will take four core modules and have six elective modules from which you can choose four topics from diverse subjects relating to energy supply and demand. These include energy in industry and the built environment, renewables, energy markets from the purchaser’s perspective and water supply and management. The latter has close parallels, and directly engages, with energy. You start the course with an introduction to energy and environmental issues and energy policies and economic dimensions in the first term, but you do not need to follow the course in any particular order from this point onwards.

If you are interested in sustainability, you have the option of taking up to two elective modules from the MSc in Environmental Strategy offered by the University of Surrey.

Completing eight modules and four examinations and four modular assessments will lead to a Postgraduate Diploma. Completing four core and four elective modules and a dissertation will lead to a Masters degree. If you are interested in this course may also be interested in the MSc Renewable Energy and Power Systems Management.

Core modules
-Introduction to energy and environmental issues (15 credits)
-Energy policies and economic dimensions (15 credits)
-The energy market from the purchaser's perspective (15 credits)
-Corporate energy management (15 credits)

Elective modules
-Energy, consumer goods and the home (15 credits)
-Transport energy and emissions (15 credits)
-Energy in industry and the built environment (15 credits)
-Renewable energy and sustainability (15 credits)
-Risk management (15 credits)
-Water supply and management (15 credits)

Career prospects

The story of energy is now part of public debate and climate change drives the international agenda. In the UK, there are additional energy supply issues, through the decline of existing nuclear capacity, growing imports of fossil fuels and challenging medium-term targets for renewables and low carbon supply.

Our priority is to make you employable in a range of sectors in which effective energy supply and demand side management has become an important consideration.

You will graduate with economic and market-based skills relevant to complying with relevant legislation and technical and engineering skills related to energy generation and management.

With strong industry links and working level experience from our exceptional team of expert lecturers, as well as the diverse modules on offer, you will be equipped to become a leader and entrepreneur in your chosen area of specialisation within the realm of energy management, supply or policy making.

Our graduates have gone on to hold high-ranking positions as energy consultants, data analysts and directors of corporate sustainability working within organisations including:
-AK Home Energy
-Enelco Environmental Technology
-Energy Institute
-Equinoxe Services Ltd
-Log Tech Consultancy
-Ofgem
-Peckham Power
-RWE NPower Renewables
-SCFG

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With the MSc Air Safety Management you can align, develop or transform your career. Study across several locations on this industry-accredited global programme. Read more
With the MSc Air Safety Management you can align, develop or transform your career. Study across several locations on this industry-accredited global programme.

Who is it for?

This programme is for those who have been working within the aviation industry (for at least two years), and have a primary interest in its safety. Current students include pilots, air traffic controllers, maintenance staff, engineers and the majority have a license/professional education. We also welcome students with a military background. This Air Safety Management MSc programme is tailored towards those working who cannot attend regular university schedules.

This course is compatible with The MoD's Enhanced Learning Credits Administration Service (ELCAS) - an initiative to promote lifelong learning amongst members of the UK Armed Forces. If you are/have been a member of the UK Armed Forces, you could be entitled to financial support to take this course.

Objectives

Airlines, airports and other aviation companies are mostly led by license holders, safety officers, pilots, aircraft engineers, air traffic controllers, dispatchers and many more. This means the demand for management knowledge is growing. Our programme gives students the opportunity to freshen their knowledge, learn the latest management techniques and build a lifelong network of peers.

With unexpected events affecting the aviation industry as well as increased competition and technological and regulatory changes, every organisation needs a core of up-to-date safety and risk managers ready to succeed into leadership positions.

The programme is designed to deliver individual success. First initiated by the Honourable Company of Airline Pilots (HCAP) to increase the career opportunities of aircrew, today the programme is recognised as a key resource within the aviation safety industry and as a benchmark for innovation.

Academic facilities

As a student you will benefit from learning within modern lecture theatres (equipped with the latest interactive AV systems) and modern IT laboratories.

A dynamic virtual learning environment (Moodle) gives you access to online assessment and communication tools as you study and you can work with specialist School facilities including:
-A flight deck and flight test course
-A320 procedure training
-Wind tunnels and micro turbines
-Optical compressors and fuel injection systems.

As part of the University of London you can also become a member of Senate House Library for free with your student ID card.

Teaching and learning

A dissertation related to experience in the industry is required. There is a high degree of flexibility in terms of sequence and time frame to suit students working in airlines, air traffic control, air forces and other organisations.

This course gives you a recognised industry qualification, control of your own career and the ability to contribute to air safety management. The course is very flexible and you can study while you work.

At the end of the programme you will have improved your:
-Presentation/speaking skills - through regular opportunities within each module and the project.
-Report writing and analytical skills - through coursework and the project.
-Personal management skills - through the careful use of resources to complete assignments on time.

The successful MSc graduate will have:
-A good understanding of business analysis, crisis, human motivation, and management of the air safety industry.
-A sound understanding for the national and international regulatory and commercial business environment and the ability to prepare a sound business case.
-Knowledge of aspects of accident and incident investigation, human factors, safety risk management.
-A proven ability to research and write a substantial analytical report.

These include:
-Being able to assimilate core themes from the talks given by a number of industry speakers, some of whom may have different positions.
-Being able to write succinct and clear English.
-Preparing a valid business case for a company and, at least as important, to know when a potential case is not viable.
-Having a wider knowledge of the interfaces of any single organisation with others in the industry.
-Being able to make a short verbal presentation and to defend a project under examination.

Modules

We explore air safety management from a broad perspective so you will be exposed to areas as diverse as human resources, regulation, and crisis management. The academic framework has been created by the industry for the industry. This means you learn from the former British Airways human resources director in one module, and the industry's crisis management expert in safety or the chief executive officer of a major maintenance facility in another.

The course is based on completing the Induction Workshop plus eight modules over one to five years, which are taught over three-day periods. Teaching takes place across global locations including London, Dubai and Frankfurt. Students also take on a project/dissertation in an air transport related subject, which is usually completed within six to twelve months. From developing new safety measures to social media marketing in the aviation world, students choose their own research focus and often use the project as a way into a new career.

Students who choose not to do the project, or are unable to complete the programme within the five years, receive a Postgraduate Certificate on successful completion of four modules, including two core modules, or a Postgraduate Diploma on successful completion of eight modules.

Core modules
-Active Safety Management (EPM836)
-Crisis Management (EPM828)
-Safety Risk Management (EPM973)

To begin your MSc, you will be required to attend the Induction Workshop (IW), which gives you a thorough introduction into Higher Education and introduces all the tools and facilities available for your MSc. You will have to write a short essay after the IW, which will be your final assessment to be accepted into City, University of London.

Elective modules
-Airline Operations (EPM825)
-Air Transport Economics (EPM823)
-Airline Business (EPM831)
-Human Resource Management (EPM822)
-Psychology in Aviation Management (EPM966)
-Airline Marketing (EPM821)
-Airline Operational Regulatory Compliance (EPM825)
-Fleet Planning (EPM829)
-Developing a Business Plan (EPM969)
-Financial Accounting (EPM824)
-Sustainable Aviation (EPM975)
-Airports and Ground Handling (EPM968)
-Airworthiness (EPM897)
-Airline Maintenance (EPM906)
-Airline Revenue Management, Pricing and Distribution (EPM972)
-Safety Management - Tools and Methods (EPM833)
-Air Accident Investigation (EPM970)
-Leadership in Organisations (EPM971)
-Aviation Law (EPM978)
-Future Aviation (EPM980)

Dissertation - a dissertation related to experience in the industry is required. There is a high degree of flexibility in terms of sequence and time frame to suit students working in airlines, air traffic control, air forces and other organisations.

Career prospects

This is a professional programme recognised by the aviation industry and accredited by the Royal Aeronautical Society.

Airlines are increasingly expecting their managers to study the MSc from City, University of London, and our alumni network includes high-ranking individuals including safety managers, training captains, quality managers, flight safety officers, safety inspectors, safety consultants and accident investigators in civil aviation authorities, airlines and with other aircraft operators and defence forces worldwide.

Graduates may change or transform their careers as a result of the MSc.

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With the MSc Air Transport Management you can align, develop or transform your career. Study across several locations on this industry-accredited global programme. Read more
With the MSc Air Transport Management you can align, develop or transform your career. Study across several locations on this industry-accredited global programme.

Who is it for?

This programme is for those who have been working within the aviation industry (for at least two years). Current students include pilots, air traffic controllers, maintenance staff, engineers and the majority have a license/professional education. We also welcome students with a military background. This Air Transport Management MSc programme is tailored towards those working who cannot attend regular university schedules.

This course is compatible with The MoD's Enhanced Learning Credits Administration Service (ELCAS) - an initiative to promote lifelong learning amongst members of the UK Armed Forces. If you are/have been a member of the UK Armed Forces, you could be entitled to financial support to take this course.

Objectives

Airlines, airports and other aviation companies are mostly led by license holders, pilots, aircraft engineers, air traffic controllers, dispatchers and many more. This means the demand for management knowledge is growing. Our programme gives students the opportunity to freshen their knowledge, learn the latest management techniques and build a lifelong network of peers.

With unexpected events affecting the aviation industry as well as increased competition and technological and regulatory changes, every organisation needs a core of up-to-date managers ready to succeed into leadership positions. The programme is designed to deliver individual success. First initiated by the Honourable Company of Airline Pilots (HCAP) to increase the career opportunities of aircrew, today the programme is recognised as a key resource within the aviation industry and as a benchmark for innovation.

Academic facilities

As a student you will benefit from learning within modern lecture theatres (equipped with the latest interactive AV systems) and modern IT laboratories.

A dynamic virtual learning environment (Moodle) gives you access to online assessment and communication tools as you study and you can work with specialist School facilities including:
-A flight deck and flight test course
-A320 procedure training
-Wind tunnels and micro turbines
-Optical compressors and fuel injection systems.

As part of the University of London you can also become a member of Senate House Library for free with your student ID card.

Teaching and learning

You will be taught by industry professionals and leaders in their field of expertise including the former British Airways human resources director in one module, and the industry’s crisis management expert in safety or the chief executive officer of a major maintenance facility in another.

Teaching takes place across global locations including London, Dubai and Frankfurt. Each module, including the Induction Workshop, is taught over a three day period.

This programme gives you a recognised industry qualification, control of your own career and the ability to contribute to air transport management. The programme is very flexible and you can study while you work.

At the end of the programme you will have improved your:
-Presentation/speaking skills - through regular opportunities within each module and the project.
-Report writing and analytical skills - through coursework and the project.
-Personal management skills - through the careful use of resources to complete assignments on time.

The successful MSc graduate will have:
-A good understanding of business analysis, finance, human motivation, and management of the air transport industry.
-A sound understanding for the national and international regulatory and commercial business environment and the ability to prepare a sound business case.
-Knowledge of aspects of fleet planning, route management, engineering and air traffic management issues.
-A proven ability to research and write a substantial analytical report.

These include:
-Being able to assimilate core themes from the talks given by a number of industry speakers, some of whom may have different positions.
-Being able to write succinct and clear English.
-Preparing a valid business case for a company and, at least as important, to know when a potential case is not viable.
-Having a wider knowledge of the interfaces of any single organisation with others in the industry.
-Being able to make a short verbal presentation and to defend a project under examination.

Assessment

Each elective is assessed by two pieces of coursework, the core modules are assessed by one piece of coursework and an examination. Each module comprises:
-Part I: Prior reading before the module where appropriate.
-Part II: Attendance at City (or other locations) for the module over three days.
-Part III: Examinations are held on the third day of the core modules.
-Part IV: Coursework is due within six weeks from the last day of the module.

Modules

We explore air transport management from a broad perspective so you will be exposed to areas as diverse as human resources, regulation, and crisis management. The academic framework has been created by the industry for the industry. There is a high degree of flexibility in terms of sequence and time frame to suit students working in airlines, air traffic control, air forces and other organisations.

Students also take on a project/dissertation in an air transport related subject, which is usually completed within six to twelve months. From developing new safety measures to social media marketing in the aviation world, students choose their own research focus and often use the project as a way into a new career. Students who choose note to do the project, or are unable to complete the programme with the five years can receive a Postgraduate Certificate pending Programme Director approval.

We cover the full spectrum of a Master of Science education, adding Management modules for the future career in aviation. The dissertation at the end of the MSc programme gives each student the opportunity to demonstrate the new research and project management qualifications achieved through the programme.

The programme is based on the successful completion of the Induction Workshop which acts as an entry pathway to the MSc. The MSc consists of three core modules and 5 electives plus the project/dissertation. Each module is taught over a three day period across global locations including London, Dubai and Frankfurt.

The dissertation at the end of the MSc programme gives each student the opportunity to demonstrate the new research and project management qualifications achieved through the programme.

Students who choose not to do the project, or are unable to complete the programme within the five years, receive a Postgraduate Certificate on successful completion of four modules, including two core modules, or a Postgraduate Diploma on successful completion of eight modules. Core modules for the Air Transport MSc are airline business, airline operations and air transport economics.

Core modules
-Airline Operations (EPM825)
-Air Transport Economics (EPM823)
-Airline Business (EPM831)

To begin your MSc, you will be required to attend the Induction Workshop (IW), which gives you a thorough introduction into Higher Education and introduces all the tools and facilities available for your MSc. You will have to write a short essay after the IW, which will be your final assessment to be accepted into City, University of London.

Elective modules - you will choose five elective modules. Each elective module is worth 15 credits.
-Active Safety Management (EPM836)
-Crisis Management (EPM828)
-Safety Risk Management (EPM973)
-Human Resource Management (EPM822)
-Psychology in Aviation Management (EPM966)
-Marketing (EPM821)
-Airline Operational Regulatory Compliance (EPM825)
-Airline Fleet Planning (EPM829)
-Developing a Business Plan (EPM969)
-Financial Accounting (EPM824)
-Sustainable Aviation (EPM975)
-Airports and Ground Handling (EPM968)
-Airworthiness (EPM897)
-Airline Maintenance (EPM906)
-Airline Revenue Management and Finance (EPM972)
-Safety Management - Tools and Methods (EPM833)
-Air Accident Investigation (EPM970)
-Leadership in Organisations (EPM971)
-Aviation Law (EPM978)
-Future Aviation Challenges - from Unmanned to Spaceflight Vehicles (EPM980)
-Reviews of Quality, Safety and Aviation Business Functions (EPM976)

Dissertation - A dissertation related to experience in the industry is required. There is a high degree of flexibility in terms of sequence and time frame to suit students working in airlines, air traffic control, air forces and other organisations.

Career prospects

This is a professional programme recognised by the aviation industry and accredited by the Royal Aeronautical Society. Airlines are increasingly expecting their managers to study the MSc from City, University of London, and our alumni network includes high-ranking individuals including the chief operating officer of Oman Air, the chief executive officer of Jet Time, the Safety Manager of Lufthansa, the Air Safety Director of ICAO and the vice president of Emirates Airbus Fleet.

Graduates may change or transform their careers as a result of the MSc. An RAF air traffic controller immediately moved into a senior training position at Eurocontrol in Brussels after completing the programme.

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With the MSc Business Systems Analysis and Design course at City you can unravel a business system and prepare to work as an analyst within the industry. Read more
With the MSc Business Systems Analysis and Design course at City you can unravel a business system and prepare to work as an analyst within the industry.

Who is it for?

The course is for motivated students who enjoy working within high-pressure environments often to tight deadlines. You will need a good undergraduate degree as well as the tenacity and patience to understand business systems and the ability to adapt to constant change.

Objectives

There is a common misconception in building business systems: that users know their requirements. Often they don’t. This postgraduate Business Systems Analysis programme has been designed to address this problem.

The MSc in Business Systems Analysis and Design is not about developing algorithms and coding. We work with technology but we are not technicians because we know that to become an IT consultant or business analyst, you need to understand the disparate areas that make up the discipline. This is a Masters degree where you will design a business system; in order to do this you will unpick the information infrastructure to find out if the system works.

Analysing a business system is a process that demands constant re-evaluation. By investigating system requirements, considering how information flows through it, and exploring the pitfalls that emerge within user hierarchies, at City we examine the business system as a whole. This approach is essential to respond to rapid business change.

These are some of the questions the course poses:
-What is the right system to address the problem?
-Does the system meet the needs of the business now and will it be able to adapt in the future?
-How is information flowing within the system?
-How will users interact with the system throughout the project life cycle?

Placements

As a student on this programme you can undertake an internship in the July to December period, for up to six months. You can work under a client’s direction for all or part of this time. Many students use the internship as an opportunity to carry out a specific project which forms the context for their final dissertation.

One current student is working within a user experience design company to investigate how scents affect the emotional perception of digital fruit images displayed on a desktop service.

Academic facilities

As a student on the MSc Business Systems Analysis and Design course you will have access to dedicated labs and use specialist software such as SAP. At City we also have access to Microsoft Dynamics ERP software to support the enterprise information system module. Microsoft Dynamics is an industry-based CRM system. As part of the University of London you can also become a member of Senate House Library for free with your student ID card.

Teaching and learning

We provide a diversity of teaching approaches so you get a diversity of learning experiences in the form of traditional lectures, live classroom demonstrations, tutorials, laboratories, and TV studio role-playing. We encourage you to engage with the material in an active way. As a postgraduate student, we expect you to take responsibility for your own learning and use non-timetabled hours for your own private study or group interactions.

You will be assessed in a variety of ways from coursework and laboratory work to presentations, examinations and a project dissertation. By successfully completing eight taught modules and the research project you will be awarded a Master of Science (MSc) degree. All modules in this course are supported by Moodle, City's online learning environment.

The course is available full time (12 months) and part time (up to 28 months - two days a week). The Department is aware that this involves considerable commitment from part-time students, and we try to be as flexible as we can so you can successfully combine your work and study.

By completing eight modules and the dissertation you will be awarded 180 credits and a Masters level qualification. Alternatively, if you do not complete the dissertation but have successfully completed the eight modules, you will be awarded 120 credits and a postgraduate diploma. If you successfully complete four modules (60 credits) you will be awarded a postgraduate certificate.

Modules

There are six core modules and four electives from which you can choose two topics. Practical work is emphasised throughout the degree programme to develop your understanding and skills, which is strengthened by interactive teamwork. The course has an excellent track record in producing employable hybrid IT/business professionals.

In the industry you need to communicate your expertise in lay terms. The modules give you experience in working on group projects so you can manage roles and responsibilities and build a set of professional values. The core content will also give you the ability to set strategies, manage information flows and deal with problems such as overload and risk.

The course develops:
-Skills in business awareness, design and consultancy to facilitate the alignment of IT systems and services to business objectives
-The specialist understanding of theoretical principles in business systems analysis and design.
-Technical skills, through practical laboratory work, so you can apply your knowledge of IT and how it affects business competitiveness.

The course will give you specialist knowledge ranging from business systems requirements analysis and design, software systems engineering, data modelling to business intelligence, project management and business engineering with ERP solutions.

Core modules
-Business engineering with ERP solutions INM342 (15 credits)
-Business intelligence & analytics INM451 (15 credits)
-Practical business systems consultancy INM353 (15 credits)
-Project management INM372 (15 credits)
-Research methods and professional issues INM373 (15 credits)
-Systems specification INM312 (15 credits)

Elective modules - choose from one module in the first term from the following:
-User-centred design INM355 (15 credits)
-Information and knowledge management INM351 (15 credits)

Choose from one module in the second term from the following:*
-Databases INM343 (15 credits)
-Information Retrieval (IR) INM351 (15 credits)

*Note: Databases is compulsory for students who do not have prior knowledge at the discretion of the programme director.

Career prospects

As a City graduate you leave with front-line knowledge. With insight from major areas of research including software engineering, human-computer interaction and artificial intelligence, you will be able to assimilate your skills within the industry and offer a future-focused mindset.

From Unilever to HMV and from Accenture to ITN, City graduates are employed across sectors in consultancy companies, software houses, the public services, telecommunications, multinational manufacturers, and large retailers. The programme will help you build a strong peer network as well as a solid network of contacts for your continued career development.

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These courses provide students with a theoretical and practical understanding of the issues involved in the design, conduct, analysis and interpretation of randomised controlled trials of health interventions. Read more
These courses provide students with a theoretical and practical understanding of the issues involved in the design, conduct, analysis and interpretation of randomised controlled trials of health interventions. They are suitable for students working in high-, middle- and low-income countries.

The need for rigorous evaluation of components of health care is increasingly recognised worldwide. An important type of evaluation is the randomised controlled clinical trial. These courses will give students an understanding of trials which will equip them to work in this increasingly important field.

They are suitable both for those wishing to gain an overall understanding of trials before moving into the field, and those who have general or specialist experience in clinical trials and aim to broaden their role in the design, management, analysis and reporting of clinical trials in high, middle and low income countries.

The aims and learning outcomes of the courses are detailed in the programme specification.

- Full programme specification (pdf) (http://www.londoninternational.ac.uk/sites/default/files/progspec-clinicaltrials.pdf)
- Distance Learning prospectus (pdf) (http://www.londoninternational.ac.uk/sites/default/files/prospectus/lshtm-prospectus.pdf)

Visit the website http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/masters/dmsct.html

English Language Requirements

You will meet the English language requirement if you have passed, within the past three years:

- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English when a minimum overall score of B or 190 is achieved;

- (IELTS) International English Language Testing System when an overall score of at least 7.0 is achieved with a minimum of 7.0 in the Written sub-test and a minimum of 5.5 in Listening, Reading and Speaking; or

- Pearson Test of English (Academic) overall score of 68 or above, with a minimum of 68 in Writing and a minimum of 59 in Listening, Reading and Speaking

- (TOEFL) iBT Test of English as a Foreign Language overall score of 100 or above with at least 24 in Writing, 23 in Speaking, 22 in Reading and 21 in Listening

Method of assessment

Assessment varies from module to module but will include a combination of unseen written examinations and written assignments. Details are given in the module specifications.

Examinations take place once a year in June (please note: it is not possible to hold examinations at other times of year). These are normally held in a student’s country of residence. We have examination centres in over 180 countries worldwide (for details please visit the assessment and examinations section).

Examinations are arranged mainly through Ministries of Education or the British Council. Students taking examinations will need to pay a fee to their local examination centre. Please note that if you fail an examination at the first entry you will be allowed one further attempt.

Credit awarded

Credits will be awarded to all modules (15 credits each) and (MSc only) the integrating module (30 credits) successfully completed. To successfully pass an award, the following credits must be gained:

- Postgraduate Certificate – 60 credits
- Postgraduate Diploma – 120 credits
- MSc – 180 credits

Study materials

The majority of the Clinical Trials module study materials are delivered online after course/module registration. You will receive details of how to use the online learning environment effectively. Study materials provided for non-Clinical Trials modules may include study guides, textbooks, CD-ROMs/additional computer software (e.g. Stata). You will have access to past examination papers and Examiners' reports, Student Handbooks, and to the School's online library resources. We also provide all students with a student registration card.

Flexible study

We know that if you have a full-time job, family or other commitments, and wish to study at a distance, you will have many calls on your time. The course allows you to study independently, at a time and pace that suits you (subject to some course-specific deadlines) using the comprehensive study materials provided, with support available from academic staff. You have between 1-5 years in which to complete the Postgraduate Certificate, and between 2-5 years in which to complete the Postgraduate Diploma or the MSc.

Once registered, you will be sent the learning materials for the module(s) you have chosen to study. Clinical Trials module materials are mostly delivered online. These materials will take you through a programme of directed self-study, and indicate how and where you can obtain supplementary study materials and access tutorial support to enhance your studies.

The study year runs from the beginning of October through to the June exams, during which time tutorial support is available. Those writing the Clinical Trials integrating report will also continue to have tutorial support over the summer. Deadlines for submission of coursework vary per course but are usually in March, May, August and September.

Support

- a web-based learning environment (including web conferencing, allowing you to engage in academic discussions with tutors and fellow students)

- personalised feedback from teaching staff and advice on assignments

- tutors are allocated to each module and are available to answer queries and promote discussion during the study year, through the online Virtual Learning Environment

- communicate with other distance learning students, either individually or through learning support groups

Blended learning: taking modules in London

After successful completion of a minimum number of core modules, Postgraduate Diploma and MSc students may also be eligible for the 'blended learning option', which allows for the study of up to two modules only (from a restricted list) at the School in London during the Spring or Summer terms in place of distance learning modules. Please note that these options, and the dates when the modules are held at the School, are subject to change - full details will be sent to all distance learning students in July each year.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/masters/dmsct.html#seventh

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There is a great need for suitably qualified engineers to fulfill the existing and future needs of the global smart economy. This course addresses that need by providing an exciting range of topical modules and a state-of-the-art engineering facility. Read more

Overview

There is a great need for suitably qualified engineers to fulfill the existing and future needs of the global smart economy. This course addresses that need by providing an exciting range of topical modules and a state-of-the-art engineering facility. The programme also offers the student a chance to develop their research skills in a full-time three month project.

In the world of increasingly connected things and people, electronic engineers develop the technology that is the interface between the digital and the physical worlds. With the increasing pervasiveness of electronics enhanced things, and the need for ever-present wire-free communication, there is an increasing demand for engineers with experience in wireless communications systems and embedded computing systems.

The internet of things will lead to billions of wirelessly connected devices that will fundamentally change our approach to wireless systems and networks. To address this, there is a need for well qualified graduates who can design solutions based on solid understanding of the wireless environment and electronic hardware.
Similarly, as we continue to embed intelligence in everything from home appliances to cars and wearable sensors to robotic systems, there is growing need for engineers who understand the unique problems of real time application deadlines, resource constrained computing environments, and embedded intelligence.
The ME Electronic Engineering has been designed to provide two specialized module sets that introduce advanced techniques and topical content: one focusing on wireless communications and the other on embedded systems. These are supported by core modules which provide techniques that are widely applied and reusable across a range of engineering applications.
The programme has been designed to have a large project element to allow students to demonstrate their expertise in their chosen specialism. In addition students will be invited to present their work in an open day to invited local industry leaders. A small number of placements may be available for students graduating in 2016 (to be confirmed).

See the website https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/electronic-engineering/our-courses/meng-electronic-engineering

Minimum English language requirements:
- IELTS: 6.5 minimum overall score
- TOEFL (Paper based test): 585
- TOEFL (Internet based test): 95
- PTE (Pearson): 62

National University of Ireland Maynooth’s TOEFL code is 8850

Course Structure

Note: As module availability may change year on year, applicants should check the Department web site for the most up to date list of modules available for 2016-2017, see web address below:

https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/electronic-engineering/current-students

Career Options

Graduates will have enhanced qualifications and up to date knowledge of modern cutting-edge techniques and technology suitable for a range of electronic and ICT positions in the smart economy.

Graduates of this course are well qualified to work in wireless communications and embedded systems space. Both of these areas are seeing business growth and, despite the demand, both areas are experiencing a shortage of suitably skilled engineers. Therefore this programme will significantly enhance your job prospects in these fields.
The region around Maynooth and the Greater Dublin Region is host to one of the greatest concentrations of ICT companies – ranging from large multinational companies such as Intel, IBM and Google to a very active and strong ecosystem of specialist and start-up companies. Maynooth University is at the heart of this industry and this programme will provide opportunities for students to engage with the community.
As a result of the advanced techniques introduced and the substantial project, this programme also provides a suitable foundation for students who may be considering undertaking further research in the area of the internet of Things, embedded systems and wireless communication.
International students from outside the European Economic Area may also avail of the Third Level Graduate Scheme which allows graduates to remain in Ireland for up to 12 months after graduation to seek employment and if successful to apply for a Work Permit or Green Card Permit.

Find out how to apply here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/electronic-engineering/our-courses/meng-electronic-engineering#tabs-apply

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/study-maynooth/postgraduate-studies/fees-funding-scholarships

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