• University of Derby Online Learning Featured Masters Courses
  • Birmingham City University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Surrey Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Bristol Featured Masters Courses
  • Aberystwyth University Featured Masters Courses
  • Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University Featured Masters Courses
  • Northumbria University Featured Masters Courses
De Montfort University Featured Masters Courses
University College London Featured Masters Courses
University of Hertfordshire Featured Masters Courses
University of Dundee Featured Masters Courses
University of Portsmouth Featured Masters Courses
"carbon" AND "credit"×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Carbon Credit)

We have 32 Masters Degrees (Carbon Credit)

  • "carbon" AND "credit" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 32
Order by 
Programme description. The challenge of responding and adapting to climate change will drive trillions of dollars of new investment over the coming decades, with major changes required across the economy, in energy production and consumption, industry, buildings, transport, infrastructure, forests and agriculture. Read more

Programme description

The challenge of responding and adapting to climate change will drive trillions of dollars of new investment over the coming decades, with major changes required across the economy, in energy production and consumption, industry, buildings, transport, infrastructure, forests and agriculture. Delivering this investment will require greatly enhanced capacity in all aspects of carbon finance. In addition, following the Paris Agreement both developed and developing countries now have increased commitments for addressing climate change which is driving increased demand for skills and knowledge in carbon and climate finance.

This programme is the world's first MSc in Carbon Finance, dedicated to professionals in the climate change investment field and focussed on the business opportunities and financial flows driven by society's response to climate change (carbon finance).

The MSc in Carbon Finance will appeal to graduates with significant work experience in business, government or the NGO sector.

Typically students will not have had an opportunity to specialise in climate change but will want to move into a career in climate change investment, carbon markets, consulting or carbon accounting.

Likely future roles include carbon credit development, low carbon portfolio management, renewable energy investment, climate find management, carbon trading, carbon consulting, carbon accounting and related policy or regulatory roles (e.g. with government or NGOs).

Very few business schools in the world have a similar depth of expertise in carbon finance.

Programme structure

Learning will primarily be through lectures, set reading, class discussions, exercises, group-work assignments, problem solving in tutorials and case studies. Assessment methods include examinations, assignments, presentations or continuous assessment.

Learning outcomes

Students who follow this programme will gain an understanding of:

  • Explain and evaluate the current state of climate change science and key climate change policy initiatives;
  • Explain and apply principles of finance in the energy sector;
  • Describe and critically evaluate the structure and dynamics of the major global, regional and national-level carbon markets;
  • Explain and apply practices and procedures of carbon accounting;
  • Describe and evaluate the challenges and opportunities for low-carbon investment.


Read less
This unique multi-disciplinary course is taught by architects, engineers and physicists involved in practice and research. It focuses on the theory and practice of developing low carbon and sustainable buildings. Read more
This unique multi-disciplinary course is taught by architects, engineers and physicists involved in practice and research. It focuses on the theory and practice of developing low carbon and sustainable buildings.

The course includes a number of interlinked modules that simulate the design and development of a sustainable project. This enables students from different disciplines to develop skills and understanding relevant to their own discipline, be it design or consultancy, and in relation to a national and international context.

Why choose this course?

The course is run by the School of Architecture, which is recognised as one of the country's leading schools of architecture and is consistently ranked by The Architect's Journals one of the five best schools in the UK. You will gain an advanced understanding of the key sustainability issues related to buildings enabling them to strategically influence feasibility and design processes within the built environment. The course attracts some of the best students in the field from a diverse range of ages, backgrounds, gender and nationalities. This offers opportunities for interdisciplinary, globally aware teaching and learning.

The range of subjects draws on the research strengths of the teaching staff and enables research to inform the teaching modules. You are encouraged where possible to take part in staff research projects. You will have the opportunity to go on an annual field trip. This is an opportunity to directly experience some of the very best of sustainable design projects in another culture. Previous field trips have been to Germany, Scotland and Denmark. Students from this course have gone on to work in a wide range of occupations from architectural and engineering practices and research consultancies to development work, furniture design, owning and operating electricity utilities, and even carbon trading.

This course in detail

The course is organised on a modular credit system, 60 credits for postgraduate certificate, 120 credits for the postgraduate diploma (9 months full-time, 20 months part-time) and 180 credits for the master's degree (12 months full-time, 24 months part-time).

Modules combine a ratio of taught to self-led study. For example, a module of 20 credits approximates to 200 hours of student effort, up to 36 hours of which will normally be devoted to lectures, seminars, individual tutorials or other staff contact. The remainder of the time is devoted to student-led study and assessment.

Please note: as courses are reviewed regularly, the module list you choose from may vary from that shown below.

The core modules for the MSc and PGDip are:
-Building Physics (20 credits)
-The Sustainable Built Environment (20 credits)
-Post-occupancy Building Evaluation (20 credits)
-Advanced Low Carbon Building Technologies (20 credits)
-Modelling and Passive Strategies (20 credits)
-Sustainable Design in Context (20 credits)

The compulsory modules for the MSc are:
-Research Methods and Design (10 credits)
-MSc Dissertation (50 credits)

Teaching and learning

The teaching and learning methods reflect the wide variety of topics and techniques associated with sustainability, low-carbon and resource efficient design.

Staff-led lectures provide the framework, background and knowledge base, and you are encouraged to probe deeper into the topics by further reading and review. Analysis, synthesis and application of material introduced in the lectures are achieved through professional and staff-led workshops, group and one-to-one tutorials, student-led seminars, case studies, and practical work that anticipates the design project.

The course attracts students from a diverse range of ages, backgrounds, gender and nationalities. This offers opportunities for interdisciplinary, globally aware teaching and learning. You are exposed to a variety of cultural perspectives and issues through the use of international case studies and draw on their diverse strengths through peer learning and group work.

An annual field trip is an opportunity to directly experience some of the very best of sustainable design projects in another culture. Previous field trips have been to Germany, Scotland and Denmark.

The range of subjects draws on the research strengths of the teaching staff and enables research to inform the teaching modules. You are encouraged where possible to take part in staff research projects.

We attract some of the best students in the field, drawn by the integrating basis of the programme and its solid theoretical foundation on expertise within the University.

Careers and professional development

Graduates will possess an advanced understanding of the key sustainability issues related to buildings enabling them to strategically influence feasibility and design processes within the built environment. They will be familiar with a range of models, tools and methods with which to quantify, predict, evaluate and manage building performance, and will be able to use them and switch to other tools based on an understanding from first principles.

Drawing on a working knowledge of how to minimise energy, carbon emissions and resource consumption in buildings through the various stages of their life cycles, they will be able to take account of changing, incomplete and uncertain information related to the environment. They will also have well developed skills in auditing, analysis, reporting and presentation and a thorough understanding of the interdisciplinary subject area.

Students from this course have gone on to work in a wide range of occupations from architectural and engineering practices and research consultancies to development work, furniture design, owning and operating electricity utilities, and even carbon trading.

Read less
This programme is appropriate for you if are seeking to develop the skills and confidence to address the critical global challenges of energy and diminishing natural resources. Read more

This programme is appropriate for you if are seeking to develop the skills and confidence to address the critical global challenges of energy and diminishing natural resources. Clean energy, optimal use of resources and the economics of climate change are the key issues facing society, and form the fundamental themes of this programme.

Course details

You explore the world’s dependency on hydrocarbon-based resources, together with strategies and technologies to decarbonise national economies. The course examines global best practice, government policies, industrial symbiosis and emerging risk management techniques. You also address the environmental, economic and sociological (risk and acceptability) impacts of renewable energy provision and waste exploitation as central elements. 

The programme develops the problem-solvers and innovators needed to face the enormous challenges of the 21st century - those who can play key roles in driving energy and environmental policies, and in formulating forward-looking strategies on energy use and environmental sustainability at corporate, national and global scales.

What you study

For the PgDip award you must successfully complete 120 credits of taught modules. For an MSc award you must successfully complete the 120 credits of taught modules and a 60-credit master's research project. 

Energy, environment, risk managing projects, sustainability and integrated waste management are the main foci of the programme, but you also explore the financial aspects of energy and environmental management. Economics is integral to the development of policies and is often a key influencing factor.

This programme aims to develop a comprehensive knowledge and understanding of the role and place of energy in the 21st century and the way the environment impinges on the types of energy used and production methods. It also aims to investigate the environment as it is perceived, and contextualise its actual importance to mankind. Specific objectives for this course are to establish the financial validity for the pursuit of alternative energy forms and management of the environment.

You are encouraged to take up opportunities of voluntary placements with local industries to conduct real-world research projects. These placements are assessed in line with the assessment criteria and learning outcomes of the Project module. 

Examples of past MSc research projects

  • The taxonomy of facilitated industrial symbioses
  • Assessment of the climate change impacts of the Tees Valley
  • Exploring the links between carbon disclosure and carbon performance
  • Hydrothermal carbonisation of waste biomass
  • Quantifying the impact of biochar on soil microbial ecology
  • Potential for biochar utilisation in developing rural economies
  • Carbon trading opportunities for renewable energy projects in developing countries
  • Exploring the potential for wind energy in Libya
  • Demand and supply potential of solar panel installations
  • A feasibility study of the application of zero-carbon retrofit technologies in building communal areas
  • Energy recovery from abandoned oil wells through geothermal processes

Course structure

Core modules

  • Concepts of Sustainability
  • Economics of Climate Change
  • Energy and Global Climate Change
  • Global Energy Policy
  • Integrated Waste Management and Exploitation
  • Project
  • Research Methods and Proposal

Modules offered may vary.

Teaching

How you learn

The course provides a number of contact teaching and assessment hours (through lectures, tutorials, projects, assignments), but you are also expected to spend time on your own, called 'self-study' time, to review lecture notes, prepare course work assignments, work on projects and revise for assessments. For example, each 20-credit module typically has around 200 hours of learning time. 

In most cases, around 60 hours are spent in lectures, tutorials and in practical exercises. The remaining learning time is for you to gain a deeper understanding of the subject. Each year of full-time study consists of modules totalling 180 credits; hence, during one year of full-time study a student can expect to have 1,800 hours of learning and assessment.

How you are assessed

Modules are assessed by a variety of methods including examination and in-course assessment with some utilising other approaches such as group-work or verbal/poster presentations.

Employability

Work placement

There may be short-term placement opportunities for some students, particularly during the project phase of the course. This University is also in the process of seeking accreditation for the Waste Management module from the Chartered Institution of Wastes Management.

Career opportunities

Successful graduates from this course are well placed to find employment. As an energy and environmental manager, you might find yourself in a role responsible for overseeing the energy and environmental performance of private, public and voluntary sector organisations, as well as in a wide range of engineering industries.

Energy and environmental managers examine corporate activities to establish where improvements can be made and ensure compliance with environmental legislation across the organisation. You might be responsible for reviewing the whole operation, carrying out energy and environmental audits and assessments, identifying and resolving energy and environmental problems and acting as agents of change. Your role could include the training of the workforce to develop the ability to recognise their own contributions to improved energy and environmental performance.

Your role may also include the development, implementation and monitoring of energy and environmental strategies, policies and programmes that promote sustainable development at corporate, national or global levels.



Read less
This MSc Energy and Environmental Management (with Advanced Practice) course is ideal if are seeking to develop your skills and confidence to address the critical global challenges of energy and diminishing natural resources. Read more

This MSc Energy and Environmental Management (with Advanced Practice) course is ideal if are seeking to develop your skills and confidence to address the critical global challenges of energy and diminishing natural resources. Clean energy, optimal use of resources and the economics of climate change are the key issues facing society, and form the fundamental themes of this programme.

Course details

You explore the world’s dependency on hydrocarbon-based resources, together with strategies and technologies to decarbonise national economies. This course examines global best practice, government policies, industrial symbiosis and emerging risk management techniques. You also address the environmental, economic and sociological (risk and acceptability) impacts of renewable energy provision and waste exploitation as central elements.There are three routes you can select from to gain a postgraduate Master’s award:

  • MSc Energy and Environmental Management – one year full time
  • MSc Energy and Environmental Management – two years part time
  • MSc Energy and Environmental Management – two years full time

The one-year programme is a great option if you want to gain a traditional MSc qualification – you can find out more here. This two-year master’s degree with advanced practice enhances your qualification by adding to the one-year master’s programme an internship, research or study abroad experience.The MSc Energy and Environmental Management (with Advanced Practice) offers you the chance to enhance your qualification by completing an internship, research or study abroad experience in addition to the content of the one-year MSc. This two-year programme is an opportunity to enhance your qualification by spending one semester completing a vocational internship, research internship or by studying abroad. Although we can’t guarantee an internship, we can provide you with practical support and advice on how to find and secure your own internship position. A vocational internship is a great way to gain work experience and give your CV a competitive edge. Alternatively, a research internship develops your research and academic skills as you work as part of a research team in an academic setting – ideal if you are interested in a career in research or academia. A third option is to study abroad in an academic exchange with one of our partner universities. This option does incur additional costs such as travel and accommodation. You must also take responsibility for ensuring you have the appropriate visa to study outside the UK, where relevant.

What you study

For the MSc with advanced practice, you complete 120 credits of taught modules, a 60-credit master’s research project and 60 credits of advanced practice.

Energy, environment, risk managing projects, sustainability and integrated waste management are emphasised on the programme, but you also explore the financial aspects of energy and environmental management. Economics is integral to developing policies and is often a key influencing factor.

You develop a comprehensive knowledge and understanding of the role and place of energy in the 21st century, and how the environment impinges on the types of energy used and the way they are produced. You investigate the environment as it is perceived, and contextualise its actual importance to mankind. Specific objectives for this course are to establish the financial validity of pursing alternative energy forms and managing the environment.

Examples of past MSc research projects

  • The taxonomy of facilitated industrial symbioses
  • Assessment of the climate change impacts of the Tees Valley
  • Exploring the links between carbon disclosure and carbon performance
  • Hydrothermal carbonisation of waste biomass
  • Quantifying the impact of biochar on soil microbial ecology
  • Potential for biochar utilisation in developing rural economies
  • Carbon trading opportunities for renewable energy projects in developing countries
  • Exploring the potential for wind energy in Libya
  • Demand and supply potential of solar panel installations
  • A feasibility study of the application of zero-carbon retrofit technologies in building communal areas
  • Energy recovery from abandoned oil wells through geothermal processes

Course structure

Core modules

  • Concepts of Sustainability
  • Data Acquisition and Signal Processing Techniques
  • Economics of Climate Change
  • Energy and Global Climate Change
  • Global Energy Policy
  • Integrated Waste Management and Exploitation
  • Research Methods and Proposal
  • Research Project (Advanced Practice)

Advanced Practice options

  • Research Internship
  • Study Abroad
  • Vocational Internship

Modules offered may vary.

Teaching

How you learn

You learn through a variety of teaching methods including lectures, tutorials, projects and assignments. You are also expected to participate in self-directed study, to review lecture notes, prepare assignments, work on projects and revise for assessments. Each 20-credit module typically has around 200 hours of learning time. 

You usually spend around 60 hours in lectures, tutorials and in practical exercises over the duration of the course. The remaining learning time is for you to gain a deeper understanding of the subject. Each year of full-time study consists of modules totalling 180 credits. During one year of full-time study you can expect to have 1,800 hours of learning and assessment.

How you are assessed

Modules are assessed by a variety of methods including exams and in-course assessment with some using other approaches such as group work, or verbal or poster presentations. 

Your Advanced Practice module is assessed by an individual written reflective report (3,000 words) together with a study or workplace log, where appropriate, and through a poster presentation.

Employability

Career opportunities

Successful graduates from this course are well-placed to find employment. As an energy and environmental manager, you might find yourself responsible for overseeing the energy and environmental performance of a private, public or voluntary sector organisation, or in one of a wide range of engineering industries.

Work placement

There may be short-term placement opportunities for some students, particularly during the project phase of the course. This University is also in the process of seeking accreditation for the Waste Management module from the Chartered Institution of Wastes Management.



Read less
Our Climate Change. Environment, Science & Policy MSc course is an opportunity for graduates of geography, physical sciences, engineering and computer sciences to explore specific issues relating to climate and environmental change at an advanced level. Read more

Our Climate Change: Environment, Science & Policy MSc course is an opportunity for graduates of geography, physical sciences, engineering and computer sciences to explore specific issues relating to climate and environmental change at an advanced level. You will explore a wide range of critical topics focusing on human-originated influences on the terrestrial, hydrological and atmospheric environments, and their biological, physical and societal consequences.

Key benefits

  • Gain an up-to-date understanding of the nature and processes of environmental changes occurring in Earth’s terrestrial, hydrological and atmospheric environments.
  • Study the methods used to examine the potential future consequences of environmental changes.
  • Learn to evaluate and analyse environmental change research critically and reflect on the strengths and weaknesses and potential societal implications of the science.
  • Develop an understanding of the scientific evidence needed for policymakers and society to respond to the problems associated with global and regional environmental changes impacting the Earth.

Description

The Climate Change: Environment, Science & Policy MSc is a flexible course allowing you to study either a Policy or a Science pathway. Our course will provide you with an in-depth understanding of the processes and the nature of environmental changes occurring in the Earth’s terrestrial, hydrological and atmospheric environments. You will also develop essential research, analysis and critical-thinking skills that will help you to understand and interpret scientific evidence and also respond to the problems associated with global and regional environmental changes in the Earth’s system.

The study course is made up of optional and required modules and you must take the minimum of 180 credits for the course. If you are studying full-time, you will complete the course in one year, from September to September. If you are studying part-time, your course will take two years to complete. You will take the required combination of required and optional modules over this period of time, with the dissertation in your second year.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

We will teach you through a combination of lectures and seminars, and you will typically have 20 hours of this per module. We also expect you to undertake 180 hours of independent study for each module. For your 12,000 word dissertation, we will provide four workshops and five hours of one-to-one supervision to complement your 587 hours of independent study.

As part of a two-year schedule, part-time students typically take the required 40-credit taught module and 40 credits of optional module in year 1. They will then take a 60 credit dissertation module and 40 credit optional modules in year 2. Typically, one credit equates to 10 hours of work.

Assessment

Performance on taught modules in the Geography Department is normally assessed through essays and other written assignments, oral presentations, lab work and occasionally by examination, depending on the modules selected. All students also undertake a research-based dissertation of 12,000 words.

Career prospects

Our MSc is designed to prepare you for a career in environmental change research, consultancy and/or policy development. It provides interdisciplinary research training for those going onto a PhD in environmental and/or Earth system science within King's or elsewhere, and students entering the job market immediately after graduation are expected to be highly marketable in three main areas: local and national governmental and non-governmental agencies (eg Environment Agency, County Councils, Nature Conservancies); environmental consultancies and businesses (eg environmental informatics providers; environmental businesses - including carbon trading; insurance; waste management and energy industries), and policy development organisations (eg such government departments as Defra). The Seminars in Environmental Research, Management and Policy module offers you the chance to hear and meet practitioners in many of these key areas.

Sign up for more information. Email now

Have a question about applying to King’s? Email now



Read less
Course highlights. Learn about the latest developments in sustainable chemistry. Benefit from world class facilities and our strong links with industry. Read more

Course highlights

  • Learn about the latest developments in sustainable chemistry
  • Benefit from world class facilities and our strong links with industry
  • Study an interdisciplinary programme

Overview

This course covers all aspects of modern green and sustainable chemistry including feedstocks, energy, sustainable synthesis (including biocatalysis) and industrial process design.

Chemistry plays a key role in our search for better medicines to improve healthcare in an ageing population, for safer agrochemicals to aid food production for a growing population, and for advanced materials for new technologies. Our objective is to ensure that chemistry is sustainable.

This course trains a new generation of scientists to find innovative sustainable resource and energy-efficient solutions that have low environmental impact, demonstrate social responsibility and make a positive contribution to economic growth. You’ll cover many aspects of modern sustainable chemistry including:

  • feedstocks
  • energy
  • sustainable synthesis (including biocatalysis)
  • industrial process design

This programme is interdisciplinary. It capitalises on strong established links between the School of Chemistry, the Faculty of Engineering, and the Nottingham Business School to ensure you’re learning from the experts. 

Course details

You will develop an excellent knowledge of contemporary methods of synthesis, analysis and process design optimised for both energy and reaction mass efficiency. The course will also equip you with the tools to critically evaluate comparable reaction pathways and make decisions in the design of efficient chemical processes key to the pharmaceutical, agrochemical and other chemical-using industries.

You will also learn to make effective use of electronic databases in the searching and retrieval of information, and will develop key skills to analyse complex problems.

Course structure

This degree is a one-year, full-time programme, consisting of lectures, workshops, seminars and an experimental research project. Assessments will take place through coursework throughout the year and in examinations, which usually take place in January and May or June of each year.

You will study 180 credits in total over the year, of which 100 credits are made up of core modules. You will also select 20 credits of optional modules. Please visit the online prospectus to see detailed module information.

A highlight of the course is a two-month, 60-credit summer research project in original experimental work. You will be supervised by one or more academic staff members and will join an active research group. Projects are typically selected in March, and after background literature searching and planning through the closely linked 20-credit module Research Planning and Management, experimental work on the project starts in June.

World-class facilities

We are home to the £15.8m GlaxoSmithKline Carbon Neutral Laboratory which opened in 2017. The award winning building has been designed to offset the carbon emissions from construction. It houses around 100 researchers with dedicated instrument rooms. This is an example of our commitment to sustainable chemistry as well as providing excellent facilities for our students and researchers. Many of our masters students undertake research in the laboratory.

Careers

Graduates from our masters courses can expect to move into a range of scientific careers, including further study at doctoral level and employment with companies across the chemicals, materials, biotechnology and pharmaceutical sectors. Strong industrial links, including industrial participation in the delivery of material and opportunities to carry out industrially supported research projects, will further enhance your employability. Other graduates choose to progress to PhD study in a related subject area at the University of Nottingham or at other universities.



Read less
Sustainability has emerged as a defining issues of the 21st century. Achieving enduring and fairer societies requires viable economies, sound science and good governance. Read more
Sustainability has emerged as a defining issues of the 21st century. Achieving enduring and fairer societies requires viable economies, sound science and good governance. This course provides training in theory and critical analysis along with the practical skills to facilitate the transformation needed to deliver low carbon futures.

Why study Sustainability at Dundee?

The MSc in Sustainability is being introduced in recognition of the challenges of water, food, energy and health security facing the planet. The portfolio of environmental disciplines is exceptionally strong in the University as are its traditions of cross-disciplinary collaboration and cooperation.
Along with the flagship MSc in Sustainability, there are four specialised pathways:

MSc in Sustainability and Water Security
MSc in Sustainability and Climate Change
MSc in Sustainability and Low Carbon Living
MSc in Sustainability and the Green Economy

What's so good about Sustainability at Dundee?

There is a strong postgraduate culture which Sustainability students can enjoy.
The Graduate School of Natural Resources Law, Policy and Management includes both the Centre for Energy, Petroleum and Mineral Law Policy and the Centre for Water Law, Policy and Science (under the auspices of UNESCO) both of which have long standing international reputations. Specialist high-level speakers sourced from international organisations are invited to present throughout the year, these sessions provide a vital opportunity for students to become connected with industry so continued communication is encouraged after the events.

The School of the Environment and CECHR similarly have an extended programme of guest lectures and speakers and through xcechr there are multiple events bringing Masters and PhD students together by a common interest in environmental change research. Examples of the activities that result include Student-Supervisor-Seminar-Series, ‘change-maker workshops’ and a national show-case ‘Facing the Future’ Symposium.

Who should study this course?

This course is suitable for a wide range of graduates from;
Environmental backgrounds (e.g. geography, planning, environmental studies) looking to upskill and achieve a deeper understanding
Natural science graduates (e.g. chemistry, maths) and engineers looking to develop a more rounded understanding of environmental issues, especially in relation to regulation and policy.
Arts and social science students wishing to use their social, economic and political perspectives to take on the challenges associated with complex environmental systems and their management.

How you will be taught

The course is taught as a collection of 20 credit modules amounting to a total of 180 Masters (SHE M, SCQF 11) credits. The delivery style and assessment requirements for each module varies as we believe a diversity of practice provides strength. Nevertheless all modules combine a mixture of formal lecture, small group seminar, practical/field classes and individual tutorials depending on need and the particular learning objectives of each module. The study load corresponds to one third in each of the first two teaching semesters and one third for independent study for the dissertation the summer recess.

What you will study

There are a choice of four specialist pathways in addition to the MSc in Sustainability: See above.

Each of the five MSc pathways contains a common core comprising ‘Principles of Sustainability’ and ‘Transformation for Sustainability’, along with the ‘Research Training’ module. Each named pathway then comprises a specialised core module and then options drawn from a wide range of electives (c. 30 available from contributing academic Schools). All five MSc pathways feature a 60 credit individual research project, the weighting of which reflects the importance of independent investigation and permitting students to develop expertise in their chosen area through effectively four months of dedicated research.

Each of the MSc in Sustainability pathways is geared around the following learning outcomes:

Knowledge and Understanding:
Achieve a critical understanding of key sustainability principles and perspectives informing actions in pursuit of sustainable development, inclusive of environment, economy and equity considerations;
Demonstrate knowledge of approaches to evaluating and measuring sustainability;
Apply different concepts of transformation and change to enable individual and societal shifts towards more sustainable practices;

Skills:
Ability to analyse, evaluate and critically review theory and policy debates relating to sustainability;
Ability to draw on international perspectives and examples of best practice in relation to methods of evaluation and assessment of sustainability;
Ability to design and plan interventions for creating change to promote greater sustainability across different scales;
Design and undertake a substantial independent research project to address significant areas of theory and/or practice.

Capabilities:
Critique and synthesis theory and evidence drawing on a variety of sources;
Ability to communicate evidenced based reports relevant to a range of stakeholders, including policy makers;
Ability to work independently and as part of a team tackling complex environmental problems to tight deadlines;
Ability to design and evaluate transformative change leading to improved sustainability strategies, processes and plans

Transferrable skills, including building arguments, synthesis, reflexivity and making presentations.

How you will be assessed

Assessment follows a variety of styles including individual essays and practical assignments along with formal written examinations; to group exercises and peer group assessment – this is particularly important where oral presentations are involved. The independent research project (dissertation) is an excellent opportunity for a candidate to achieve deep insight into a topic of their own choice. Masters level dissertations can be very diverse, and include formal hypothesis-led research projects; theory or literature-based projects; case-study assessment and advanced professional practice evaluations. Choice of dissertations is negotiated between the student and his or her academic supervisor.

Careers

The environmental sector is one of the key growth areas in the global economy and in UK terms is comparable in size to the pharmaceutical and aerospace sectors combined. An MSc in Sustainability is designed to equip our graduates to take up a wide range of careers in policy, practical management, training and research across a spectrum of organisations from local to international and within the public and private sectors.

International Agencies and NGOs
Civil Service
Governmental environmental and conservation agencies (e.g. SNH, SEPA, EA)
Environmental management and policy sectors (private and public sector)
Environmental consultancy
Management consultancy
Public affairs
Built environment sustainability
Local planning authorities
Research and development
Preparation for PhD research

Read less
Students can choose to start in September, May or January. About the course. This scheme aims to facilitate knowledge exchange between academia and industry. Read more

Students can choose to start in September, May or January

About the course

This scheme aims to facilitate knowledge exchange between academia and industry. Students must complete three taught modules including research methods and a 120 credit work-based dissertation / research thesis (approximately 20,000 words in length).

While the primary academic focus is on the completion of an advanced piece of research, the collaborative route provided by a work-based research project provides an ideal opportunity to embed new knowledge in the work place and ensure that research is relevant to industry. As such, it is crucial that a student’s employer is supportive of both their research aims and the time commitment that the proposed research will involve. Self-employed students should aim to undertake research which will be closely aligned to their business.

Students may build on the MRes to work towards a Professional Doctorate.

Course structure and content

An MRes can be completed in 2-5 years but we would expect most students to spend 1 year on their taught modules and 2 years on their work based dissertation. 12 or 14 weeks for one module by distance learning. Three intakes per year (January, May, September).

Students will be eligible for a UK Student loan if their course is completed within 3 years.

Core modules:

MRes Research Project

Research Methods

Optional modules:

Contact time

The MRes comprises three taught modules (including Research Methodologies and Advances in Bioscience) followed by a 120 credit work-based dissertation (20,000 words).

We have designed our training to be as accessible as possible, particularly for those in full time employment. Each taught module comprises a 12 or 14 week distance learning module worth 20 credits which can be taken for your own continuing professional development or interest; or built towards a postgraduate qualification. The research elements of our qualifications are carried out in your work place with regular academic supervision. The training is web-based which means that as long as you have access to a reasonable broadband connection (i.e. are able to stream videos such as on YouTube), you can study where and when best suits you. Learning material includes podcast lectures, e-group projects, guided reading, interactive workbooks and discussion forums, as well as assignments and e-tutorials. By signing a re-registration form each year you will have access to e-journals and library resources for the duration of your registration.

Assessment

There are no exams within this programme. Taught modules are assessed via course work and forum discussion. Research is monitored and assessed.



Read less
Equip yourself with the knowledge and skills to be part of the new bio-economy. The focus of this MSc is on substituting plant material for mineral oil and you can choose from a range of modules which incorporate the latest thinking around this. Read more

Students can choose to start in September, May or January

About the course

Equip yourself with the knowledge and skills to be part of the new bio-economy.

The focus of this MSc is on substituting plant material for mineral oil and you can choose from a range of modules which incorporate the latest thinking around this.

This distance learning MSc is delivered by ‌IBERS, with some optional modules being drawn from Bangor University. Both universities have strong, industry focused biotech research portfolios.

Our uniquely structured-yet-flexible format allows you to:

· Study where (provided you have internet access) and when is convenient for you

· Stay focussed and motivated as you work through each module with a cohort of fellow students

· ‘Pick-n-Mix’ the modules which are most relevant to you

· Start in January, May or September

· Take as many or as few modules as you wish over your 5-year registration period

· Supplement your choices with optional modules from Bangor University

· Update your knowledge and develop your critical skills

· Embed your research project into your work

In most cases the research elements of our qualifications are carried out in your work place with regular academic supervision. However, there are also opportunities for research projects to be based at IBERS; ask us if that option would be of interest to you.

Who should take this course?

If you are working in the biotech industry or are developing policy for this sector; or if these are areas you would like to move into, this course is an ideal way to update your knowledge and gain postgraduate qualifications by studying part-time while you are working.

If you are a new graduate interested in pursuing a career in the biotech industry, you can study full or part-time to gain the qualifications and knowledge that you need to start your new career.

How is IBERS Distance Learning Delivered?

This MSc has been designed to be as accessible and flexible as possible, particularly for those in full time employment or living outside the UK. Each 20 credit, 14 week module includes recorded lectures from academics and industry experts, along with guided readings, discussion forums and two assignments. We work very closely with Bangor University, which means that you can also take relevant Bangor modules as part of your studies.

How much work will I need to do?

A typical master’s student is expected to study for 200 hours when taking a 20 credit module. Our students report spending 10 to 15 hours a week per module studying; obviously the more time and effort you can put in, the more you'll benefit from studying the module and the better your grades are likely to be.

How long will it take?

Part-time: From the initial start date you have a maximum of five years to fit in as many or as few modules as you wish. A part-time MSc cannot be completed in less than two years.

Full-time: You should choose your start time to ensure that you will cover the modules that interest you. You will be expected to take two or three modules at a time and complete within two years.

Students will be eligible for a UK Student Loan if the course is completed in 3 years.

Course Content

Students must complete six taught modules - including at least 3 subject specific modules and Research Methods PLUS a 60 credit dissertation (180 credits).

Subject Specific Modules:

Biorenewable Feedstocks
Biorefining Technologies
Biobased product development
Waste Stream Valorisation
Drivers of the Bioeconomy

Core Modules:
Research Methodologies
Work-Based Dissertation

Complementary Modules:

Genetics and Genomics
Carbon Footprinting and LCA
Anaerobic Digestion
Climate Change

Read less
This one year full-time MA in Architectural Design is aimed at students who are looking for a rich, engaging and design-focused post-graduate programme, but do not wish to qualify as a UK registered architect. Read more

This one year full-time MA in Architectural Design is aimed at students who are looking for a rich, engaging and design-focused post-graduate programme, but do not wish to qualify as a UK registered architect.

Overview

This one year full-time MA in Architectural Design is aimed at students who are looking for a rich, engaging and design-focused post-graduate programme, but do not wish to qualify as a UK registered architect. It shares many of the design elements of our established MArch (Master of Architecture/ Part 2) programme, but provides greater flexibility in terms of study choices, allowing you to engage with the interests of our research staff. 

In the programme, we will focus on using design-led research to inform your learning and investigation. You will develop your existing design skills by focussing on how design thinking might address current global challenges. This approach offers an intense and lively forum for the exploration and discussion of design issues. This is why we place particular emphasis on using design as a means to conduct research. Researching through design is a creative activity that closely integrates the process of designing with the act of researching, so that they can mutually inform each other. You will explore problems by making and testing design propositions, introducing and developing established knowledge as and when required. Through project work, you will draw on knowledge from many disciplines.

Students will have the options to develop their design thinking in the School’s principal research areas which currently include:

  • Low carbon/energy design and construction
  • Building performance, prediction and evaluation
  • Making/prototyping
  • Materials
  • Sustainable cities
  • Urban regeneration
  • Architectural practice
  • Asian architecture, art and culture
  • Building conservation
  • History and theory of architecture and urbanism
  • User-centred design of the built environment

You will work in small groups called ‘design units’ under the guidance of an experienced tutor and also work independently to develop a research-focussed approach to your studies. This will require you to question and evaluate evidence and think creatively and iteratively. Emphasis will be on individual discovery and personal reflection as a learning process.

Distinctive features

  • Study in one of the top Schools of Architecture in the UK
  • Supported by the School’s award-winning Design Research Unit Wales (DRUw)
  • Learn from notable design-led practitioners; currently more than 50% of our design programmes are delivered by practising architects
  • Perfect for students who prefer a more practical/active approach to learning through our focus on investigation through design
  • Choose from a range of optional modules to supplement your learning in areas of interest to you and develop important skills in design-based research

Structure

This programme is available on a one year full-time basis. You will be based in the Welsh School of Architecture for the duration of the programme.  The taught element of this programme is structured around a 60 credit design module, where you will use techniques of research through design to explore an issue of interest related to one of the School’s design units. This will normally run between October and April and will conclude with a final presentation in front of a panel of reviewers. Your work in the design studio is complimented by a 30 credit module analysing architectural precedent, and a choice of optional study modules.

You will usually start the dissertation element of the programme in May and complete this over the summer. The dissertation is the culmination of your design research throughout the programme. The dissertation usually comprises of a documented design project, accompanied by a 5000 word critical commentary. Support for developing the necessary skills of research through design will be provided during the taught elements of the programme.

The modules shown are an example of the typical curriculum and will be reviewed prior to the 2018/19 academic year. The final modules will be published by September 2018.

During your year on the programme, you will focus on developing a design-research agenda, defining and establishing your own position in architectural design. The topics covered are usually structured around thematic studios, or ‘units’ led by design tutors who have expertise and interest in specific areas of research and/ or practice. The themes are often related to areas of research expertise within the School and may be run in conjunction with the units offered on the MArch programme.

You will undertake analysis of architectural precedent within the studio environment and choose 30 credits worth of optional modules, chosen from a list of subjects based on the research interests of the staff in the school. This list is reviewed on an annual basis. You can choose any combination of 10 and 20 credit modules for your option. 

For your dissertation you will work independently using the skills that have been developed during the taught programme to develop a critical research argument through design. This will involve completing a design thesis project. You will be expected to supplement this with a 5000 word critical written commentary.

Career prospects

Whilst many of our graduates will choose to undertake a career within architecture or other built environment professions, the programme provides a large number of transferable skills which will be of benefit across a wide range of professions. The focus on independent, project based learning is welcomed by employers in that it provides graduates with skills in creative thinking, conceptual organisation, critical reflection and taking initiative.



Read less
This fresh, new programme for 2017 is a collaboration between the School of GeoSciences and the School of Social and Political Sciences. Read more

This fresh, new programme for 2017 is a collaboration between the School of GeoSciences and the School of Social and Political Sciences.

The world is facing an ‘energy trilemma’; how to achieve energy security, energy equity and environmental sustainability. Whilst equipping students with an active understanding of low carbon technologies, policies and markets, this new MSc programme is focused squarely on analysing the social, societal and environmental dimensions of energy transitions. You will examine how citizens are involved in and are affected by changes in energy systems.

On a more theoretical level, the programme will enable you to relate supply-side issues to geo-politics and political economy, whilst energy demand will be studied in relation to broader challenges of sustainable consumption.

On a more practical level you will explore the potential of ‘smart’ ICT to affect consumption and inform strategic choices in sustainable living at household and community level. With Scotland being a world leader in renewable electricity generation (especially wind and marine), but also being economically dependent on declining North Sea oil and gas and suffering from high levels of energy poverty, this interdisciplinary MSc. benefits from close access to a high number of insightful case studies, which will serve to examine links between global and local issues, explore international best practices and identify locally suited pathways to more sustainable energy management.

Applicants receiving an offer of admission, either unconditional or conditional, will be asked to pay a tuition fee deposit of £1,500. Please see the fees and costs section for more information.

Programme structure

The programme has been designed to develop transdisciplinary perspectives on the energy trilemma and integrative analytical skills (qualitative and quantitative) which are in short supply in the energy sector. The full-time programme is divided into two semesters of taught courses, followed by a field trip at Easter before the dissertation period over the summer. We are happy to accommodate different working patterns for part-time students, including a half day a week schedule for three-year part time study.

The programme consists of four core modules (20 credits each, two core courses per semester), two optional modules (20 credits, one for each semester) and a 60 credit dissertation.

Compulsory courses*

Semester 1:

  • Energy and Society I: Key themes and issues
  • Energy in the Global South

Semester 2:

  • Energy and Society II: Methods and applications
  • Energy Policy and Politics

Students will also undertake one 20 credit course per semester. The University of Edinburgh offers an unrivalled selection of relevant optional courses for the MSc in Energy, Society and Sustainability. Bearing in mind your particular background and interests, the Programme Director will assist you in your choice from a large menu of optional courses related to six potential specialisation pathways; sustainable technologies and economics, politics, development, environmental sustainability, science and technology and public policy.

Optional courses may include*:

  • Technologies for Sustainable Energy (10 credits) AND
  • Energy and Environmental Economics (10 credits)
  • Applications in Ecological Economics
  • Global Environment: Key issues
  • Global Environmental Politics
  • Resource Politics and Development
  • Governance, Development and Poverty in Africa
  • Principles of Sustainable Development
  • Human Dimensions of Environmental Sustainability
  • Climate Change Management
  • Case Studies in Sustainable Development
  • Science, Knowledge and Expertise
  • Development, Science and Technology
  • Controversies in Science and Technology
  • Economic Issues in Public Policy (Semester 1)
  • Political Issues in Public Policy (Semester 2)

**Please note, courses are offered subject to timetabling and availability and are subject to change.

Learning outcomes

The programme aims for students to develop transdisciplinary skills in the assessment of the transition potential of energy systems towards greater sustainability, focussing especially on the human dimension of technological change and working and experimenting with energy users to co-produce knowledge about pathways to change.

Upon successful completion of the programme, students will have gained:

  • Understanding of energy systems and the energy trilemma
  • Understanding of social theories that underpin human attitudes and behaviour in relation to energy use
  • Understanding the non-technical and more-than-technical aspects of energy transitions
  • Understanding how energy-related decisions are linked to other societal challenges and socio-technical developments
  • Understanding of energy literacy

Career opportunities

UK research councils cite a major skills gap in the energy sector, one of the biggest growth sectors within the UK economy in recent years. Demand has never been higher for sound evidence on behavioural change, public engagement with energy issues, and public support for community and commercial investments in low carbon energy generation. We train our graduates to translate complex science into effective policies and new business opportunities. We have strong links with government departments, energy relevant NGOs and key industry players who want to make use of these skills. Committed to helping you meet prospective employers and network with those active in the field, we organise careers events and encourage dissertations conducted in partnership with external organisations.



Read less
IN BRIEF. The full masters degree is accredited by the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors. Excellent employment opportunities. Read more

IN BRIEF:

  • The full masters degree is accredited by the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors
  • Excellent employment opportunities
  • Flexible intakes give students the opportunity to work and study at the same time
  • International students can apply

COURSE SUMMARY

There is currently a severe skills shortage in the UK for quantity surveyors with expertise in mechanical and electrical installations - consequently, this course has an exceptionally high graduate employment record. Qualified mechanical and electrical quantity surveyors find employment in the building  sector  or in specialist fields including nuclear power.

Studying this course will provide you with the skills demanded by clients who rely on a quantity surveyor’s specialist mechanical and electrical knowledge and judgement to keep a project running smoothly. This programme will equip you with a professional understanding of procurement, financial  and  risk management and lifecycle cost management, as they apply to the construction industry. In addition to formalising your knowledge of traditional quantity surveying, you’ll receive a solid grounding in cutting-edge developments applying to mechanical and electrical works.

As this full masters degree is accredited by the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS), you will be educated to the highest industry standards and are granted exemption from RICS academic entry requirements.

COURSE DETAILS

This course aims to create reflective practitioners in quantity surveying who have a knowledge and understanding of procurement and financial management and recognise the significance of process, technology and people to the success of mechanical and electrical projects. Throughout the course you will critically examine existing practice through implementing process measurement and will evaluate alternative strategies for process improvement.

You will learn how to:

  • Organise and plan the procurement and financial management of construction projects
  • Very effectively manage and administer construction contracts
  • Lead and work effectively with project teams and communicate effectively in a variety of forms.

COURSE STRUCTURE

This course can be studied part-time by distance learning. Admission onto the course is in September or January.

The MSc award consists of four taught modules followed by a dissertation. The PgDip requires the completion of the four taught modules. All modules are delivered over a 15 week period and are mostly assessed through coursework, there are no exams. A 30 credit taught module is studied per semester. Assessment of these modules is driven by real-world problems aligned to your workplace and job role. Teaching is based around a virtual learning environment supported by interactive online sessions. In the final two semesters you will undertake a dissertation which is also delivered online and incorporates extensive tutor engagement and support.

TEACHING

Studying via distance learning, you’ll enjoy access to an online learning environment supported by intensive tutor support. Weekly online tutorials are led by tutors with student interaction. Our online repository of learning material enables you to undertake self-directed study at your own convenience. Learning is driven by real-world problems with application to your workplace and job role.

ASSESSMENT

You will be assessed through:

  • Written coursework (100%)
  • Continuous informal assessment by your tutors

CAREER PROSPECTS

As a qualified mechanical and electrical quantity surveyor, you could find employment in the building sector or in specialist fields such as the nuclear industry. There is currently a severe skills shortage in the UK for quantity surveyors with expertise in mechanics and electrics, consequently, graduate employability statistics for this course are high. Due to the increased importance of sustainability in the modern built environment, new roles are emerging for the mechanical and electrical quantity surveyors quantity surveyor in the areas of renewable energy, sustainability, low carbon technologies and energy management. With buildings accounting for around 50% of all carbon emissions, the surveyor plays a significant role in combating climate change.

This course has been designed to help you plan and organise the procurement and financial management of mechanical and electrical projects. Our course will equip you with the skills required to critically examine existing construction practices while evaluating alternative strategies to set in motion a process for improvement in construction. You will graduate with the skills and knowledge demanded by clients who rely on a quantity surveyor's knowledge and judgement to keep a project running smoothly.

LINKS WITH INDUSTRY

This course was developed at the request of industry to meet the training needs of aspiring mechanical and electrical specialists, and to help plug the skills gap which currently exists in the UK. Guest lecturers from industry with expertise in relevant areas regularly give lectures throughout the duration of the course.

The full masters award is accredited by the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) allowing exemption from their academic entry requirements.

FURTHER STUDY

The School of the Built Environment has an exciting and vibrant research community engaged in advanced research in the built environment, please see www.salford.ac.uk/research/best and http://www.salford.ac.uk/research/uprise for more information.



Read less
The MSc in Electrical Energy Systems has a particular focus on the integration of renewable generation into electricity transmission and distribution networks and on preparing students for a new era of truly ‘smart’ grids, and is designed to meet the urgent need for specialists in advanced electrical energy systems. Read more

The MSc in Electrical Energy Systems has a particular focus on the integration of renewable generation into electricity transmission and distribution networks and on preparing students for a new era of truly ‘smart’ grids, and is designed to meet the urgent need for specialists in advanced electrical energy systems.

Overview

This course meets an urgent need for specialists in advanced electrical energy systems that are needed to design and build secure, reliable, low-carbon and affordable energy systems in developed and developing countries around the world. The programme maintains a particular focus on the integration of renewable generation in to electricity transmission and distribution networks and will prepare you for a new era of truly ‘smart’ grids.

More specifically, the programme aims to equip you with:

  • A demonstrable mastery of a broad spectrum of advanced engineering principles to real-life technological, financial, regulatory, managerial and ethical problems encountered in the electrical Energy and Power profession, and the potential to be key professional players in the wider industry, the professions, and public service.
  • A systematic understanding of knowledge, and a critical awareness of current problems and new insights which are at the forefront of Electrical Energy Systems.
  • A comprehensive understanding of techniques applicable to their own research or advanced scholarship.
  • Originality in application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of how established techniques of research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in the area of Electrical Energy Systems.

Distinctive features

 The distinctive features of the programme include:

  • The opportunity to learn in a research-led teaching institution in one of the highest ranked university units in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF).
  • You will undertake project work in a research environment where staff were top in the UK for Research Impact in terms of their research’s reach and significance.
  • The participation of research-active staff in programme design and delivery, many of whom are Chartered Engineers or have experience of working in industry.
  • The variety of advanced level modules on offer.
  • The emphasis on progression towards independent learning in preparation for lifelong learning.
  • The emphasis on acquisition of practical skills through industrially based final year group projects.
  • The approval as Further Learning by the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET).
  • An open and engaging culture between students and staff.

Learning and assessment

A wide range of teaching styles will be used to deliver the diverse material forming the curriculum of the programme, and you will be required to attend lectures and participate in examples classes.

A 10-credit module represents approximately 100 hours of study in total, which includes 24–36 hours of contact time with teaching staff. The remaining hours are intended to be for private study, coursework, revision and assessment. Therefore you are expected to spend a significant amount of time (typically 20 hours each week) studying independently.

At the dissertation stage, you will be allocated a supervisor in the relevant field of research whom you should expect to meet with regularly.

Learning Central, the Cardiff University virtual learning environment (VLE), will be used extensively to communicate, support lectures and provide general programme materials such as reading lists and module descriptions. It may also be used to provide self-testing assessment and give feedback.

Career prospects

Graduates from courses such as these are in high demand and are expected to gain employment in large electrical energy utilities, electricity distribution companies, consulting companies, the public sector, eg energy agencies and the Carbon Trust, and in research and development. A number of graduates set up their own companies.



Read less
Designed for a new generation of heritage leaders, this programme provides the interdisciplinary skills needed to deliver the heritage programmes and projects of the future. Read more

Designed for a new generation of heritage leaders, this programme provides the interdisciplinary skills needed to deliver the heritage programmes and projects of the future. The programme combines aspects of cultural heritage - historic buildings, museums, collections, sites and landscapes - with the best preventive conservation and heritage management policies, projects, methodologies and practices.

About this degree

Students are encouraged to take a long view of preservation and heritage management and challenged to define problems, set objectives and explore a range of sustainability issues and strategies. Concepts of value, sustainability, life expectancy, stewardship, ownership, vulnerability and risk are interwoven with the scientific study of historic materials, assemblies, technologies and systems.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four core modules (120 credits), a research report (60 credits) and an optional project placement (not credit bearing).

A Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits, full-time nine months) is offered.

Core modules

  • Sustainability and Heritage Value
  • Heritage Materials and Assemblies
  • Sustainable Strategies
  • Project Planning, Management and Maintenance

Optional modules

  • There are no optional modules for this programme.

Dissertation/report

All MSc students submit a 10,000-word dissertation on a topic related to the main themes of the programme. The topic can be chosen to enhance career development or for its inherent interest.

Teaching and learning

The programme is taught using a variety of media and strategies including problem-based and case-based learning, discussion groups, project work, exercises, coursework and reports. Assessment is through written assignments, oral examination and the 10,000-word dissertation.

Fieldwork

A two-week study visit to Malta forms an integral part of the degree. This is hosted by Heritage Malta, the national agency responsible for the management of national museums, heritage sites and their collections in Malta and Gozo.

A video of the 2016 Malta field trip can be seen here Malta field trip .

Travel and accommodation expenses for the visit to Malta are covered by the programme.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Built Environment: Sustainable Heritage MSc

Careers

Most graduates are expected to assume responsibility for directing major projects within museums, libraries, archives, or organisations responsible for historic buildings and archaeological sites; or as a part of interdisciplinary architectural, engineering or project management practices. Additional career enhancement may be achieved by using the MSc as a foundation for PhD research.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Architect, Ilustre Municipalidad de Santiago
  • Architectural Director, Kay Elliott
  • Green Building Consultant, ECADI (East China Architectural Design & Research Institute)
  • Carbon Consultant, Sturgis Carbon Profiling
  • Consultant to Ministry of Culture India, Advisory Committee on World Heritage Matters

Employability

The programme, which is accredited by RICS, is an internationally recognised qualification from a world-leading university that equips students with the skills and expertise needed to contribute to heritage projects at an advanced level. There is an opportunity to undertake a placement at a leading heritage organisation or practice during the programme and students gain access to an extensive alumni network of professionals who have studied on the programme and are currently leaders in the field.<br><br>

Please see the departmental Sustainable Heritage MSc careers page for more information.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Bartlett is the UK's largest multidisciplinary Faculty of the Built Environment, bringing together scientific and professional specialisms required to research, understand, design, construct and operate the buildings and urban environments of the future.

Students on this programme benefit from: international, interdisciplinary teachers who are leading professionals in their field; real-life heritage case studies as the basis for discussing complex and demanding issues; access to public stewards and private owners of heritage - in order to learn from practice and leading heritage stakeholders; a fully funded study visit to Malta; project placement opportunities with leading international heritage organisations.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Bartlett School of Environment, Energy & Resources

81% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



Read less
The Qualifying Certificate in Psychology is designed to enable students with no previous experience of psychology in higher education to acquire sufficient knowledge and skills to study at FHEQ level 5/6 (second or third year of full-time study) at a UK university. Read more
The Qualifying Certificate in Psychology is designed to enable students with no previous experience of psychology in higher education to acquire sufficient knowledge and skills to study at FHEQ level 5/6 (second or third year of full-time study) at a UK university.

The certificate is offered as an entry qualification for the Oxford Brookes MSc Psychology, but it also meets the entry requirements for other universities' psychology conversion courses.

The course is available from September for part-time students, and from January for full-time and part-time students.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/studying-at-brookes/courses/postgraduate/2015/psychology-qualifying-certificate/

Why choose this course?

- Oxford Brookes has one of the largest groups of developmental psychologists in the UK along with expertise in cognitive neuroscience and qualitative methods.

- Our professionally-accredited courses allow chartered membership of the British Psychological Society.

- Excellent opportunities for progression into courses across psychology, education and health.

- State-of-the-art facilities including a video observation lab, Babylab, action research lab and perception lab.

- Strong connections through joint research projects with partners in health, education and industry.

- A comprehensive programme of research seminars offered by the department as well as specialist seminars organised by individual research groups.

Teaching and learning

Our department has a thriving community of research-active staff and research scholars. We include aspects of our research in all our courses, teach specialist modules in our areas of expertise and supervise dissertations in our specialist subjects. Learning methods include lectures, directed reading, seminars and practical work.

Teaching is organised on a module-credit basis, each involving approximately 150 hours of student effort and approximately 36 hours of staff contact.

Each course module is assessed individually, generally on the quality of written work. Assessment methods may include essays, formal written examinations or in-class tests.

Specialist facilities

The Psychology Department boasts state-of-the-art facilities including a video observation lab, Babylab, action research lab and perception lab. In addition, postgraduate students have a dedicated study and social working space to facilitate group projects and provide a venue for our research seminar series.

Careers

The department offers advice on future career opportunities, including practical help with applications to future training and employment. For many of our students, their postgraduate psychology qualification is a stepping stone to professional training for careers in educational and clinical psychology. Some choose to continue their academic studies, progressing to PhD.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) 95% of our research was internationally recognised and 60% of the impact of our research was rated internationally excellent.

Prof. Margaret Harris has been awarded a grant of over £315K from the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) to find out whether technological advances to aid children and babies with hearing loss have had a positive effect on deaf children’s literacy.

Prof. Anna Barnett and her colleague Dr Luci Wiggs have been awarded a grant of £59K from The Waterloo Foundation to examine sleep disturbance in children with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD). This condition is characterised by significant movement difficulty and associated psycho-social and educational problems. Previous work suggests that sleep disturbance may be a relevant factor and this project will examine sleep in DCD with extensive and objective measures in relation to child and parent functioning.

Dr Kate Wilmut has been awarded a prestigious ESRC grant of over £160k to conduct research into forward planning of movement in children with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder. It is hoped that furthering our understanding of the mechanisms underlying this condition may lead to the development of effective intervention programmes.

With funding from the Leverhulme Trust, Prof. Vince Connelly is leading an interdisciplinary project conducting research into the writing problems of children with language difficulties. Embracing psychology, education and linguistics, this ground-breaking project is aimed at bridging the gaps in current knowledge and will help practitioners to develop literacy strategies to help this already disadvantaged group of children.

Dr Clare Rathbone has been awarded a grant from the ESRC to examine the relationship between memory and identity across the lifespan. Memory impairments can lead to more than mere forgetfulness; they can affect our sense of self and identity. This work will explore the changes in memory that take place in both normal ageing and in dementia.

Professor Margaret Harris and Dr Mark Burgess were awarded £640k by the Technology Strategy Board, a public research council that facilitates innovative technological collaboration between businesses and researchers. They are conducting multi-method research into the critical socio-psychological factors that underpin people’s transition from traditional combustion engine cars to ultra low carbon vehicles and are feeding their results back to car manufacturers, energy companies, and the government.

Research areas and clusters

Developmental Psychology Research Group
There are three main strands to research in this group:
1. Cognitive & Social Development - this includes work on the impact of socio-cultural contexts on human cognition and identity development, children’s evaluation of other people as sources of information, children’s understanding of emotion, the nature of mother-child interactions, children’s interactions with their peers and explanations for school bullying

2. Language & Literacy - this has a focus on the development of speech, reading, spelling, writing and handwriting

3. Developmental Disorders - this includes research on children with hearing impairment, Specific Language Impairment, Dyslexia, Developmental Coordination Disorder, Autism and sleep disorders.

Some of our research focuses on the description of typical development and explanation of developmental processes in different domains. Other work is concerned with understanding the mechanisms underlying atypical development and an examination of ways to support children and their families. Several staff in this research group work with professionals from other disciplines including health and education and are concerned with the production of practical assessment tools and the evaluation of intervention approaches to help children achieve their full potential.

- Adult Cognition Research Group
Research in this group covers the exploration of basic mechanisms as well as higher order processes in normal and atypical populations. A variety of methods are employed (behavioural and psychophysical measures, eye-tracking, movement analysis, and neuropsychological instruments). Specific research interests include: memory processes in ageing, autobiographical memory and identity processes, visual and attentional processing, reading and, perception and action

- Applied Social Psychology
The work of this group involves the application of a variety of different research methods and theoretical perspectives to investigate a range of contemporary issues and social problems. Members of the group share research interests in the psychological processes that underpin significant life transitions, the self and identify, mental and physical health experiences, attitudes, autism and sex differences.

Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page



Cookie Policy    X