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Masters Degrees (Carbon Credit)

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The challenge of responding and adapting to climate change will drive trillions of dollars of new investment over the coming decades, with major changes required across the economy, in energy production and consumption, industry, buildings, transport, infrastructure, forests and agriculture. Read more

Programme description

The challenge of responding and adapting to climate change will drive trillions of dollars of new investment over the coming decades, with major changes required across the economy, in energy production and consumption, industry, buildings, transport, infrastructure, forests and agriculture. Delivering this investment will require greatly enhanced capacity in all aspects of carbon finance.

This programme is the world's first MSc in Carbon Finance, dedicated to professionals in the carbon market and climate change investment field and focussed on the business opportunities and financial flows driven by society's response to climate change.

The syllabus uniquely focuses on the business opportunities and financial flows driven by society’s response to climate change (carbon finance).

The MSc in Carbon Finance will appeal to graduates with significant work experience in business, government or the NGO sector.

Typically students will not have had an opportunity to specialise in climate change but will want to move into a career in the carbon markets or in climate change investment, consulting or carbon accounting.

Likely future roles include carbon credit development, carbon trading, carbon consulting, carbon accounting and related policy or regulatory roles (e.g. with government or NGOs).

This MSc offers an intensive exploration of a subject crucial to the future of business and, of course, the planet itself. Very few business schools in the world have a similar depth of expertise in carbon finance.

Programme structure

Learning will primarily be through lectures, set reading, class discussions, exercises, group-work assignments, problem solving in tutorials and case studies. Assessment methods include examinations, assignments, presentations or continuous assessment.

Learning outcomes

Students who follow this programme will gain an understanding of:

-the current state of climate change science, greenhouse gas stabilization pathways and the principal mitigation and adaptation options
-climate change policy responses at international, regional, national and local levels and the various types of regulatory response available to governments
-the relationship between climate change science, policy, carbon markets and other climate finance and investment
-what carbon finance means and the relationship between carbon finance and conventional finance
-essentials of conventional finance and financing issues in the energy sector in particular
-the structure and dynamics of the major global, regional and national-level carbon markets, including voluntary carbon markets and the flexibility mechanisms of the Kyoto Protocol and its successor agreement(s)
-accounting for carbon at firm, project and product/supply chain level, carbon auditing, financial reporting and non-financial disclosure, benchmarking, taxation implications, and the ethics of carbon accounting
-the use of statistics for financial research
-an appreciation of the role that carbon finance plays in organisations’ strategy, finance and accounting decisions

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This unique multi-disciplinary course is taught by architects, engineers and physicists involved in practice and research. It focuses on the theory and practice of developing low carbon and sustainable buildings. Read more
This unique multi-disciplinary course is taught by architects, engineers and physicists involved in practice and research. It focuses on the theory and practice of developing low carbon and sustainable buildings.

The course includes a number of interlinked modules that simulate the design and development of a sustainable project. This enables students from different disciplines to develop skills and understanding relevant to their own discipline, be it design or consultancy, and in relation to a national and international context.

Why choose this course?

The course is run by the School of Architecture, which is recognised as one of the country's leading schools of architecture and is consistently ranked by The Architect's Journals one of the five best schools in the UK. You will gain an advanced understanding of the key sustainability issues related to buildings enabling them to strategically influence feasibility and design processes within the built environment. The course attracts some of the best students in the field from a diverse range of ages, backgrounds, gender and nationalities. This offers opportunities for interdisciplinary, globally aware teaching and learning.

The range of subjects draws on the research strengths of the teaching staff and enables research to inform the teaching modules. You are encouraged where possible to take part in staff research projects. You will have the opportunity to go on an annual field trip. This is an opportunity to directly experience some of the very best of sustainable design projects in another culture. Previous field trips have been to Germany, Scotland and Denmark. Students from this course have gone on to work in a wide range of occupations from architectural and engineering practices and research consultancies to development work, furniture design, owning and operating electricity utilities, and even carbon trading.

This course in detail

The course is organised on a modular credit system, 60 credits for postgraduate certificate, 120 credits for the postgraduate diploma (9 months full-time, 20 months part-time) and 180 credits for the master's degree (12 months full-time, 24 months part-time).

Modules combine a ratio of taught to self-led study. For example, a module of 20 credits approximates to 200 hours of student effort, up to 36 hours of which will normally be devoted to lectures, seminars, individual tutorials or other staff contact. The remainder of the time is devoted to student-led study and assessment.

Please note: as courses are reviewed regularly, the module list you choose from may vary from that shown below.

The core modules for the MSc and PGDip are:
-Building Physics (20 credits)
-The Sustainable Built Environment (20 credits)
-Post-occupancy Building Evaluation (20 credits)
-Advanced Low Carbon Building Technologies (20 credits)
-Modelling and Passive Strategies (20 credits)
-Sustainable Design in Context (20 credits)

The compulsory modules for the MSc are:
-Research Methods and Design (10 credits)
-MSc Dissertation (50 credits)

Teaching and learning

The teaching and learning methods reflect the wide variety of topics and techniques associated with sustainability, low-carbon and resource efficient design.

Staff-led lectures provide the framework, background and knowledge base, and you are encouraged to probe deeper into the topics by further reading and review. Analysis, synthesis and application of material introduced in the lectures are achieved through professional and staff-led workshops, group and one-to-one tutorials, student-led seminars, case studies, and practical work that anticipates the design project.

The course attracts students from a diverse range of ages, backgrounds, gender and nationalities. This offers opportunities for interdisciplinary, globally aware teaching and learning. You are exposed to a variety of cultural perspectives and issues through the use of international case studies and draw on their diverse strengths through peer learning and group work.

An annual field trip is an opportunity to directly experience some of the very best of sustainable design projects in another culture. Previous field trips have been to Germany, Scotland and Denmark.

The range of subjects draws on the research strengths of the teaching staff and enables research to inform the teaching modules. You are encouraged where possible to take part in staff research projects.

We attract some of the best students in the field, drawn by the integrating basis of the programme and its solid theoretical foundation on expertise within the University.

Careers and professional development

Graduates will possess an advanced understanding of the key sustainability issues related to buildings enabling them to strategically influence feasibility and design processes within the built environment. They will be familiar with a range of models, tools and methods with which to quantify, predict, evaluate and manage building performance, and will be able to use them and switch to other tools based on an understanding from first principles.

Drawing on a working knowledge of how to minimise energy, carbon emissions and resource consumption in buildings through the various stages of their life cycles, they will be able to take account of changing, incomplete and uncertain information related to the environment. They will also have well developed skills in auditing, analysis, reporting and presentation and a thorough understanding of the interdisciplinary subject area.

Students from this course have gone on to work in a wide range of occupations from architectural and engineering practices and research consultancies to development work, furniture design, owning and operating electricity utilities, and even carbon trading.

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This programme is appropriate for you if are seeking to develop the skills and confidence to address the critical global challenges of energy and diminishing natural resources. Read more
This programme is appropriate for you if are seeking to develop the skills and confidence to address the critical global challenges of energy and diminishing natural resources. Clean energy, optimal use of resources and the economics of climate change are the key issues facing society, and form the fundamental themes of this programme.

Course details

You explore the world’s dependency on hydrocarbon-based resources, together with strategies and technologies to decarbonise national economies. The course examines global best practice, government policies, industrial symbiosis and emerging risk management techniques. You also address the environmental, economic and sociological (risk and acceptability) impacts of renewable energy provision and waste exploitation as central elements.

The programme develops the problem-solvers and innovators needed to face the enormous challenges of the 21st century - those who can play key roles in driving energy and environmental policies, and in formulating forward-looking strategies on energy use and environmental sustainability at corporate, national and global scales.

What you study

For the PgDip award you must successfully complete 120 credits of taught modules. For an MSc award you must successfully complete the 120 credits of taught modules and a 60-credit master's research project.

Energy, environment, risk managing projects, sustainability and integrated waste management are the main foci of the programme, but you also explore the financial aspects of energy and environmental management. Economics is integral to the development of policies and is often a key influencing factor.

This programme aims to develop a comprehensive knowledge and understanding of the role and place of energy in the 21st century and the way the environment impinges on the types of energy used and production methods. It also aims to investigate the environment as it is perceived, and contextualise its actual importance to mankind. Specific objectives for this course are to establish the financial validity for the pursuit of alternative energy forms and management of the environment.

You are encouraged to take up opportunities of voluntary placements with local industries to conduct real-world research projects. These placements are assessed in line with the assessment criteria and learning outcomes of the Project module.

Examples of past MSc research projects:
-The taxonomy of facilitated industrial symbioses
-Assessment of the climate change impacts of the Tees Valley
-Exploring the links between carbon disclosure and carbon performance
-Hydrothermal carbonisation of waste biomass
-Quantifying the impact of biochar on soil microbial ecology
-Potential for biochar utilisation in developing rural economies
-Carbon trading opportunities for renewable energy projects in developing countries
-Exploring the potential for wind energy in Libya
-Demand and supply potential of solar panel installations
-A feasibility study of the application of zero-carbon retrofit technologies in building communal areas
-Energy recovery from abandoned oil wells through geothermal processes

Core modules
-Concepts of Sustainability
-Economics of Climate Change
-Energy and Global Climate Change
-Global Energy Policy
-Integrated Waste Management and Exploitation
-Project
-Research Methods and Proposal

Modules offered may vary.

Teaching

The course provides a number of contact teaching and assessment hours (through lectures, tutorials, projects, assignments), but you are also expected to spend time on your own, called 'self-study' time, to review lecture notes, prepare course work assignments, work on projects and revise for assessments. For example, each 20-credit module typically has around 200 hours of learning time.

In most cases, around 60 hours are spent in lectures, tutorials and in practical exercises. The remaining learning time is for you to gain a deeper understanding of the subject. Each year of full-time study consists of modules totalling 180 credits; hence, during one year of full-time study a student can expect to have 1,800 hours of learning and assessment.

Modules are assessed by a variety of methods including examination and in-course assessment with some utilising other approaches such as group-work or verbal/poster presentations.

Employability

There may be short-term placement opportunities for some students, particularly during the project phase of the course. This University is also in the process of seeking accreditation for the Waste Management module from the Chartered Institution of Wastes Management.

Successful graduates from this course are well placed to find employment. As an energy and environmental manager, you might find yourself in a role responsible for overseeing the energy and environmental performance of private, public and voluntary sector organisations, as well as in a wide range of engineering industries.

Energy and environmental managers examine corporate activities to establish where improvements can be made and ensure compliance with environmental legislation across the organisation. You might be responsible for reviewing the whole operation, carrying out energy and environmental audits and assessments, identifying and resolving energy and environmental problems and acting as agents of change. Your role could include the training of the workforce to develop the ability to recognise their own contributions to improved energy and environmental performance.

Your role may also include the development, implementation and monitoring of energy and environmental strategies, policies and programmes that promote sustainable development at corporate, national or global levels.

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Sustainability has emerged as a defining issues of the 21st century. Achieving enduring and fairer societies requires viable economies, sound science and good governance. Read more
Sustainability has emerged as a defining issues of the 21st century. Achieving enduring and fairer societies requires viable economies, sound science and good governance. This course provides training in theory and critical analysis along with the practical skills to facilitate the transformation needed to deliver low carbon futures.

Why study Sustainability at Dundee?

The MSc in Sustainability is being introduced in recognition of the challenges of water, food, energy and health security facing the planet. The portfolio of environmental disciplines is exceptionally strong in the University as are its traditions of cross-disciplinary collaboration and cooperation.
Along with the flagship MSc in Sustainability, there are four specialised pathways:

MSc in Sustainability and Water Security
MSc in Sustainability and Climate Change
MSc in Sustainability and Low Carbon Living
MSc in Sustainability and the Green Economy

What's so good about Sustainability at Dundee?

There is a strong postgraduate culture which Sustainability students can enjoy.
The Graduate School of Natural Resources Law, Policy and Management includes both the Centre for Energy, Petroleum and Mineral Law Policy and the Centre for Water Law, Policy and Science (under the auspices of UNESCO) both of which have long standing international reputations. Specialist high-level speakers sourced from international organisations are invited to present throughout the year, these sessions provide a vital opportunity for students to become connected with industry so continued communication is encouraged after the events.

The School of the Environment and CECHR similarly have an extended programme of guest lectures and speakers and through xcechr there are multiple events bringing Masters and PhD students together by a common interest in environmental change research. Examples of the activities that result include Student-Supervisor-Seminar-Series, ‘change-maker workshops’ and a national show-case ‘Facing the Future’ Symposium.

Who should study this course?

This course is suitable for a wide range of graduates from;
Environmental backgrounds (e.g. geography, planning, environmental studies) looking to upskill and achieve a deeper understanding
Natural science graduates (e.g. chemistry, maths) and engineers looking to develop a more rounded understanding of environmental issues, especially in relation to regulation and policy.
Arts and social science students wishing to use their social, economic and political perspectives to take on the challenges associated with complex environmental systems and their management.

How you will be taught

The course is taught as a collection of 20 credit modules amounting to a total of 180 Masters (SHE M, SCQF 11) credits. The delivery style and assessment requirements for each module varies as we believe a diversity of practice provides strength. Nevertheless all modules combine a mixture of formal lecture, small group seminar, practical/field classes and individual tutorials depending on need and the particular learning objectives of each module. The study load corresponds to one third in each of the first two teaching semesters and one third for independent study for the dissertation the summer recess.

What you will study

There are a choice of four specialist pathways in addition to the MSc in Sustainability: See above.

Each of the five MSc pathways contains a common core comprising ‘Principles of Sustainability’ and ‘Transformation for Sustainability’, along with the ‘Research Training’ module. Each named pathway then comprises a specialised core module and then options drawn from a wide range of electives (c. 30 available from contributing academic Schools). All five MSc pathways feature a 60 credit individual research project, the weighting of which reflects the importance of independent investigation and permitting students to develop expertise in their chosen area through effectively four months of dedicated research.

Each of the MSc in Sustainability pathways is geared around the following learning outcomes:

Knowledge and Understanding:
Achieve a critical understanding of key sustainability principles and perspectives informing actions in pursuit of sustainable development, inclusive of environment, economy and equity considerations;
Demonstrate knowledge of approaches to evaluating and measuring sustainability;
Apply different concepts of transformation and change to enable individual and societal shifts towards more sustainable practices;

Skills:
Ability to analyse, evaluate and critically review theory and policy debates relating to sustainability;
Ability to draw on international perspectives and examples of best practice in relation to methods of evaluation and assessment of sustainability;
Ability to design and plan interventions for creating change to promote greater sustainability across different scales;
Design and undertake a substantial independent research project to address significant areas of theory and/or practice.

Capabilities:
Critique and synthesis theory and evidence drawing on a variety of sources;
Ability to communicate evidenced based reports relevant to a range of stakeholders, including policy makers;
Ability to work independently and as part of a team tackling complex environmental problems to tight deadlines;
Ability to design and evaluate transformative change leading to improved sustainability strategies, processes and plans

Transferrable skills, including building arguments, synthesis, reflexivity and making presentations.

How you will be assessed

Assessment follows a variety of styles including individual essays and practical assignments along with formal written examinations; to group exercises and peer group assessment – this is particularly important where oral presentations are involved. The independent research project (dissertation) is an excellent opportunity for a candidate to achieve deep insight into a topic of their own choice. Masters level dissertations can be very diverse, and include formal hypothesis-led research projects; theory or literature-based projects; case-study assessment and advanced professional practice evaluations. Choice of dissertations is negotiated between the student and his or her academic supervisor.

Careers

The environmental sector is one of the key growth areas in the global economy and in UK terms is comparable in size to the pharmaceutical and aerospace sectors combined. An MSc in Sustainability is designed to equip our graduates to take up a wide range of careers in policy, practical management, training and research across a spectrum of organisations from local to international and within the public and private sectors.

International Agencies and NGOs
Civil Service
Governmental environmental and conservation agencies (e.g. SNH, SEPA, EA)
Environmental management and policy sectors (private and public sector)
Environmental consultancy
Management consultancy
Public affairs
Built environment sustainability
Local planning authorities
Research and development
Preparation for PhD research

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Equip yourself with the knowledge and skills to help agriculture to meet the challenges of the 21st century!. This Sustainable and Efficient Food Production MSc centres on increasing efficiency and reducing environmental impact within the extensive pasture-based production sector. Read more
Equip yourself with the knowledge and skills to help agriculture to meet the challenges of the 21st century!

This Sustainable and Efficient Food Production MSc centres on increasing efficiency and reducing environmental impact within the extensive pasture-based production sector. The programme provides flexible, accessible, postgraduate level training for people employed in the agri-food sector. Training comprises distance learning modules and work-based research projects. These are accessible as CPD or as credit-bearing units, which can be built towards a range of postgraduate qualifications. Generous bursaries are available to those employed in the UK agri-food sector.

Since this programme is aimed at people who are already working, training is via distance learning often complemented with short optional workshops.

See the website http://courses.aber.ac.uk/postgraduate/sustainable-and-efficient-food-production-distance-learning-masters/

Course Details

This Sustainable and Efficient Food Production postgraduate course centres on increasing efficiency and reducing environmental impact within the extensive pasture-based production sector. The programme provides flexible, accessible, postgraduate level training for people employed in the agri-food sector. Training comprises distance learning modules and work-based research projects. These are accessible as CPD or as credit-bearing units, which can be built towards a range of postgraduate qualifications. Generous bursaries are available to those employed in the UK agri-food sector.

Taught by experts at both Aberystwyth University (AU) and Bangor University (BU) through the Advanced Training Partnership (ATP), the Sustainable and Efficient Food Production course offers you a highly vocational option. In the most recent joint submission to the Research Excellence Framework assessment (2014), the department was placed in the top 10 universities in the UK for research intensity and 78% of our research was world-leading or internationally excellent.

To achieve an MSc students must complete five optional modules (including up to three from BU) plus Research Methodology and Advances in Biosciences and a Dissertation.

Optional modules include: Ruminant Nutrition, Improved Silage, Improving Ruminant Production, Sustainable Home-grown Feed, Ruminant Gut Microbiology, Low Input Ruminant Production, Ruminant Health and Welfare, Upland Farming Systems, Soil Management, Sustainable Grassland Systems, Carbon Footprinting and Lifecycle Analysis, Ruminant Health and Welfare, Agricultural Genetics and Genomics, Resource Efficient Farming, Anaerobic Digestion*, and Ecosystem Services

(*subject to approval).

Format

Key information:

- Two to five years to complete a full MSc.
- 14 weeks for one module by distance learning.
- Three intakes per year (January, May, September).

Our distance learning modules are designed to be flexible so that you can fit studying around your work and other commitments. A typical Masters student is expected to study for 200 hours when taking a 20 credit module. As a rule of thumb you should anticipate spending approximately 2-3 hours a week on online lectures, presentations and podcasts, and the remaining time on readings and assignments; the more time and effort you can put in, the more you'll benefit from studying the module and the better your grades are likely to be.

We have designed our training to be as accessible as possible, particularly for those in full time employment. Each topic comprises a 12-14 week distance learning module worth 20 credits which can be taken for your own continuing professional development or interest; or built towards a postgraduate qualification. The research elements of our qualifications are carried out in your work place with regular academic supervision. The training is web-based which means that as long as you have access to a reasonable broadband connection (i.e. are able to stream videos such as on YouTube), you can study where and when best suits you. Learning material includes podcast lectures, e-group projects, guided reading, interactive workbooks and discussion forums, as well as assignments and e-tutorials. By signing a re-registration form each year you will have access to e-journals and library resources for the full five years.

Core Modules

Ruminant Nutrition BDM0320
Improving Ruminant Production BDM5420
Silage Science BDM5620

Assessment

There are no exams within this programme. Taught modules are assessed via course work and forum discussion.

Find out how to apply here https://www.aber.ac.uk/en/postgrad/howtoapply/

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Designed for a new generation of heritage leaders, this programme provides the interdisciplinary skills needed to deliver the heritage programmes and projects of the future. Read more
Designed for a new generation of heritage leaders, this programme provides the interdisciplinary skills needed to deliver the heritage programmes and projects of the future. The programme combines aspects of cultural heritage - historic buildings, museums, collections, sites and landscapes - with the best preventive conservation and heritage management policies, projects, methodologies and practices.

Degree information

Students are encouraged to take a long view of preservation and heritage management, and challenged to define problems, set objectives and explore a range of sustainability issues and strategies. Concepts of value, sustainability, life expectancy, stewardship, ownership, vulnerability and risk are interwoven with the scientific study of historic materials, assemblies, technologies and systems.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four core modules (120 credits), a research report (60 credits) and an optional project placement (not credit bearing). A Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits, full-time nine months) is offered. There are no optional modules for this programme.

Core modules
-Sustainability and Heritage Value
-Heritage Materials and Assemblies
-Sustainable Strategies
-Project Planning, Management and Maintenance

Dissertation/report
All MSc students submit a 10,000-word dissertation on a topic related to the main themes of the programme. The topic can be chosen to enhance career development or for its inherent interest.

Teaching and learning
The programme is taught using a variety of media and strategies including problem-based and case-based learning, discussion groups, project work, exercises, coursework and reports. Assessment is through written assignments, oral examination and the 10,000-word dissertation.

Fieldwork
A two-week study visit to Malta forms an integral part of the degree. This is hosted by Heritage Malta, the national agency responsible for the management of national museums, heritage sites and their collections in Malta and Gozo.
Travel and accomodation expenses for the visit to Malta are covered by the programme.

Careers

Most graduates are expected to assume responsibility for directing major projects within museums, libraries, archives, or organisations responsible for historic buildings and archaeological sites; or as a part of interdisciplinary architectural, engineering or project management practices. Additional career enhancement may be achieved by using the MSc as a foundation for PhD research.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Senior Project Manager, National Trust
-Consultant to Ministry of Culture India, Advisory Committee on World Heritage Matters
-Carbon Consultant, Sturgis Carbon Profiling
-Project Planner, Transport for London
-Green Building Consultant, ECADI (East China Architectural Design & Research Institute)

Employability
The programme, which is accredited by RICS, is an internationally recognised qualification from a world-leading university that improves equips students with the skills and expertise needed to contribute to heritage projects at an advanced level.
There is an opportunity to undertake a placement at a leading heritage organisation or practice during the programme.
Students gain access to an extensive alumni network of professionals who have studied on the programme and are currently leaders in the field.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Bartlett is the UK's largest multidisciplinary Faculty of the Built Environment, bringing together scientific and professional specialisms required to research, understand, design, construct and operate the buildings and urban environments of the future.

Students on this programme benefit from: international, interdisciplinary teachers who are leading professionals in their field; real-life heritage case studies as the basis for discussing complex and demanding issues; access to public stewards and private owners of heritage - in order to learn from practice and leading heritage stakeholders; a fully funded study visit to Malta; project placement opportunities with leading international heritage organisations.

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The Qualifying Certificate in Psychology is designed to enable students with no previous experience of psychology in higher education to acquire sufficient knowledge and skills to study at FHEQ level 5/6 (second or third year of full-time study) at a UK university. Read more
The Qualifying Certificate in Psychology is designed to enable students with no previous experience of psychology in higher education to acquire sufficient knowledge and skills to study at FHEQ level 5/6 (second or third year of full-time study) at a UK university.

The certificate is offered as an entry qualification for the Oxford Brookes MSc Psychology, but it also meets the entry requirements for other universities' psychology conversion courses.

The course is available from September for part-time students, and from January for full-time and part-time students.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/studying-at-brookes/courses/postgraduate/2015/psychology-qualifying-certificate/

Why choose this course?

- Oxford Brookes has one of the largest groups of developmental psychologists in the UK along with expertise in cognitive neuroscience and qualitative methods.

- Our professionally-accredited courses allow chartered membership of the British Psychological Society.

- Excellent opportunities for progression into courses across psychology, education and health.

- State-of-the-art facilities including a video observation lab, Babylab, action research lab and perception lab.

- Strong connections through joint research projects with partners in health, education and industry.

- A comprehensive programme of research seminars offered by the department as well as specialist seminars organised by individual research groups.

Teaching and learning

Our department has a thriving community of research-active staff and research scholars. We include aspects of our research in all our courses, teach specialist modules in our areas of expertise and supervise dissertations in our specialist subjects. Learning methods include lectures, directed reading, seminars and practical work.

Teaching is organised on a module-credit basis, each involving approximately 150 hours of student effort and approximately 36 hours of staff contact.

Each course module is assessed individually, generally on the quality of written work. Assessment methods may include essays, formal written examinations or in-class tests.

Specialist facilities

The Psychology Department boasts state-of-the-art facilities including a video observation lab, Babylab, action research lab and perception lab. In addition, postgraduate students have a dedicated study and social working space to facilitate group projects and provide a venue for our research seminar series.

Careers

The department offers advice on future career opportunities, including practical help with applications to future training and employment. For many of our students, their postgraduate psychology qualification is a stepping stone to professional training for careers in educational and clinical psychology. Some choose to continue their academic studies, progressing to PhD.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) 95% of our research was internationally recognised and 60% of the impact of our research was rated internationally excellent.

Prof. Margaret Harris has been awarded a grant of over £315K from the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) to find out whether technological advances to aid children and babies with hearing loss have had a positive effect on deaf children’s literacy.

Prof. Anna Barnett and her colleague Dr Luci Wiggs have been awarded a grant of £59K from The Waterloo Foundation to examine sleep disturbance in children with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD). This condition is characterised by significant movement difficulty and associated psycho-social and educational problems. Previous work suggests that sleep disturbance may be a relevant factor and this project will examine sleep in DCD with extensive and objective measures in relation to child and parent functioning.

Dr Kate Wilmut has been awarded a prestigious ESRC grant of over £160k to conduct research into forward planning of movement in children with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder. It is hoped that furthering our understanding of the mechanisms underlying this condition may lead to the development of effective intervention programmes.

With funding from the Leverhulme Trust, Prof. Vince Connelly is leading an interdisciplinary project conducting research into the writing problems of children with language difficulties. Embracing psychology, education and linguistics, this ground-breaking project is aimed at bridging the gaps in current knowledge and will help practitioners to develop literacy strategies to help this already disadvantaged group of children.

Dr Clare Rathbone has been awarded a grant from the ESRC to examine the relationship between memory and identity across the lifespan. Memory impairments can lead to more than mere forgetfulness; they can affect our sense of self and identity. This work will explore the changes in memory that take place in both normal ageing and in dementia.

Professor Margaret Harris and Dr Mark Burgess were awarded £640k by the Technology Strategy Board, a public research council that facilitates innovative technological collaboration between businesses and researchers. They are conducting multi-method research into the critical socio-psychological factors that underpin people’s transition from traditional combustion engine cars to ultra low carbon vehicles and are feeding their results back to car manufacturers, energy companies, and the government.

Research areas and clusters

Developmental Psychology Research Group
There are three main strands to research in this group:
1. Cognitive & Social Development - this includes work on the impact of socio-cultural contexts on human cognition and identity development, children’s evaluation of other people as sources of information, children’s understanding of emotion, the nature of mother-child interactions, children’s interactions with their peers and explanations for school bullying

2. Language & Literacy - this has a focus on the development of speech, reading, spelling, writing and handwriting

3. Developmental Disorders - this includes research on children with hearing impairment, Specific Language Impairment, Dyslexia, Developmental Coordination Disorder, Autism and sleep disorders.

Some of our research focuses on the description of typical development and explanation of developmental processes in different domains. Other work is concerned with understanding the mechanisms underlying atypical development and an examination of ways to support children and their families. Several staff in this research group work with professionals from other disciplines including health and education and are concerned with the production of practical assessment tools and the evaluation of intervention approaches to help children achieve their full potential.

- Adult Cognition Research Group
Research in this group covers the exploration of basic mechanisms as well as higher order processes in normal and atypical populations. A variety of methods are employed (behavioural and psychophysical measures, eye-tracking, movement analysis, and neuropsychological instruments). Specific research interests include: memory processes in ageing, autobiographical memory and identity processes, visual and attentional processing, reading and, perception and action

- Applied Social Psychology
The work of this group involves the application of a variety of different research methods and theoretical perspectives to investigate a range of contemporary issues and social problems. Members of the group share research interests in the psychological processes that underpin significant life transitions, the self and identify, mental and physical health experiences, attitudes, autism and sex differences.

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In response to today’s climate change, this course aims to satisfy the demand for new skills in the areas of environmental sustainability and low carbon building design. Read more

Why take this course?

In response to today’s climate change, this course aims to satisfy the demand for new skills in the areas of environmental sustainability and low carbon building design.

It will enable you to engage in current debates on the generation of sustainable architecture within our cities. You will examine the complexities inherent in creating well-designed sustainable settlements and get the opportunity to produce your own sustainable designs.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Get involved with some of our regional regeneration projects to test and develop your ideas
Undertake studio-based design projects and engage with our other collaborative projects with academic institutions in a range of countries including Turkey, Spain and Australia
Have the opportunity to ‘earn and learn’ by working on real-life contracts through our Projects Office

What opportunities might it lead to?

If you are already working in architecture, environment or planning professions, or are a recent graduate, this course aims to train you to further develop your skills and knowledge in environmentally responsive design.

It will provide opportunities for you to pursue specialist career routes within the architecture field or in other areas such as governments and professional bodies where sustainability is of high priority. Alternatively, you can apply this new thinking to your own practice.

Module Details

The course uses the experience and skills of teaching staff with research interest in environmental sustainability, building simulation modelling, and sustainable development of historic sites and contemporary settlements. It takes place in an exciting inter-disciplinary environment, running in conjunction with programmes on historic building conservation, interior and urban design.

Here are the units you will study:

Practice: This unit enables you to develop your knowledge of the various and multi-faceted theories relating to sustainable architecture and environments. It also covers the principles that govern an appropriate and sustainable response to such designed environments, as well as the technologies that may be adopted and incorporated. You will address these issues and evaluate both the design theory and practice-based applied methodologies, along with the analysis, evaluation and reflection of this practice in sustainable design solutions.

Theory: This unit gives you an opportunity to engage with the current debate on environmental sustainability, climate change and the value of traditional buildings which inspire a more sustainable practice. It introduces the principles of low carbon passive design strategies, as well as advanced daylight and thermal modelling techniques to assess their effectiveness in achieving an environmentally responsive design.

Research Methods and Research Proposal: In this unit you will develop research skills, which will aid you throughout your course and particularly in producing your thesis. You will be asked to establish a critical position within an Outline Research Proposal. You will develop techniques, which will allow you to engage proactively within your area of study. You will be encouraged to explore methods of investigation that are responsive to, as well as inquisitive of, the conditions presented and which therefore speculate around possible critical scenarios. Implicit within these explorations is the need to investigate diverse means of representation and depiction through a variety of possible media and discourse.

Integration: This unit allows you to work in a multi-disciplinary context through groups within your own subject area and across the areas of interior design, urban design, sustainable architecture and historic building conservation, as well as explore the interrelationships of all disciplines. You will need to work collectively on given projects or problems related to staff run studios, which explore a range of given themes. This unit will introduce you to these themes at the start of the course and connect you to research areas within the School.

Work-Based Learning: This unit gives you the opportunity to replace a 30-credit core unit with a work-based version of that unit. Not all units can be replaced and you will need to discuss the appropriateness of a unit with tutors. Work-based learning requires you to engage in critical and reflective learning in the workplace. This will be developed through a learning contract, negotiated by you, your employer and School. The work undertaken in practice will be appraised through critical reflective writing that engages with the practice of the particular subject discipline and this will form the assessment artefacts.

Thesis: Your thesis is a substantial research-based project that enables you to carry out an in-depth investigation into a subject area of personal interest, which is related to or developed from a theme studied during the course. The proposed research theme should have a clearly defined focus to allow for in-depth theoretical, contextual and visual research. An initial seminar programme will help you develop your research proposal, define a research question and locate suitable primary and secondary sources. You will be allocated an appropriate supervisor on the basis of this proposal, who will work with you toward the final submission.

Programme Assessment

This course is lecture and studio-based, culminating in a written or design-led thesis project. It will involve case study investigations, group work, discussion and planning of sustainable environments, as well as independent study to develop design or research-based responses to sustainable problems.

Design assessment is through studio review and taught courses are assessed by various forms of evidence-based sustainable design decisions and proposals. You will also carry out an in-depth research project into an area of your choice.

Student Destinations

This course enables you to specialise in sustainable architecture and build upon your passion for the design of the twenty-first century urban environment.

On graduating, you will be adept in spatial practice and able to work within design practices, architectural firms and cross-disciplinary environments, engaging in issues from the design of details to the exploration of the urban environment.

The creative skills, professional competencies and expansive learning environment that we provide could also lead to a range of careers in disciplines such as marketing, advertising, journalism, virtual design and modelling, through to people-centred careers such as project management.

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This MPA is designed for professionals in the public, private and third sectors tasked with balancing the reduction in massive, energy-related carbon emissions and the affordability and accessibility of energy. Read more
This MPA is designed for professionals in the public, private and third sectors tasked with balancing the reduction in massive, energy-related carbon emissions and the affordability and accessibility of energy. Students undertake a major live project associated with a real world energy/climate problem and have opportunities to learn from practising energy and climate specialists.

Degree information

Students are taught the conceptual frameworks, policy analysis tools and analytical methods to develop energy and climate policies. Students also study how energy and climate policies are implemented, evaluated and revised in policy cycles. A focus on leadership and the development of professional skills is emphasised throughout.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. The programme consists of four core modules (105 credits), one optional module (15 credits), an elective module (15 credits), and a major group project module (45 credits).

Core modules
Students undertake three core modules with students from sister MPA programmes, and a specialist module focussing on their degree topic.
-Introduction to Science, Technology, Engineering and Public Policy
-Analytical Methods for Policy
-Energy, Technology and Climate Policy
-Evidence, Institutions and Power

Optional modules - students select one optional STEaPP module from the following:
-Science, Technology and Engineering Advice in Practice
-Risk Assessment and Governance
-Communicating Science for Policy
-Negotiation, Mediation and Diplomacy
-Students will then also select one further 15-credit graduate module which is relevant to their degree of study. This module can be selected from any UCL department.

Dissertation/report
In the group project, students work with an external client on a relevant policy challenge. With the support of STEaPP academic staff, the multidiscipinary student groups work together to produce an analysis that meets their clients' needs.

Teaching and learning
The programme combines innovative classroom teaching methods with unique scenario-based learning, enabling students to dynamically engage with real-world policy challenges. Scenarios are designed to help students consolidate knowledge and develop essential practical skills and their understanding of principles. During the programme, students acquire a comprehensive range of relevant skills.

Careers

Graduates with Energy, Technology and Climate Policy Policy MPA degrees will typically work in government agencies, corporate regulatory affairs departments or within advocacy groups doing legislative, regulatory or policy analysis. The career path for this type of profession begins as research or policy assistant, moves through policy or research analyst, then to technical consultant or project director or other senior professional roles. Ambitious candidates can work toward top-level positions such as assistant secretary or executive director.

Why study this degree at UCL?

A rapidly changing energy landscape is providing opportunities for energy leadership in almost every country and industry sector. This practical programme offers experiential learning for skills needed in energy and climate policy-making.

Students undertake a week-long scenario activity on the policy-making process where they engage with external experts and UCL academics. Students go on to undertake a nine-month major project on energy/climate policy for a real world client. Example policy problems include renewable energy sources, carbon capture and storage, or emerging energy technologies.

Students also network with their peers in sister MPA and doctoral programmes.

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If you are a scientist or technologist wanting transition into an industry with exciting career opportunities or are already involved in the leather industry but wanting to increase your knowledge and skills, this is an ideal course for you. Read more
If you are a scientist or technologist wanting transition into an industry with exciting career opportunities or are already involved in the leather industry but wanting to increase your knowledge and skills, this is an ideal course for you.

Here at the Institute for Creative Leather Technologies (ICLT), you will cover the science and technology of leather manufacture in a way designed to suit graduates for senior tannery positions. Whilst developing the critical mind it provides an excellent base for a move into Research and Development departments within chemical companies, tanneries and brands or into academic careers.

Leather is returning to prominence as nearly all alternatives require using up non-renewable carbon-based materials. Scientific advances in conjunction with environmental responsibility have transformed the leather manufacture industry into a modern scientific process, creating a highly sustainable material with high value in many sectors such as sports, automobiles, luxury goods and fashion.

Northampton graduates have been at the forefront of these changes making our leather alumni one of the best bodies in the industry to be associated with. Successful graduates from this course can expect easy access into senior industry positions.

This course is ideal for embedding into corporate continuing personal development (CPD) programmes. Taking this into account, ICLT delivers the course in a way that enables employees to only be away from their place of work for three months between September and December. During this period the theoretical and practical elements of the course are delivered in an intensive manner, after which the employees are able to return to their workplace to continue with their assessments and research elements of the programme. The course also enables students to study in the traditional manner where they stay at University for the whole academic year if desired.

As one of the foremost centres for leather education in the world, ICLT is dedicated to providing cutting edge education and training in the theory and practice of leather technology at the highest level.

If you do not meet our standard entry requirements, it is possible to undertake a single or a number of modules. The non-credit bearing course is called ‘Professional Leather Development’ Course, for further information about this course please visit the Professional Leather Development Course page: https://www.northampton.ac.uk/study/courses/professional-leather-development-course/

Course content

The MSc Leather Technology (Professional) course is unique in that it aims to provide the opportunity to acquire and/or enhance technical skills within the subject of leather technology. Students will study within an environment that encourages the development of intellectual creativity as well as providing transferable skills to undertake research with respect to advanced technologies, developing skills and flexibility necessary to discriminate between technical and entrepreneurial issues and relating these to the needs of the leather industry such as successful management of the commercial operations.

This course offers students the opportunity to work and learn in a state-of-the-art teaching tannery for some of the modules, and will also be working with staff with a mix of academic and industrial experience. Many of the staff carry out research in various leather subjects and over the last 20 years Northampton leather research has built a leading world-wide reputation.

Industry leaders are frequent visitors to meet students and provide knowledge on current technical and commercial aspects of leather and its fascinating chain from farm to fashion or one of its many other end uses.

The MSc Leather Technology (Professional) course is delivered to meet student flexibility. In order for you to complete Master’s level qualification, you must complete up to seven modules and an independent research dissertation. During the course, you will complete six compulsory modules and choose up to two optional modules. This ensures that you have a basic understanding of principles pertinent to the leather industry with an added advantage in that you are able tailor the course to meet your particular needs and career aspirations.

Further information on the indicative content of the leather modules is available through the module catalogue for Leather Technology (Level 7).

Course modules (16/17)

-Leather Process Operations
-Performance Leather Process Operations
-Quality Evaluation and Systematic Problem Solving
-Sustainable Manufacture within the Leather Industry
-Research and Analytical Methods
-Dissertation
-From Hide to High Street
-Leather Science
-Marketing: Principles and Management
-International Marketing Strategy
-Managing Operations
-Podiatry: Applied to the Footwear Industry
-Wastes Management

Methods of Learning

Theoretical lectures and seminars are reinforced by practical examples, case studies and site visits. Our virtual learning environment allows you and course tutors to exchange ideas as well as submit assignments.

Assessments

A variety of approaches to teaching is used such as lectures, seminars, workshops, practical sessions with course teaching materials made available through our virtual learning environment. Modules are assessed by a wide range of methods and include the following: practical reports, seminar files, reflective portfolios, presentations and dissertation.

Facilities and Special Features

As the UK’s only university to integrate leather technology with subjects such as fashion, marketing, business and the environment, we are proud to house an on campus working tannery for practical leather making as well as laboratories to enable leather testing.
-100% employment of graduates in 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014.
-This course is unique to the University of Northampton and not offered anywhere else in the UK or Europe.
-The University has an on campus tannery and laboratories for teaching.
-Modules to cater for leather career choices in practical leather making and testing.
-Industry-led practical workshops and seminars in technology and supply chain knowledge delivered by international experts.
-Continual networking with potential employers within the industry.
-Opportunities to attend international leather fairs in Hong Kong, Milan and Shanghai.
-Bursaries and scholarships available for leather students.

Careers

Graduates of this course are in high demand and are able to secure suitable posts in leather making or associated industries, including technical management, research and development, technical services, higher education and government bodies. When it comes to jobs in the leather industry, demand exceeds supply and opportunities are available worldwide with excellent progression prospects. Employment opportunities can also be found in other materials production or chemical industries. Successful graduates from this course can also proceed to undertake MPhil or PhD studies with us.

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Superb industry links and world-class research come together to make Oxford Brookes one of the best places in the UK to study Mechanical Engineering at postgraduate level. Read more
Superb industry links and world-class research come together to make Oxford Brookes one of the best places in the UK to study Mechanical Engineering at postgraduate level. Being in the heart of one of Europe’s highest concentration of high-tech businesses provides opportunities for industry-focused studies.You will take charge of your career by building on your undergraduate degree and developing your professional skills. It introduces you to research, development and practice in advanced engineering design and equips you for professional practice at senior positions of responsibility.You will gain the skills to take complex products all the way from idea to fully validated designs. Using the most advanced CAD packages, you will learn the techniques required to analyse and test your designs followed by full design implementation. Our teaching is centred around our state-of-the-art laboratories in a purpose-designed engineering building.

Why choose this course?

You will be taught by staff with exceptional knowledge and expertise in their fields, including world-leaders in research on sustainable engineering, materials and joining technology and design engineers leading development of novel products such as carbon and bamboo bike. Our research projects and consultancies are done with partners such as Siemens, Yasa Motors, Stannah Stairlifts, 3M etc. using our facilities including analytical and mechanical test equipment, scanning electron microscope and the latest 3D printing technology. Well-funded research programmes in areas of current concern such as modern composite materials, vehicle end-of-life issues and electric vehicles.

Our research incorporates the latest developments within the sector with high profile visiting speakers contributing to our invited research lectures. In REF 2014 57% of the department's research was judged to be of world leading quality or internationally excellent with 96% being internationally recognised. Visiting speakers from business and industry provide professional perspectives, preparing you for an exciting career, for more information see our industrial lecture series schedule. Our close industry links facilitate industrial visits, providing you with opportunities to explore technical challenges and the latest technology - to get a flavour of activities within our department see 2015 highlights.

You will have the opportunity to join our acclaimed Formula Student team (OBR), where you have a chance to put theory into practice by competing with the best universities from around the world. Find out more about Formula Student at Brookes by visiting the Oxford Brookes Racing website.

Professional accreditation

Accredited by the Institution of Mechanical Engineers (IMechE) and The Institute of Engineering and Technology (The IET) as meeting the academic requirements for full Chartered Engineer status.

This course in detail

The course is structured around three periods: Semester 1 runs from September to December, Semester 2 from January to May, and the summer period completes the year until the beginning of September.

To qualify for a master's degree you must pass the compulsory modules, two optional modules and the Dissertation.

Compulsory modules
-Advanced Mechanical Engineering Design
-Advanced Strength of Components
-Advanced Engineering Management

Optional modules
-Computation and Modelling
-CAD/CAM
-Advanced Materials Engineering and Joining Technology
-Sustainable Engineering Technology
-Noise, Vibration and Harshness
-Vehicle Crash Engineering
-Engineering Reliability and Risk Management

The Dissertation (core, triple credit) is an individual project on a topic from motorsport engineering, offering an opportunity to specialise in a particular area of motorsport. In addition to developing a high level of expertise in a particular area of motorsport, including use of industry-standard software and/or experimental work, the module will also provide you with research skills, planning techniques, project management. Whilst a wide range of industry-sponsored projects are available (e.g. Far-Axon, Clayex/Dymola, Tranquillity Aerospace, Norbar, etc.), students are also able undertake their own projects in the UK and abroad, to work in close co-operation with a research, industrial or commercial organisation.

Please note: As our courses are reviewed regularly as part of our quality assurance framework, the choice of modules available may differ from those described above.

Teaching and learning

Teaching methods include lectures and seminars to provide a sound theoretical base, and practical work designed to demonstrate important aspects of theory or systems operation.

Teaching staff are drawn primarily from the Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mathematical Sciences. Visiting speakers from business and industry provide further input.

Careers and professional development

Our graduates enjoy the very best employment opportunities, with hundreds of engineering students having gone onto successful careers in a wide range of industries.

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Intended specifically for students pursuing a career in Architecture, the Professional Diploma course offers a unique combination of design-based academic study and practical hands-on learning. Read more

Part II in Sustainable Architecture

Intended specifically for students pursuing a career in Architecture, the Professional Diploma course offers a unique combination of design-based academic study and practical hands-on learning. The course is prescribed as a Part II qualification by the Architects Registration Board and is recognised by the EU, thereby enabling students to move on to a Part III qualification.

Students are introduced to a range of skills that are increasingly in demand within the building industry. The focus is on designing buildings in their context, to allow for adaptation to the effects of climate change and to create healthy environments for all.

Teaching is delivered in the WISE building - itself an example of recent developments in sustainable construction - and includes a mix of studio- based design work, lectures, seminars and practicals. The annual Summer School enables students to design, detail and build a structure at CAT using the local materials available.

Modules include

- Design studies with professional practice
- Building performance and energy use
- Building performance and the use of materials
- Design and fabrication: renewable energy engineering
- Environment, energy, climate and human beings

What qualification will you receive?

Successful completion of the programme Professional Diploma in Architecture: Advanced Environmental and Energy Sudies at the Centre for Alternative Technology leads to the award of Professional Diploma (ProfDip) by UEL.

Course Structure

The programme runs as eight interlinked modules over a period of eighteen months. The major design project module consists of 60 credits; with two further 30 credit design modules. Each support studies module consists of 30 credits.
The programme is divided into two parts:
Design Studies, forming the core activity
Support Studies, consisting of Environment and Energy Fundamentals, Building Technology in an Environmental Context, History and Theory of Architecture and Professional Studies.

At the beginning of each Module students are given the Module Book which contains lecture notes, reading material, examples of student essays and design work and various items of information and administration. During each module there will be cross disciplinary seminars, workshops and tutorials, as well as specialised design sessions.

Why study at CAT?

Studying at the Centre for Alternative Technology (CAT) is a truly unique experience. For the past 40 years CAT has been at the forefront of the environmental movement, pioneering low-carbon living and renewable technology. At the Graduate School of the Environment (GSE), students benefit from our extensive practical and academic knowledge, graduating with the skills needed to become leading players in the sustainability sector.

Sustainable Architecture taught in Sustainable Building

The Professional Diploma Part 2 course is taught in the Welsh Institute of Sustainable Education (WISE building). This iconic building was named building of the year by the Telegraph in 2010, it also won a internationally recognised RIBA award in 2011. Designed by CAT architects Pat Borer and David Lea, it includes:
a 200-seat circular lecture theatre made from rammed earth
Three large classrooms/workspaces/labs and two further smaller seminar rooms
A computer suite
Foyer with games, books and a bar
24 en-suite twin bedrooms, overlooking a large open roof garden and decking
Find out more about our facilities here: https://gse.cat.org.uk/index.php/postgraduate-courses/msc-sustainability-and-adaptation/sa-site-and-facilities

Hands-on learning

At CAT, hands-on learning takes place side by side with academic study. Residential on-site block learning weeks are taught at the Centre for Alternative Technology (CAT), a truly unique and inspiring learning environment. Nestled in a disused slate quarry on the edge of the Snowdonia National Park, CAT is a living laboratory for paractical, sustainable solutions. It contains some of the most innovative and renowned environmentally conscious buildings in the country, as well as one of the most diverse range of installed renewable technologies, on site water and sewage treatment, sustainably managed woodland and acres of organic gardens.

Practical building and knowledge sharing

Alongside their design and academic work, students of the Professional Diploma in Architecture also participate in a variety of building projects. This allows them to get practical experience and understanding of the complexities of what happens once their designs leave the architectural studio. During these projects architecture students work alongside MSc students who will go into complimentary building professions allowing for networking and a wealth of transferable knowledge.

Immersive learning environment

Optional residential module weeks include lectures, seminars, group work and practicals. Applied work tends to dominate later in the week once we have laid the theoretical groundwork. These module weeks provide a truly immersive environment to escape daily life and apply yourself to new learning. Many eminent experts give guest lectures or hold seminars during these modules, as it is a course which seeks to draw on the expertise and learning of the whole environmental sector.

Creating high standards of Sustainable Architecture

We pride ourselves on the high standard of work that our graduates continue to produce. To see for yourself, have a look at some of the projects our students produce: https://www.flickr.com/photos/catimages/sets/72157649961496950/

Is this the course for you?

If you would like to visit for a free overnight stay during a module, attend lectures and workshops and meet staff and students, please contact the Student Support Officer:

For more information visit: https://gse.cat.org.uk/index.php/postgraduate-courses/professional-diploma-in-architecture-part-ii

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The global challenges of climate and energy require new technologies for renewable energy sources, methods of energy storage, efficient energy use, new lightweight vehicular structures, techniques for carbon capture and storage and climate engineering. Read more
The global challenges of climate and energy require new technologies for renewable energy sources, methods of energy storage, efficient energy use, new lightweight vehicular structures, techniques for carbon capture and storage and climate engineering. This is a broad-based MSc, designed for graduates who wish to acquire skills in energy and materials science in order to participate in the emerging challenges to meet climate change targets.

Degree information

Students gain an advanced knowledge of materials science as it applies to energy and environmental technologies and research skills including information and literature retrieval, critical interpretation and analysis, and effective communication. They can benefit from modules in chemistry, physics, chemical engineering or mechanical engineering, thus offering future employers a wide-ranging skills base. Graduates will be well qualified to deal with the problems of energy decision-making and the implications for the environment.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. The programme consists of five core modules (90 credits), two optional modules (15 credits each) and a research project (60 credits). An exit-level only Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits) is available. An exit-level only Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits) is available.

Core modules - students take all of the following, totalling 90 credits, and a 60 credit research dissertation.
-Advanced Topics in Energy Science and Materials
-Microstructural Control in Materials Science
-Energy Systems and Sustainability
-Transferable Skills for Scientists
-Research Project Literature Review

Optional modules - students take 30 credits drawn from the following:
-Climate and Energy
-Materials and Nanomaterials
-Electrical Power Systems and Alternative Power Systems
-Atom and Photon Physics
-Solid State Physics
-Mastering Entrepreneurship

Dissertation/report
All MSc students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of approximately 10,000 words, an oral presentation and a viva voce examination (60 credits).

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, tutorials, laboratory classes and research supervision. Assessment is through unseen written examination and coursework. The literature project is assessed by written dissertation and oral presentation, and the research project is assessed by a written report, an oral presentation and a viva voce examination.

Careers

The UK has committed to 80% reduction in CO2 emissions on a 1990 baseline by 2050. CERES, the organisation that represents the largest institutional investors would like to see 90% reduction by 2050. National Systems of Innovation (NSI), which includes the universities, research centres and government departments working in conjunction with industry, will need to apprehend new opportunities and change direction, diverting personnel to energy and climate issues in response to changing markets and legislation. This MSc will contribute to the supply of personnel needed for the era of sustainability.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Process Innovation Executive, Samsung Electronics UK
-Chemical Engineer, Jing Eong Fang
-Research Intern, CECP
-PhD Nanomaterials, University of Oxford
-PhD Sugar Chemistry, Monash University

Why study this degree at UCL?

This programme is designed for graduates from a wide range of science and engineering backgrounds who wish to broaden their knowledge and skills into materials science with an emphasis on the energy and climate change issues that will drive markets over the next century. It delivers courses from five departments across three faculties depending on options and includes a self-managed research project which is intended to introduce the challenges of original scientific research in a supportive environment.

Research activities span the whole spectrum of energy-related research from the development of batteries and fuel cells to the prediction of the structure of new water-splitting catalytic materials.

Students develop experience in scientific method, techniques for reporting science and in the many generic skills required for a future career.

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Our MA Health and Organisational Research is one of two programmes we offer that can either be taken simply as Masters-level programmes, or alternatively can be used as the Masters element of our ESRC-accredited pathways for our Doctoral Training Centre. Read more
Our MA Health and Organisational Research is one of two programmes we offer that can either be taken simply as Masters-level programmes, or alternatively can be used as the Masters element of our ESRC-accredited pathways for our Doctoral Training Centre.

As part of our ESRC-funded doctoral training pathway, your course content, aims and outcomes are closely allied to the ESRC ‘7 Global Research Challenges’ criteria. This means that our course is focussed on developing areas of scholarship in issues of Health, Well-being and Psychosocial Issues, Understanding Individual Behaviour and Global Economic Performance, Policy and Management.

Our course should be of interest if you wish to pursue a career in health services and health research. It is taught across our School and Essex Business School, drawing upon both substantive and methodological expertise from within these schools.

On our course, you gain:
-Knowledge of the core areas of social science, organisational studies and health, including health policy, public health, epidemiology and medical sociology
-An understanding of the debates surrounding research in the organisation and provision of healthcare
-Advanced training in researching psychosocial aspects of health and wellbeing

This is a unique opportunity for you to study within an interdisciplinary environment.

Please note that this course can also be studied via modular, credit accumulation.

Our expert staff

Our staff are multi-professional, including clinically-qualified lecturers, sociologists and social policy and management specialists, so they have clinical and academic credibility.

Specialist facilities

As a student on this course you will not only have access to Health and Human Sciences but also have access to our business school. Our landmark new Essex Business School building is the first zero-carbon business school in the UK. Set around a lush winter garden, the Eden-style dome will give the building its own micro-climate.

Our new building is a beautifully crafted environment for students, offering:
-Study pods and innovation booths for group-working
-A light and spacious lecture theatre, with seating for 250 students
-A café with adjacent sun terrace
-A virtual trading floor with Bloomberg Terminals offering direct use of Bloomberg data, information and analytics
-A rainwater pond that recycles water to cool the building

Your future

We currently have graduates working in both clinical and management positions in local trusts, hospitals and care organisations, as well as in local and county councils.

This course also lends itself to progression onto our PhD Health Research, or our PhD Health and Organisational Research.

A postgraduate qualification is a major achievement and greatly valued by employers. For some jobs a postgraduate qualification may be essential, for others it offers a competitive edge. Our graduates go into a variety of jobs, where the key employability skills and knowledge they have gained through postgraduate study are put to good use.

Example structure

-Qualitative Health Research
-Research Evaluation Projects
-Statistical Analysis
-Theory and Method in Health Research
-Dissertation (optional)
-Management and Organisational Behaviour
-Leadership in Health and Social Care (optional)
-Legal and Ethical Issues (optional)
-Management Psychology (optional)
-Managing for Ethics and Sustainability (optional)
-Philosophy of Management and Accounting (optional)

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The course produces graduates with an in-depth and practical understanding of the use of innovative structural engineering materials in the provision of sustainable and holistic construction solutions for the built environment. Read more
The course produces graduates with an in-depth and practical understanding of the use of innovative structural engineering materials in the provision of sustainable and holistic construction solutions for the built environment.

The use of construction materials is key to infrastructural development globally. New approaches are now needed for innovative renewable and low carbon structural engineering materials.

This MSc course will not only help prepare you for an exciting career in the industry, but it will also help prepare you to continue your studies onto a Doctor of Philosophy research programme.

Visit the website http://www.bath.ac.uk/engineering/graduate-school/taught-programmes/structural-engineering/

Learning outcomes

The course is aimed at engineering and science graduates who wish to work in the construction industry.

As a student you will be provided with the practical knowledge and tools to support you in the use of innovative structural engineering materials in the context of sustainable and holistic construction. You will also learn how to harness that knowledge in a business environment. You will gain analytical and team working skills to enable you to deal with the open-ended problems typical of structural engineering practice.

The MSc is based on research expertise of the BRE Centre for Innovative Construction Materials (http://www.bath.ac.uk/ace/research/cicm/) and is accredited as meeting the requirements for Further Learning for a Chartered Engineer (CEng) for candidates who have already acquired a partial CEng accredited undergraduate first degree. Please visit the Joint Board of Moderators (http://www.jbm.org.uk/) for further information about accreditation.

Collaborative working

The course includes traditionally taught subject-specific units and business and group-orientated modular work. These offer you the chance to gain experience in design, project management and creativity, while working with students from other subjects.

Project Work

Group project work:
In semester 2 you undertake a cross-disciplinary group activity for your professional development, simulating a typical industrial work situation.

Individual project work:
In the final semester, you undertake an individual research project directly related to key current research at the University, often commissioned by industry.

Structure in detail

A full list of units can be found on the programme catalogue (http://www.bath.ac.uk/catalogues/2015-2016/ar/ar-proglist-pg.html#AC).

Semester 1 (October-January)
The first semester provides a foundation in the most significant issues relating to the sustainable use of innovative structural engineering materials in design and construction; and involves units in natural building materials, advanced timber engineering, advanced composites, sustainable concrete technology and architectural structures.

- Five taught compulsory units
- Includes coursework involving laboratory or small project sessions.
- Typically each unit consists of 22 hours of lectures and 11 hours of tutorials, and may additionally involve a number of hours of laboratory activity and field trips with approximately 65-70 hours of private study (report writing, laboratory results processing and revision for examinations).

Semester 2 (February-May)
Semester 2 consists of a further 30 credits comprising of five core 6 credit units. These units include:

- Materials engineering in construction
- Advanced timber engineering
- Engineering project management.

Students will undertake a group-based design activity and an individual project scoping and planning unit (Project Unit 1). The group-based activity involves application of project management techniques and provides the basis for an integrated approach to Engineering, but with the possibility of specialising in the chosen master's topic.

It is a feature of this programme that the project work proceeds as far as possible in a way typical of best industrial practice. The Semester 2 project activities have significant planning elements including the definition of milestones and deliverables according to a time-scale, defined by the student in consultation with his/her academic supervisor and (where appropriate) his/her industrial advisor.

Summer/Dissertation Period (June-September)
Individual project leading to MSc dissertation.

Depending on the chosen area of interest, the individual project may involve theoretical and/or experimental activities; for both such activities students can use the department computer suites and well-equipped and newly refurbished laboratories for experimental work. The individual projects are generally carried out under the supervision of a member of academic staff.

There may be an opportunity for some projects to be carried out with the Building Research Establishment (BRE).

Subjects covered

- Advanced structures
- Advanced composites in construction
- Advanced timber engineering
- Materials engineering in construction
- Natural building materials
- Sustainable concrete technology

About the department

The Department of Architecture and Civil Engineering brings together the related disciplines of Architecture and Civil Engineering. It has an interdisciplinary approach to research, encompassing the fields of Architectural History and Theory, Architectural and Structural Conservation, Lightweight Structures, Hydraulics and Earthquake Engineering and Dynamics.

Our Department was ranked equal first in the Research Excellence Framework 2014 for its research submission in the Architecture, Built Environment and Planning unit of assessment.

Half of our research achieved the top 4* rating, the highest percentage awarded to any submission; and an impressive 90% of our research was rated as either 4* or 3* (world leading/ internationally excellent in terms of originality, significance and rigour).

The dominant philosophy in the joint Department is to develop postgraduate programmes and engage in research where integration between the disciplines is likely to be most valuable. Research is carried out in collaboration with other departments in the University, particularly Management, Computer Science, Mechanical Engineering, and Psychology.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.bath.ac.uk/study/pg/apply/

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