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The University of Birmingham, as a partner in The Midlands Energy Graduate School (MEGS), has launched a new taught Masters in Efficient Fossil Energy Technologies. Read more
The University of Birmingham, as a partner in The Midlands Energy Graduate School (MEGS), has launched a new taught Masters in Efficient Fossil Energy Technologies.

Consisting of core and optional modules, delivered by experts from the universities of Nottingham, Birmingham and Loughborough, this MSc will encourage and embed excellence in fossil energy technologies, carbon capture and efficient combustion. It will prepare future leaders and industrial engineers with knowledge and skills to tackle the major national and international challenges of implementing new fossil-based power plant and processes more efficiently, with near zero emissions and CO2 capture.

This course provides expert teaching from three leading universities in the UK a unique partnership to allow students to benefit from a wide range of expertise. Modules studied represent the academic specialism offered by each university and the research project, taken at the university where you register, will focus on specific aspects of fossil energy technologies: Birmingham specialises in managing chemical reactions, plant design and carbon capture technologies; Loughborough in materials technologies for power generation and high-temperature applications; and Nottingham will focus on combustion technologies, power generation, environmental control and carbon capture. It is therefore important to select your choice of university carefully. Full details of these options and specialisms are in the Modules section of the Course Details tab and all enquiries are welcome.

Chemical Engineering is dynamic and evolving. It provides many solutions to problems facing industries in the pharmaceutical, biotechnological, oil, energy and food and drink sectors. It is vital to many issues affecting our quality of life; such as better and more economical processes to reduce the environmental burden, and more delicious and longer lasting food due to the right combination of chemistry, ingredients and processing.

Birmingham is a friendly, self-confident, School which has one of the largest concentrations of chemical engineering expertise in the UK. The School is consistently in the top five chemical engineering schools for research in the country.

About the School of Chemical Engineering

Birmingham has one of the largest concentrations of Chemical Engineering expertise in the UK, with an excellent reputation in learning, teaching and research.
Investment totalling over £3.5 million in our buildings has resulted in some of the best teaching, computing and laboratory facilities anywhere in the UK.
We have achieved an excellent performance in the Research Excellence Framework (REF) – the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. 87% of the research in the School was rated as world-leading or internationally excellent. It was ranked joint fourth overall in the UK for its research prowess and first nationally for research impact.
The enthusiasm that the academic staff have for their research comes through in their teaching and ensures that they and you are at the cutting edge of chemical engineering.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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This research Master's programme focuses on technology and the applications of virtual reality, computer graphics, imaging and computer vision. Read more
This research Master's programme focuses on technology and the applications of virtual reality, computer graphics, imaging and computer vision. Students learn alongside world-leading researchers specialising in virtual reality, augmented reality, 3D modelling, visualisation, interfaces, gaming and social. They will partake in UCL’s multidisciplinary tradition, sharing ideas and resources across UCL Engineering Sciences and beyond.

Degree information

Students will learn how to analyse, engineer and evaluate a broad range of virtual reality and augmented reality systems. They will discover how to analyse the requirements for interfaces, such as type of system, role of application tasks and perceptual requirements. They will learn how to develop for advanced immersive systems as well as how to validate and evaluate those systems.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of an individual dissertation (75 credits), a group research project (30 credits), four optional modules (45 credits), and two transferable skills modules (30 credits).

Core modules
All of the following modules must be taken.
-Individual Research Project
-Group Project B
-Research Methods and Reading
If the cohort is not large enough to run the Group Project, students will take a second individual research project instead.

Optional modules
Students choose four optional modules (45 credits in total) from the following list.
One of the transferable skills modules must be Researcher Professional Development or Entrepreneurship Theory and Practice.

-Mathematical Methods Algorithms & Implementations
-Virtual Environments
-Image Processing
-Computer Graphics
-Machine Vision
-Graphical Models
-Geometry of Images
-Acquisition & Processing of 3D Geometry
-Inverse Problems in Imaging
-Computational Photography & Capture
-Researcher Professional Development
-Entrepreneurship Theory and Practice
It is also possible for students to select other advanced taught or research modules, with approval.

Please note that registration on optional modules is subject to demand and cannot be guarenteed.

Dissertation/report
All students will undertake an individual research project (75 credits) which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000 - 12,000 words and a 15-minute oral presentation.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, lab practicals and tutorials, and is assessed through examinations, presentations, dissertation and coursework.

Careers

We equip our graduates for jobs in organisations including creative media companies, global IT companies and 3D graphics and product design specialists. We expect graduates to be able to develop state-of-the-art systems that fulfil a broad range of application needs.

Many of our alumni work in the various media industries across London. A significant number have founded their own successful start-up companies.

Employability
With virtual reality and associated technologies being relatively new, industry needs individuals with a broad ability to design and evaluate systems. VEIV and UCL provide a multidisciplinary environment where students can specialise in a particular area, but also get a broad understanding of the various ways that novel immersive technologies are being analysed and developed.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The Virtual Reality MRes is run by UCL’s Virtual Environments, Interaction and Visualisation (VEIV) Centre. This Centre has been a world leader in computational capture, rendering and simulation for the past 15 years.

VEIV has access to UCL’s exceptional virtual reality facilities, including a full range of consumer AR & VR equipment, motion capture systems, a large CAVE projection room system and haptic robots.

Being in the heart of London we have strong links with industry. London is home to many technology communities - including the Graduate Developer Community - who provide mentors for students interested in finding developer roles when they graduate.

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Programme description. This MSc is aimed at students who wish to pursue a geosciences-related career in the future energy sector, as it transitions from fossil fuels to a low carbon economy. Read more

Programme description

This MSc is aimed at students who wish to pursue a geosciences-related career in the future energy sector, as it transitions from fossil fuels to a low carbon economy. The aim is to offer a programme that uses subsurface (geological) knowledge opening a diverse range of career pathways in lower carbon geoenergy technologies; the disposal of energy-related wastes and the hydrocarbon industry.

This MSc programme builds on the strength and reputation of the research groups operating in the School of GeoSciences on uses of the subsurface: carbon capture and storage (CCS); radioactive waste disposal; energy storage and extraction; unconventional and conventional hydrocarbons; wet and dry geothermal heat; and subsurface fluid tracing using noble gases and stable isotopes.

Programme structure

Compulsory courses (for students who have accredited prior learning, elective courses are taken in lieu) – 90 credits

  • Future Geoenergy Resources
  • Applied Hydrogeology and Near surface Geophysics
  • Hydrogeology 2
  • Environmental Geochemistry
  • Project Design and Literature Analysis
  • Carbon Storage and Monitoring

Compulsory Courses – for those with Geoscience background – 20 credits

  • Subsurface Reservoir Quality

Compulsory Courses – for those without Geoscience background – 20 credits

  • Geology for Earth Resources
  • Hydrocarbons

Optional courses: choice of 10 credits from following

  • Ore Mineralogy, Petrology & Geochemistry
  • Seismic Reflection Interpretation
  • Carbon Capture and Transport
  • Helmsdale MSc Field Excursion
  • Environmental Problems and Issues
  • Nuclear Waste Management: Principles, Policies & Practice

Compulsory Dissertation

  • Dissertation in Applied Geoscience (Geoenergy)

Career opportunities

This programme will train students in the use of subsurface geological knowledge opening a diverse range of career pathways in lower carbon geoenergy technologies and the disposal of energy-related wastes. These include radioactive waste disposal; carbon capture and storage; geothermal energy and subsurface energy storage including compressed air energy storage.

Other pathways include working in environmental and regulatory aspects of energy storage involving potential pollution; tracking subsurface fluids in the event of leakage from subsurface facilities and ground water resources.



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The School of Arts offers postgraduate research in a diverse range of areas with specialists available to supervise study in the fields of Film and TV Studies, English, Contemporary Drama and Performance Studies and Music. Read more
The School of Arts offers postgraduate research in a diverse range of areas with specialists available to supervise study in the fields of Film and TV Studies, English, Contemporary Drama and Performance Studies and Music. The School has distinctive expertise in offering practice based MPhil and PhD programmes tailored to your individual interests as well offering the more traditional degree based on the written thesis or a mixture of the two. Research expertise in the School is organised around four groups.

The Body, Space and Technology Research Group make specific and focused interventions in the fields of physical and virtual live performance practices. The group publishes its own online journal and pioneers new developments in both theoretical and practical fields. Performances arising from the research are given regularly in London and internationally. The group’s current project ‘Advanced Interactivity in the Arts’ is investigating digital technology and its impact on performance; motion capture; live video; granular synthesis; web-based applications; body based performer techniques.

The Contemporary Writing Research Group includes researchers and practitioners across the genres and forms of contemporary fiction and poetry. There are four practising creative writers, and a creative writing fellow. Research specialisms in the group include: contemporary poetics, the New York School of Poets, music and writing, popular fictions, postcolonial, multicultural and feminist writing. The group has staged a number of international conferences, including: British Braids (2001), Jewish Women Writers (2002) and Contemporary Writing Environments (2004).

The Contemporary Music Practice Research Centre covers the interfaces between genres of composition and improvisation, technology and human performance, music and society, movement and sound, and between text and music. The group staged a conference, ‘Interfaces – Where Composition and Improvisation Meet’ in December 2000 and hosted the 2001 Annual Conference of the British Forum for Ethnomusicology, which was attended by a large number of international delegates. The theme of the conference was ‘Music and Power’.

The Screen Media Research Centre includes researchers working in many areas of film, television and new media including documentary, British, European and Hong Kong cinema; Hollywood and American independent cinema, political film, cult cinema, animation and representations of gender and sexuality; and generic territories including horror, science fiction and comedy. The group has staged international conferences including ‘The Spectacle of the Real: From Hollywood to Reality TV and Beyond’, in January 2003.

The School has a growing postgraduate community and offers a range of resources to support research. Students also benefit from the recently opened Graduate Centre which provides a dedicated space to meet with fellow postgraduate students. The School also has opportunities for part-time teaching for postgraduates with relevant skills. All postgraduates can apply for financial help to give conference papers and other research related activities.

Awards
The School of Arts may be able to offer a limited number of bursaries or fee waivers. Other financial awards may be available from the Arts and Humanities Research Council and other funding bodies. Some of these funding packages cover tuition fees (at UK/EU rates) and living expenses for the duration of study; others cover the fees, or contribute in other ways towards the cost of study.

MPhil and PhD research supervision is available and includes the following areas:

Drama/Performance Studies
Aesthetic potential of digitised technology for performance (artificial intelligence, motion capture, 3D-modelling and animation)
Somatic practice and performance composition
Interdisciplinary performance
Live capture (sound, film) plus performance
Solo performance and new performance writing

English/Contemporary Writing
Contemporary literature
Creative writing
Twentieth century literature
Victorian literature
The Renaissance
Modern American literature
Popular literature
Postcolonial literature
Contemporary literary theory
Literature and mourning
Innovative, marginal and non-traditional texts
All aspects of literary theory

Film/TV Studies
Five themes provide major strands within which most of the research is organised:
Cult Media and Transgression
Spectacle, Documentary and the Real
The Politics of Representation and Cultural Identity
Dominant and Alternative Cinemas
Videogames and Digital Media

Music
Composition
Improvisation
Electronic music and live electronic transformation
Meeting points between popular, world and ‘classical’ cultures
‘Digital arts’ – the interfaces between different forms of electronic media and live performance
Music in education and community

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We actively encourage postgraduate students on this course to undertake internships and build up a portfolio of clients and practical experience. Read more
We actively encourage postgraduate students on this course to undertake internships and build up a portfolio of clients and practical experience.

Course overview

Careers in Sport and Exercise Science can develop in at least two directions. Firstly you can help elite athletes reach their optimum sports performance. Secondly you can help the general population to improve fitness through exercise referral and community programmes.

This course allows you to specialise in both those areas, by providing you with a solid grounding in measurement, evaluation, research methods, data analysis, and sport and exercise psychology. Additionally, you will get the chance to study applied physiology, applied biomechanics or complete a personal project. The final stage is a research project that reflects your developed knowledge and skills.

Compared to undergraduate studies, this Masters has more emphasis on self-directed lab work, data collection and analysis. We encourage you to undertake real-world internships and build up experience with external clients and sports clubs. This practical experience will complement the rigorous research elements of the course.

By the end of the course you will have a portfolio of work, feedback from clients/employers, and a record of practical and academic projects. This will give you a clear advantage when it comes to applying for jobs.

Course content

The course mixes taught elements with independent research and self-directed study. There is flexibility to pursue personal interests in considerable depth, with guidance and inspiration from Sunderland's supportive tutors.

Core modules:
-Measurement and Evaluation (20 Credits)
-Applied Sport and Exercise Psychology (20 Credits)
-Applied Research Methods and Data Analysis (20 Credits)
-Masters Project (60 Credits)

Designated core modules (you must choose one of the following, but you may choose the other as an option):
-Applied Sport and Exercise Physiology (20 Credits)
-Applied Biomechanics in Sport and Exercise (20 Credits)

Optional modules (choose at least one):
-Strength and Conditioning in Practice (20 Credits)
-Sports Injuries, Management and Rehabilitation (20 Credits)
-Applied Weight Management (20 Credits)
-Professional Skills and Practice (20 Credits)
-Independent Learning Project (20 Credits)
-Applied Public Health (20 Credits)
-Brief Interventions (20 Credits)

Teaching and assessment

We use a wide variety of teaching and learning methods which include lectures, problem-based learning seminars, web-based resources, small group discussions and debates. You will develop your practical skills with workshops and laboratory classes.

Assessment methods include essays, case studies, portfolios, oral presentations, scientific reports, practical exams, data analyses, critical reviews, poster presentations and a dissertation.

Facilities & location

We have invested in the latest software and equipment so that you have maximum scope to measure and improve performance. Our facilities will propel your learning in sport and exercise sciences.

Biomechanics equipment

Our equipment can measure motion, muscle activity and forces on the body during high intensity sports and the activities of daily living. Equipment and techniques include the following:
-3D motion capture systems including Vicon® systems and Xsens® motion capture suits
-Software such as Dartfish®, Kinovea® and LongoMatch® software to capture live action images for match tagging and coaching feedback
-Movement tracking tools such as Actigraph® and Catapult®
-Delsys® Trigno electromyography equipment to see how the muscles of the body are working
-Kistler® force platforms and Batak® reaction walls to analyse sporting performance
-Novel® Pedar systems to analyse foot pressure

Exercise Physiology and Psychology
Our laboratories include the most up-to-date equipment for assessing human performance. You’ll get hands-on practical experience with the following:
-Polar® Team2 heart rate monitoring system for assessing the heart rates of a full squad of team players in real time
-Cortex® gas analysers to evaluate cardiovascular performance
-Biochemical analysers from Randox®, Jenway® and Gonotec® to measure substances and enzymes within the body
-Tendo®, Myotest® and Globus® equipment to profile your strength and power and develop specific training programmes
-Fusion Sport® SMARTSPEED light gates for assessing speed, agility and reaction times
-Assess and enhance cognitive performance using our Neurotracker® 3D multiple object tracking equipment

Sports Medicine and Anatomy
Anatomy is taught by experienced staff in a specialist clinical lab using skeletons, anatomical models, 3D software, online material and human subjects. You will learn techniques for sports injury rehabilitation, including the use of sports massage and ultrasound equipment.

You will also examine balance and stability using our Biodex® stability and balance trainer and assess strength imbalances using our sophisticated Biodex® dynamometer and new BTE Primus® rehabilitation equipment. You can investigate how new techniques such as thermal imaging are being used in injury assessment with Flir® IR cameras.

Fitness and Conditioning Suite
In our lab, you'll find fitness and conditioning equipment that would be the envy of most modern gyms. From a wide range of cardiovascular equipment to machine and Olympic weights, you will receive hands-on teaching in a professional environment.

University Library Services
The University library has thousands of relevant books, e-books and journal articles, with many more titles available through the inter-library loan service. We subscribe to useful resources such as SPORTDiscus, which provides journal articles, book chapters and summaries about sport, fitness and related disciplines.

Sciences Complex
This course is based in the Sciences Complex at our City Campus, which has benefited from multi-million pound investments. The IT facilities are excellent and, across the University, there are hundreds of workstations as well as wireless internet access. If you have any computer problems, just ask the friendly helpdesk team.

Sports facilities
Students at Sunderland have easy access to some of the best facilities in the region. These include:
-50m Olympic size swimming pool
-95m artificial ski slope
-Climbing wall with some of the best route setters in the UK
-Football training pitches at Sunderland AFC’s Academy of Light
-Marine Activities Centre for sailing, canoeing, kayaking and powerboating
-LTA indoor tennis centre with 13 indoor and outdoor courts
-Floodlit athletics tracks

CitySpace
Our City Campus features a state-of-the-art facility called CitySpace. It features:
-Sports hall (suitable for hosting large-scale events)
-Fitness suite/gym
-Strength and conditioning room
-Injury prevention and support suite
-Fitness classes
-Climbing wall

Employment & careers

Potential employers of graduates from this course include national sports associations, sports and leisure companies, recreation services, local authorities, health bodies including the NHS, schools and colleges. Job roles include the following (some require further training):
-Sports and exercise scientist
-Performance Analyst
-Sports coach/instructor
-Manager of health promotion initiatives
-Manager of cardiac rehabilitation and exercise referral
-Fitness centre manager
-Personal trainer/specialist fitness instructor
-Lecturer

Recent Sunderland graduates are now working within the fitness industry, sports development and in Further Education colleges.
A Masters degree will also enhance career opportunities within Higher Education and prepare you for further postgraduate studies.

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Serious games and virtual reality represent a large, and actively growing, industry – the application of modern games technology in a wide range of areas around medicine, training, education, security and beyond. Read more
Serious games and virtual reality represent a large, and actively growing, industry – the application of modern games technology in a wide range of areas around medicine, training, education, security and beyond. While educational games already represent a multi-billion dollar global industry, the recent growth in virtual reality has seen predictions that this market will grow to $150 billion dollars by 2020 (Techcrunch, April 6, 2015).

The MSc provides students with the skills to become a key part of this explosive growth, and potential to become key innovators in this exciting and rapidly developing area. The MSc offers students with prior programming/scripting experience the transferable skills to design, develop and analyse games and simulations for a range of application areas and to conduct interdisciplinary research in the serious applications of games technology, particularly in healthcare, education and training.

As Virtual Reality and interaction technologies approach mainstream adoption, new opportunities for the application of immersive games technologies in engineering, medicine and in the home are putting games at the forefront of innovation worldwide.

At the School of Simulation and Visualisation we already have years of experience working on a wide range of serious games based projects for industrial, medical, heritage and education clients, building on our research and our expertise in 3D modeling and animation, motion capture technology and software development. We are pleased to be able to share our experience and expertise with this MSc.

Programme Structure:

Stage 1

Core Research Skills for Postgraduates
Games Programming
Serious Game Design and Research
School of Simulation and Visualisation Elective: Choose one from
Interactive Heritage Visualisation
Applications in Medical Visualisation

Stage 2

Motion Capture & Interaction
Audio for games & interactive applications
Serious Games Development
GSA Elective
Stage 3

MSc Research Project
Part time study is also available. Please see the Part Time Study Guide for more information.

Entry Qualifications:

You should have a Honours degree or equivalent professional practice in any of the following disciplines:

Computer science, computer graphics, computer programming, software development, mathematics, or physics
Computer games programming, game development, game design, game art, 3D modeling and animation, interactive systems
High calibre graduates from other disciplines may be considered if they are able to demonstrate an interest and ability in the field of serious games development.

IELTS 6.0 for overseas applicants for whom English is not their first language.

Scholarships and Funded Places:

Information on career development loans and financial support can be found in the fees and funding pages.

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Channel your creativity and join a multi-skilled team to develop the next generation of video games. On our arts-based MA, you’ll join the vibrant games and technology community based here in Cambridge that includes Guerrilla, ARM, Frontier Developments, Jagex and Ninja Theory. Read more
Channel your creativity and join a multi-skilled team to develop the next generation of video games. On our arts-based MA, you’ll join the vibrant games and technology community based here in Cambridge that includes Guerrilla, ARM, Frontier Developments, Jagex and Ninja Theory.

Your course will have a new home in Compass House, which will extend our campus along East Road. You’ll have the latest technology at your fingertips and be able to collaborate with other students on innovative projects to hone your skills.

See the website http://www.anglia.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/computer-games-development-art

If you have a degree in an art and design or computer games-related subject, our course will allow you to specialise in games art at Master's level.

Based in the inspiring environment of our new Compass House Games Centre, you’ll learn all about best practice in the games industry. We’ll encourage you to work in design production teams, tackling a series of creative and technical challenges with programmers and industry professionals. You'll develop your design skills and learn how to create and publish successful games across a range of platforms.

Cambridge accounts for nearly 20% of the UK computer games industry, so it's a great place to study as we enjoy excellent links with the major games developers in the area. What's more, our Computer Games Centre offers studio space to local indie developers, who'll share their knowledge and experience with you.

We're partners with the Global Science & Technology Forum, allowing our students access to cutting-edge research materials.

While you're studying, we'll encourage you to take on work placements and collaborate on live projects with the games industry. You’ll also have the chance to enter games events, such as Brains Eden, which Anglia Ruskin hosts every year.

This course runs in parallel with our MSc Computer Games Development (Computing), reflecting the multidisciplinary nature of games creation.

See the website http://www.anglia.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/computer-games-development-art

Careers

Our MA gives you the chance to specialise in the design and technical implementation of computer games, whether you already have a games-related degree, or you're a recent graduate of a non-games-related degree who's looking to move into this area. Our course is also suitable if you work in another creative industry and are looking to move into games design and creation.

The skills you'll learn on this course are relevant to other forms of games - including board games and educational games - allowing you to consider a number of career options.

Interactive computer games is a relatively new medium; as the industry grows, you’ll find more and more opportunities to use the computing and creative skills you'll hone while studying here.

Modules & assessment

Core modules:
Process and Practice as Research
Games Development 1
Games Development 2
Digital Arts - Experimental Practice
Master's Project: Art and Design

Assessment

You’ll show your progress through a combination of written and practical work, carried out individually and as part of a team.

What you'll study

Cambridge School of Art has been inspiring creativity since 1858 when it was opened by John Ruskin.

Engaging with current debates surrounding contemporary practice and with the state-of-the-art facilities, Cambridge School of Art houses light, bright studios, industry-standard film and photographic facilities, and 150-year-old printing presses alongside dedicated Apple Mac suites. Our digital art gallery, the Ruskin Gallery, exhibits both traditional shows and multimedia presentations, from national and international touring exhibitions and our own students.

We are the only university in Cambridge offering art and design courses at higher education level. A tight-knit community of artists, academics and over 900 students, we collaborate across our University, the creative industries, and other sectors. Cambridge is a centre for employment in the creative industries and there are rich opportunities for collaboration with the city’s entertainment, technological, scientific, arts and heritage industries.

Our graduates have a history of winning national and international awards and an excellent employment record. They include Pink Floyd's Syd Barrett and Dave Gilmour, Spitting Image creators Peter Fluck and Roger Law, and illustrator Ronald Searle, the creator of St Trinian's.

We’re part of the Faculty of Arts, Law and Social Sciences, a hub of creative and cultural innovation whose groundbreaking research has real social impact.

Facilities

Based at the new Compass House Computer Games Centre, a three-minute walk from our main Cambridge campus, you’ll have 24-hour access to a hub space with group work naturally forming a part of your studies.

The centre includes a start-up lab for small games companies, supported by Games Eden, the Cambridge Computer Games industry network. This will give you excellent opportunities to work in an entrepreneurial games environment.

All students on our Computer Games courses – undergraduate and postgraduate – have access to industry-standard PCs running Maya, 3DS Max, ZBrush, Mudbox, Motion Builder, After Effects, Unity 3D, and UDK. You’ll be able to use motion capture equipment, 3D monitors, VR equipment, graphics tablets, a render farm, HD cameras and digital SLRs (for HDRI capture).

Links with industry

Cambridge is home to nearly 20% of the UK’s computer games industry, including Sony’s Guerrilla Studios, ARM, Jagex, Ninja Theory, Frontier, Geomerics and a host of smaller indie developers. Our Computer Games Art department is a member of TIGA, the Business & University Games Syndicate, and a partner of the Global Science & Technology Forum, giving you access to cutting-edge research materials.

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The Master of Fine Arts (M.F.A.) degree program offers students the opportunity to pursue graduate study in the Departments of Art, New Media, or Theatre and Dramatic Arts. Read more
The Master of Fine Arts (M.F.A.) degree program offers students the opportunity to pursue graduate study in the Departments of Art, New Media, or Theatre and Dramatic Arts. These majors emphasize a combination of theory and practice relevant to their discipline. Faculty, comprised of artists and scholars, foster an environment of active engagement with material, critical and conceptual investigations in production and performance. The M.F.A. program allows graduate students to concentrate in their chosen disciplines and to synthesize their research into a unique and challenging Thesis Project. Exceptional facilities, integrated technical support, a lively community of arts and culture, and a commitment to academic and creative excellence are integral qualities of the Faculty of Fine Arts.

Masters of Fine Arts - New Media

Building on our reputation for excellent undergraduate education in the areas of 3D art and animation, the moving image, interactive arts, digital design, and new media theory and culture, the Master of Fine Arts (MFA) in New Media offers students the opportunity to join a dynamic community of artists, designers, and scholars.

As a smaller program with high calibre students, the MFA in New Media encompasses a strong theoretical and practical foundation in areas related to faculty research interests. Students hone their creative talents using first rate design and animation software, motion-capture technology, and digital video production equipment. The program offers an exceptional level of interaction with faculty and staff. The MFA in New Media degree is a two-year, full-time studio program of applied and academic study. The University of Lethbridge is committed to providing competitive financial support to all graduate students.

Located a short drive from Calgary, the United States border, and the Canadian Rockies, Lethbridge is a growing city that enjoys a diverse geography of prairie, rolling hills, and an expansive natural river valley area. Lethbridge is home to numerous art collectives and a number of contemporary art galleries including the University of Lethbridge Art Gallery, Casa, Trianon Gallery, Parlour, and the nationally acclaimed Southern Alberta Art Gallery. Several sites for exhibitions are available to graduate students, including the University of Lethbridge Penny Building, which provides a strong downtown presence.

The program offers students unique opportunities to contribute to the vibrant cultural life on campus and in the broader community of Lethbridge. MFA students are encouraged to augment their studio practice through interactions with other graduate programs in the Faculty of Fine Arts (Art, Music, and Drama). The University’s liberal arts focus offers opportunities to take courses and explore collaborations with the Humanities, Sciences, and Social Sciences.

Located in the U of L Centre for the Arts, the New Media Department is supported by excellent studios, labs, specialized workshops, and digital facilities, including:

•Teaching and research computer labs equipped with dedicated workstations for computer graphics and visual content development
•Green Screen Studio combined with Digital Photo Studio facilities supported by digital video and photo cameras, dedicated mobile and studio lighting equipment kits, and professional sound recording and editing equipment
•Faculty research labs with cutting edge stereoscopic visualization technology
•Motion Capture Studio based on Vicon technology
•Dedicated animation work stations integrated into new media computer labs
•HD video and digital cameras, lighting kits, and sound equipment

How to apply

In order to apply, you will need to provide the following documentation:

• Academic Transcripts
• Curriculum Vitae
• Three Letters of Reference
• Letter of Intent
• English Language Proficiency (ELP)

All applications and supporting documents must be provided through the online portal: https://www.uleth.ca/future-student/graduate-studies/apply

Funding

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.uleth.ca/graduate-studies/master-arts/award-opportunities

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The Centre for Anatomy & Human Identification provides a wide range of modules in key aspects of Medical Art and Forensic Art & Facial Identification which are offered on a stand-along basis. Read more
The Centre for Anatomy & Human Identification provides a wide range of modules in key aspects of Medical Art and Forensic Art & Facial Identification which are offered on a stand-along basis.

These modules enable the student to develop specialist expertise or perhaps refresh knowledge.

Our academic staff offer postgraduate modules in their specialist areas, therefore, students are taught by experts in the field.

What's so good about this course at Dundee?

Students benefit from the facilities of a well-established art college, whilst appreciating the newly-refurbished laboratories, a dedicated library and access to human material in a modern medical science environment.

The award-winning staff in the Centre for Anatomy and Human Identification (CAHID) are amongst the most experienced in the UK in the fields of human identification, forensic anthropology, craniofacial identification and the study of the human body. The core remit of the Centre is the study of anatomy and staff deliver high quality anatomy teaching at all levels, via whole body dissection which allows students to develop a sound knowledge of the human body.

The Centre was awarded a prestigious Queen's Anniversary Prize for Higher Education in November 2013. Presented in recognition of 'world class excellence', the Queen’s Anniversary Prizes are among the most highly-regarded awards for the UK’s universities and colleges.

Teaching & Assessment

The modules are delivered through traditional lectures, dissection, study groups and anatomical illustration workshops. These will be supplemented with tutorials to allow for small and large group-based discussion as well as life drawing critique sessions.

-Core modules
Anatomy for Artists
Medical Art 1: Image Capture and Creation
Medical Art 2: Communication and Education
Forensic Facial Imaging, Analysis and Comparison
Forensic Art

Progression

These modules form part of our postgraduate portfolio. You can continue from a single module to a Postgraduate Certificate, by combining the modules as follows:

Anatomy for Artists
Medical Art 1: Image Capture and Creation
Medical Art 2: Communication and Education (requires completion of Medical Art 1 or prior professional experience)
Upon completion of all three a PGCert in Medical Art will be awarded

Anatomy for Artists
Forensic Facial Imaging, Analysis and Comparison
Forensic Art (requires completion of Forensic Facial Imaging, Analysis and Comparison or prior professional experience)
Upon completion of all three a PGCert in Forensic Art and Facial Identification will be awarded.

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Our MA in Music Production gives you time, facilities and authoritative guidance from academics and industry professionals to develop both practical studio craft along with a firm theoretical and critical understanding of modern technique and practice. Read more
Our MA in Music Production gives you time, facilities and authoritative guidance from academics and industry professionals to develop both practical studio craft along with a firm theoretical and critical understanding of modern technique and practice.

Course summary

This new programme (which replaces the Production pathway of the Music MA) provides practical, theoretical and analytical study of the creation, perception and reception of audio productions. An interdisciplinary approach is adopted which examines how creative studio practice is informed by perspectives provided by science and engineering (acoustics, psychoacoustics, electroacoustics, signal processing) as well as composition, performance and musicology. Professional competences in various aspects of sound recording practice are developed and assessed, along with the underlying transferable knowledge. This is in addition to a cultural and historical perspective which encourages the understanding of production, with its own notions of style and genre, as an evolving and integral part of music making.

Aims

The MA in Music Production degree is aimed at students wishing to explore the practice and theory of Music Production. This combines a very broad view of the techniques and applications of production for audio media with the subsequent development of more tightly focussed individual skills and scholarship. Music Production might involve anything ranging from the creation of entirely synthetic material using computer-based techniques to the successful capture of acoustic performances, as well as the restoration and reconstruction of existing audio heritage. There are also important philosophies and technologies underlying this discipline that are constantly evolving.

Whether you are an electronic/computer-based composer or an early music specialist who wants to make the very best recordings, this course will provide you with the intellectual and practical skills to realise your goals. This is not a training course in specific pieces of software or hardware. It is a year-long exposure to thinking about and working in Music Production in its many forms. It is an opportunity to develop your own ideas, styles and career in this exciting discipline.

Structure and Ethos

The use of technology for the creation and capture of music is a core part of the Department of Music’s activities. The Department is home to the Music Research Centre: one of the finest facilities for listening to and recording sound in the UK. There is a large-scale neutral listening and performing space built to extremely low noise specifications (PNC15), a linked studio suite containing a dedicated performance space with configurable acoustics and two mix down/control rooms. The department’s main concert hall has a dedicated studio control room along with a suite of editing and programming rooms. This remarkable set of facilities is populated with a wide range of microphones and recording hardware/software. There are extensive computing facilities for practical work and research. Surround sound work is very well supported by multiple sets of 5.1 and full periphonic (i.e. with height) ambisonic reproduction systems.

Throughout the course MA Music Production students are expected to use these facilities to make recordings and other audio artefacts. Running alongside this practical activity are taught modules which provide an understanding and fluency in audio signals and systems and the production chain, listening and analytical skills. In the final six months students produce a self-directed portfolio as well as undertaking a large research project.

Industry and Employment Relevance

The role of producer is widely recognised within the music industry, across all styles and in many different areas of activity. This course will provide you with a versatile skill-set which will be of value for entrepreneurs or for candidates seeking professional appointments, be it with a small independent production house or a broadcaster with global reach. The department is home to professional sound recordists, producers, performers, composers and technology developers and so offers a unique combination of expertise in this field. Rather than a narrow set of competencies which will quickly date, you will graduate with a set of robust skills which will transfer to many different scenarios along with a breadth and depth of understanding of Music Production which will allow you to create meaningful and significant audio content, as well as critically analyse the work of other producers. A significant proportion of our graduates go on to do further research at PhD level.

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Research profile. The Institute of Perception, Action and Behaviour (IPAB) focuses on how to link computational perception, representation, transformation and generation processes to external worlds, in theory and in practice. Read more

Research profile

The Institute of Perception, Action and Behaviour (IPAB) focuses on how to link computational perception, representation, transformation and generation processes to external worlds, in theory and in practice.

This covers domains such as visual perception, dynamic control of robot systems, active sensing and decision making, biomimetic robotics, computer-based generation of external phenomena, such as images, music or actions, and agent-based interaction within computer games and animation.

Supported by the dynamic research culture of IPAB, you can develop robots that learn their own motor control, mimic animal behaviours, or produce autonomous and coordinated team actions. Or you can work with systems that interpret real images and video, or generate complex behaviour in animated characters.

We aim to link strong theoretical perspectives with practical hands-on construction, and provide the hardware and software support to realise this vision.

Training and support

You carry out your research within a research group under the guidance of a supervisor. You will be expected to attend seminars and meetings of relevant research groups and may also attend lectures that are relevant to your research topic. Periodic reviews of your progress will be conducted to assist with research planning.

A programme of transferable skills courses facilitates broader professional development in a wide range of topics, from writing and presentation skills to entrepreneurship and career strategies.

The School of Informatics holds a Silver Athena SWAN award, in recognition of our commitment to advance the representation of women in science, mathematics, engineering and technology. The School is deploying a range of strategies to help female staff and students of all stages in their careers and we seek regular feedback from our research community on our performance.

Facilities

Our robotics labs contain a range of mobile platforms, robot manipulators, humanoid robots, and custom-built sensor and actuation systems that attract continuous interest from funders, industry and members of the public.

Recent developments include the UK's only NASA Valkyrie robot platform, application of robotic hardware to prosthetics and assisted living, and a team that competes in the international robot soccer league.

Our new Edinburgh Centre for Robotics (ECR) brings collaboration with Heriot-Watt University to expand the range of facilities and applications we can explore, and to fund research training.

The machine vision lab has facilities for 3D range data capture, motion capture and high-resolution and high-speed video, and the high performance computing needed for graphics is well supported, including hardware partnerships with companies such as NVIDIA.

Career opportunities

While many of our graduates go on to highly successful academic careers, others find their niche in commercial research labs, putting their knowledge and skills to use in an industry setting.

Several of our recent graduates have set up or joined spin-out robotics companies. Our graphics researchers have strong connections to the media and games industries.



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Over recent years there has been a growing awareness and appreciation of the use of project management techniques in a much wider range of business settings. Read more
Over recent years there has been a growing awareness and appreciation of the use of project management techniques in a much wider range of business settings. This, in part, is due to increasing competition and a business imperative which recognises that in order to achieve competitive advantage, efficiency and success of each and every project is important.

This exciting new Masters in Applied Project Management contextualises the practice of project management within specific sectors and provides the graduate with the generic skills and competences required to fulfil their business and organisational needs.

The practical approach to teaching and learning is enhanced through added three distinct pathways of Environment, Computing and Enterprise Management and a final dissertation allowing for even further focusing against your choices career sector. There are seven taught modules ranging from Principles of Project Management to Professional Enquiry Methods with two being from your selected pathway.

The part-time Saturday version would see the learner working within their career sector and building upon that knowledge base. To help support learning experience a week long module is offered in April each academic year which additionally helps balance the workload and completion within two years.

Course detail

The practical approach to teaching and learning is enhanced through added three distinct pathways of Environment, Computing and Enterprise Management and a final dissertation allowing for even further focusing against your choices career sector. There are seven taught modules ranging from principles of Project Management to Professional Enquiry Methods with two being from your selected pathway.

Format

A variety of teaching methods will be used within course module deliveries especially to capture the applied aspects of project management. In fact the core modules were constructed with teaching variety methods from the outset. The pathways modules need to capture sector expectations and final dissertation offers a wideness of choice.

Assessment

The assessment across the modules has been thought out to offer a balance of assessment approaches of assignment only and some will have a mixture with an examination as an end assessment.

By way of example: The module Strategic Innovation Management initial assignment involves a group undertaking and requires a presentation creation and delivery. The final assignment is an individually developed document requiring to conduct research on the use of projects in an organisation. There is no examination for the modules and assessment weighting is 40/60.

There are only a total of five modules that require examinations as part of their end assessment for the course with maximum of only four examinations required for selected pathways.

Career and study progression

Project Management is the discipline of planning, organising and executing projects effectively and efficiently. As such, project management plays an important role in nearly any organisation, from SMEs through to the largest global corporations. Knowledge and skills gained within this course will enable graduates to take on the role of project manager and/or become an effective member of a project management team.

Outstanding graduates are encouraged to further their study at the level of MPhil and PhD at UWL and at other institutions.

We actively encourage students with potential for research to make their interest known early on in their course.

How to apply

Click the following link for information on how to apply to this course: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/how-apply

Scholarships and bursaries

Information about scholarships and bursaries can be found here: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/scholarships-and-bursaries

Read less
Over recent years there has been a growing awareness and appreciation of the use of project management techniques in a much wider range of business settings. Read more
Over recent years there has been a growing awareness and appreciation of the use of project management techniques in a much wider range of business settings. This, in part, is due to increasing competition and a business imperative which recognises that in order to achieve competitive advantage, efficiency and success of each and every project is important.

This exciting new Masters in Applied Project Management contextualises the practice of project management within specific sectors and provides the graduate with the generic skills and competences required to fulfil their business and organisational needs.
The practical approach to teaching and learning is enhanced through added three distinct pathways of Environment, Computing and Enterprise Management and a final dissertation allowing for even further focusing against your choices career sector. There are seven taught modules ranging from Principles of Project Management to Professional Enquiry Methods with two being from your selected pathway.

Course detail

This full-time version is with Internship of 6 months duration, with dissertation development. This allows completion within 18 months. To support Internship two non-assessed modules of Personal & Professional Development and Employability Skills & Employment are incorporated within the course and allocated tutor for internship.

The Internship Course seeks to provide the same rigorous and challenging programme of professional practice as the MSc Applied Project Management but has the added advantage of including a 6 months internship incorporated into the period of study. This makes it ideal for students seeking to add a practical dimension to their studies and understand the demands of workplace supervision and management. Internship opportunities exist throughout the industry within the UK.

The practical approach to teaching and learning is enhanced through added three distinct pathways of Environment, Computing and Enterprise Management and a final dissertation allowing for even further focusing against your choices career sector. There are seven taught modules ranging from principles of Project Management to Professional Enquiry Methods with two being from your selected pathway.

Pathways

You can choose form one of the following three pathways:

1) Environment
o Commercial Management of Construction
o Urban Development

2) Computing
o Information Systems Project Management
o Consultancy and Technological Innovation

3) Enterprise Management
o Management of Organisational Change
o Strategic Innovation Management

Format

A variety of teaching methods will be used within course module deliveries especially to capture the applied aspects of project management. In fact the core modules were constructed with teaching variety methods from the outset. The pathways modules need to capture sector expectations and final dissertation offers a wideness of choice.

Assessment

The assessment offers a balance of assessment approaches of assignment only and some will have a mixture with an examination as an end assessment.

For example: The module Strategic Innovation Management initial assignment involves group work and requires a presentation creation and delivery. The final assignment is an individually developed document requiring you to conduct research on the use of projects in an organisation. There is no examination for the modules and assessment weighting 40/60.

There are only a total of 5 modules that require examinations as part of their end assessment for the course with maximum of only 4 examinations required for selected pathways.

Career and study progression

Project management plays an important role in nearly all organisation, from SMEs through to the largest global corporations. Knowledge and skills gained within this course will enable graduates to take on the role of project manager and/or become an effective member of a project management team.

Graduates are encouraged to further their study at the level of MPhil and PhD. We actively encourage students interested in research to make their interest known early on in their course.

How to apply

Click the following link for information on how to apply to this course: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/how-apply

Scholarships and bursaries

Information about scholarships and bursaries can be found here: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/scholarships-and-bursaries

Read less
Our PGCert in Music Production gives you time, facilities and authoritative guidance from academics and industry professionals to develop both practical studio craft along with a firm theoretical and critical understanding of modern technique and practice. Read more
Our PGCert in Music Production gives you time, facilities and authoritative guidance from academics and industry professionals to develop both practical studio craft along with a firm theoretical and critical understanding of modern technique and practice.

Course summary

This new programme (which replaces the Production pathway of the Music MA) provides practical, theoretical and analytical study of the creation, perception and reception of audio productions. An interdisciplinary approach is adopted which examines how creative studio practice is informed by perspectives provided by science and engineering (acoustics, psychoacoustics, electroacoustics, signal processing) as well as composition, performance and musicology. Professional competences in various aspects of sound recording practice are developed and assessed, along with the underlying transferable knowledge. This is in addition to a cultural and historical perspective which encourages the understanding of production, with its own notions of style and genre, as an evolving and integral part of music making.

Aims

The PGCert in Music Production degree is aimed at students wishing to explore the practice and theory of Music Production. This combines a very broad view of the techniques and applications of production for audio media with the subsequent development of more tightly focussed individual skills and scholarship. Music Production might involve anything ranging from the creation of entirely synthetic material using computer-based techniques to the successful capture of acoustic performances, as well as the restoration and reconstruction of existing audio heritage. There are also important philosophies and technologies underlying this discipline that are constantly evolving.

Whether you are an electronic/computer-based composer or an early music specialist who wants to make the very best recordings, this course will provide you with the intellectual and practical skills to realise your goals. This is not a training course in specific pieces of software or hardware. It is a year-long exposure to thinking about and working in Music Production in its many forms. It is an opportunity to develop your own ideas, styles and career in this exciting discipline.

Structure and Ethos

The use of technology for the creation and capture of music is a core part of the Department of Music’s activities. The Department is home to the Music Research Centre: one of the finest facilities for listening to and recording sound in the UK. There is a large-scale neutral listening and performing space built to extremely low noise specifications (PNC15), a linked studio suite containing a dedicated performance space with configurable acoustics and two mix down/control rooms. The department’s main concert hall has a dedicated studio control room along with a suite of editing and programming rooms. This remarkable set of facilities is populated with a wide range of microphones and recording hardware/software. There are extensive computing facilities for practical work and research. Surround sound work is very well supported by multiple sets of 5.1 and full periphonic (i.e. with height) ambisonic reproduction systems.

Throughout the course Music Production students are expected to use these facilities to make recordings and other audio artefacts. Running alongside this practical activity are taught modules which provide an understanding and fluency in audio signals and systems and the production chain, listening and analytical skills. In the final six months students produce a self-directed portfolio as well as undertaking a large research project.

Industry and Employment Relevance

The role of producer is widely recognised within the music industry, across all styles and in many different areas of activity. This course will provide you with a versatile skill-set which will be of value for entrepreneurs or for candidates seeking professional appointments, be it with a small independent production house or a broadcaster with global reach. The department is home to professional sound recordists, producers, performers, composers and technology developers and so offers a unique combination of expertise in this field. Rather than a narrow set of competencies which will quickly date, you will graduate with a set of robust skills which will transfer to many different scenarios along with a breadth and depth of understanding of Music Production which will allow you to create meaningful and significant audio content, as well as critically analyse the work of other producers. A significant proportion of our graduates go on to do further research at PhD level.

Read less
Our Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip) in Music Production gives you time, facilities and authoritative guidance from academics and industry professionals to develop both practical studio craft along with a firm theoretical and critical understanding of modern technique and practice. Read more
Our Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip) in Music Production gives you time, facilities and authoritative guidance from academics and industry professionals to develop both practical studio craft along with a firm theoretical and critical understanding of modern technique and practice.

Course summary

This new programme provides practical, theoretical and analytical study of the creation, perception and reception of audio productions. An interdisciplinary approach is adopted which examines how creative studio practice is informed by perspectives provided by science and engineering (acoustics, psychoacoustics, electroacoustics, signal processing) as well as composition, performance and musicology. Professional competences in various aspects of sound recording practice are developed and assessed, along with the underlying transferable knowledge. This is in addition to a cultural and historical perspective which encourages the understanding of production, with its own notions of style and genre, as an evolving and integral part of music making.

Aims

The PGDip in Music Production degree is aimed at students wishing to explore the practice and theory of Music Production. This combines a very broad view of the techniques and applications of production for audio media with the subsequent development of more tightly focussed individual skills and scholarship. Music Production might involve anything ranging from the creation of entirely synthetic material using computer-based techniques to the successful capture of acoustic performances, as well as the restoration and reconstruction of existing audio heritage. There are also important philosophies and technologies underlying this discipline that are constantly evolving.

Whether you are an electronic/computer-based composer or an early music specialist who wants to make the very best recordings, this course will provide you with the intellectual and practical skills to realise your goals. This is not a training course in specific pieces of software or hardware. It is a year-long exposure to thinking about and working in Music Production in its many forms. It is an opportunity to develop your own ideas, styles and career in this exciting discipline.

Structure and Ethos

The use of technology for the creation and capture of music is a core part of the Department of Music’s activities. The Department is home to the Music Research Centre: one of the finest facilities for listening to and recording sound in the UK. There is a large-scale neutral listening and performing space built to extremely low noise specifications (PNC15), a linked studio suite containing a dedicated performance space with configurable acoustics and two mix down/control rooms. The department’s main concert hall has a dedicated studio control room along with a suite of editing and programming rooms. This remarkable set of facilities is populated with a wide range of microphones and recording hardware/software. There are extensive computing facilities for practical work and research. Surround sound work is very well supported by multiple sets of 5.1 and full periphonic (i.e. with height) ambisonic reproduction systems.

Throughout the course Music Production students are expected to use these facilities to make recordings and other audio artefacts. Running alongside this practical activity are taught modules which provide an understanding and fluency in audio signals and systems and the production chain, listening and analytical skills. In the final six months students produce a self-directed portfolio as well as undertaking a large research project.

Industry and Employment Relevance

The role of producer is widely recognised within the music industry, across all styles and in many different areas of activity. This course will provide you with a versatile skill-set which will be of value for entrepreneurs or for candidates seeking professional appointments, be it with a small independent production house or a broadcaster with global reach. The department is home to professional sound recordists, producers, performers, composers and technology developers and so offers a unique combination of expertise in this field. Rather than a narrow set of competencies which will quickly date, you will graduate with a set of robust skills which will transfer to many different scenarios along with a breadth and depth of understanding of Music Production which will allow you to create meaningful and significant audio content, as well as critically analyse the work of other producers. A significant proportion of our graduates go on to do further research at PhD level.

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