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Masters Degrees (Capacity Building)

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Specialists in Rural Development, Communication and Innovation are greatly needed in organizations and projects around the world, especially those offering capacity building, training, information and e-learning while addressing rural poverty, social equity, sustainability, resource scarcity and food security. Read more

Responding to changes in rural environments

Specialists in Rural Development, Communication and Innovation are greatly needed in organizations and projects around the world, especially those offering capacity building, training, information and e-learning while addressing rural poverty, social equity, sustainability, resource scarcity and food security. Communication is the key in bringing about social change and innovation. However, adapting development projects and processes to social, political, economic and environmental changes poses challenges to many organisations, which has resulted in a pressing need to facilitate innovation and communication processes. Organizations and professionals providing such services require knowledge on facilitation, public participation and innovative praxis.

To ensure appropriate responses to contemporary conditions and local circumstances, such organisations need to adapt their approaches, as well as design new operational structures, to increase the relevance of their performance and the sustainability of their actions. This programme equips mid-career professionals and their organisations with competences that will strengthen their ability to work in a range of complex multi-actor settings in his increasingly digitized world.

Competences

At graduation, you will have developed the ability to:
• analyse stakeholders’ interests and needs and outline policies that lead to social change and participation
• design processes and strategies that facilitate communication and knowledge sharing
• transform traditional extension policy and practice and develop new approaches to communication and innovation
• design and facilitate effective, appropriate and exciting learning environments

Career opportunities

When an organisation reorganises its service provision and information management, there is often a considerable need for new management styles and thus for capacity building. Various sources and activities – such as policy reforms, customer surveys and the formulation of funding conditions – suggest this applies at all organisational levels. In some cases, complex organisational problems need to be addressed; in others, staff needs to improve their ability to design and implement new strategies and activities for information and communication.

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IN BIOFORCE. 1) Opening Sessions. Objectives. To introduce the pedagogical objectives and contents to participants. To ensure that the expectations of trainees are coherent with the learning objectives defined for the programme. Read more

Modules Contents and Objectives

IN BIOFORCE

1) Opening Sessions

Objectives: To introduce the pedagogical objectives and contents to participants. To ensure that the expectations of trainees are coherent with the learning objectives defined for the programme.

Contents: Bioforce presentation. Introduction of the learning programme and objectives.

2) Immersion Internship

Objectives: To facilitate group cohesiveness and participant involvement within the programme.
To make a detailed presentation of the components of the MSc in HPM.
To encourage a joint reflection about humanitarian and development issues.
Show awareness of its own strengths and limitations as a humanitarian programme manager.

Contents: Presentation, preparation and organization of the immersion internships. Discussion and group work on Humanitarian topics.

3) Framework of Humanitarian Aid

Objectives/Learning outcomes: To provide participants with thorough knowledge of the humanitarian sector and issues at stake: stakeholders, systems, coordination mechanisms, legal and ethical framework, Q&A initiatives and applications relating to programme management.

Contents: Humanitarian actors, systems and challenges. International humanitarian law, ethics & principles. Quality & Accountability initiatives, methods & practical tools.

4) Managing People & Organisations

Objectives/Learning outcomes: To enable participants to choose and apply appropriate tools to manage themselves, other people, and organisations involved in humanitarian programmes.

Contents: Strengthening organisational capacity. Change management. Quality & Accountability in people management. Creating & developing trust in diverse teams. HR processes : HR organisation, recruitment, performance management, staff development. How to lead: leadership, management & delegation. Managing team safety and security.

5) Managing Programmes & Projects

Objectives/Learning outcomes: To enable participants to choose and apply appropriate tools to manage all stages of the project cycle in humanitarian contexts.

Contents: Programme Cycle Management (PCM):

- Assessment & analysis
- Planning & implementation
- Monitoring & evaluation

Cross-cutting issues in PCM (participation, targeting...) Quality & Accountability in programme management.

6) Managing Finance & Funding

Objectives/Learning outcomes: To provide participants with the critical skills and confidence required to raise funds for humanitarian programmes, and to manage financial resources accountably.

Contents: Donors & donor strategies. Quality & Accountability in finance management. Budgeting & proposal writing. Funding strategies & opportunities. Key principles & concepts of financial management. Practical aspects of financial management.

7) Training of Trainers for Capacity Building in the Sector

Objectives/Learning outcomes: To provide participants with the appropriate methods & tools to develop, facilitate, monitor & evaluate capacity building activities.

Contents: Designing & implementing training activities.

8) Field Exercise

Objectives/Learning outcomes : Develop, through a field scenario-based exercise, operational capacity and autonomy of the trainees.

Contents : Within an operational framework, students will have to implement capabilities developed during the training period. The exercise is based on 5 days role play scenario. Students are placed in the position of aid actors in a context of humanitarian/emergency intervention. They have to implement several programs in the field on behalf of different NGOs. They operate in a complex emergency context where multiple players are involved.

IN ESC GRENOBLE

NB : For the ESC Students it is possible to follow “English track programme” described bellow or to follow a second semester in an English spoken abroad university.
For the other students, they must follow the “English track programme”.

1) Advanced Decision Techniques

Objectives/Learning outcomes: Good knowledge of quantitative tools for decision-making.

Contents: This course presents the main quantitative modelling and simulation tools to help in decision-making.

2) Strategy, Innovation and Entrepreneurship

This course focuses on the strategic choices: the decisions that shape the future of an organization. This course will address first the strategic choices that the manager must operate in an entrepreneurship environment (opportunity, business model design), then different options for development and growth patterns (growth internal / external growth, mergers and acquisitions, alliances).

3) Corporate Governance

Objectives/Learning outcomes: At the end of the course, the students:

- will know how to position and use concepts and techniques in finance, accounting, management control and law learnt during the common core subjects in a more global framework of analysis,
- will have learnt the legislation covering corporate governance,
- will be aware of the present developments in practice and the principal discussions concerning corporate governance,
- will be able to establish a diagnosis on the quality of a company's corporate governance.

Contents: It is essential for every manager to understand who determines the objectives of corporations and of other organizations, how they are governed and how their managers are incentivized and monitored. The course covers the following themes: value creation, the legal rules and the practices of company management(remuneration, ethics, social responsibility, governance "codes"), the legal rights and the behaviour of shareholders, the impact of financial markets on governance (shareholders activism, takeovers, LBOs). In addition the students have the opportunity to apply the main concepts and techniques of finance, accounting and management control to the case of a listed company.

4) Geopolitics

Objectives/Learning outcomes: At the end of the course, students will be able to:

- acquire the basics of a geopolitical culture allowing them to develop a reading list for current geopolitical and economic affairs,
- understand the geopolitical conditions for undertaking business in certain emerging and/or risk-laden geopolitical situations.

Contents: The object of this course is to allow students to acquire knowledge about geopolitical and economic affairs in certain zones and emerging and risk-related countries in the world. During the course, the following themes will be covered:

- the globalisation of the economy and its players, notably national States, and international and non-governmental organisations,
- geopolitical and economic analysis of certain countries and zones: Brazil, Russia, China, the Mediterranean and Africa,
- the problems of Afghanistan and Pakistan will also be discussed,
- Europe will be studied through analysis of the different themes mentioned above.

5) Global Marketing and Strategy

Objectives/Learning outcomes : Students will be able to:

- critically analyse and propose well-justified solutions to key Global Marketing Strategy issues.
- develop a Strategic Marketing plan to go global.

Contents: This module takes a decision-making perspective to Marketing Strategy issues, specifically in the global context.

The course will cover:

- Globalization decision and process,
- International market selection,
- International marketing research,
- International market entry strategies and expansion,
- Standardization versus Adaptation of 4 Ps.

6) Leadership and Responsible Management

Objectives/Learning outcomes: At the end of this course, students will:

- understand the organizational and managerial specificities of contemporary organizations,
- know about recent developments in organizational thinking relating to institutional theory, power and politics, routines, and organizational cognition,
- be able to reflect on the specific challenges to leadership and corporate social responsibility in contemporary organizations.

Contents: This course addresses key issues for understanding and managing contemporary organizations. It seeks to move beyond simple managerialist views by integrating recent developments in organizational thinking with the dual challenges of organizational leadership and corporate social responsibility. Topics covered in this course include institutionalized environments, innovation and entrepreneurship, social movements, networks and social capital, power and politics in contemporary organizations, organizational routines and decision making, sense making and cognition in organizations, and organizational change. Each topic will be introduced through case studies alongside theoretical readings, and each of the course sessions will discuss the consequences of these topics for both leadership processes and corporate social responsibility.
The course will be demanding in terms of class preparation, contribution and after-class work, and hopefully rewarding in terms of generating novel insights into contemporary organizational and managerial challenges.

Applied Research Project

During the whole training period, the students, divided into sub-groups of 2-3 students, work on a problematic related a strong issue in the humanitarian and development sector. It is an applied research which leads to a written report in English and its presentation before a jury composed by the tutor and the partner if possible and relevant. This applied research is an integral part of the training programme and it is monitored by a tutor.
The month of December will be specifically dedicated to work on this project.
During the second semester, even if students are abroad, they have to organize themselves to work on this project.
The grade given on this work will be included in the final transcript.

OBJECTIVE

To work as a team during the whole training period to sort out a humanitarian and/or development management issue.

This project will require:

- To write a report in English (20,000 – 25,000 words) which may remain confidential; it is possible to write a summary for the organisation in a foreign language if required. Students have to submit the final report to the tutor 15 days before the oral presentation. The deadline for the oral presentation is mid-november 2014 (15 November 2014);
- To write a case study-based summary;
- To prepare the oral presentation to the jury in English.

STUDENTS’ PROFILES

Students involved in this applied research are from the MSc in Humanitarian Programme Management delivered by ESC Grenoble and Bioforce.

EXPECTED RESULTS

- A specific humanitarian and/or development management issue is defined.
- A bibliographical research is consolidated.
- Concrete proposals and outlooks are drawn up.
- A critical analysis is provided.
- Relevant recommendations are made.

The definition of the issue has to be validated by both Bioforce and ESC Grenoble. A specific deadline will be communicated by Bioforce.

Rigor in diagnostic, analysis and facts interpretations, as well as recommendations will be required.
This work aims to support organizations in their development and functioning. In this way, we expect students to be creative (while being realist) and to practice benchmarks. This research work is neither an operational mission nor a counseling one. The report presented is not an internship report.

EXEMPTION OF “GRAND MÉMOIRE” – FOR THE ESC STUDENTS

Usually, ESC Grenoble students have to write a “Grand mémoire” during their enrollment. As they already write a specific applied research report, they benefit from an exemption of this “Grand mémoire”.

Assignment

Students from the MSc in HPM have to realize an assignment, after their study period, during 20 weeks at least. The presentation before a jury must be done before the 15th of November 2014.
The aim of this assignment is to reinforce students’ autonomy and to further develop their skills as a humanitarian programme manager in the humanitarian and development sector.

Students are to submit to Bioforce assignment terms of reference in order to be validated. As a second step, the ESC Grenoble will give the final validation.

The ESC Grenoble is in charge of all administrative issues regarding the assignment.

The evaluation process for the assignment is the following:

- A written report including :
- a context (region, country, organisation, programme, …) presentation,
- a description and analysis of the objectives and results obtained,
- an analysis of the key challenges faced during the assignment,
- an analysis of the impact of the training period on their professional capacities as a humanitarian programme manager.

- An oral presentation before a jury.

The final mark will be a global mark including the written report and the oral presentation.

Assessment Process

ASSESSMENT PROCESS IN BIOFORCE

The assessment process includes the following exams:

- An individual written exam for the “Managing people and organizations” module. This exam may consist of theoretical questions, exercises or case study linked with the module’s learning outcomes. The student has to obtain a minimum of 10 out of 20 to successfully complete the module.
- An individual written exam for the “Managing programmes and projects” module. This exam may consist of theoretical questions, exercises or case study linked with the module’s learning outcomes. The student has to obtain a minimum of 10 out of 20 to successfully complete the module.
- An individual written exam for the “Managing finance and funding” module. This exam may consist of theoretical questions, exercises or case study linked with the module’s learning outcomes. The student has to obtain a minimum of 10 out of 20 to successfully complete the module.

ASSESSMENT PROCESS IN GRENOBLE ECOLE DE MANAGEMENT

It is a two-stage process:

- For each module, a continuous assessment is managed by a Grenoble Ecole de Management’s permanent professor.
- For some modules, an exam is organized.

To be successfully completed, the student has to obtain a minimum of 10 out of 20. Each module’s responsible define the share of continuous assessment and exam.

CONDITIONS OF GRADUATION

The diploma is delivered to the students:

- Having obtained a minimum of 10 out of 20 to all exams;
- Having produced and supported the presentation of a report demonstrating analysis and synthesis skills.

Admission

To participate to the MSc in Humanitarian Programme Management, the prerequisites are the following:

- Master 1 level or Bachelor’s degree (four years of higher education after baccalauréat) for applicants justifying at least 1 year of professional experience as a project coordinator, administrator or logistician in international solidarity
- By special dispensation, a L3 (licence) level or Bachelor’s degree (three years of higher education after baccalauréat) for applicants justifying an outstanding work experience (more than one year).
- have an English language proficiency level of B2 (according to European language levels - Self Assessment Grid).
- Have a profesional project in programme management (Programme coordinator, Logistics coordinator…)

Please note that these prerequisites provide a base for any validation of the application form. The final decision lies with the Coordinators of the training programme.”

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The philosophy of the Building Information Management course reflects the increasingly digital, multi-disciplinary and integrated nature of project delivery, influenced by the demand from governments and clients for greater efficiencies on construction projects. Read more
The philosophy of the Building Information Management course reflects the increasingly digital, multi-disciplinary and integrated nature of project delivery, influenced by the demand from governments and clients for greater efficiencies on construction projects. These efficiencies can be gained from more accurate prototyping, simulation, costing, planning, design, production and operation, and will be an output of sound information management and data input to Building Information Modelling (BIM) software.

The unique nature of Westminster's Building Information Management MSc is the focus on 'Management', which will create professionals who are able to manage the whole construction process and the information associated with this. The course is accredited by the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) and the Chartered Institute of Building (CIOB).

The future construction professional requires knowledge and understanding of building information management, as well as how an integrated project team will take a project from inception to completion. Collaborative working and co-ordinated information exchange will increase the efficiency of project delivery and asset performance, leading to better sustainability over the building lifecycle and a satisfied client. This building information management approach is a strategic view of integrated project delivery that encompasses both the demand side (client) and supply side (consultants, contractors and suppliers).

Course content

The Building Information Management MSc is mainly aimed at graduates who are already in construction-related employment and who aspire to senior positions in their field. The course aims to provide a challenging, stimulating and professionally relevant course of study which is directly related to the effective management of construction projects.

The course aims to offer learners flexible access to the core content, whilst still providing the discipline and structure of regular attendance at the University. This is achieved through the use of a 'blended learning' approach. The design of the part-time course recognises the significant challenges of combining postgraduate-level study with full-time professional employment.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of what you will study on this course.
Core modules
-BUILDING INFORMATION MANAGEMENT AND INTEGRATED PRACTICE
-CORPORATE MANAGEMENT
-CONSTRUCTION DISSERTATION OR WORK-RELATED PROJECT
-ECONOMICS OF THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY
-PROCUREMENT
-RISK MANAGEMENT FOR PROJECTS

Option modules
-BUILDING DESIGN MANAGEMENT
-CONSTRUCTION PROJECT PLANNING
-DEVELOPING EFFECTIVE PROJECT TEAMS

Professional accreditation

This course is accredited by the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors and the Chartered Institute of Building.

Associated careers

This course is aimed at graduates who are, or have been, in construction-related employment who aspire to senior positions in the construction industry.

Enhancing students' employability and industry connections is a key aim of the course. In 2013 Westminster ran Project Intermission, in partnership with industry mentors DMA Architects, Studio Klaschka and Gardiner & Theobald. Students from various built environment disciplines worked collaboratively on a 'real' project for a 'real' client, with input from industry practitioners, using cutting-edge Building Information Modelling (BIM) technologies. From this project, construction student Kevin Hernandez secured a work placement with AECOM. Project Intermission was also shortlisted for a CIOB International Innovation and Research Award 2013.

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The philosophy of the Building Information Management course reflects the increasingly digital, multi-disciplinary and integrated nature of project delivery, influenced by the demand from governments and clients for greater efficiencies on construction projects. Read more
The philosophy of the Building Information Management course reflects the increasingly digital, multi-disciplinary and integrated nature of project delivery, influenced by the demand from governments and clients for greater efficiencies on construction projects. These efficiencies can be gained from more accurate prototyping, simulation, costing, planning, design, production and operation, and will be an output of sound information management and data input to Building Information Modelling (BIM) software.

The unique nature of Westminster's Building Information Management courses is the focus on 'Management', which will create professionals who are able to manage the whole construction process and the information associated with this.

The future construction professional requires knowledge and understanding of building information management, as well as how an integrated project team will take a project from inception to completion. Collaborative working and co-ordinated information exchange will increase the efficiency of project delivery and asset performance, leading to better sustainability over the building lifecycle and a satisfied client. This building information management approach is a strategic view of integrated project delivery that encompasses both the demand side (client) and supply side (consultants, contractors and suppliers).

The Building Information Management Postgraduate Diploma is mainly aimed at graduates who are already in construction-related employment and who aspire to senior positions in their field. The course aims to provide a challenging, stimulating and professionally relevant course of study which is directly related to the effective management of construction projects.

The course aims to offer learners flexible access to the core content, whilst still providing the discipline and structure of regular attendance at the University. This is achieved through the use of a 'blended learning' approach.

Course content

The following modules are indicative of what you will study on this course.

You will take modules totalling 120 credits as follows:
-Building Information Management and Integrated Practice (40 Credits)
-Procurement (20 Credits)
-Work-based learning / Project Module (40 Credits)
-Plus one other option module from the Building Information Management MSc course (20 credits)

Associated careers

This course is aimed at graduates who are, or have been, in construction-related employment who aspire to senior positions in the construction industry.

Enhancing students' employability and industry connections is a key aim of the course. In 2013 Westminster ran Project Intermission, in partnership with industry mentors DMA Architects, Studio Klaschka and Gardiner & Theobald. Students from various built environment disciplines worked collaboratively on a 'real' project for a 'real' client, with input from industry practitioners, using cutting-edge Building Information Modelling (BIM) technologies. From this project, construction student Kevin Hernandez secured a work placement with AECOM. Project Intermission was also shortlisted for a CIOB International Innovation and Research Award 2013.

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The Master of Science in Capacity Development and Extension is a unique program in Canada that develops the core competencies of students for facilitating social and environmental change. Read more
The Master of Science in Capacity Development and Extension is a unique program in Canada that develops the core competencies of students for facilitating social and environmental change.

Our program focuses on processes of learning, advocacy, leadership, communication and capacity development for rural/remote and small communities in Canada and around the world. Our “students without borders” engage with society through service learning projects during their course work, and through applied research and a range of professional development activities.

Our graduates are innovators in the public and not-for-profit sectors. Many pursue doctoral studies and achieve important careers in community development, policymaking and academia.

Principles of Our Teaching and Learning

CDE is a learner-centered community which is grounded in practice-based theories. We value social justice through shared-decision making, open communication, respect for difference, and commitment to conflict management. We pursue creative and independent thought in our intellectual pursuits.

Examples of CDE Research

-Living at the Intersection: Exploring the Relationship between Youth Health and Wellbeing, Place, and After-School Programs in Small Urban Towns
-Stitching towards Empowerment: Exploring Empowerment of Women in an Embroidery Co-operative in Uganda. A Case Study of Tabiro Ladies’ Club
-Kahawa Yetu – Our Coffee: A need for better organizational capacity in Kenya’s coffee cooperatives. A case study of New Gatanga Coffee Cooperative
-Ethno-cultural vegetable retail analysis: Pricing structure and market information
-Impact of After-School Programs on Rural Youth: A Case Study of Fusion Youth Centre
-Micro-livestock for livelihoods: Meeting practical and strategic needs of women in Sunyani District, Ghana
-The use of stigma as a marker of otherness by RTLM in the Rwandan Genocide
-Campus/community radio in Canada: Linking listeners to broadcasters with Web 2.0 Technologies
-The potential of Agroforestry for Peace Building: The Case of Jonglei – South Sudan
-After the Tornado: An Exploration of Capacity and Vulnerability on Community Engagement in Goderich

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The production, reproduction and transformation of urban space via socially, economically, and environmentally just methods presents a complex challenge for professionals. Read more
The production, reproduction and transformation of urban space via socially, economically, and environmentally just methods presents a complex challenge for professionals. This MSc combines cultural, social, economic, political and spatial analysis to recalibrate the urban design project, presenting a holistic response in which informality and marginality are central features.

Degree information

The programme will equip students with a political economy understanding of space; a comprehension of the needs, abilities, aspirations and forms of resistance of urban dwellers; the ability to respond with strategically co-ordinated proposals to leverage local abilities to meet local needs; and an ability to critically engage with the practice of urban design and architecture in developmental processes – particularly in the Global South.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of three core modules (90 credits), two optional modules (30 credits) and a development and planning report (60 credits).

Core modules
-Transforming Local Areas: Urban Design for Development
-Participatory Process: Building for Development
-The BUDD Studio: Building and Urban Design Practice

Optional modules
-Critical Urbanism Studio I. Learning from Informality: Case studies and alternatives
-Critical Urbanism Studio II: Investigative Design Strategies for Contested Spaces
-Disaster Risk Reduction in Cities
-Post Disaster Recovery: Policies, Practices and Alternatives
-Housing Policy, Programme and Project Alternatives
-Housing as Urbanism: Housing Policy and the Search for Scale
-Adapting Cities to Climate Change in the Global South
-The Political Ecology of Environmental Change
-Sustainable Infrastructure and Services in Development
-Urban Water and Sanitation, Planning and Politics
-Social Policy and Citizenship
-Gender in Policy and Planning
-The City and its Relations: Context, Institutions and Actors in Urban Development Planning
-Urban Development Policy, Planning and Management: Strategic Action in Theory and Practice
-Transport Equity and Urban Mobility
-Industrialisation and Infrastructure
-Food and the City
-Urban and Peri-Urban Agriculture: Knowledge Systems in the Global South
-NGOs and Social Transformation

Please note, the availability of some modules may be dependent on student numbers.

Dissertation/report
All MSc students submit a 10,000-word report on a topic related to the main themes of the programme. The topic can be chosen to enhance career development or for its inherent interest.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of weekly lectures, seminar presentations, group exercises and workshops. The BUDD studio includes a fieldwork project in an urban reality of the global south, developed in partnership with local organisations, networks of communities, slum dweller federations, universities and governments alike. Students are encouraged to explore different tools, concepts and ideas throughout the programme and test these during the field project. Assessment is through coursework, design work, written examinations and the 10,000-word report.

Careers

The programme enables graduates to work in NGOs and local government – facilitating community organisations and households to improve their living conditions. Graduate destinations range from UK-based organisations in the public, private and community sectors, to governmental, inter-governmental and non-governmental organisations, which operate in a development capacity in the South. Recent graduates have also been employed by international NGOs and aid and development agencies and architectural and design practices. Some graduates return to their home countries and engage in urban design and architecture practice, teaching, or research of urban development there; others have successfully sought employment away from their own countries.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Architectural Assistant, Foster + Partners
-Architectural Designer, Thinking Development
-Research Assistant/PhD in Development Planning, UCL
-Urban Designer/Visual Designer, Nanjing Yangtze River Urban Architectural Design Co. Ltd
-Project Manager, Home Office

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Bartlett is the UK's largest multidisciplinary faculty of the built environment, bringing together dozens of scientific and professional specialisms required to research, understand, design, construct and operate the buildings and urban environments of the future.

The Development Planning Unit is an international centre concerned with promoting sustainable forms of development, understanding rapid urbanisation and encouraging innovation in the policy, planning and management responses to the economic, social and environmental development of cities and regions, especially in Asia, Africa and Latin America. Its programmes are supported by international agencies as well as by national and provincial governments.

The Building and Urban Design in Development (BUDD) programme in particular reflects on the necessity of design practices to contribute to changing the mainstream paradigm of working with the urban poor, with communities and the city itself.

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The last three decades have seen a substantial rise in the number and frequency of disasters. Global warming, together with its associated extreme weather events make it likely to see this trend continue. Read more
The last three decades have seen a substantial rise in the number and frequency of disasters. Global warming, together with its associated extreme weather events make it likely to see this trend continue.

It is becoming increasingly important to foster resilience and a capacity to withstand disaster events, as a part of reducing and managing risk within a broader context of sustainable development.

The course aims to provide students with the research skills, knowledge and management expertise to deal with future crises, emergencies and disasters in the developed and developing world.

WHY CHOOSE THIS COURSE?

Courses in disaster management have been offered at Coventry University for over ten years.
-Provides an understanding of theory and practice and their application within local, national and international contexts
-Designed to give students the knowledge and skills necessary for successful disaster intervention in the UK, and elsewhere across the globe
-Emphasis on academic content and on application of theory and principles
-Uses case studies to ensure that applied and theoretical knowledge complement each other
-Appropriate for professionals who wish to further their careers in the areas of disaster management, risk assessment, community development, humanitarian assistance and capacity building
-Staff teaching on the course have a wide range of practice based and research skills and form a cohesive multi-disciplinary team with a strong commitment to advancing disaster management research and practice

WHAT WILL I LEARN?

The course covers a range of subject areas, such as:
-Disaster risk reduction and development
-Humanitarian theory and practice in disasters
-Communities - approaches to resilience and engagement
-Risk, Crisis, and continuity management
-Management of natural and environmental hazards
-Technology for disaster and emergency management
-Research design and methods
-Dissertation

HOW WILL THIS COURSE ENHANCE MY CAREER PROSPECTS?

Qualified disaster professionals are in high demand. Our part-time students are often sponsored by their employers and our graduates are much sought after by a range of organisations, including, governments, NGOs and private sector organisations.

The Programme’s goal is to enhance graduates’ employability by giving students the knowledge and skills necessary to critically evaluate and apply key elements of disaster mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery, including the ability to conduct assessments of hazards, risks, vulnerability and capacity. Also, through providing students with an understanding of approaches that may be used internationally to reduce and manage risk, the Programme aims to prepare students for employment in a wide range of careers focused on disaster intervention.

GLOBAL LEADERS PROGRAMME

To prepare students for the challenges of the global employment market and to strengthen and develop their broader personal and professional skills Coventry University has developed a unique Global Leaders Programme.

The objectives of the programme, in which postgraduate and eligible undergraduate students can participate, is to provide practical career workshops and enable participants to experience different business cultures.

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This online course reviews recent developments in the field of psychosocial programming in humanitarian contexts and examines the evidence-base for effective, quality programming. Read more

Psychosocial Interventions for Displaced Populations by Distance Learning - Short Course

This online course reviews recent developments in the field of psychosocial programming in humanitarian contexts and examines the evidence-base for effective, quality programming. It is suitable for professional development both for those wishing to explore this rapidly developing area of humanitarian response and for those with significant experience in the field who wish to consolidate their understanding of effective practice.

The material builds upon the substantial research, field experience and networks of the two course facilitators, Professor Alastair Ager and Dr Rebecca Horn, to create a lively, interactive learning approach that draws upon the diverse backgrounds and perspectives of our global participants.

Participants registered on the course will work through ten units of material – featuring readings, narrated PowerPoints, videos etc. - over a six week period. A discussion board provides a context for interaction between participants as well as with course facilitators. Those wishing to gain academic credit for study will then complete a written assignment.

Course Dates: 27 February to 07 April 2017

The content of the module will include:

1: The Developing Field of Mental Health and Psychosocial Support (MHPSS)
2: The MHPSS Guidelines
3: Current Policy and Practice Developments:
4: Approaches to Psychosocial Support: Child Friendly Spaces
5: Approaches to Psychosocial Support: Gender, Conflict and Displacement
6: Approaches to Psychosocial Support: Community-Based Approaches
7: Approaches to Psychosocial Support: Mainstreaming into Other Sectors
8: Approaches to Psychosocial Support: Humanitarian Staff Care
9: Design, Monitoring and Evaluation of Psychosocial Programming
10: Capacity Building for Psychosocial Support

All units involve discussion of principles and frameworks, evidence-base and emerging best practice.

Credit Rating: 15 SCOTCAT/5 ECTS

Participants of the professional development courses will receive a certificate of attendance from the Institute.

However, participants wishing to gain an award may register for a post graduate certificate. The modules are then taken for credit on a part-time basis each year. A PG Cert requires 60 credits and a post graduate diploma requires 120 credits. If you do a dissertation in addition to the short courses, you will gain 180 credits.

If you register for an award, you can have up to 4 years for a PG Cert, 5 years for a PG Dip and 7 years for a MSc to complete in part-time mode.

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The School of Law at the University of Nottingham is proud of its human rights programme. Our world class team exposes students to the most exciting and important ideas and developments in the field. Read more
The School of Law at the University of Nottingham is proud of its human rights programme. Our world class team exposes students to the most exciting and important ideas and developments in the field. All of the senior human rights teaching staff have international reputations; they have also amassed second-to-none experience of human rights policy making and practice in the framework of such organisations as the United Nations and the Council of Europe.

The modules at the heart of the programme provide a thorough grounding in international human rights law. Many of the more specialised topics are cutting edge and innovative, such as, for instance,”Mental Disability and International Human Rights” and “Rights, Human and Other Animals”. One module, “International Human Rights Field Operations: Law in Practice”, is the only course of its kind in the world.

The learning experience is greatly enhanced by the wide international background of the student body, bringing together talented and committed people from across the globe, many of whom have considerable experience of human rights work. We also try to assist students with internships and other work to gain experience of human rights in practice. Many of our students, after completion of their degree, obtain jobs with the United Nations or other international organisations, with governments or non-governmental organisations, or otherwise in the field of human rights.

The learning environment at Nottingham is greatly enhanced by the exciting programme of guest lectures, delivered by distinguished scholars and practitioners. We regularly host groundbreaking conferences and other events that contribute to the development and the application of the international legal standards.

The University of Nottingham Human Rights Law Centre (within the School of Law) is one of the world’s best known and respected academic human rights institutions. It carries out its work by means of research, training, publications and capacity building. It collaborates with governments, intergovernmental organizations, academics, students and civil society, and has implemented programmes in Europe, Africa, Asia and the Middle East. The Centre offers numerous services for LLM students, including an annual international student’s conference, a human rights cinema series, a student’s law journal, internship bursaries and research assistance opportunities

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Rapid technological and informational changes, an unprecedented drive towards globalisation of the world economy and the rapid expansion of world trade are among some of the changes affecting economic development today. Read more

About the MSc programme

Rapid technological and informational changes, an unprecedented drive towards globalisation of the world economy and the rapid expansion of world trade are among some of the changes affecting economic development today. In this context, local and regional economies increasingly need new responses and demand specialist skills to exploit the opportunities these changes offer. The MSc Local Economic Development, accredited by the Institute for Economic Development (IED), prepares students to meet these challenges.

You will focus on the variety of ways in which local and regional agencies can work with the private sector in order to stimulate local economies. You will also develop an understanding of the local, national and international trends in business organisation and a knowledge of the variety of local agents involved. The programme emphasises management issues of local capacity building, attracting investment, network building, infrastructure, human resources, and focuses as well on the rationale and impact of regional and local development policies and on the role of institutions.

Graduate destinations

Previous graduates are mainly working in international organisations (UN system [including ILO, UNDP, FAO], World Bank, OECD, European Union, World Trade Conference), national and regional governments, international consultancy, non-governmental organisations (NGOs), research centres and top universities. Further information about what previous students are doing can be found on our website.

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The programme is vocationally relevant and academically rigorous and enjoys full accreditation from the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD) meaning that the programme meets the knowledge requirement of CIPD membership. Read more
The programme is vocationally relevant and academically rigorous and enjoys full accreditation from the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD) meaning that the programme meets the knowledge requirement of CIPD membership. Full CIPD membership requires further work experience to demonstrate practical competence. The York MSc in Human Resource Management is delivered by a team of specialist HR academics, supported by practitioners who work closely with the local CIPD branch. Teaching is delivered via a mix of lectures, seminars and practical workshops. The teaching faculty are subject experts in their respective fields and many have professional experience in HR management. Previous students have praised our staff for their professionalism, friendly and welcoming manner, and enthusiasm for their subject.

With the environment in which organisations operate becoming ever more turbulent, how to recruit, select, retain and develop employees is increasingly important as a source of sustainable competitive advantage. Graduates of the MSc in HRM will be equipped with the skills and the knowledge to prepare them for entering international roles within the contemporary HRM function and to be able to contribute towards the shaping of the HR strategy and its integration with broader business strategies. Graduates of this programme will understand how the contemporary HRM function contributes to a range of organisations and they will develop the business acumen to work within organisations, and across organisational and national boundaries whilst responding to the interests and needs of internal and external stakeholders. Graduates will appreciate the pertinence of undertaking the HR role in a manner that drives sustainable organisational performance, whilst respecting the needs and wellbeing of diverse groups of workers. The MSc HRM seeks to enable graduates to respond decisively to business demands with relevant and evidence based HR solutions.

Teaching takes place in modern purpose-built facilities on the University of York's Heslington East campus. The campus offers a safe and secure location in which to live and study, two miles from the centre of the historic and beautiful walled city of York. York is well-positioned on the national rail network and the UK's major cities - and airline hubs - are within easy reach; London is just 2 hours away, Manchester can be reached in under 1.5 hours and Edinburgh is 2.5 hours north.

Course Structure

Term 1
-Human Resource Management in Context (20 credits)
-The Changing Nature of Work (20 credits)
-Skills for Business Leadership (10 credits)

Term 2
-Organisational Capacity Building (20 credits)
-Global Perspectives on HRM and Employment Relations (20 credits)
-Human Resource Management and Sustainability (20 credits)

Term 3 and Summer
-Research Skills for Human Resource Management (10 credits)
-Dissertation for Human Resource Management (60 credits)

Note: these modules are subject to change - the University reserves the right to change the modules on offer.

Where you'll go from here

York Masters students have been successful in developing careers in a range of organisations in many parts of the world. Common destinations on leaving are:
-Computing
-Education (Further and Higher)
-Finance and Banking
-Government - Departments and Civil Service
-Government - Local and National
-HR, Recruitment and Professional Training
-Libraries, Museums and Information Services
-Manufacturing - Food and Beverages
-Oil and Mining
-Research
-Retail - Supermarkets and Food
-Retail - Wholesale
-Telecommunications

A small number of students each year are keen to continue their studies, enrolling on specialists masters programmes elsewhere in the UK or moving on to The York Management School’s Doctoral programme.

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This exciting MSc programme focuses on leadership, change management, evidence-based service innovation and delivery all key to the delivery of high quality health care. Read more
This exciting MSc programme focuses on leadership, change management, evidence-based service innovation and delivery all key to the delivery of high quality health care. The programme is intended for experienced, qualified health care professionals who may work in and across a range of health care settings and in a variety of clinical, managerial and leadership roles.

The course aims to:

- Develop leadership knowledge and skills which can be applied to the delivery of a quality, evidence-based service linked to service user, staff and organisational outcomes
- Develop transformational leaders capable of improving and innovating health and social care delivery in a range of settings
- Develop a critical awareness of self in the leadership of service delivery and innovation
- Enhance critical awareness and reflection on the interfaces between policy, research, commissioning, service and practice
- Enable you to contribute to the advancement of your practice and the service you deliver by your professional development and life-long approach to learning

You have the option to exit after Year 1 with a PgCert Leadership Studies in Health Care and to exit after Year 2 with a PgDip Leadership Studies in Health Care. There is also the opportunity to undertake one of two optional modules from the Masters in Public Administration through the School of Business.

The course is delivered one day per week, in Year 1 you will attend University on Mondays and in Year 2 you will attend on Wednesdays.

See the website http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/courses/course-finder/leadership-service-improvement

Modules

Year 1 (3 core modules, 20 credits each)
Semester 1:
- Research in health and social care
- Strategic leadership in health care

Semester 2:
- Innovation for excellence leading service improvement

Year 2 (1 core and 2 optional modules, 20 credits each)
Core module:
- Delivering an evidence-based service

Optional modules (1 module from group A, 1 module from group B):
- Mentorship and coaching for leadership (group A)
- Leading in patient and public engagement (group A)
- Issues in knowledge construction (group B)
- Professional development through contract learning (group B)
- Equality and diversity in the workforce (group B)
- Commissioning and procurement in the health and social services (group B)

Year 3:
- Dissertation (60 credits)

Employability

With a range of flexible pathways available, our courses and modules are designed to enhance career opportunities by equipping health care professionals with the knowledge and skills to manage change, lead improvement initiatives and become an effective leader.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies if needed, including:

- direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
- Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
- mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

Professional links

The School of Health and Social Care delivers postgraduate education programmes and applied research linked to practice and workforce innovation and research capacity building. The work undertaken by staff and students is recognised both nationally and internationally.

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Effective information management is key to the success of any organisation. The MBA Information Management develops knowledgeable and capable executives who will become managers in the IT / computing industry, or in companies in other sectors. Read more
Effective information management is key to the success of any organisation. The MBA Information Management develops knowledgeable and capable executives who will become managers in the IT / computing industry, or in companies in other sectors. The aim of the programme is to provide graduates with a range of management knowledge and skills, together with a thorough foundation in information management, information technology, and its commercial applications. The programme includes topical case studies, and reflects contemporary developments within the sector. The course is suitable for graduates in a wide range of disciplines, including Engineering, Finance, Social Sciences and other subjects.

Compulsory Modules:

Organisations and People: This module examines key issues arising from contemporary research in organisational behaviour (OB) and human resource management (HRM). It provides an integrated analysis of management, organisations and people, developing the conceptual, strategic and practical skills necessary for managers in complex, global organisational contexts. Specific topics include:

The nature of organisations
Organisation structures: strategy, design and function, job design
Organisation cultures: values, ethics, norms of behaviour
Theories and models of management: classical and contemporary
Individual differences: perception, learning, motivation, equality and diversity
Groups and teams in the organisation
Managing relationships: power, conflict, communication, engagement
Managers as leaders, people developers, coaches
Managing job satisfaction and performance

International Strategic Management: This module analyses strategic decision-making within business. You will develop a critical understanding of the strategic processes of business management, the interconnections with the functional domains of marketing, human resource management and corporate finance, and the management of knowledge systems. Specific topics include:

Concepts of strategic management applicable to business
Prescriptive and emergent strategies
Strategy implementation through capacity building and resource allocation
Managing, monitoring and reviewing strategic change
Organisational designs for strategic advantage
Human resources strategy, marketing and corporate financial strategy
Organisational learning and knowledge management

Management Research: This module analyses the philosophical basis for research in the management sciences, and examines a number of key methodological issues and approaches. Research designs for both quantitative and qualitative research methodologies are developed, including interviews, case studies, focus groups, surveys and experiments. Specific topics include:

Research methodologies and philosophy: positivism and interpretivism
Qualitative research methods and the search for meaning
Selecting a research strategy and design
Data gathering, documentary records, triangulation and mixed methods
Content analysis, conversation analysis, discourse analysis, grounded theory
Quantitative research design and methodologies
Univariate and multivariate analysis, factor, cluster and discriminant analysis

Web Technologies: This module provides an understanding of the basic technologies and structures for developing web applications, including internet resource creation, search techniques and programming languages for creating web content. You will create and use multimedia content in web applications, and gain familiarity with technologies for creating secure web applications. Specific topics include:

Internet concepts; networks; ISO 7 layer model; basic network architecture; routing; domain names; email; ftp; telnet; HTTP
WWW concepts; Internet resources; URI, and URI resolution, URL, URN; relation to XML namespaces; search engines; search algorithms; search engine optimisation
JavaScript; PHP; CSS; programming tools and environments
Multimedia; WWW support for multimedia; file compression
Internet Security; Cryptography; standards for the Internet; public key systems; signatures; authentication; trust management; electronic cash; security issues; firewalls
Web programming; HTML; XML; form input; CGI scripting; Perl programming

Finance for Managers: This module is designed for those who aim to achieve a basic understanding of financial management and control, and who require an understanding of finance in order to manage an organisation effectively. Financial planning and control are central themes, as well as the appraisal techniques of investment projects. Specific topics include:

Principles underlying the preparation of accounting information
Recording business transactions
Preparation and analysis of financial statements
Preparation of budgets, financial planning and control
Costing methods, uses and interpretation of cost data
Investment appraisal techniques

Databases: This module shows how to design a database and intelligently query a database using SQL; and provides an introductory level of understanding in database systems. A mini project is carried out towards the end of the module. This project allows you to complete the entire development process, from informal user requirements, to ER/EER modelling, transformation into relations, normalisation, and finally to the SQL commands to create and query the database. Specific topics include:

Characteristics of a relational database
ER/EER modelling of simple applications
Relational model and relational algebra
Transformation of an ER/EER model into a relational database
Normalisation techniques
Uses of SQL language to create and query a database

Technologies for Internet Systems: This module introduces technologies and tools for Internet Systems and e-commerce systems. Technologies and structures for developing web applications are examined. Technical issues for implementing an e-system, and commonly-available technology components, are covered. You will implement a practical web based e-commerce system using relevant technologies, taking into account current market implementation. Specific topics include:

e-commerce ideas and concepts
Internet concepts; networks; basic network architecture; routing; domain names; email; telnet; HTTP
Architectures and technologies, e-payment, e-commerce software and hardware, e-security, auctions
Design and implementation: HTML, XML, CSS, JavaScript, DOM, SVG
Research awareness: agent-based e-commerce; web services; grid computing; virtual organisations

Information Systems: This module examines the major types and components of Information Systems, their functions, benefits and limitations. The theoretical underpinnings of Information Systems are analysed. You will study the main business and personal uses of Information Systems, and how such systems are developed, procured and deployed. Specific topics include:

Understanding the nature of organisations and the people within them, and their use of information for strategic business purposes
The influence of human and organisational factors on the successful introduction of information systems
Methods and techniques involved in project and programme management
The importance of business processes and techniques for process modelling

Part 2:

For MBA Information Management, you MUST:

Complete two of the following Applied Business Projects: Business Planning; e-Business and Chain Value; Human Resource Management; International Business; Operations Management; Investment and Private Banking.
Write a Computing project, Software Hut. Software Hut is a project in which students (in groups) analyse, design and implement a software product for an organisation.

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The course has been designed to produce knowledgeable and skilled public health practitioners who are able to work with various client groups across different settings within the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) Professional Code of Conduct (2008). Read more
The course has been designed to produce knowledgeable and skilled public health practitioners who are able to work with various client groups across different settings within the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) Professional Code of Conduct (2008). This knowledge and skill development will be reflected in your ability to demonstrate achievement of the NMC Standards of proficiency for Specialist Community Public Health Nursing (2004). Ten key areas of public health practice and domains require a practitioner to search for health needs; stimulate an awareness of health needs; influence policies affecting health and facilitate health enhancing activities in different public health settings.

The course embraces a family/child/workplace centred public health role with individuals, families and populations, focusing on improving health and tackling health inequalities. The approach requires you to work within a dynamic socio-cultural and service provision context across traditional boundaries, networking and developing services in conjunction with service users, other professionals and voluntary workers. This involves the capacity to lead, assess, work collaboratively, evaluate public health provision, and accept responsibility and accountability for the safe, effective and efficient management of that provision.

Course detail

This course is for people who wish to register on the third part of the NMC register as a Specialist Community Public Health Nurse: Health Visitor, School Nurse, or Occupational Health Nurse. The course requires effective registration on Part 1 (Nursing) or Part 2 (Midwifery) of the NMC register.

The aim of the programme is to prepare specialist community public health nursing (SCPHN) students with the knowledge, skills and critical abilities to provide leadership and innovation in community health. The wider goals are to improve population health, in particular the health of children and families, and to prevent illness. SCPHNs graduating from the programme will have the community capacity building skills to support the development of better, more accessible community based health and well being services.

Modules

Level 3 Module titles include:
• Principles of Evidence Based Public Health
• Public Health and Health Promotion
• Professional Perspectives in Specialist Community Public Health Nursing
• Leadership and Enterprise
• V100 Prescribing Practice
• Promoting the Health of School-aged Children in the Community
• Workplace, Health and Wellbeing

Optional modules include:
• Working Therapeutically with Families
• Sexual Health
• Mental Health and Well-being of Children and Young People
• Issues in Child Protection
• Health and Wellbeing in the Workplace

Additional online modules available include:
• Using Health Research
• Building Community Capacity

Format

A range of teaching and learning methods are used including formal lectures, seminars, enquiry-based and on-line learning, project work, individual self-directed study and assignment preparation. Students are encouraged to draw on their own and colleagues' existing experience in the learning process.

Assessment

The assessment is a 2000 word reflective assignment based on a learning contract negotiated to individual needs. Practice will be undertaken to meet the NMC requirements for returning to practice within an appropriate supervised practice area in local NHS Trust. The practice placement is organised by the returnees, supported by UWE.

Modules are assessed by a range of methods including case studies, oral presentations, professional practice portfolios and written examinations.

How to apply

Information on applications can be found at the following link: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/study/applyingtouwebristol/postgraduateapplications.aspx

Funding

- New Postgraduate Master's loans for 2016/17 academic year –

The government are introducing a master’s loan scheme, whereby master’s students under 60 can access a loan of up to £10,000 as a contribution towards the cost of their study. This is part of the government’s long-term commitment to enhance support for postgraduate study.

Scholarships and other sources of funding are also available.

More information can be found here: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/students/feesandfunding/fundingandscholarships/postgraduatefunding.aspx

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The role of the corporate environmental manager is becoming increasingly complex and strategic. Corporate social and environmental responsibility is becoming prominent in consumer demand and a pre-requisite for tender eligibility. Read more
The role of the corporate environmental manager is becoming increasingly complex and strategic. Corporate social and environmental responsibility is becoming prominent in consumer demand and a pre-requisite for tender eligibility. This necessitates a more sophisticated environmental manager who can interpret legislative and audit requirements and deliver them in a manner conducive to continued economic development, whilst recognising the market trends. The aim of this programme is to develop skills in the delivery of economic activities related to environment, green technology and sustainability. The programme includes highly topical case studies from across these sectors reflecting changing strategies and alternative approaches. The course is suitable for graduates in a wide range of disciplines, including Environment, Engineering, Finance, Social Sciences and other subjects.
Testimonials

Compulsory Modules:

Organisations and People: This module examines key issues arising from contemporary research in organisational behaviour (OB) and human resource management (HRM). It provides an integrated analysis of management, organisations and people, developing the conceptual, strategic and practical skills necessary for managers in complex, global organisational contexts. Specific topics include:

The nature of organisations
Organisation structures: strategy, design and function, job design
Organisation cultures: values, ethics, norms of behaviour
Theories and models of management: classical and contemporary
Individual differences: perception, learning, motivation, equality and diversity
Groups and teams in the organisation
Managing relationships: power, conflict, communication, engagement
Managers as leaders, people developers, coaches
Managing job satisfaction and performance

International Strategic Management: This module analyses strategic decision-making within business. You will develop a critical understanding of the strategic processes of business management, the interconnections with the functional domains of marketing, human resource management and corporate finance, and the management of knowledge systems. Specific topics include:

Concepts of strategic management applicable to business
Prescriptive and emergent strategies
Strategy implementation through capacity building and resource allocation
Managing, monitoring and reviewing strategic change
Organisational designs for strategic advantage
Human resources strategy, marketing and corporate financial strategy
Organisational learning and knowledge management

Management Research: This module analyses the philosophical basis for research in the management sciences, and examines a number of key methodological issues and approaches. Research designs for both quantitative and qualitative research methodologies are developed, including interviews, case studies, focus groups, surveys and experiments. Specific topics include:

Research methodologies and philosophy: positivism and interpretivism
Qualitative research methods and the search for meaning
Selecting a research strategy and design
Data gathering, documentary records, triangulation and mixed methods
Content analysis, conversation analysis, discourse analysis, grounded theory
Quantitative research design and methodologies
Univariate and multivariate analysis, factor, cluster and discriminant analysis

Business Planning for the Green Economy: This module explores the process of establishing a venture from idea generation to the completion of a business plan which incorporates environmental planning and management. It takes the student through the actual process of developing a business plan and its different components, the market and sustainability. Specific topics include:

Entrepreneurship
The entrepreneurial role in relation to the initiation and development of a sustainable business
Key environmental factors of business development
The differences between the entrepreneur and the environmental manager, and the problems faced by small growth firms in sustainable growth.
The importance and complexity of entrepreneurship and environmentalism within a large firm environment

Finance for Managers: This module is designed for those who aim to achieve a basic understanding of financial management and control, and who require an understanding of finance in order to manage an organisation effectively. Financial planning and control are central themes, as well as the appraisal techniques of investment projects. Specific topics include:

Principles underlying the preparation of accounting information
Recording business transactions
Preparation and analysis of financial statements
Preparation of budgets, financial planning and control
Costing methods, uses and interpretation of cost data
Investment appraisal techniques

Strategic Environmental Management: This module is designed to provide a an understanding of the principles of sustainable development, environmental legislation, environmental auditing and assesment, and green technological development. Specific topics include:

Sustainable development
Environmental legislation
Environmental auditing
Environmental assessment
Corporate social responsibility and socially responsible investment
Life cycle analysis

Green Technology: This module reviews the environmental consequences of economic activities, including energy generation, waste management, food and water supply, consumer goods. It then goes on to consider recent policy initiatives and drivers and examines key green technologies. Specific topics include:

Development and deployment of green technologies
Environment impacts of energy generation
Green technology policies and initiatives
Green technologies - commerce, ideas and concepts
Geographical Information Systems (GIS) for green technologies

Part 2:

For MBA Environmental Management, you must complete Part 2 by undertaking a relevant dissertation.

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