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Masters Degrees (Canterbury)

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Kent’s MA in Roman History and Archaeology is designed for students who wish to adopt a twin-tracked approach to the past by using both historical and archaeological evidence. Read more
Kent’s MA in Roman History and Archaeology is designed for students who wish to adopt a twin-tracked approach to the past by using both historical and archaeological evidence.

Roman civilisation produced one of the largest empires of the ancient world. The Roman Empire had one of the most advanced technologies of the ancient world, producing major architectural, cultural and artistic achievements. The extensive remnants left behind enable us to recreate and understand Roman culture thousands of years later.

Our Department of Classical & Archaeological Studies (http://www.kent.ac.uk/secl/classics/index.html) contains one of the largest concentrations of experts in Roman History and Archaeology with experts in Pompeii, Rome, Egypt, as well as in the study of artefacts and of ancient medicine. You spend your first term at our beautiful campus overlooking the Roman and Medieval city of Canterbury, just one hour from London. While in Canterbury, you gain training in research skills in both Roman History and in Archaeology.

The second term is based in Rome, at the campus of the American University of Rome (http://www.aur.edu), where you study the sites and museums of ancient Rome. All teaching is in English. The experience of staying in Rome and studying the city alters brings into focus new ideas and a new perspective of the ‘Eternal City’.

Each week is structured around a series of site visits, so that you gain an in-depth knowledge of the ancient city. In the final term, you complete your MA by writing a dissertation of up to 15,000 words on a research topic defined in collaboration with your supervisor. The programme can also be studied at Canterbury only.

This is an ideal programme for graduates of history, ancient history, classics or the wider humanities, wanting to gain practical experience in applying their expertise and benefit from the experience and confidence gained from living and studying overseas.

Course structure

During the first term at Canterbury you take two core modules. Your second term is in Rome and you take one core module and one optional module. Over the course of these two terms you discuss with the course director your ideas and plans for your 15,000-word dissertation. The writing of the dissertation takes place in the summer with completion in August.

Modules

Term 1 (Canterbury):
Compulsory modules:

CL900 - Research Skills in Ancient History
CL805 - Contemporary Archaeology: Theories, Methods and Issues

Term 2 (Rome):
Compulsory Module:

CL828 - Rome: The Imperial City

One option from:

Optional modules in Rome are taken through the American University in Rome and change each year. Past options have included:

Rome: Writing the city

This upper level Classics course will examine depictions of the city of Rome in classical literature. It will examine the fabric of the city and the idea of Rome as a symbol of civilization. The buildings and public spaces of Rome were the backdrop for performance, spectacle, ceremony and daily and these activities generated meaning and symbolism. For the Romans specific locations were connected to history, myth and collective memory and were protected by the genius loci. Amongst others, the following authors will be studied: Cicero, Livy, Lucan, Ovid, Propertius, Tacitus, Virgil. All texts will be studied in translation.

Etruscan Art and Archaeology

This is an upper level course studying the art and archaeology of the Etruscans from their emergence at the beginning of the first millennium BCE until their absorption by the Romans. The course will take full advantage of the rich museum collections of Etruscan material in Rome and will include a field trip to the sites of Cerveterii and Tarquinia. The course will look at the origins of the Etruscans, their art and material culture, their interactions with other groups and their eventual absorption by the Romans.

Global Heritage

This upper level seminar course examines global heritage concerns looking in particular at how the past conditions the present and influences identity. Lectures and seminars will be built around four topics: the role of international organizations, heritage and memory, heritage and economic development and contemporary issues in global heritage. Each topic unit will be completed by a seminar where students will present case studies that illustrate the issues raised.

Term 3: Dissertation

CL897 - Dissertation
CL805 - Contemporary Archaeology: Theories, Methods and Issues (30 credits)
CL828 - Rome-The Imperial City (30 credits)
CL829 - Rome Optional Module (30 credits)
CL900 - Research Skills in Ancient History - Understanding the City in Antiquit (30 credits)
CL897 - CL Dissertation (60 credits)

Assessment

The programme is assessed by coursework for each of the modules, an examination in Latin or ancient Greek, if these modules are taken, and by the dissertation.

This programme is also available at Canterbury only.
https://www.kent.ac.uk/secl/postgraduate/taught.html

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The Modern French Studies MA allows you to undertake postgraduate study in French literature, society and culture, from the 18th century to the present, and benefit from the complementary experience of living in Paris. Read more
The Modern French Studies MA allows you to undertake postgraduate study in French literature, society and culture, from the 18th century to the present, and benefit from the complementary experience of living in Paris.

MA students split their year between Canterbury and Paris. You spend the autumn term in Canterbury, where you choose two modules. You then spend the spring term in Paris, where you are based at our teaching and research centre in Montparnasse. During that term, you take modules taught by staff from the University of Kent and guest lecturers, thus ensuring consistent academic standards and assessment throughout the year.

French culture has always had a huge impact on the world; from politics to cinema, literature to fashion, and France remains a major influence in European and global culture. The MA in Modern French Studies offers you the opportunity to study a range of major writers and key themes in French literature, media and culture from the 18th century to the present day.

The programme is designed for students with a variety of interests, including literature, the visual arts, philosophy and aesthetics. It also reflects the research specialisms and publications of the members of Department of Modern Languages, with wider input from the School of European Culture and Languages (SECL).

Kent provides an ideal location in which to study French culture; our Canterbury campus is close to mainland Europe, with Paris only a couple of hours away by Eurostar. After a term at our Canterbury campus, you study at Kent’s Paris School of Arts and Culture to study modules with a particular focus on the city, gaining the experience of living within another European culture.

Visit the website: https://www.kent.ac.uk/secl/modern-languages/postgraduate/taught-french-and-comparative-literature-paris.html

Programme Aims

The programme aims to:

•provide the opportunity to obtain a postgraduate qualification (MA) in one year, and to allow, if required, a smooth transition to doctoral studies
•allow you to spend the first term in Canterbury, studying modules in modern French studies, and the second term in Paris, studying modules in French, European, English and American literatures
•attract and meet the needs of candidates who wish to gain in-depth an understanding of the textual and visual interconnections pertaining to modern French studies
•provide a cultural approach to the study of relations between the visual and the textual
•consider the manner in which literature and the visual arts intersect in French culture from the eighteenth century to the present
•provoke critical reflection on areas of modern French literary studies and theories of visual studies
•provide training in multidisciplinary research methods
•develop knowledge and understanding of relevant aspects of contemporary Paris and the cultural history of the city as reflected in modern French, European, English and American literatures and other artistic media
•introduce various methodological approaches
•provide teaching which is informed by current research and scholarship and which requires you to engage with aspects of work at the frontiers of knowledge
•provide a means of access to intellectual awareness and understanding
•provide opportunities for the development of personal, communication and research skills and other key skills appropriate for graduate employment both in industry and in the public sector
•develop critical, analytical, problem-solving and other transferable skills
•build on proficiencies in spoken and written French and spoken and written English.

Careers

A postgraduate degree in French studies is an extremely versatile qualification that can open the door to exciting career opportunities in many professions. Our graduates have gone on to work in the IT industry, academic administration, cultural management and to further postgraduate training and academic careers at UK and overseas universities.

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This Comparative Literature MA is based in both Canterbury and Paris to offer the study of literature beyond national and linguistic borders, enabling you to spend one term in each location. Read more
This Comparative Literature MA is based in both Canterbury and Paris to offer the study of literature beyond national and linguistic borders, enabling you to spend one term in each location.

After a term at our Canterbury campus, you move to Kent’s Paris centre to study modules with a specific focus on this city, allowing you to benefit from the experience of living and studying in another European culture. All classes in Paris are taught in English. The programme can also be studied at Canterbury only.

Comparative Literature involves the study of literature from two or more national and linguistic traditions, allowing students to gain an intercultural and transnational understanding of diverse cultural and literary practices. The MA programme explores three main areas: themes, genres, movements and major literary figures; the interactions and exchanges between national literary traditions; and the theory and practice of comparative literature. These complementary strands encourage comparative analysis in a variety of contexts, ranging from the study of national literatures to the exploration of different genres, periods, media and literary theory.

The programme is offered by the Department of Comparative Literature and benefits from staff expertise in a range of areas, including European modernism, postmodernism, postcolonial literature, literature and medicine, literature and sexuality, literature and psychoanalysis and literature and the visual arts. Our programme also draws on additional expertise in the School of European Culture and Languages particularly from colleagues in the departments of French, German, Hispanic Studies and Italian, as well as from colleagues in the School of English.

You begin by studying a choice of four modules across the Autumn and Spring terms, before writing a 12,000-word dissertation over the summer, supervised by an expert in the department.

This programme is for those wanting to pursue detailed literary and cultural studies and also wishing to benefit from the experience of living and studying overseas.

This programme enables you to study in Canterbury in the autumn term and in Paris in the spring term. The autumn term modules are the same as those for the standard MA in Comparative Literature. The spring term modules are taught by staff from the University of Kent and occasional guest lecturers, ensuring consistent academic standards and assessment throughout the year. These modules are designed to be specifically relevant to the experience of living and studying in Paris. You are encouraged to make full use of Paris’ cultural resources and to integrate these into your studies. University of Kent staff are resident in Paris during the spring term to ensure year-long continuity of academic guidance and pastoral support.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

CP810 - Comparative Literature in Theory and Practice (30 credits)
CP813 - Literature and Medicine (30 credits)
CP807 - Diaspora and Exile (30 credits)
FR803 - Paris and the European Enlightenment (30 credits)
FR820 - Paris: Reality and Representation (30 credits)
CP998 - Comparative Literature Dissertation (60 credits)

Teaching and Assessment

Assessment is by one 5,000-word essay for each module, and the dissertation.

This programme is also available at Canterbury only or full-time at Paris.
https://www.kent.ac.uk/secl/postgraduate/taught.html

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The MA in French and Comparative Literature offers an excellent environment for the postgraduate study of literature beyond national and linguistic borders with a particular focus on French culture, with the complementary experience of living in Paris for a term. Read more
The MA in French and Comparative Literature offers an excellent environment for the postgraduate study of literature beyond national and linguistic borders with a particular focus on French culture, with the complementary experience of living in Paris for a term.

Comparative Literature at Kent involves the study of literature from two or more European cultures, to gain an intercultural and transnational understanding of cultural practice. The MA in French and Comparative Literature introduces you to a wide range of theoretical perspectives, enriching your appreciation of the cultures, texts and critical practices examined in the programme’s various modules. You benefit from expert teaching from members of the Department of Modern Languages and the Department of Comparative Literature and thus participate in an interdisciplinary dialogue.

Kent provides an ideal location in which to study French culture; our Canterbury campus is close to mainland Europe, with Paris only a couple of hours away by Eurostar. After a term at our Canterbury campus, you study at Kent’s Paris School of Arts and Culture to study modules with a particular focus on the city, gaining the experience of living within another European culture.

After you have taken four modules across the autumn and spring terms, you undertake a 12,000 word dissertation over the summer with supervision from an expert within the department. The French and Comparative Literature MA can also be studied at Canterbury only.

This programme is ideal for modern languages graduates who wish to consolidate their knowledge in a wider context; English graduates wishing to diversify their interests; and graduates in other humanities subjects (history, philosophy, theology) who would like to apply their knowledge to literary and visual material, and those with the desire to live in Paris in an active and extended engagement with the culture.

In Canterbury, you choose two relevant 30-credit modules. You then spend the spring term in Paris, where your studies are based at our teaching and research centre in Montparnasse. During that term, you take two modules taught by staff from the University of Kent and occasional guest lecturers, thus ensuring consistent academic standards and assessment throughout the year.

The modules are designed to be specifically relevant to the experience of living and studying in the city. You are encouraged to make full use of Paris’ cultural resources and to integrate these into your studies. University of Kent staff are resident in Paris during the spring term to ensure year-long continuity of academic guidance and pastoral support.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

CP808 - Writing the Self: Autobiography in the Modern Period (30 credits)
FR866 - Literature and Theory (30 credits)
FR872 - Theories of Art in Modern French Thought (30 credits)
FR803 - Paris and the European Enlightenment (30 credits)
FR820 - Paris: Reality and Representation (30 credits)
FR998 - French Dissertation (60 credits)

Teaching and Assessment

Assessment is by one 5,000-word essay for each module and the dissertation.

This programme is also available at Canterbury only or full-time at Paris.
https://www.kent.ac.uk/secl/postgraduate/taught.html

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This unique MA is designed for students who wish to adopt a twin-tracked approach to the past by using both historical and archaeological evidence. Read more
This unique MA is designed for students who wish to adopt a twin-tracked approach to the past by using both historical and archaeological evidence. A key focus of the MA is on the cities of the Roman Empire, especially the capital, Rome. A term is spent in Rome, in which you study the monuments and artefacts of the ancient city at first hand, visiting relevant sites and museums, with options to study site conservation and museum presentation as well as the history and archaeology of Rome.

Roman civilisation produced one of the largest empires of the ancient world. The Roman Empire had one of the most advanced technologies of the ancient world, producing major architectural, cultural and artistic achievements. The extensive remnants left behind enable us to recreate and understand Roman culture thousands of years later.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/secl/classics/postgraduate/taught-roman-history-and-archaeology-rome.html

About the Department of Classical & Archaeological Studies

Our Department of Classical & Archaeological Studies contains one of the largest concentrations of experts in Roman History and Archaeology with experts in Pompeii, Rome, Egypt, as well as in the study of artefacts and of ancient medicine. You spend your first term at our beautiful campus overlooking the Roman and Medieval city of Canterbury, just one hour from London. While in Canterbury, you gain training in research skills in both Roman History and in Archaeology.

The second term is based in Rome, at the campus of the American University of Rome, where you study the sites and museums of ancient Rome. All teaching is in English. The experience of staying in Rome and studying the city brings into focus new ideas and a new perspective of the ‘Eternal City’.

Each week is structured around a series of site visits, so that you gain an in-depth knowledge of the ancient city. In the final term, you complete your MA by writing a dissertation of up to 15,000 words on a research topic defined in collaboration with your supervisor. The programme can also be studied at Canterbury only.

Course Structure

During the first term at Canterbury you take two core modules. Your second term is in Rome and you take one core module and one optional module. Over the course of these two terms you discuss with the course director your ideas and plans for your 15,000-word dissertation. The writing of the dissertation takes place in the summer with completion in August.

The programme is assessed by coursework for each of the modules, an examination in Latin or ancient Greek, if these modules are taken, and by the dissertation.

Careers

Our MA programmes include much scope for vocational training, skills acquisition and guided project work, often with use of our extensive facilities. These aspects of our programmes have been praised by external assessors in recent years.

Recent graduates have progressed to careers in a wide range of related professional and leadership areas, including national and local museums, teaching and senior roles with archaeological organisations (national government institutions, contracting units and trusts). A large proportion of completing Master’s students have progressed onto PhD study.

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This is an innovative and interdisciplinary MA programme, combining taught modules and a dissertation, which allows you to share your year between Canterbury and Paris. Read more
This is an innovative and interdisciplinary MA programme, combining taught modules and a dissertation, which allows you to share your year between Canterbury and Paris.

Designed with serious, ambitious writers in mind, our programme uses seminars, tutorials, workshops, and precise editing to enable you to take control of your own work and write exciting, contemporary material.

Following a similar path to our Creative Writing MA, this programme allows you to spend your first term at our Canterbury campus with full access to its excellent academic and recreational facilities before relocating to our Paris centre for the spring term.

During your studies in Paris, you are based at Columbia Global Center (known as Reid Hall) in a historic corner of Montparnasse. You choose from a range of Paris-focused modules which are taught in English. In your final term, you complete your MA by writing a 15,000-word dissertation on a research topic defined in collaboration with your academic supervisors.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/214/creative-writing-canterbury-and-paris

About the School of English

The School of English has a strong international reputation and global perspective, apparent both in the background of its staff and in the diversity of our teaching and research interests.

Our expertise ranges from the medieval to the postmodern, including British, American and Irish literature, postcolonial writing, 18th-century studies, Shakespeare, early modern literature and culture, Victorian studies, modern poetry, critical theory and cultural history. The international standing of the School ensures that we have a lively, confident research culture, sustained by a vibrant, ambitious intellectual community. We also count a number of distinguished creative writers among our staff, and we actively explore crossovers between critical and creative writing in all our areas of teaching and research.

The Research Excellence Framework 2014 has produced very strong results for the School of English at Kent. With 74% of our work graded as world-leading or internationally excellent, the School is ranked 10th out of 89 English departments in terms of Research Intensity (Times Higher Education). The School also received an outstanding assessment of the quality of its research environment and public impact work.

Course structure

You take either Fiction 1 in the first term and Paris: The Residency (or Fiction 2) in the second, or Poetry 1 in the first term and Paris: The Residency (or Fiction 2) in the second. In the first term, you may choose from any of the other creative writing modules on offer and in the second term, you choose from the Paris modules list. While in Paris, you are also encouraged to attend readings and talks, and to organise your own writing workshops.

For further information about the University of Kent, Paris, please see http://www.kent.ac.uk/paris/.

Modules

The above modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation.

Assessment

You take a total of four modules, for which you will produce approximately 8,000 words each (or an equivalent number of poems or translations). In addition, you write a creative dissertation of about 12,000 words.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide you with the opportunity to obtain a postgraduate qualification (MA) in one year, and to allow you, if required, a smooth transition to doctoral studies

- give you the breadth of experience of studying creative writing modules in Canterbury in the Autumn term, and then spending the Spring term in Paris writing ‘in residence’ while pursuing one other Kent at Paris module

- extend and deepen your understanding of your own writing practice through coursework and research

- enable you to develop an historical awareness of literary and creative writing traditions, particularly those that have been located in, or in some other way focussed on, Paris develop your independent critical thinking and judgement

- develop your independent creative thinking and practice

- develop your knowledge and understanding of relevant aspects of contemporary Paris and the literary history of the city with a view to you incorporating some of these aspects into your own creative and critical writing

- develop your understanding and critical appreciation of the expressive resources of language

- enable you to make connections across your various modules and transfer knowledge between modules

- provide you with teaching, workshops and other learning opportunities that are informed by current research and practice and that require you to engage with aspects of work and practice at the frontiers of knowledge.

Careers

Many career paths can benefit from the writing and analytical skills that you develop as a postgraduate student in the School of English. Our students have gone on to work in academia, journalism, broadcasting and media, publishing, writing and teaching; as well as more general areas such as banking, marketing analysis and project management.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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This is an innovative and interdisciplinary MA programme, combining taught modules and a dissertation, which allows you to share your year between Canterbury and Paris. Read more
This is an innovative and interdisciplinary MA programme, combining taught modules and a dissertation, which allows you to share your year between Canterbury and Paris.

The programme allows you to choose from the full range of our MA literature modules. The list of what’s on offer is regularly added to by academics keen to explore new areas of thinking with students and to draw you in to our established areas of research strength.

Following a similar path to our English and American Literature MA, the Paris option allows you to spend your first term at our Canterbury campus with full access to its excellent academic and recreational facilities. For the spring term you relocate to our Paris centre, studying in a historic corner of Montparnasse - close to the famous Latin Quarter, the Sorbonne University and the glorious Jardin du Luxembourg.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/223/english-and-american-literature-canterbury-and-paris

About the School of English

The School of English has a strong international reputation and global perspective, apparent both in the background of its staff and in the diversity of our teaching and research interests.

Our expertise ranges from the medieval to the postmodern, including British, American and Irish literature, postcolonial writing, 18th-century studies, Shakespeare, early modern literature and culture, Victorian studies, modern poetry, critical theory and cultural history. The international standing of the School ensures that we have a lively, confident research culture, sustained by a vibrant, ambitious intellectual community. We also count a number of distinguished creative writers among our staff, and we actively explore crossovers between critical and creative writing in all our areas of teaching and research.

The Research Excellence Framework 2014 has produced very strong results for the School of English at Kent. With 74% of our work graded as world-leading or internationally excellent, the School is ranked 10th out of 89 English departments in terms of Research Intensity (Times Higher Education). The School also received an outstanding assessment of the quality of its research environment and public impact work.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

EN818 - American Modernism 1900-1930 (Teaching Period I) (30 credits)
EN832 - Hacks, Dunces and Scribblers: Authorship and the Marketplace in the Eig (30 credits)
EN835 - Dickens, The Victorians and the Body (30 credits)
EN852 - Colonial and Postcolonial Discourses (30 credits)
FR866 - Literature and Theory (30 credits)
EN871 - Origins of Modern Poetry (30 credits)
FR820 - Paris: Reality and Representation (30 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is by a 5-6,000-word essay for each module and a 12,000 word dissertation.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- extend and deepen through coursework and research your understanding of a body of literatures in English, with special emphasis on modern and postcolonial literatures, and on literary and critical theory

- enable you to develop an historical awareness of literary traditions

- develop your independent critical thinking and judgement

- introduce you to bibliographic method and scholarship and to foster in you the research methods that facilitate advanced literary study

- provide a basis in knowledge and skills if you intend to teach English and American literature, especially in higher education

- develop your understanding and critical appreciation of the expressive resources of language

- offer opportunities for you to develop your potential for creative writing (where such a module is taken)

- offer scope for the study of literature within an interdisciplinary context, notably that provided by history

- develop your ability to argue a point of view with clarity and cogency, both orally and in written form

- develop your knowledge and understanding of relevant aspects of contemporary Paris and the cultural history of the city as reflected in modern European, English and American literatures and other artistic media.

Research areas

Research in the School of English comes roughly under the following areas. However, there is often a degree of overlap between groups, and individual staff have interests that range more widely.

Eighteenth Century
The particular interests of the Centre for Studies in the Long Eighteenth Century converge around gender, class, nation, travel and empire, and the relationship between print and material culture. Staff in the Centre pursue cutting-edge approaches to the field and share a commitment to interdisciplinary methodologies.

The Centre regularly hosts visiting speakers as part of the School of English research seminar programme, and hosts day symposia, workshops and international conferences.

Nineteenth Century
The 19th-century research group is organised around the successful MA in Dickens and Victorian Culture and the editorship of The Dickensian, the official publication outlet for new Dickens letters. Other staff research interests include literature and gender, journalism, representations of time and history, sublimity and Victorian Poetry.

American Literature
Research in north American literature is conducted partly through the Faculty-based Centre for American Studies, which also facilitates co-operation with modern US historians. Staff research interests include 20th-century American literature, especially poetry, Native American writing, modernism, and cultural history.

Creative Writing
The Centre for Creative Writing is the focus for most practice-based research in the School. Staff organise a thriving events series and run a research seminar for postgraduate students and staff to share ideas about fiction-writing. Established writers regularly come to read and discuss their work.

Medieval and Early Modern
The Faculty-based Canterbury Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies has a distinctive brand of interdisciplinarity, strong links with local archives and archaeological trusts, and provides a vibrant forum for investigating the relationships between literary and non-literary modes of writing in its weekly research seminar.

Modern Poetry
The Centre for Modern Poetry is a leading centre for research and publication in its field, and participates in both critical and creative research. Staff regularly host visiting speakers and writers, participate in national and international research networks, and organise graduate research seminars and public poetry readings.

Postcolonial
Established in 1994, the Centre for Colonial and Postcolonial Research has acquired an international reputation for excellence in research. It has an outstanding track record in publication, organises frequent international conferences, and regularly hosts leading postcolonial writers and critics. It also hosts a visiting writer from India every year in association with the Charles Wallace Trust.

Careers

Many career paths can benefit from the writing and analytical skills that you develop as a postgraduate student in the School of English. Our students have gone on to work in academia, journalism, broadcasting and media, publishing, writing and teaching; as well as more general areas such as banking, marketing analysis and project management.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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The Modern French Studies MA allows you to undertake postgraduate study in French literature, society and culture, from the 18th century to the present, and benefit from the complementary experience of living in Paris. Read more
The Modern French Studies MA allows you to undertake postgraduate study in French literature, society and culture, from the 18th century to the present, and benefit from the complementary experience of living in Paris.

French culture has always had a huge impact on the world; from politics to cinema, literature to fashion, and France remains a major influence in European and global culture. The MA in Modern French Studies offers you the opportunity to study a range of major writers and key themes in French literature, media and culture from the 18th century to the present day.

The programme is designed for students with a variety of interests, including literature, the visual arts, philosophy and aesthetics. It also reflects the research specialisms and publications of the members of Department of Modern Languages (http://www.kent.ac.uk/secl/french/index.html), with wider input from the School of European Culture and Languages (SECL) (http://www.kent.ac.uk/secl/index.html).

Kent provides an ideal location in which to study French culture; our Canterbury campus is close to mainland Europe, with Paris only a couple of hours away by Eurostar. After a term at our Canterbury campus, you study at Kent’s Paris School of Arts and Culture (https://www.kent.ac.uk/paris/) to study modules with a particular focus on the city, gaining the experience of living within another European culture.

After you have taken four modules across the Autumn and Spring terms, you undertake a 12,000 word dissertation over the summer with supervision from an expert within the department. The programme is also available to study at Canterbury only.

The MA in Modern French Studies is an ideal programme for those with an active interest in French society, history and literature, with the desire to live in Paris in an active and extended engagement with the culture.

Course structure

The MA in Modern French Studies offers you the opportunity to study a range of major writers and key themes in French literature, visual culture and thought from the eighteenth century to the present day. The programme is designed for students with a variety of interests, including literature, the visual arts, philosophy and aesthetics. It also reflects the research specialisms and publications of the members of staff involved.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

FR866 - Literature and Theory (30 credits)
FR872 - Theories of Art in Modern French Thought (30 credits)
FR820 - Paris: Reality and Representation (30 credits)
FR803 - Paris and the European Enlightenment (30 credits)
FR998 - French Dissertation (60 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is by one 5,000-word essay for each module and the dissertation.

This programme is also available at Canterbury only or full-time at Paris.
https://www.kent.ac.uk/secl/postgraduate/taught.html

Read less
This is an innovative and interdisciplinary MA programme, combining taught modules and a dissertation, which allows you to share your year between Canterbury and Paris. Read more
This is an innovative and interdisciplinary MA programme, combining taught modules and a dissertation, which allows you to share your year between Canterbury and Paris.

This programme develops your understanding of the politics of culture in relation to both the imperialist world’s interpretation of the colonial, and postcolonial assertions of autonomy. In this context, while ‘postcolonial’ refers primarily to societies of the so-called ‘Third World’, it also includes questions relevant to cultures such as those of Ireland and Australia.

This programme allows you to spend your first term at our Canterbury campus with full access to its excellent academic and recreational facilities, before relocating to our Paris centre for the spring term, studying in the heart of historic Montparnasse.

In Paris, you participate in the Paris-focused modules, taught in English. Then, in the the final term, you complete your MA by writing a 12,000-word dissertation on a research topic defined in collaboration with your academic supervisors.

Course structure

During the autumn term your core module, Colonial and Postcolonial Discourses, provides an introduction to the analysis of colonial discourse and to the most significant strands of postcolonial theory. Topics covered also include the role that culture plays in anti-colonial struggles and the role of the postcolonial intellectual in the contemporary world. Recommended reading for the module includes works by Frantz Fanon, Edward Said and Gayatri Spivak.

During the Spring term, spent in Paris, you develop your studies to include the cultural production of exiles, with particular focus on the role of Paris as a place of refuge and as a focus for multi-cultural encounters and creativity. Works studied may include texts by North American, Latin American and North African writers living in Paris, with focus on their diverse representations of the city and how the experiences of diaspora and exile inform and shape their writing.

You then complete your one-year MA by writing a dissertation on an aspect of postcolonial studies that you will defined in consultation with an appropriate tutor. All texts and teaching materials are in English, so this programme offers you a rare opportunity to spend part of your MA year living and studying in Paris without necessarily knowing any French.

Modules

You take two compulsory Postcolonial modules and two further optional modules (four in total) during the autumn and spring terms. You are also expected to attend the Faculty and School Research Methods Programmes. You then write the dissertation or editorial project between the start of the Summer Term and the end of August.

In 2015/16 the following core specialist modules are available: EN852 – Colonial and Postcolonial Discourses (Canterbury) and CP807 – Diaspora and Exile (Paris). These should be considered indicative of the types of modules available, which may vary from year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation.

EN852 - Colonial and Postcolonial Discourses (30 credits)
FR866 - Literature and Theory (30 credits)
FR820 - Paris: Reality and Representation (30 credits)
CP807 - Diaspora and Exile (30 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is by a 5-6,000-word essay for each module and a 12,000 word dissertation.

This programme is also available at Canterbury only or full-time at Paris.
https://www.kent.ac.uk/english/postgraduate/index.html?tab=taught-masters

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This taught MA programme offers a unique opportunity to study the multi-faceted nature of contemporary European theatre. It is associated with the European Theatre Research Network (ETRN), the renowned Kent-based research centre dedicated to the study of non-English continental European theatre. Read more
This taught MA programme offers a unique opportunity to study the multi-faceted nature of contemporary European theatre. It is associated with the European Theatre Research Network (ETRN), the renowned Kent-based research centre dedicated to the study of non-English continental European theatre.

On this programme you will study one term in Canterbury and another term in Paris.

The notion of ‘dramaturgy’, this unique concept and practice characteristic of European theatre work, serves as our central lens from which we explore creative practices and processes in contemporary European theatre, theatre systems, performance aesthetics, and their histories. You become familiar with current conceptual and theoretical paradigms of European theatre, from mise en scène to the postdramatic theatre and the links of European theatre with European philosophy from Plato to Alain Badiou. You also receive a thorough grounding in research methodologies.

You have the opportunity to work alongside the ETRN’s leading researchers, such as Patrice Pavis, Hans-Thies Lehmann, Paul Allain, Peter M Boenisch, and others, and to hear about their current, ongoing research. We make full use of Canterbury’s geographical location between London and the Continent, offering theatre visits and excursions, and also making use of the University’s campuses in Paris and Brussels.

This programme enables you to study in Canterbury in the autumn term and in Paris in the spring term. The modules in Paris are designed to be specifically relevant to the experience of living and studying in Paris. These are taught by staff from the University of Kent and occasional guest lecturers, ensuring consistent academic standards and assessment throughout the year. You are encouraged to make full use of Paris’ cultural resources, especially of the vibrant theatre scene, and to integrate these into your studies. University of Kent staff are resident in Paris during the spring term to ensure year-long continuity of academic guidance and pastoral support.

Possible modules may include:

European Theatre and Dramaturgy (compulsory)
Mise en Scène: Aesthetics and Dramaturgies of European Theatre (Paris compulsory)
Theatre Practises: Paris Casebook (option)
Other options include: Creative Producing and Dramaturgy, Theatre Criticism, Theories of Art in Modern French thought, a language module, and modules from the University of Kent at Paris programme.
Teaching and Assessment
Assessment is through a variety of written work and verbal presentations. This includes academic essays, in-class research presentations, contributions to workshops, portfolios of critical writing, and performance analysis. It also includes an assessed project proposal towards a prospective PhD project which could be your starting point for applying for doctorate scholarship.

The final dissertation requires you to research an individual project in depth, and to present its findings in writing and in a conference-style presentation.

This programme is also available at Canterbury only or full-time at Paris.
https://www.kent.ac.uk/arts/study/postgraduate.html

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Our MA in Religion is a new programme providing core training in metholodogies of the study of religion while encouraging wider interdisciplinary work. Read more
Our MA in Religion is a new programme providing core training in metholodogies of the study of religion while encouraging wider interdisciplinary work.

Following an autumn term at our Canterbury campus, you spend the spring term studying at Kent's Paris School of Arts and Culture (https://www.kent.ac.uk/paris/), where you gain a specific insight into the influence of religion in a European context. Your knowledge is enhanced and shaped through the independence that is gained by living abroad for a period of time.

This programme is also available at Canterbury only or split site between Canterbury and Paris.

Course structure

The programme is primarily for students who wish to pursue further postgraduate research or research in other contexts. The MA offers an overview of key theoretical debates in the study of religion, as well as methodological issues and approaches for conducting fieldwork.

You complete two core modules (one in the Autumn; one in the Spring), both attracting 30 credits. You can also select two 30-credit option modules that will help you to further develop your specific interests.

Compulsory modules:

- Religion and Modern European Thought
- The Study of Religion

You are also able to select optional modules that will help you to develop your specific interests. As demand for doctoral research funding becomes increasingly competitive, you also receive guidance on seeking funding and writing research proposals, as well as the opportunity to refine ideas for a research project through the taught modules and dissertation.

It is possible to enrol for 12-month, part-time study for a PCert in Religion, taking the two compulsory modules.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

TH830 - Religion and European Thought (Paris) (30 credits)
TH831 - Spirituality and Therapy (30 credits)
TH832 - The Study of Religion: Genealogies, Inventions and Interventions (30 credits)
CP807 - Diaspora and Exile (30 credits)
FR803 - Paris and the European Enlightenment (30 credits)
FR820 - Paris: Reality and Representation (30 credits)
TH998 - Dissertation:Theology & Religious Studies (60 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is by coursework on the taught modules and the dissertation on the MA programme.

This programme is also available at Canterbury only or full-time at Paris.
https://www.kent.ac.uk/secl/postgraduate/taught.html

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Rome - Ancient and Modern is a unique programme that enables you to engage with the city of Rome as contemporary city with major archaeological, artistic, and historic significance. Read more
Rome - Ancient and Modern is a unique programme that enables you to engage with the city of Rome as contemporary city with major archaeological, artistic, and historic significance.

Students will be equipped to study the early modern art and architecture of the city, while at the same time be well equipped to engage with the remains from antiquity. There is no other programme that offers this combination and the opportunity to study on-site in Rome with the archaeology, the paintings, and the sculpture right in front of you.

Our Department of Classical & Archaeological Studies (http://www.kent.ac.uk/secl/classics/index.html) contains one of the largest concentrations of experts in Roman History and Archaeology with experts in Pompeii, Rome, Egypt, as well as in the study of artefacts and of ancient medicine. You spend your first term at our beautiful campus overlooking the Roman and Medieval city of Canterbury, just one hour from London. While in Canterbury, you gain training in research skills in both Roman History and in Archaeology.

The second term is based in Rome, at the campus of the American University of Rome (https://www.aur.edu/), where you study the sites and museums of ancient Rome. All teaching is in English.

This is an ideal programme for graduates of history, ancient history, classics or the wider humanities, wanting to gain practical experience in applying their expertise and benefit from the experience and confidence gained from living and studying overseas.

Course structure

For the term spent in Rome, you study the monuments and artefacts of the city at first hand, visiting relevant sites and museums. University of Kent staff are present for part of the spring term in Rome to ensure continuity of academic guidance and pastoral support.

Modules

Autumn term in Canterbury
- Research Methods in Ancient History (30 credits)
- Introduction to Research in History & Philosophy of Art (30 credits)

Spring term in Rome
- Rome –The Imperial City (30 credits)
- Discovering Rome in Rome (30 credits)
- Summer term through to end of August in Canterbury Dissertation (60 credits)

Assessment

All assessment is by coursework, involving a variety of written work, essays, a literature review, and a 15,000-word dissertation; and oral presentations, including a guided itinerary through Rome.

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This MA provides a structured introduction to the postgraduate study of the history and philosophy of art. This programme allows you to spend your first term at our Canterbury campus with full access to its excellent facilities. Read more
This MA provides a structured introduction to the postgraduate study of the history and philosophy of art.

This programme allows you to spend your first term at our Canterbury campus with full access to its excellent facilities. For the spring term you relocate to our Paris centre to study in a historic corner of Montparnasse. This programme can also be studied in Paris only.

Particular focuses include contemporary art, photography, Renaissance art, medieval art, 18th-century British painting, 19th-century French painting, modernism, aesthetics and the philosophy of art and film. You may elect to take a Philosophy of Art & Aesthetics pathway, which draws on the expertise of our Aesthetics Research Group.

The programme is intended for graduates in art history, philosophy and cognate subjects, such as fine art. It gives you the opportunity to pursue your interest in visual art at advanced level, to develop a high level of expertise in topics in history and philosophy of art and to prepare for doctoral research in history of art or philosophy of art.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/99/history-and-philosophy-of-art-paris

About the Department of History & Philosophy of Art

The History & Philosophy of Art Department provides opportunities for graduate study with well-established researchers in the fields of art history, philosophy of art and aesthetics. Staff research covers contemporary art and aesthetics, modernism, theories of art, the historiography of art and the Cold War; biographical monographs, the photograph (in its historical, contemporary and critical contexts), and the historical interplay of image, theory and institutions from the Renaissance to the present (especially European and North American).

Developing areas of interest include the cultural and historical significance of the print, and the role of performance and new media in contemporary art practices. In particular, postgraduates have the opportunity to participate in the activities of the multidisciplinary Aesthetics Research Centre and the Art History and Visual Cultures Research Centre. There is also a full programme of visiting speakers from across the constituent subject areas within the School of Arts, which includes Film and Drama.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

HA838 - Key Concepts and Classic Texts in History and Philosophy of Art (30 credits)
HA841 - Modern Art in Paris (30 credits)
HA898 - History & Philosophy of Art Dissertation (60 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is by two assignments per module and the dissertation.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide you with a focused programme of taught postgraduate study in history and philosophy of art

- provide you with a taught foundation for subsequent postgraduate research

- enable you to acquire or deepen your knowledge and understanding of the historical and contemporary topics within the history of art and philosophy of art

- enable you to develop your art historical and philosophical skills beyond that expected of an undergraduate

- enable you to develop, articulate and defend art historical and philosophical ideas as they relate to art

- enable you to engage with historical and contemporary theoretical thought about the arts from art historical and philosophical perspectives.

Study support

Postgraduate resources
There is a large and wide-ranging library holding for History & Philosophy of Art, covering the fields of painting, sculpture, architecture, photography, aesthetics and contemporary visual communications. There is a substantial stock of periodicals, online access to e-journals and a slide library with well over 100,000 images, covering areas such as contemporary art, visual cultures, garden history and the film still, as well as traditional media. Kent is ideally located for access to galleries in London and on the continent.

In 2010, we moved into the purpose-built, and RIBA award-winning, Jarman Building located at the centre of the Canterbury campus. The new building is home to the Studio 3 Gallery and a range of teaching and social spaces as well as a dedicated postgraduate centre.

Support
All postgraduate students are offered research skills training and the opportunity to take part in reading groups and research seminars at departmental, school and faculty level. Research students have the added opportunity for funded conference attendance. There is also a dedicated student support office at our Canterbury campus, which can offer support and guidance throughout your studies, in addition to an office in Paris.

In recent years, several members of the History & Philosophy of Art Department, both full-time and part-time, have been awarded University prizes for excellence in student support, curriculum innovation and research-based teaching – an ethos which we seek to extend to the postgraduate community.

Dynamic publishing culture
Staff publish regularly and widely in journals, conference proceedings and books. Among others, they have recently contributed to: British Journal of Aesthetics; Art History; History of Photography; Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism; Journal of Visual Arts Practice; and The Philosophical Quarterly.

Global Skills Award
All students registered for a taught Master's programme are eligible to apply for a place on our Global Skills Award Programme (http://www.kent.ac.uk/graduateschool/skills/programmes/gsa.html). The programme is designed to broaden your understanding of global issues and current affairs as well as to develop personal skills which will enhance your employability

Research areas

The Department has a collective interest in developing interdisciplinary projects, including projects informed by art history and philosophy of art or aesthetics. Shared areas of research interest include: photography, art theory from the Renaissance to recent times and contemporary art.

Careers

Arts postgraduates have gone on to work in a range of professions, from museum positions and teaching roles to marketing and gallery assistants. Our graduates have found work with Tate Britain, the V&A, Museum of Childhood and other arts, culture and heritage-related organisations.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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Our. postgraduate Fine Art course. is designed to provide a structured context for the development of individual Masters projects. Read more

Our postgraduate Fine Art course is designed to provide a structured context for the development of individual Masters projects. It does this through introducing and exploring various strategies for making art, and nurturing an understanding of the ideas that make such practices meaningful. Questioning and exploring personal strategies for making art, we offer a reflective environment in which to understand the ideas and contexts that make your practice meaningful.

The cross-disciplinary structure of the course encourages connections with other modes of thinking and working.

Guest lectures and professional practice seminars will help you develop your personal networks. You'll work closely with local and national galleries and public arts organisations, including Turner Contemporary, Whitstable Biennale, The London Art Fair, Strange Cargo and the Folkestone Triennial, and be actively supported to develop and show work outside the context of the University.

With a well-established and strong history, our Master in Fine Art course at UCA Canterbury is open to artists, designers, illustrators, architects and theorists (including graduates in the humanities). It's designed to foster new and innovative approaches to fine art study at an advanced level.

Building upon the practical and conceptual concerns of contemporary art practice, you'll develop an advanced ability to conceptualise and research in relation to your own practice.

We take great pride in ensuring that you have a fulfilling, engaging and inspirational experience. We're thrilled that this is reflected through our student satisfaction rates, which consistently reach almost 100%.

Working internationally with other universities, local and national galleries and museums, as well as specialist partners within industry, our course draws on a number of industrial links and expertise from a range of creative fields.

Our course is supported by seminars, tutorials, workshops, work-in-progress sessions, study visits and critiques. The progressive move from staff-directed to autonomous learning is an integral part of the structure of this course, too, as you identify, develop and manage your own Masters project.

Industry Partners

Working internationally with other universities, local and national galleries and museums, and specialist partners within industry, our course draws on a number of industrial links and expertise from a range of creative fields.

You'll be actively encouraged to show and distribute your work outside of the university context. And guest lectures and professional practice seminars will enable you to develop your personal networks and awareness of professional practice.

Connections include local arts organisations such as:

-London Art Fair

-Stour Valley Arts

-Strange Cargo

-The Creative Foundation

-The Whitstable Biennale

-Turner Contemporary.

Careers

Lots of our graduates go on to develop careers in fields such as:

-Arts administration

-Creative media management

-Curatorial practices

-Education

-Filmmaking

-Fine art

-Freelance photography

-Pre and post production work

-Printmaking and reprographics

-Producing

-Public art

-Publishing

-Sound production

-Video editing.

Virtual Media Space

Visit our Postgraduate Virtual Media Space to find out more about our courses, see what it's like to study at UCA and gain access to our campus virtual tours.



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This innovative and interdisciplinary MA programme combines taught modules and a dissertation and allows you to share your year between Canterbury and Paris. Read more
This innovative and interdisciplinary MA programme combines taught modules and a dissertation and allows you to share your year between Canterbury and Paris.

You choose from our full range of MA literature modules, which is regularly added to by academics keen to explore new areas of thinking with students and to draw you in to our established areas of research strength.

This programme allows you to spend your first term at our Canterbury campus with full access to its excellent academic and recreational facilities. For the spring term you relocate to our Paris centre, studying in a historic corner of Montparnasse - close to the famous Latin Quarter, the Sorbonne University and the glorious Jardin du Luxembourg.

In Paris, you participate in the Paris-focused modules, taught in English. Then, in the final term, you complete your MA by writing a 12-12,000-word dissertation on a research topic defined in collaboration with your academic supervisors. The programme can also be studied in Paris only.

You take two modules in each of the first two terms and a dissertation in the third.

The modules available in Paris, during the second term are:

One Paris module from your own subject area (compulsory).
The second module can be taken from the selection of Paris modules available.
For further information about the University of Kent, Paris, please see http://www.kent.ac.uk/paris/

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

EN818 - American Modernism 1900-1930 (Teaching Period I) (30 credits)
EN832 - Hacks, Dunces and Scribblers: Authorship and the Marketplace in the Eig (30 credits)
EN835 - Dickens, The Victorians and the Body (30 credits)
EN852 - Colonial and Postcolonial Discourses (30 credits)
FR866 - Literature and Theory (30 credits)
EN871 - Origins of Modern Poetry (30 credits)
FR820 - Paris: Reality and Representation (30 credits)

[[Teaching and Assessment[[
Assessment is by a 5-6,000-word essay for each module and a 12,000 word dissertation.

This programme is also available at Canterbury only or full-time at Paris.
https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/search/subject_category/English

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