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Masters Degrees (Cancer Genetics)

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The Cancer MSc reflects the depth and breadth of research interests, from basic science to translational medicine, within the UCL Cancer Institute. Read more

The Cancer MSc reflects the depth and breadth of research interests, from basic science to translational medicine, within the UCL Cancer Institute. The programme, taught by research scientists and academic clinicians, provides students with an in-depth look at the biology behind the disease processes which lead to cancer.

About this degree

This programme offers a foundation in understanding cancer as a disease process and its associated therapies. Students learn about the approaches taken to predict, detect, monitor and treat cancer, alongside the cutting-edge research methods and techniques used to advance our understanding of this disease and design better treatment strategies.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (60 credits), four specialist modules (60 credits) and a research project (60 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits, full-time nine months) is offered.

A Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits, full-time 12 weeks) is offered.

Core modules

  • Basic Biology and Cancer Genetics
  • Cancer Therapeutics

Specialist modules

  • Behavioural Science and Cancer
  • Biomarkers in Cancer
  • Cancer Clinical Trials
  • Haematological Malignancies and Gene Therapy

Dissertation/report

All MSc students undertake a laboratory project, clinical trials project or systems biology/informatics project, which culminates in a 10,000–12,000 word dissertation and an oral research presentation.

Teaching and learning

Students develop their knowledge and understanding of cancer through lectures, self-study, database mining, wet-lab based practicals, clinical trial evaluations, laboratory training, assigned reading and self-learning. Each taught module is assessed by an unseen written examination and/or coursework. The research project is assessed by the dissertation (75%) and oral presentation (25%).

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Cancer MSc

Careers

The knowledge and skills developed will be suitable for those in an industrial or healthcare setting, as well as those individuals contemplating a PhD or medical studies in cancer.

Employability

Skills include critical evaluation of scientific literature, experimental planning and design interpretation of data and results, presentation/public speaking skills, time management, working with a team, working independently and writing for various audiences.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL is one of Europe's largest and most productive centres of biomedical science, with an international reputation for leading basic, translational and clinical cancer research.

The UCL Cancer Institute brings together scientists from various disciplines to synergise multidisciplinary research into cancer, whose particular areas of expertise include: the biology of leukaemia, the infectious causes of cancer, the design of drugs that interact with DNA, antibody-directed therapies, the molecular pathology of cancer, signalling pathways in cancer, epigenetic changes in cancer, gene therapy, cancer stem cell biology, early phase clinical trials, and national and international clinical trials in solid tumours and blood cancers.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Cancer Institute

80% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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OVERVIEW. The MSc in Cancer Medicine will provide students with new knowledge of how precision medicine can improve and shape future healthcare. Read more

OVERVIEW

The MSc in Cancer Medicine will provide students with new knowledge of how precision medicine can improve and shape future healthcare. Students will gain hands-on experience of molecular techniques and the equipment/devices used in a modern molecular laboratory; the course will provide training in laboratory and research skills that are applicable across multiple scientific disciplines in a supportive learning environment. Students will be able to evaluate how novel therapeutic approaches can be used to stratify patients into treatment groups for better clinical management (stratified / precision medicine). They will observe the delivery of precision medicine through tours of the Northern Ireland Cancer Centre.

There are optional modules in the second semester allowing students to explore.the fundamental principles of Carcinogenesis and the translational approaches (including cutting edge technologies) which allow cancer scientists and clinicians to advance our understanding and treatment of cancers. The Precision Cancer Medicine stream provides a comprehensive overview of the current understanding of the Hallmarks of Cancer from the role of genetic/epigenetic alterations, cell cycle control and metastases/angiogenesis to the development of applications to help diagnose cancers earlier, improve treatments, rationally design clinical trials and reduce chemotherapy drug resistance.

The Radiation Oncology stream will develop skills in understanding the biological principles of radiotherapy and its clinical applications in the treatment of cancer. This will include the physical and chemical basis of radiation interactions and the biological consequences of radiation exposures. Clinical aspects of Radiation Oncology will be covered including principle of advanced radiotherapy delivery, cancer imaging techniques and biomarker discovery.

Importantly, both streams show how our improved understanding of the molecular processes driving cancer growth and spread can be ‘translated’ through research-intensive MSc projects to improve the treatment and survival of cancer patients.

For further information email  or send us a message on WhatsApp

CANCER MEDICINE HIGHLIGHTS

The strong links between us and the biotech and biopharmaceutical sectors provides a stimulating translational environment, while also expanding your career opportunities.

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

INDUSTRY LINKS

  • The strong links between us and the biotech and biopharmaceutical sectors provides a stimulating translational environment, while also expanding your career opportunities.

WORLD CLASS FACILITIES

  • The Programme will be taught in the Centre for Cancer Research & Cell Biology a purpose-built institute at the heart of the Health Sciences Campus, boasting state-of-the-art research facilities

INTERNATIONALLY RENOWNED EXPERTS

  • We have an international reputation in this area, achieved through; high-impact peer review publications; significant international research funding and the establishment of successful spin-out companies.

COURSE STRUCTURE

Semester 1

Research Translational: from Concept to Commercialisation (Full Year)

  • This module covers the principles of disease biology and new technological developments that increase our understanding of disease processes. It develops an appreciation of the importance of innovation, business awareness and leadership skills in the translation of discovery science to clinical implementation.

Diagnosis and Treatment (Semester 1)

  • This module provides a comprehensive overview of the diagnosis and treatment of the common solid and haematological malignancies, including breast, ovarian, genitourinary and gastrointestinal cancers as well as the leukaemias. An overview of the common diagnostic pathways in clinical practice will be provided, and this will including gaining an understanding of imaging modalities and histopathological techniques in routine use. 

Cancer Biology (Semester 1)

  • This module provides a comprehensive overview of the fundamental principles of carcinogenesis highlighting how normal control processes are bypassed during tumour formation. The pathogenic mechanisms to be discussed will range from genomic alterations in key gene families, to epigenetic mechanisms of gene control, alterations in kinase activities or protein turnover, or activation of aberrant phenotypes such as invasion and angiogenesis.Semester 2

Students will make a selection from the following modules:

  • Precision Cancer Stream
  • Cancer Genetics & Genomics
  • Translational Cancer Medicine

OR

  • Radiation Oncology and Medical Physics (ROMP)
  • Biology of Radiotherapy

Clinical Radiation

Building on the biological basis of radiotherapy, this module will develop knowledge and skills in understanding clinical radiotherapy and medical imaging. Through the delivery of a multidisciplinary taught programme, students will cover clinical tumour and normal tissue biology, radiological imaging and the design of radiotherapy treatment plans. This will develop the clinical rationale for radiotherapy in the treatment of cancer and highlight emerging treatment combinations and techniques for biomarker discovery in radiation oncology.Biology and Imaging

Research Project

You will undertake a project in the Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology.

Dissertation

This module comprises the write-up contribution to the overall research element of the programme, with the Research Project (SCM 8067). The Dissertation will represent the student’s personal studies in the literature, a description of their experimental execution of their project, data presentation, analysis and interpretation, followed by critical discussion and conclusions.

For further information email  or send us a message on WhatsApp



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The Institute of Genetic Medicine brings together a strong team with an interest in clinical and developmental genetics. Our research focuses on the causes of genetic disease at the molecular and cellular level and its treatment. Read more
The Institute of Genetic Medicine brings together a strong team with an interest in clinical and developmental genetics. Our research focuses on the causes of genetic disease at the molecular and cellular level and its treatment. Research areas include: genetic medicine, developmental genetics, neuromuscular and neurological genetics, mitochondrial genetics and cardiovascular genetics.

As a research postgraduate in the Institute of Genetic Medicine you will be a member of our thriving research community. The Institute is located in Newcastle’s Life Science Centre. You will work alongside a number of research, clinical and educational organisations, including the Northern Genetics Service.

We offer supervision for MPhil in the following research areas:

Cancer genetics and genome instability

Our research includes:
-A major clinical trial for chemoprevention of colon cancer
-Genetic analyses of neuroblastoma susceptibility
-Research into Wilms Tumour (a childhood kidney cancer)
-Studies on cell cycle regulation and genome instability

Cardiovascular genetics and development

We use techniques of high-throughput genetic analyses to identify mechanisms where genetic variability between individuals contributes to the risk of developing cardiovascular disease. We also use mouse, zebrafish and stem cell models to understand the ways in which particular gene families' genetic and environmental factors are involved in the normal and abnormal development of the heart and blood vessels.

Complex disease and quantitative genetics

We work on large-scale studies into the genetic basis of common diseases with complex genetic causes, for example autoimmune disease, complex cardiovascular traits and renal disorders. We are also developing novel statistical methods and tools for analysing this genetic data.

Developmental genetics

We study genes known (or suspected to be) involved in malformations found in newborn babies. These include genes involved in normal and abnormal development of the face, brain, heart, muscle and kidney system. Our research includes the use of knockout mice and zebrafish as laboratory models.

Gene expression and regulation in normal development and disease

We research how gene expression is controlled during development and misregulated in diseases, including the roles of transcription factors, RNA binding proteins and the signalling pathways that control these. We conduct studies of early human brain development, including gene expression analysis, primary cell culture models, and 3D visualisation and modelling.

Genetics of neurological disorders

Our research includes:
-The identification of genes that in isolation can cause neurological disorders
-Molecular mechanisms and treatment of neurometabolic disease
-Complex genetics of common neurological disorders including Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease
-The genetics of epilepsy

Kidney genetics and development

Kidney research focuses on:
-Atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome (aHUS)
-Vesicoureteric reflux (VUR)
-Cystic renal disease
-Nephrolithiasis to study renal genetics

The discovery that aHUS is a disease of complement dysregulation has led to a specific interest in complement genetics.

Mitochondrial disease

Our research includes:
-Investigation of the role of mitochondria in human disease
-Nuclear-mitochondrial interactions in disease
-The inheritance of mitochondrial DNA heteroplasmy
-Mitochondrial function in stem cells

Neuromuscular genetics

The Neuromuscular Research Group has a series of basic research programmes looking at the function of novel muscle proteins and their roles in pathogenesis. Recently developed translational research programmes are seeking therapeutic targets for various muscle diseases.

Stem cell biology

We research human embryonic stem (ES) cells, germline stem cells and somatic stem cells. ES cell research is aimed at understanding stem cell pluripotency, self-renewal, survival and epigenetic control of differentiation and development. This includes the functional analysis of genes involved in germline stem cell proliferation and differentiation. Somatic stem cell projects include programmes on umbilical cord blood stem cells, haematopoietic progenitors, and limbal stem cells.

Pharmacy

Our new School of Pharmacy has scientists and clinicians working together on all aspects of pharmaceutical sciences and clinical pharmacy.

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The increasing impact of genetics in healthcare and the development of newer sophisticated technologies requires contributions from research scientists, clinical laboratory scientists and clinicians to investigate the causes of, and therefore permit optimal management for, diseases for which alterations in the genome, either at the DNA sequence level or epigenetic level, play a significant role. Read more
The increasing impact of genetics in healthcare and the development of newer sophisticated technologies requires contributions from research scientists, clinical laboratory scientists and clinicians to investigate the causes of, and therefore permit optimal management for, diseases for which alterations in the genome, either at the DNA sequence level or epigenetic level, play a significant role. Collaboration between staff from the University of Glasgow and the NHS West of Scotland Genetics Service enables the MSc in Medical Genetics and Genomics to provide a state-of-the-art view of the application of modern genetic and genomic technologies in medical genetics research and diagnostics, and in delivery of a high quality genetics service to patients, as well as in design of targeted therapies.

Why this programme

◾This is a fully up-to-date Medical Genetics degree delivered by dedicated, multi-award-winning teaching and clinical staff of the University, with considerable input from hospital-based Regional Genetics Service clinicians and clinical scientists.
◾The full spectrum of genetic services is represented, from patient and family counselling to diagnostic testing of individuals and screening of entire populations for genetic conditions: eg the NHS prenatal and newborn screening programmes.
◾The MSc Medical Genetics Course is based on the south side of the River Clyde in the brand new (2015) purpose built Teaching & Learning Centre, at the Queen Elizabeth University Hospitals (we are located 4 miles from the main University Campus). The Centre also houses state of the art educational resources, including a purpose built teaching laboratory, computing facilities and a well equipped library. The West of Scotland Genetic Services are also based here at the Queen Elizabeth Campus allowing students to learn directly from NHS staff about the latest developments to this service.
◾The Medical Genetics MSc Teaching Staff have won the 2014 UK-wide Prospects Postgraduate Awards for the category of Best Postgraduate Teaching Team (Science, Technology & Engineering). These awards recognise and reward excellence and good practice in postgraduate education.
◾The close collaboration between university and hospital staff ensures that the Medical Genetics MSc provides a completely up-to-date representation of the practice of medical genetics and you will have the opportunity to observe during clinics and visit the diagnostic laboratories at the new Southern General Hospital laboratory medicine building.
◾The Medical Genetics degree explores the effects of mutations and variants as well as the current techniques used in NHS genetics laboratory diagnostics and recent developments in diagnostics (including microarray analysis and the use of massively parallel [“next-generation”] sequencing).
◾New developments in medical genetics are incorporated into the lectures and interactive teaching sessions very soon after they are presented at international meetings or published, and you will gain hands-on experience and guidance in using software and online resources for genetic diagnosis and for the evaluation of pathogenesis of DNA sequence variants.
◾You will develop your skills in problem solving, experimental design, evaluation and interpretation of experimental data, literature searches, scientific writing, oral presentations, poster presentations and team working.
◾This MSc programme will lay the academic foundations on which some students may build in pursuing research at PhD level in genetics or related areas of biomedical science or by moving into related careers in diagnostic services.
◾The widely used textbook “Essential Medical Genetics” is co-authored by a member of the core teaching team, Professor Edward Tobias.
◾For doctors: The Joint Royal Colleges of Physicians’ Training Board (JRCPTB) in the UK recognises the MSc in Medical Genetics and Genomics (which was established in 1984) as counting for six months of the higher specialist training in Clinical Genetics.
◾The Medical Council of Hong Kong recognises the MSc in Medical Genetics and Genomics from University of Glasgow in it's list of Quotable Qualifications.

Programme structure

Genetic Disease: from the Laboratory to the Clinic

This course is designed in collaboration with the West of Scotland Regional Genetics Service to give students a working knowledge of the principles and practice of Medical Genetics and Genomics which will allow them to evaluate, choose and interpret appropriate genetic investigations for individuals and families with genetic disease. The link from genotype to phenotype, will be explored, with consideration of how this knowledge might contribute to new therapeutic approaches.

Case Investigations in Medical Genetics and Genomics

Students will work in groups to investigate complex clinical case scenarios: decide appropriate testing, analyse results from genetic tests, reach diagnoses where appropriate and, with reference to the literature, generate a concise and critical group report.

Clinical Genomics

Students will take this course OR Omic Technologies for Biomedical Sciences OR Frontiers in Cancer Science.

This course will provide an overview of the clinical applications of genomic approaches to human disorders, particularly in relation to clinical genetics, discussion the methods and capabilities of the new technologies. Tuition and hands-on experience in data analysis will be provided, including the interpretation of next generation sequencing reports.

Omic technologies for the Biomedical Sciences: from Genomics to Metabolomics

Students will take this course OR Clinical Genomics OR Frontiers in Cancer Science.

Visit the website for further information

Career prospects

Research: About half of our graduates enter a research career and most of these graduates undertake and complete PhDs; the MSc in Medical Genetics and Genomics facilitates acquisition of skills relevant to a career in research in many different bio-molecular disciplines.

Diagnostics: Some of our graduates enter careers with clinical genetic diagnostic services, particularly in molecular genetics and cytogenetics.

Clinical genetics: Those of our graduates with a prior medical / nursing training often utilise their new skills in careers as clinical geneticists or genetic counsellors.

Other: Although the focus of teaching is on using the available technologies for the purpose of genetic diagnostics, many of these technologies are used in diverse areas of biomedical science research and in forensic DNA analysis. Some of our numerous graduates, who are now employed in many countries around the world, have entered careers in industry, scientific publishing, education and medicine.

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The Genetics of Human Disease MSc aims to provide students with an in-depth knowledge of molecular genetics, quantitative and statistical genetics and human disease and how this can be applied to improve healthcare through the development and application of diagnostic tests and therapeutic agents. Read more

The Genetics of Human Disease MSc aims to provide students with an in-depth knowledge of molecular genetics, quantitative and statistical genetics and human disease and how this can be applied to improve healthcare through the development and application of diagnostic tests and therapeutic agents.

About this degree

The programme provides a thorough grounding in modern approaches to the understanding of the genetics of disease alongside the cutting-edge research methods and techniques used to advance our understanding of development of disease. Core modules provide a broad coverage of the genetics of disease, research skills and social aspects, whilst specialised streams in Inherited Diseases, Pharmacogenetics and Computational Genomics, in which students can qualify, and the research project allow more in-depth analysis in areas of genetics.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four core modules (60 credits) and two specialist modules (30 credits) and a research project culminating in a dissertation (90 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma consisting of six modules (four core modules in term one and two modules within the selected stream in term two) is offered, full-time nine months.

A Postgraduate Certificate consisting of four core modules in term one (60 credits) is offered, full-time three months.

Core modules

  • Advanced Human Genetics: Research Principles
  • Understanding Bioinformatics Resources and their Applications
  • Human Genetics: Core Skills
  • Basic Statistics for Medical Sciences

Specialist modules

In term two you will take specialist modules depending on the specialist stream you select: Inherited Disease (A); Pharmacogenetics (B); Computational Genomics (C). 

  • Applications in Human Genetics (A)
  • Either Genetics of Cardiovascular Disease or Genetics of Neurological Disease (A)
  • Clinical Applications of Pharmacogenetic Tests (B)
  • Anti-Cancer Personalised Medicine or Pharmacogenomics, adverse drug reactions and biomarkers (B)
  • Applications in Human Genetics (C)
  • Statistics for Interpreting Genetic Data (C)

Dissertation/report

Students undertake an original research project investigating topical questions in genetics and genetics of human disease which culminates in a dissertation of 12,000 to 14,000 words and an oral presentation.

Teaching and learning

Students develop their knowledge and understanding of genetics of human diseases through a combination of lectures, seminars, tutorials, presentations and journal clubs. Taught modules are assessed by unseen written examination and/or, written reports, oral presentations and coursework. The research project is assessed by the dissertation and oral presentation. 

Further information on modules and degree structure available on the UCL Genetics Institute website.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Genetics of Human Disease MSc

Careers

Advanced training in genetic techniques including bioinformatic and statistical approaches positions graduates well for PhD studentships in laboratories using genetic techniques to examine diseases such as heart disease, cancer and neurological disorders. Another large group will seek research jobs in the pharmaceutical industry, or jobs related to genetics in healthcare organisations.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Laboratory Specialist, King Abdullah Medical Complex
  • Non-Clinical Research Associate, University of Oxford
  • Trainee Geneticist, Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust
  • PhD in Cardiovascular Science, UCL
  • Genomic Research Technician, Genome Centre

Employability

The MSc in Genetics of Human Disease facilitates acquisition of knowledge and skills relevant to a career in research in many different biomedical disciplines. About half of our graduates enter a research career by undertaking and completing PhDs and working as research associates/scientists in academia. Some of our graduates go on to jobs in the pharmaceutical industry, while others enter careers with clinical genetic diagnosis services, particularly in molecular genetics, in healthcare organisations and hospitals around the world. Those graduates with a prior medical training often utilise their new skills as clinical geneticists.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL is in a unique position to offer both the basic science and application of modern genetics to improve human health. The programme is a cross-faculty initiative with teaching from across the School of Life and Medical Sciences (SLMS) at UCL.

Students will be based at the UCL Genetics Institute (UGI), a world-leading centre which develops and applies biostatistical and bioinformatic approaches to human and population genetics. Opportunities to conduct laboratory or computational-based research projects are available in the laboratories of world-leading geneticists affiliated to the UGI.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Division of Biosciences

82% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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The science of human genetics has been transformed in the past decade. Following the sequencing of the entire human genome, a wealth of resources is now available to researchers aiming to identify the genetic variants that influence human health. Read more
The science of human genetics has been transformed in the past decade. Following the sequencing of the entire human genome, a wealth of resources is now available to researchers aiming to identify the genetic variants that influence human health. These findings will shed light on the underlying molecular pathology of many diseases that are poorly understood at present, eventually paving the way for novel treatment and prevention strategies. The speed at which these discoveries are being made is accelerating, and it is likely that molecular genetics will soon underpin much of modern medicine.

Career Pathways:
The MSc in Human Molecular Genetics programme is designed to prepare you for a genetics research career, either in human gene function and genetic disease, or molecular approaches to diagnosis and health care biotechnology. It provides a broad grounding in Human Genetics, with emphasis on molecular aspects, to give a solid basis for subsequent academic or industrial research, or for entry to NHS Genetics training. Approximately 40% of our students go on to do a PhD, 40% become research assistants/associates, while others go on to jobs in industry or further studies (bioinformatics/computing medicine). One or two students every year enter the NHS in clinical genetics training posts.

Programme Structure:
You will study the fundamentals of human and molecular genetics, models of inheritance for rare and common/ complex polygenic diseases, cytogenetics, analytical methods in human genetics and genomics, animal models and transgenesis, gene therapy, epigenetics, cancer genetics and an introduction to clinical genetics and genetic counselling services.

There are four weeks of intensive laboratory practical sessions, as well as computer science practicals applied to problems in genetics, genomics and bioinformatics, regular research seminars on site, student seminar and journal presentations, study group activities and a six-month full-time research project in the summer.

The programme is based on an average 20 hours contact time per week. This will vary between 15 hours in most weeks and approximately 40 hours during intensive practicals and projects. Private study time is included within the schedule: you are expected to contribute an additional 10-15 hours private study per week to the course. We do not recommend you try to support yourself by taking a part-time employment whilst studying as your work may suffer.

Assessment:
There are 3 x 3-hour written papers in late February, coursework assessments (poster presentation, analytical methods in genetics, oral presentation), a project report and a viva examination in September.

Programme Location:
The programme is primarily based at Hammersmith Campus in West London although some teaching modules are held at St Mary's Campus and the Northwick Park Campus.

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Genetic counsellors work in a multidisciplinary team with clinical geneticists, nurses, social workers, dietitians, communicating complex genetic information to individuals and families to facilitate decision making. Read more

Genetic counsellors work in a multidisciplinary team with clinical geneticists, nurses, social workers, dietitians, communicating complex genetic information to individuals and families to facilitate decision making. Genetic counsellors are employed in clinical genetics units and work in many areas including: cancer genetics, predictive testing, paediatric genetics, prenatal genetics, adult genetics. Genetic counsellors increasingly are involved in qualitative and quantitative clinical genetic research.

The Master of Genetic Counselling constitutes the professional qualification for entry into employment as an associate genetic counsellor, and for Board Eligible certification, awarded through the Board of Censors in Genetic Counselling (Human Genetics Society of Australasia).

The 2 year Master of Genetic Counselling is designed to build and increase skills and breadth in clinical practice and research, utilising the expertise of tutors who are clinicians, genetic counsellors, scientists, people with a disability and community members. The Masters is taught within the Victorian Clinical Genetics Services at the Royal Childrens Hospital Parkville Victoria. Students are encouraged to attend educational activities within Genetic Health including seminars, clinic meetings and journal club.

The Graduate Diploma is an exit point after 1 year of study in the Masters.

Internationally, genetic counselling is taught within a 2 year clinical Masters. The Masters program aims to increase research and employment opportunities for graduates through developing reciprocity with other countries. With well established links to overseas training programs there are international opportunities for students, through an active exchange program for clinical placements and research collaborations. Past graduates are employed throughout the world -including in Singapore, Malaysia, New Zealand. It is expected that graduates of the Melbourne Masters will be eligible to register to practise as genetic counsellors in the UK and Canada, further increasing employment opportunities.

The Master of Genetic Counselling will fulfil the requirements for certification and employment as a genetic counsellor in Australia and reciprocity with training overseas. The program teaches counselling skills, research skills and clinical genetics knowledge in small interactive student groups. Problem Based Learning is one mode of teaching in the genetics tutorials. This mode of teaching facilitates independent learning which equips the student to continue to develop professionally throughout their career. Students will complete a minor thesis with supervision, and have extensive counselling skills practice in varied clinical genetics and community settings. Assessment tasks mirror the skills needed in genetic counselling practice and for professional certification by the HGSA(Part 2)

Teaching staff are primarily practicing genetic counsellors, scientists and clinicians within the clinical genetics service.

Research and Evaluation Skills:

  • Understand the ethics committee process and develop an ethics proposal;
  • Undertake a critical literature review relevant to a particular topic of research;
  • Develop original research arising from clinical practice;
  • Present findings from an original research project at a professional forum;
  • Understand the principles of qualitative research, including research design and process in an ethical framework OR
  • Understand biostatistical concepts and methods and their application in the assessment and management of health conditions OR
  • Develop an understanding of the nature and purposes of health program evaluation.

Critical Reflection and Cognition Skills:

  • Develop counselling skills through application of models of practice, in supervised clinical placements;
  • Critically evaluate different models of practice through theory, observation and participation in genetic counselling interviews;
  • Respect differences in cultural, religious and socioeconomic beliefs in clients, through developing a critical understanding of difference through the literature and personal contact with clients;
  • Develop self-awareness through reflection and active participation in the process of supervision.

Communication Skills:

  • Analyse the genetic counselling process and the impact on families from a cultural, ethical and psychosocial perspective;
  • Understand and critically analyse the process of transference and countertransference in an interview;
  • Critically analyse the process of communication.

Ethical Skills:

  • Understand the ethical principles that guide and inform genetic counselling practice;
  • Consider personal, cultural and moral values which may impact on the individual practice of genetic counselling;
  • Recognise the ethical challenges that may confront clients;
  • Understand and identify the potential for ethical challenges in emerging genetic technologies;
  • Identify possible challenges to facilitating informed consent and maintaining patient confidentiality.

Genetics Knowledge:

  • Understand the principles of inheritance;
  • Understand chromosomal disorders and the genetic basis of disease;
  • Understand clinical genetic risk assessments for patients and families;
  • Elicit and document a family history and family pedigree, convey genetic information and discuss risk;
  • Understand the normal stages of human embryo development and have an awareness of how this can be disrupted;
  • Understand the role of genetics as the underlying cause of various disorders of the human body;
  • Understand the role of genetics in cancer;
  • Have an appreciation for the range of molecular, cytogenetic and biochemical laboratory tests utilised in clinical genetic practice;
  • Understand the genetic testing approach taken for specific genetic disorders;
  • Understand the treatment approach taken for specific genetic disorders;
  • Understand the issues relating to population based screening;
  • Understand the role of prenatal screening and testing in pregnancy management and care, and the options available when fetal abnormality is detected;
  • Understand the organisational and economic aspects of health care in Australia;
  • Understand the role of the genetic counsellor in the context of the multidisciplinary approach to clinical genetic health care;
  • Understand the principles of the legal and professional duties and the responsibilities of genetic counsellors as health professionals and members of a health care team.


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The area of cancer immunotherapy considers how to use conventional therapies including surgery, radiation and chemotherapy. Read more
The area of cancer immunotherapy considers how to use conventional therapies including surgery, radiation and chemotherapy. Whilst these treatment have served well and new drugs will continue to be designed, clinical trials over the last five years have shown that boosting the body’s immune system, whose main task is to deal with invading pathogens, can help our immune system to destroy tumour cells. Many of the new immunotherapies may be tested in combination with more conventional treatments or tested alone, but investigators and oncologists now believe immunotherapy, initially combined with pharmacological treatments, will soon provide curative therapies and certainly give many patients a new lease of life.

More about this course

Worldwide the incidence of cancer is increasing, and is expected to reach 22 million new cases per year by 2030. In addition to treatments such as radiotherapy and surgery, chemotherapy has a vital role to play in prolonging the lives of patients.

The aims of the Cancer Immunotherapy MSc are to:
-Provide an in-depth understanding of the molecular targets at which the different classes of anticancer drugs are aimed, and of how drug therapies are evolving
-Review the biology of cancer with respect to genetics, pathological considerations, and the molecular changes within cells which are associated with the progression of the disease
-Enhance intellectual and practical skills necessary for the collection, analysis, interpretation and understanding of scientific data
-Deliver a programme of advanced study to equip students for a future career in anti-cancer drug and immunotherapy development
-Cover new areas in immunotherapy (some of which may enhance existing pharmacological therapies including: History of immunotherapy and review of immune system; Monoclonal antibodies in cancer therapy and prevention; DNA vaccines against cancer; Adoptive T cell therapy; Dendritic cell vaccines; Antibodies that stimulate immunity; Adjuvant development for vaccines; Epigenetics and cancer: improving immunotherapy; Immuno-chemotherapy: integration of therapies; Exosomes and Microvesicles (EMVs) in cancer therapy and diagnosis; Dendritic cell vaccine development and Pox virus cancer vaccine vectors; Microbial causes of cancer and vaccination

Students will have access to highly qualified researchers and teachers in pharmacology and immunology, including those at the Cellular and Molecular Immunology Research Centre. Skills gained from research projects are therefore likely to be highly marketable in industry, academia and in the NHS. Students will be encouraged to join the British Society of Immunology and the International Society of Extracellular Vesicles.

Assessment is a combination of coursework, which includes tests and essays, the research project and its oral defence and examination.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2016/17 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:
-Advanced Immunology (core, 20 credits)
-Cancer Immunotherapy (core, 20 credits)
-Cancer Pharmacology (core, 20 credits)
-Cancer: Diagnosis and Therapy (core, 20 credits)
-Molecular Oncology (core, 20 credits)
-Research Project (core, 60 credits)
-Scientific Frameworks for Research (core, 20 credits)

After the course

Students will have many opportunities to work in industry. There are established industries working hard to develop cancer immunotherapies including Bristol-Myers Squibbs, MERCK, AstraZeneca and Roche. There are also an innumerate number of start-up companies appearing including Omnis Pharma, UNUM Therapeutics and Alpine Immune Sciences.

Students will also have ample opportunity for future postgraduate study either within the School of Human Sciences and the Cellular and Molecular Immunology Centre at the MPhil/PhD level or beyond, even with some of our research partners within the UK, Europe and beyond.

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Clinicians, scientists and students engaged in cancer research at Newcastle share a common purpose. to improve treatment outcomes for patients with cancer. Read more
Clinicians, scientists and students engaged in cancer research at Newcastle share a common purpose: to improve treatment outcomes for patients with cancer. Work covers a broad spectrum - understanding the biological and molecular differences between normal and malignant cells and using this knowledge to develop new anti-cancer drugs.

Our staff and postgraduate students are based in the Northern Institute for Cancer Research (NICR) or the School of Chemistry. The NICR incorporates the Newcastle Cancer Centre, a unique collaboration between Cancer Research UK and the North of England Children's Cancer Research Fund.

We are a major training base for the next generation of cancer researchers. Our Institute covers many areas of cancer research, including:
-Solid tumours and leukaemias
-Childhood and adult cancers
-Drug discovery and early phase clinical trials

We offer approximately 15 MD, PhD and integrated MRes/PhD studentships each year, including the Newcastle Cancer Centre training programme. Projects in all research areas are available to fully-funded international students.

Members of our postgraduate community come from a variety of subject backgrounds including biological and biomedical sciences, chemistry, genetics, pharmacy, medicine, dentistry and veterinary medicine.

We hold regular postgraduate seminars which you will be required to attend and where you will deliver presentations. You will also attend and present your data annually at national cancer research meetings and at least one international meeting.

Placements

Our Institute has close working relationships with companies in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology sectors.

A number of our studentships are direct collaborations with industrial partners, with opportunities to spend placements with these partners.

Facilities

Our staff and postgraduate students are based in the Northern Institute for Cancer Research (NICR) or the School of Chemistry (medicinal chemistry students).

Our laboratories contain a full range of contemporary genomic, bioinformatic, proteomic, synthetic chemistry and pharmacology equipment, and clinical research facilities.

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The MSc in Cancer Biology is for students who wish to gain an advanced education and training in the biological sciences, within the context of a disease that affects a large proportion of the global population. Read more
The MSc in Cancer Biology is for students who wish to gain an advanced education and training in the biological sciences, within the context of a disease that affects a large proportion of the global population.

The programme provides training in the modern practical, academic and research skills that are used in academia and industry. Through a combination of lectures, small-group seminars and practical classes, students will apply this training towards the development of new therapies.

The programme culminates with a research project that investigates the molecular and cellular basis of cancer biology or the development of new therapies under the supervision of active cancer research scientists.

Visit the website: https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/226/cancer-biology

About the School of Biosciences

The School of Biosciences is among the best-funded schools of its kind in the UK, with current support from the BBSRC, NERC, MRC, Wellcome Trust, EU, and industry. It has 38 academic staff, 56 research staff (facility managers, research fellows, postdoctoral researchers and technicians), approximately 100 postgraduate students and 20 key support staff. The school's vibrant atmosphere has expanded to become a flourishing environment to study for postgraduate degrees in a notably friendly and supportive teaching and research environment.

Research in the School of Biosciences revolves around understanding systems and processes in the living cell. It has a strong molecular focus with leading-edge activities that are synergistic with one another and complementary to the teaching provision. Our expertise in disciplines such as biochemistry, microbiology and biomedical science allows us to exploit technology and develop groundbreaking ideas in the fields of genetics, molecular biology, protein science and biophysics. Fields of enquiry encompass a range of molecular processes from cell division, transcription and translation through to molecular motors, molecular diagnostics and the production of biotherapeutics and bioenergy.

In addition to research degrees, our key research strengths underpin a range of unique and career-focused taught Master’s programmes that address key issues and challenges within the biosciences and pharmaceutical industries and prepare graduates for future employment.

Course structure

Each one-hour lecture is supplemented by two hours of small-group seminars and workshops in which individual themes are explored in-depth. There are practical classes and mini-projects in which you design, produce and characterise a therapeutic protein with applications in therapy.

In additional to traditional scientific laboratory reports, experience will be gained in a range of scientific writing styles relevant to future employment, such as literature reviews, patent applications, regulatory documents, and patient information suitable for a non-scientific readership.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

BI830 - Science at Work (30 credits)
BI836 - Practical and Applied Research Skills for Advanced Biologists (30 credits)
BI837 - The Molecular and Cellular Basis of Cancer (15 credits)
BI838 - Genomic Stability and Cancer (15 credits)
BI840 - Cancer Therapeutics: From the Laboratory to the Clinic (15 credits)
BI857 - Cancer Research in Focus (15 credits)
BI845 - MSc Project (60 credits)

Assessment

The programme features a combination of examinations and practically focused continuous assessment, which gives you experience within a range of professional activities, eg, report writing, patent applications and public health information. The assessments have been designed to promote employability in a range of professional settings.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide an excellent quality of postgraduate-level education in the field of cancer, its biology and its treatment

- provide a research-led, inspiring learning environment

- provide a regional postgraduate progression route for the advanced study of a disease that affects a high proportion of the population

- promote engagement with biological research into cancer and inspire you to pursue a scientific career inside or outside of the laboratory

- develop subject specific and transferable skills to maximise employment prospects

- promote an understanding of the impact of scientific research on society and the role for scientists in a range of professions.

Research areas

Research in the School of Biosciences is focused primarily on essential biological processes at the molecular and cellular level, encompassing the disciplines of biochemistry, genetics, biotechnology and biomedical research.

The School’s research has three main themes:

- Protein Science – encompasses researchers involved in industrial biotechnology and synthetic biology, and protein form and function

- Molecular Microbiology – encompasses researchers interested in yeast molecular biology (incorporating the Kent Fungal Group) and microbial pathogenesis

- Biomolecular Medicine – encompasses researchers involved in cell biology, cancer targets and therapies and cytogenomics and bioinformatics.

Each area is led by a senior professor and underpinned by excellent research facilities. The School-led development of the Industrial Biotechnology Centre (IBC), with staff from the other four other schools in the Faculty of Sciences, facilitates and encourages interdisciplinary projects. The School has a strong commitment to translational research, impact and industrial application with a substantial portfolio of enterprise activity and expertise.

Careers

A postgraduate degree in the School of Biosciences is designed to equip our graduates with transferable skills that are highly valued in the workplace. Our research-led ethos ensures that students explore the frontiers of scientific knowledge, and the intensive practical components provide rigorous training in cutting edge technical skills that are used in the modern biosciences while working in areas of world-leading expertise within the School.

Destinations for our graduates include the leading pharmaceutical and biotechnological companies within the UK and leading research institutes both at home and abroad.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply-online/226

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Why this course?. This course will enhance your knowledge and understanding of cancer therapies and provide you with the skills to assess, analyse, critically appraise and evaluate current and emerging anti-cancer therapies and the drug discovery cascade, from target evaluation and engagement to clinical trials. Read more

Why this course?

This course will enhance your knowledge and understanding of cancer therapies and provide you with the skills to assess, analyse, critically appraise and evaluate current and emerging anti-cancer therapies and the drug discovery cascade, from target evaluation and engagement to clinical trials.

The programme was developed in response to the increasing demand for a course which focuses on current and emerging cancer therapies. It is the only programme in the UK which combines a focus on cancer biology with the practical, ethical and economic implications of personalised cancer therapy, along with its biology and the discovery and development of drugs.

It has been constructed to produce world-class graduates with the skills to contribute to the global drive in advancing cancer treatment through research, teaching, industry and public sector employment.

What you'll study

You'll focus on anti-cancer treatment therapies, with a particular emphasis on personalised medicine, covering the therapeutic target and the biological mechanisms of current and emerging anti-cancer therapies. You'll also explore radiotherapy as a diagnostic and as a single or combinational treatment with drugs in anti-cancer therapy.

You'll be introduced to the discovery and development of new drugs and the challenges associated with this process. You'll be able to evaluate the drug discovery pipeline including medicinal chemistry, screening, secondary assays and other drug discovery and development technologies. Through a virtual drug discovery programme, you'll have the opportunity to develop anti-cancer agents and progress these through the drug discovery cascade, from target engagement to clinical trials.

The programme will equip you with a range of skills including scientific writing, critical analysis, problem-solving, teamworking, as well as advanced data set analysis and interpretation. You'll experience a wide range of scientific topics from molecular biology, to cell biology and genetics, medicinal chemistry to formulation and radiobiology to nuclear medicine. You'll have the opportunity to conduct independent research and working as part of a multidisciplinary team you'll gain an appreciation of the contributions other disciplines make to cancer drug discovery.

Facilities

The Strathclyde Institute of Pharmacy & Biomedical Sciences is recognised as one of the foremost departments of its kind in the UK. It's a leading research centre in the search for new and improved medicines. You'll benefit from the advanced facilities of a new £36 million building. The Institute is ranked no 2 in the UK in the Complete University Guide 2018 and the University of Strathclyde has recently been one of the few UK institutes to be awarded the status of 'Emerging Centre of excellence for radiobiology research' in the UK.

Learning & teaching

The course is delivered through lectures, workshops, tutorials and hands-on practical sessions.

If you successfully complete the required taught classes you may undertake a laboratory project on the subject of cancer therapies for the MSc.

Assessment

Written examinations, course work with formative and summative approaches are taken in different aspects of the course. Written reports, oral presentations, scenario-based learning and moderated peer assessment are all included in the course.

Careers

Graduates will have a number of potential employment opportunities: large and small pharma companies, SMEs, within health services and providers, their home institutions and as academics in UK, EU or international Universities.

The course will enable careers in research, academia industry and the health sector and offers you a unique exposure to the entire drug discovery and development cascade while keeping patients' needs at the forefront of the learning process.



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This MSc aims to provide medical and science students with a comprehensive knowledge and understanding of the field of prenatal genetics and fetal medicine, specifically human genetics, human embryonic development and fetal medicine. Read more

This MSc aims to provide medical and science students with a comprehensive knowledge and understanding of the field of prenatal genetics and fetal medicine, specifically human genetics, human embryonic development and fetal medicine. There is a strong focus on the development of key skills and careers advice in the programme.

About this degree

Students will develop a knowledge and understanding of the field of prenatal genetics and fetal medicine, specifically in the areas of basic genetics and technology, genetic mechanisms, medical genetics, organogenesis and fetal development, gametogenesis and IVF, prenatal diagnosis and screening, fetal and perinatal medicine, and preimplantation genetic diagnosis and developing technology. They gain transferable skills including information technology, analysis of scientific papers, essay writing, seminar presentation, research techniques, peer review and laboratory skills.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of eight core modules (120 credits) and a research project (60 credits).

A Postgraduate Diploma consisting of eight core modules (120 credits, full-time nine months, flexible study two to five years) is offered.

Mandatory modules

  • Basic Genetics and Technology
  • Gametogenesis, Preimplantation Development and IVF
  • Genetic Mechanisms
  • Medical Genetics
  • Organogenesis and Fetal Development
  • Prenatal Diagnosis and Screening
  • Fetal and Perinatal Medicine
  • Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis and Developing Technology

Optional modules

There are no optional modules for this programme.

Dissertation/report

All MSc students undertake a clinical, laboratory, audit or library-based research project, which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, tutorials, practical demonstrations in laboratories, observation days in fetal medicine and IVF units, and student presentations. There are a number of peer-led learning activities. Assessment is through essays, patient case reports, critical reviews of papers, online problem booklet, examinations and the dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Prenatal Genetics and Fetal Medicine MSc

Funding

For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website.

Careers

On completion of the programme, all students will have gained knowledge of both the clinical and laboratory aspects of prenatal genetics and fetal medicine. This will enable the science-orientated students to go on to pursue research degrees, further training for careers in prenatal diagnosis or embryology, or other careers in the field or in general science. Medically-orientated students will be able to develop their careers in the field of fetal medicine.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Doctor, South West Yorkshire Partnership NHS Foundation Trust
  • Senior Genetic Counsellor, King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Centre
  • Trainee Clinical Embryologist, George's Memorial Medical Centre
  • Clinical Research Nurse, UCL
  • PhD in Prenatal Diagnosis, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens

Employability

Throughout the MSc programme students learn key skills through peer-led activities, such as evaluating and presenting orally on patient cases and media coverage of scientific papers. Students learn how to write essays and patient case reports and how to critically evaluate papers. They also have the opportunity to take part in debates and ethical discussions and to learn basic laboratory techniques. We offer a comprehensive careers programme involving our alumni, covering job applications, CV writing, general careers in science and specific advice on careers in embryology, clinical genetics, medicine and research degrees.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Institute for Women’s Health delivers excellence in research, clinical practice, education and training in order to make a real and sustainable difference to women's and babies' health worldwide.

The institute's UCL/UCL Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust collaboration provides an academic environment in which students can pursue graduate studies taught by world-class researchers and clinicians.

Our diversity of expertise in maternal and fetal medicine, neonatology, reproductive health and women's cancer ensures a vibrant environment in which students develop subject-specific and generic transferable skills, supporting a broad range of future employment opportunities.



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The MSc in Cancer Research is aimed at life science and medical graduates who wish to specialise in the field of cancer research. Read more
The MSc in Cancer Research is aimed at life science and medical graduates who wish to specialise in the field of cancer research. The purpose of the programme is to provide students with extensive research-laboratory training and an overarching theoretical knowledge of cancer biology. The course has a unique, research-oriented approach with taught modules, resulting in an internationally recognised MSc degree. The obtained knowledge and skillset enables our graduates to pursue a career as a research-scientist in academia, in the medical field or in the biotechnology or pharmaceutical sector.

Specifically the course aims to:

1. Provide a broad and in-depth knowledge in molecular-, cellular- and clinical cancer biology.

2. Provide knowledge in a broad range of classic as well as state-of-the-art research technologies applied in cancer research.

3. Provide training in laboratory and research skills both at basic and advanced levels by assigning students a laboratory research project through which they will develop both technical competencies and critical thinking abilities.

4. Facilitate the interdisciplinary approach of cancer research by engaging clinical and nonclinical scientists, enabling the cross-fertilisation of ideas and thus promoting medically-focused research.

The MSc in Cancer research is a modular course, consisting of 30% taught material (equalling 25 ECTS units) combined with a strong, 70% research element (equal to 65 ECTS) allowing ample time for the students to gain in-depth research exposure.

The course material is delivered using a blended learning format (combination of face-to-face/traditional-format lectures, tutorials, self-directed learning and assignments) that will not only deliver the information the students have to attain, but also trains the students how to research independently and evaluate the information critically, which are key and valuable skills for a highly qualified cancer research scientist.

The research element will encompass two semesters. After an induction phase, the students will work on one research project throughout the two semesters allowing them to acquire a broad range of research skills ranging from state-of-the-art technologies through data interpretation to experimental design and data presentation. Available research project titles in participating laboratories of the School of Natural Sciences and other programme-associated Institutes will be provided to the students from which they can choose their project options. The students will write the MSc thesis on the findings of their research project..

Overall, the knowledge and laboratory experience providesour graduates with a great advantage when competing for either academic or industry-linked careers.

For further information please visit: http://www.nuigalway.ie/courses/research-postgraduate-programmes/structured-phd/cancer-research.html


How to apply:
Applications are made online via Postgraduate Applications Centre (http://www.pac.ie/nuigalway). The following documents must be supplied:
- A Curriculum Vitae
- A personal statement of approximately 600 words explaining why the the applicant wishes to undertake the Structured MSc in Cancer Research programme and how the programme fits into their career objectives.
Academic transcripts, unless the applicant is a graduate or current student of NUI Galway.

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The use of chemotherapeutic agents to target and kill cancer cells is a central strategy in the treatment of cancers. This course describes the nature of the disease at the systems, cellular and molecular levels, and focuses on the drugs which are used to treat different cancers and on how they work. Read more
The use of chemotherapeutic agents to target and kill cancer cells is a central strategy in the treatment of cancers. This course describes the nature of the disease at the systems, cellular and molecular levels, and focuses on the drugs which are used to treat different cancers and on how they work.

More about this course

Worldwide the incidence of cancer is increasing, and is expected to reach 22 million new cases per year by 2030. In addition to treatments such as radiotherapy and surgery, chemotherapy has a vital role to play in prolonging the lives of patients.

The aims of this course are to:
-Provide you with an in-depth understanding of the molecular targets at which the different classes of anticancer drugs are aimed, and of how drug therapies are evolving;
-Review the biology of cancer with respect to genetics, pathological considerations, and the molecular changes within cells which are associated with the progression of the disease;
-Enhance intellectual and practical skills necessary for the collection, analysis, interpretation and understanding of scientific data;
deliver a programme of advanced study to equip you for a future career in anti-cancer drug development.

Assessment is a combination of coursework, which includes tests and essays, the research project and its oral defence and examination.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2016/17 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:
-Cancer Pharmacology (core, 20 credits)
-Cancer: Diagnosis and Therapy (core, 20 credits)
-Medical Genetics (core, 20 credits)
-Molecular Oncology (core, 20 credits)
-Research Project (core, 60 credits)
-Scientific Frameworks for Research (core, 20 credits)
-Advanced Drug Formulation Technologies (option, 20 credits)
-Bioinformatics and Molecular Modelling (option, 20 credits)
-Drug Discovery Technology (option, 20 credits)

After the course

This course is primarily designed for those wishing to pursue a career in anti-cancer drug development, whether in academia or within the pharmaceutical industry. The programme provides an excellent basis for further research or study.

Moving to one campus

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2017. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

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Improved global life expectancy has resulted in a cancer epidemic. It is well recognised that accurate early diagnosis is an essential aspect of the administration of increasingly expensive and tailored cancer treatment care plans. Read more
Improved global life expectancy has resulted in a cancer epidemic. It is well recognised that accurate early diagnosis is an essential aspect of the administration of increasingly expensive and tailored cancer treatment care plans.

The Biomedical Sciences (Cancer Biology) MSc programme has been devised to provide knowledge of key aspects of this increasingly important disease area.

You will become familiar with the genetic and cellular changes occurring in both solid and blood-borne cancers, the current and emerging technological approaches for diagnosis of the disease and the effect on pertinent cellular changes on patient prognosis. Studies on populations and the influence of genotypic variation will ensure that you are qualified to make sense of cancer statistics.

You are able to tailor your programme by selecting from a menu of option modules and pursuing a research project in an area ranging from molecular through to cellular or tissue-based aspects of cancer.

During the course you will join our thriving research environment and will have access to excellent laboratory facilities within the Faculty. On successful completion of the course you will be equipped to take forward your career with an in-depth knowledge of this increasingly common disease area.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of what you will study on this course.

Core modules
-ADVANCED CANCER BIOLOGY
-CELL SIGNALLING AND GENETICS
-MOLECULAR SCIENCE AND DIAGNOSTICS
-POSTGRADUATE PROJECT
-POSTGRADUATE RESEARCH METHODS

Option modules
-COMMUNICATING SCIENCE
-EXTENDED POSTGRADUATE PROJECT
-IMMUNOPATHOLOGY
-IMMUNOTHERAPY
-MOLECULAR AND CELLULAR THERAPEUTICS
-SYSTEMS BIOLOGY

Associated careers

After graduation, you will be equipped with the skills and knowledge to pursue a range of cancer-focused careers including appointments in diagnostic laboratories, academic, biotechnological and pharmaceutical research.

As a graduate of this course, you will be ideally placed to play an essential role in both diagnosis and improved care of cancer patients. Opportunities are also available to pursue a career in clinical trials and in areas such as data analysis and public health.

Professional recognition

The course is accredited by the Institute of Biomedical Science (IBMS).

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