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Masters Degrees (Cambridge University)

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Prepare yourself for the ever-evolving world of publishing. Get up-to-the-minute information on key issues and emerging technologies, and direct access to professional publishers through our industry links. Read more

Prepare yourself for the ever-evolving world of publishing. Get up-to-the-minute information on key issues and emerging technologies, and direct access to professional publishers through our industry links. You might even win one of our prestigious bursaries.

Course duration: 12 months full-time or 2 years part-time (September starts); 17 months full-time or 2 years part-time (January starts)

Teaching times

Semesters 1 & 2: Monday 6-8pm AND Thursday 6-8pm (full-time) / Monday 6-8pm OR Thursday 6-8pm (part-time)

NB while you will be taught predominantly in the evening, some visits to businesses will take place during the day.

Overview

Our Master's course will take you on an in-depth exploration of the publishing industry, and equip you with vital skills for a career in publishing and many related fields.

By investigating areas like commissioning and editing, business management, marketing, production and publishing law, you’ll develop the skills and knowledge to plan and implement publishing projects in the context of emerging digital media.

You’ll benefit from many networking and career-building opportunities with publishing professionals, such as work placements, projects, field trips and guest lectures. Our professional mentoring scheme will provide you with your own mentor from industry according to your career interests, so you'll have the best possible introduction to the world of publishing.

We run a number of publishing and marketing short courses which our MA Publishing students can join for free. There's also the chance to win one of our annual bursaries and prizes, which are sponsored by distinguished organisations such as Cambridge University Press and the Worshipful Company of Stationers.

At the end of the course, you’ll undertake a Major Project, which might be a conventional academic project, a case study based on work experience, a creative piece with critical commentary or a business plan – the choice is yours.

Our MA Publishing was developed in close consultation with Cambridge University Press and other local publishers including ProQuest and Lutterworth's, so you can be confident it meets the professional needs of the publishing industry.

Careers

This course will equip you with knowledge and skills that will make you highly employable, in the publishing industry or any field that involves editorial work, marketing, business planning or project management. Our graduates have a track record of success: 100% of students have gone into paid employment within six months of graduating, with more than 90% in publishing-related careers at companies such as Bloomsbury, Wiley Capstone, Pearson, Cambridge University Press and Macmillan.*

Or you might decide to continue on to a research degree, like our PhD Publishing.

*Course Leader's records

Core modules

Creativity and Content in Publishing

Legal Rights and Digital Issues in Publishing

The Business of Publishing

Production Processes in Publishing

Major Project Publishing

Assessment

You’ll demonstrate your progress through a combination of essays, reports, business plans and book proposals, individual and group presentations (with professionally prepared handouts) and your final Major Project.

Work placements and internships

You’ll be able to apply for an internship with various local, national and even overseas organisations, like Cambridge University Press, Nexus Partnerships, Bloomsbury, Hachette, Hart McLeod, Lutterworth's, ProQuest and Shakespeare and Company in Paris.

Bursaries

As an offer holder for this course, you’ll have a chance to apply for one of our annual scholarships. The Worshipful Company of Stationers and Newspaper Makers provides a scholarship of £6,000 a year, and the chance to become a Freeman of the Company, while our Cambridge University Press bursary offers a reduction of £1,200 on your tuition fees.

You’ll also have a chance of winning one of our graduation prizes for innovation, best major project, best overall grade and greatest contribution to the course.



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The MSt is part of the Clinical Medicine Programme, a suite of part-time courses designed to enhance the specialist skills of senior healthcare professionals in training and broaden their understanding in healthcare education, research, leadership and management. Read more
The MSt is part of the Clinical Medicine Programme, a suite of part-time courses designed to enhance the specialist skills of senior healthcare professionals in training and broaden their understanding in healthcare education, research, leadership and management.

The programme has been developed by Cambridge University Health Partners, the academic health sciences centre, in conjunction with the School of Clinical Medicine and the Institute of Continuing Education, University of Cambridge.

The Intensive Care pathway will be offered for the first time in October 2016. It is expected that further subspecialties will be available in future and will form a broad panel of routes for training in subspecialty clinical medicine.

Visit the website: http://www.ice.cam.ac.uk/mst-clinical-medicine

Course detail

Aims of the programme:

- Create an international cohort of consultants able to pursue and develop their roles in a rapidly-changing and challenging environment of clinical medicine

- Develop the confidence within these consultants to lead service improvement for safe and high quality patient care, with the required knowledge, skills and capability to have a positive personal impact on the work of others in their clinical team and wider service

- Develop consultants with an understanding of teaching, professional development and assessment in the field of clinical medicine

- Develop consultants with an understanding of research methodologies and ethical considerations relevant to clinical medicine

- Encourage participants to develop as reflective practitioners with the emotional intelligence, resilience and astuteness required to be effective clinical leaders

- Encourage a commitment to intellectual challenge and evidence-based clinical practice informed by the latest conceptual and theoretical knowledge of medical education, research methods, ethics and clinical leadership and governance

Format

It is expected that students will be admitted for the MSt degree from the outset and study part-time over two years. You will complete the Postgraduate Certificate modules in year one and the intensive care taught modules in years one and two, with a clinical research project and associated dissertation in year two.

Students will also study the Helmsmanship programme in parallel with the MSt.

Modules

Year 1: Postgraduate Certificate modules:

Module 1: Clinical Research
Teaching dates: 12 – 15 September 2016; 28 November 2016

Module 2: Clinical Education
Teaching dates: 23 – 26 January 2017; 9 February 2017

Module 3: Clinical Leadership
Teaching dates: 25 – 28 April 2017; 8 June 2017

Years 1 and 2: Intensive care modules:

Module 1: Sub-specialty Intensive Care Medicine
Dates to be confirmed.

Module 2: Intensive Care Medicine at Cambridge
Dates to be confirmed.

Module 3: Research in Intensive Care Medicine
Dates to be confirmed.

Helmsmanship

Helmsmanship is a unique, two year, non-award bearing course which will help you to develop the non-clinical skills required for consultant-level appointments at tertiary centres. The course is designed to provide personalised comprehensive training in the attributes required to be an effective senior clinician.

It is delivered by Cambridge University Health Partners together with the Judge Business School. The faculty includes clinicians, senior NHS managers, organisational development consultants, Judge Business School academics, and experts from the wider Cambridge community.

The course is practically focussed, developing advanced skills in education, teamworking, leadership and management in an environment which encourages personal development, organisational intelligence, iconoclasm, and resilience. It is delivered in a variety of formats, using innovative tools to engender skills such as consultant level responsibility, development and improvement of clinical and non-clinical services, change management, and the effective supervision of teams and engagement with colleagues.

Helmsmanship is not delivered in any other environment and is designed to fit within the Clinical Medicine Programme at Cambridge.

Assessment

Students are assessed throughout the taught modules of the programme using a variety of techniques and interrelated strategies including evidence of regular reflection. Demonstration of active participation in the programme will be required. There may also be a requirement for the students to take part in peer review of other students.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding

You may be interested to know that from 2016/17, Student Finance England (SFE) is introducing a postgraduate loans scheme for full-time and part-time Master’s courses. Information on eligibility, the amount of the loan and the level of repayment can be found in SFE’s The Student Room: http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/content.php?r=5659-Student-Finance

Please note that SFE is planning to take applications via its main Student finance website, from summer 2016: https://www.gov.uk/student-finance

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Philosophy at Essex takes philosophy back to its roots in everyday existential, social and political issues. Read more
Philosophy at Essex takes philosophy back to its roots in everyday existential, social and political issues. Our radical approach cuts across traditional boundaries, fostering dialogue between different schools and disciplines, and we are one of the few universities in the world that bridges the divide between the two great traditions of Analytic and Continental philosophy.

Our MA Philosophy will provide you with a rigorous grounding in modern and contemporary European philosophy. We have leading expertise in critical theory, phenomenology, German Idealism, nineteenth Century German philosophy, aesthetics, existentialism, contemporary French philosophy, philosophy and psychoanalysis, and medical humanities.

You study modules of your choice, develop your research, writing, and employability skills through an intensive Writing Workshop, and prepare an MA dissertation in your chosen area of research.

Our department is widely regarded as among the very best in the UK, having been recognised as one of the top 10 UK universities for research excellence (REF 2014), and being placed in the top 10 in The Guardian University Guide in 2010, 2011, and 2013.

As an alternative to our more flexible MA Philosophy, you can focus your study on a more specific area by following one of the following pathways:

MA Philosophy (Continental Philosophy Pathway)
All of our academic staff work on Continental Philosophy, including classical German philosophy (Kant and German Idealism), Frankfurt School Critical Theory (Adorno, Habermas, Honneth), nineteenth-century philosophy (Kierkegaard, Marx, Nietzsche), and phenomenology (Husserl, Heidegger, Merleau-Ponty). On this pathway you choose from a range of specified topics in these areas, in addition to some outside options and a dissertation on a topic in Continental Philosophy.

MA Philosophy (Critical Social Theory Pathway)
We are the leading centre for Critical Social Theory in the UK with five members of academic staff working on the Frankfurt School (Adorno, Habermas, Honneth), contemporary French thought (Derrida, Foucault, Rancière) and issues in Critical Social Theory, such as activist political theory, theory of recognition, aesthetics and politics, deliberative democracy, and the moral limits of markets. On this pathway you study modules on the Frankfurt School and Contemporary Critical Theory, in addition to some outside options and a dissertation on a topic in Critical Social Theory.

MA Philosophy (Philosophy and Art History Pathway)
Drawing on the collaborative and interdisciplinary approach of the School, our new Philosophy and Art History pathway enables students to get a thorough grounding in philosophical aesthetics. You explore issues in aesthetics and their bearing on other areas of philosophy (such as critical theory or existentialism) and Art History (such as aesthetic practices and curating), and profit from the wide-ranging expertise of our staff in both disciplines. On this pathway you study modules on Philosophy/Aesthetics and Art History (dealing, for example, with Art & Politics, Art, Architecture and Urbanism, or Art, Science & Knowledge), in addition to some outside options and a dissertation on a topic in Philosophy and Art History.

Our expert staff

Our courses are taught by world-class academics, and over three quarters of our research is rated “world-leading” or “internationally excellent” (REF 2014), which puts us fifth in the UK for research outputs.

Our open-minded and enthusiastic staff have an exceptionally broad range of research interests, so whatever questions in philosophy catch hold of your imagination, there is certain to be someone you can approach to find out more.

Recent projects and publications include:
-Béatrice Han-Pile and Dan Watts’ major new research project, The Ethics of Powerlessness: the Theological Virtues Today
-The Essex Autonomy Project, a major interdisciplinary project funded by the AHRC (Arts and Humanities Research Council), which aims to investigate the role of autonomous judgment in many aspects of human life
-Peter Dews’ The Idea of Evil, Polity, 2007
-Béatrice Han-Pile, Foucault’s Critical Project: Between the Transcendental and the Historical, Stanford University Press, 2002
-Fiona Hughes, Kant’s Critique of Aesthetic Judgement: A Reader’s Guide, Edinburgh University Press, 2007.
-Wayne Martin, Theories of Judgement: Psychology, Logic, Phenomenology, Cambridge University Press, 2006
-Irene McMullin’s Time and the Shared World: Heidegger on Social Relations, Northwestern University Press, 2013
-Fabian Freyenhagen’s Adorno’s Practical Philosophy: Living Less Wrongly, Cambridge University Press, 2013

Specialist facilities

-Graduate students have access to desk space in the School and many students work there on a daily basis
-A dedicated German-language course for graduate students in philosophy
-Attend our Critical Theory Colloquium
-Attend the Werkstatt, where recent work on phenomenology is presented
-An exciting programme of research seminars, reading groups and mini-courses that help you expand your philosophical knowledge beyond what you learn on your course
-Access a variety of philosophy textbooks and journals in the Albert Sloman Library and in our departmental library

Your future

Many of our philosophy graduates embark on doctoral study after finishing their MA. We offer supervision for PhDs in a range of fields including:
-Continental philosophy
-Critical Social Theory
-History of philosophy
-Applied ethics

Our graduates have also gone into careers in law, the media, local administration, HM Revenue and Customs, and top jobs in the Civil Service.

We work with our university’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Example structure

-Dissertation: Continental Philosophy (optional)
-Dissertation: Critical Social Theory (optional)
-Dissertation: MA Philosophy (optional)
-Dissertation: Philosophy & Art History (optional)
-Phenomenology and Existentialism (optional)
-Kant's Revolution in Philosophy (optional)
-Hegel (optional)
-Contemporary Critical Theory (optional)
-Topics in Continental Philosophy (optional)
-MA Writing Workshop (optional)
-The Frankfurt School (optional)
-Philosophy and Aesthetics (optional)
-Collecting Art From Latin America (optional)
-Art & Politics (optional)
-Current Research in Art History (optional)
-Art, Architecture and Urbanism (optional)
-Contemporary Theories of Justice (optional)
-Environmental Politics (optional)
-Political Economy (optional)
-Political Theory (optional)
-Research Seminar in Political Theory and Methods (optional)
-Theory and Explanation in Political Science (optional)
-Ideology and Political Discourse (optional)
-The New Nature Writing (optional)
-Foundations of Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (optional)
-The Protection of Refugees and Displaced Persons in International Law (optional)
-Human Rights and Development (optional)
-International Trade, Investment and Human Rights. (optional)
-Human Rights for Women (optional)
-Transitional Justice (optional)
-Psycho Analytic Theory (optional)
-Psychoanalytic Methodology (optional)

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- Aims. It is our aim to develop in our students the skills required to submit a satisfactory MPhil thesis at the end of their chosen duration (1 year full time or 2 years part time). Read more

Overview

- Aims
It is our aim to develop in our students the skills required to submit a satisfactory MPhil thesis at the end of their chosen duration (1 year full time or 2 years part time). In order to achieve this, a student will have acquired the essential skills required to design and conduct experiments (including applying for ethics approval where necessary), to analyse results, and to communicate these both in writing and orally. These skills will include those that can be transferred successfully to their choice of academic or other career.

- Support
The MPhil at the CBU is achieved by supervised research and is under the jurisdiction of the Degree Committee for the Faculty of Biology. The provision of supervision and teaching is overseen by the Graduate School of Life Sciences. Within the CBU, the internal Graduate Committee is responsible for all aspects of the running of the degrees. A suitable project falling within the interests of the supervisor, and sustainable within the limits imposed by the facilities available at the CBU, is agreed by both student and supervisor, and endorsed by the Graduate Committee. Each graduate student has a primary Supervisor, who will supervise the main body of their research, and an Advisor who acts as a supplementary source of advice and support. We also have two pastoral tutors who offer personal support and counselling throughout a student’s time at the Unit.

- Seminars
Students attend a variety of Unit Seminars given by distinguished scientists. They are able to draw from the CBU’s panels of research volunteers, both normal and clinical, and enjoy the benefits of superb computing facilities and support staff, including a Graphics/Multimedia Officer.

- The Cambridge Graduate Programme in Cognitive and Brain Sciences
CBU students are full members of the Cambridge Graduate Programme in Cognitive and Brain Sciences, which has been jointly established by the Unit and the Departments of Psychology and Psychiatry. This consists of a weekly series of theoretical seminars presented by senior researchers from the CBU and from the University. Lectures will be held on Mondays 4-5.30pm in the West Wing Seminar Room at the MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, 15 Chaucer Road, Cambridge, CB2 7EF (unless otherwise specified), or at the Psychology department on the Downing Site in Cambridge city centre. Seminars are held during Michaelmas and Lent terms only.
All public talks are publicised on the University talks website, which also contains an archive of older lectures. All scientists at the CBU are expected to attend the two public talk series, held on Wednesdays and Thursdays.

- Facilities and Linkages
The CBU has excellent facilities for experimental behavioural studies involving normal populations and patients with brain damage, as well as institutional links with Addenbrooke’s hospital giving access to various types of patient populations, including stroke and progressive neural degenerative diseases. There is a 3 Tesla MRI scanner on the premises, as well as MEG and EEG facilities. Through its partnership with the University of Cambridge Wolfson Brain Imaging Centre, the CBU has excellent access to PET and additional fMRI (3 Tesla) facilities. The CBU also offers state of the art computing facilities, supporting Unix, PC, and Mac platforms, and handling the large volumes of neuro-imaging data as well as extensive computational modelling. All students have their own networked desktop computer, with internet access through JANET.
The Unit’s close links with the University Department of Psychology and the Department of Psychiatry are strengthened through the Cambridge Graduate Programme in Cognitive and Brain Sciences, a joint programme of termly Seminars given by members of each Department and attended by all graduate students.
The CBU is also an active member of the wider neuroscience community in Cambridge, supported by the Cambridge Neuroscience network.

- Completion on time
For MPhil students a personalised training and research programme will be agreed during the early weeks of the degree.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/blcbmpbsc

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the programme, students will have:
• a comprehensive understanding of techniques, and a thorough knowledge of the literature, applicable to their own research;
• demonstrated originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical

understanding of how research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in their field;
• shown abilities in the critical evaluation of current research and research techniques and methodologies;
• demonstrated some self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems, and acted autonomously in the planning and implementation of research.

Continuing

There is no automatic progression from a CBU MPhil degree to a CBU PhD. MPhil students will need to apply to be considered for a PhD place alongside all other candidates.

Teaching

We offer a variety of theoretical and skills based training to support our wide range of topics and streams of research. A personalised training programme will be agreed for each incoming student in the first few weeks of the degree period. This will cover an agreed timetable of attendance at the various seminars, the research project planned, amd the formal review points throughout the degree.

- Feedback
Continuous assessment and supervision. Students can expect to receive an online feedback report each term.

Funding Opportunities

For eligible applicants, several MRC funded studentships are available, which pay the University Composition Fee, and a small but liveable stipend (currently £13,726 p.a.), however it should be noted that this money has never been allocated to an MPhil student as we always have excellent eligible PhD students whose funding takes priority. In reality a MPhil would almost certainly need to be self-funded or have external funding. Hence, independently funded applications are very welcome, and we will also always nominate successful applicants for the various Cambridge University scholarships available, depending on individual eligibility.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

Find out how to apply here http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/blcbmpbsc/apply

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/blcbmpbsc

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Based in London, this groundbreaking Master’s programme offers students unique access to world-class scholars, thinkers and practitioners drawn from the world of sport and its academic study. Read more

Based in London, this groundbreaking Master’s programme offers students unique access to world-class scholars, thinkers and practitioners drawn from the world of sport and its academic study.

It is directed by Ed Smith, the commentator, historian of sport, and former cricketer for England, Middlesex and Kent.

The course enables the student to undertake research on a specific topic, agreed with the supervisor, in any aspect of the history of sport over the last two centuries. Assessment is by a dissertation, written under expert guidance over the course of the year.

A central feature of the programme is its series of ten evening seminars and post-seminar dinners in a London club, at which participants can engage in general discussion with guest speakers. These experts include:

  • Mike Brearley OBE, former Captain of the England Cricket Team and former President of the MCC
  • Dr Kasia Boddy, Lecturer at Cambridge University and author of Boxing: A Cultural History
  • Mervyn King, Lord King of Lothbury KG, GBE, FBA, former Governor of the Bank of England and ex-Director, Aston Villa Football Club
  • Professor Christopher Young, historian of sport, Cambridge University
  • Simon Kuper, author and Financial Times columnist
  • Matthew Syed, journalist, author and broadcaster

Sport’s place in modern life has never been more central, and the history of sport is a rapidly growing area of academic study. The course will touch on all major sports – in Britain, America and on the Continent. Some of the themes addressed by the lectures will be:

  • Why was Britain so central to the development of modern sport?
  • When and how did sport become politicised?
  • How has sport influenced attitudes towards class, race, gender and sexuality?
  • Sport’s role as an agent and beneficiary of globalisation.

The course will begin with two seminars about how to choose, research and write an academic dissertation, held at the University’s London offices, 51 Gower Street, Bloomsbury, London WC1E 6HJ. These will be followed by ten guest lectures and dinners, held at the splendid Caledonian Club (Halkin Street, London SW1X 7DR), a few moments from Hyde Park Corner in central London.



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World History at the University of Cambridge combines the study of global and imperial history with the study of Asian, African and Latin American histories. Read more
World History at the University of Cambridge combines the study of global and imperial history with the study of Asian, African and Latin American histories. It draws upon the expertise of faculty members in each of these areas, as well as in Middle Eastern, Oceanic and American history. The MPhil in World History enables students to develop strong expertise in this rich and expanding field of historical scholarship. The MPhil in World History combines courses and a dissertation over a 9-month program. The core course focuses on historiographical debates in world history, leading to two options, usually in the history of a world region. From first term, students also begin directed research for a 15–20,000 word dissertation, working closely with a supervisor from the Cambridge World History Group. Students will also take language classes, a component that is required but not examined. This may be in any language offered in the Cambridge University Language Program, and may be elementary, continuing or advanced. In this way, the Cambridge MPhil in World History offers students thorough preparation for an advanced research degree. Cambridge graduates in World History have taken up posts in universities and academic-related spheres of work around the world. The MPhil in World History provides a point of entry into this rich tradition.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/hihimpwhs

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the programme, students will have:

- knowledge of key debates and trends in world history and historiography
- skills in presenting work in both oral and written form
- acquired the ability to situate their own research findings within the context of previous and current interpretative scholarly debates in the field

Format

The MPhil in World History course has five elements, combining taught classes, a research project, language acquisition and participation in research seminar:

1. The core course, Debates in World History (10%) This course is historiographically based, engaging students with key scholarship, classic texts, and their revisions. Several origins and traditions of world history, global history, transnational history, and regional history will be established and questioned in student-led seminar discussion.

2. Two elective courses, selected from a suite of options (20%). Options will vary from year to year, but will include courses such as “Global Thinkers”, “Global China”, “Inequality: a Global History”.

3. A dissertation (15-20,000 words) (70%).

4. A language (non-examined). This may be preliminary, intermediate or advanced, in any language.

5. Participation in the Cambridge World History Seminar.

Students will receive both formal and informal feedback in all three modules, as well as from their thesis supervisor throughout the period of teaching.

Students will receive feedback via the following routes:

- Supervision: regular oral feedback in addition to termly online feedback reports (CGSRS)
- Core course and Option essays: written feedback
- Graduate Workshop / Seminars: oral feedback
- Language classes (if taken): oral and possible written feedback from teachers
- Dissertation examination: formal written feedback from two examiners after submission and examination of dissertation

Assessment

15,000–20,000 words. The dissertation will be examined by an internal and an external examiner. The dissertation is worth 70% of the final mark. An oral examination will only be required in cases where one of the marks is a marginal fail.

Core: 3-4,000 word Essay (10% of final mark)
Options: 2 x 3-4,000 word Essay (20% of final mark)

NB: Language Component is compulsory but is not examined.

Students will also prepare a 2,000 word dissertation proposal essay due in the Lent Term. This essay will be unassessed but students will meet with their supervisor to discuss the essay and receive feedback.

Continuing

In order to be considered for continuation to the PhD, and always subject to satisfactory supervision arrangements being in place, students are expected to obtain an overall mark of 70 for the MPhil and a mark of at least 70 for their dissertation.

Please see the Faculty website for more information:

http://www.hist.cam.ac.uk/prospective-graduates/apply/apply-mphil-phd
http://www.hist.cam.ac.uk/prospective-graduates/apply/apply-ltc-home

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

Please see the History Faculty’s Funding Guide via the History Faculty’s weblink below:

http://www.hist.cam.ac.uk/prospective-graduates/faculty-funding/funding-options

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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Further your professional practice in graphic communication. Learn to challenge preconceived ideas and develop a truly innovative approach to your work. Read more

Further your professional practice in graphic communication. Learn to challenge preconceived ideas and develop a truly innovative approach to your work. You'll be supported by practising designers and work on self-directed and industry-driven projects, while also honing your research skills.

Course duration: 12 months full-time or 24 months part-time.

Teaching times

Full time - Tuesday & Wednesday 10am - 5pm

Part time - Year 1: Wednesday 10am-5pm; Year 2: Tuesday 10am-5pm

Overview

Whether you’re a new graduate or an established, professional designer, our course will help you to engage with graphic design and typography at an advanced level.

You’ll explore working practices in graphic communication and look at issues that designers - and the industry - face. As well as furthering your professional understanding, you'll also be sharpening your academic knowledge and research skills.

Undertaking both self-directed and industry-driven projects, you’ll learn to challenge preconceived thinking and develop innovative approaches to your design work. You’ll also develop your creative thinking around the professional, business and social contexts of graphic communication.

Throughout the course, your project work will be supported by collaboration and dialogue with staff, visiting professionals and fellow students.

Careers

Our Master's course will equip you for professional employment or self-employment in graphic design and design consultancy, as well as related fields like brand development, art-editorial design, publishing, typography/typesetting, advertising, and media design.

It will also give you a basis for a teaching career in higher education. You might decide to move on to a research degree, like our PhD Graphic Design and Typography.

You’ll also benefit from our links with industry, including Cambridge University Press, Oxford University Press, Sony, and a number of independent design practices and consultants.

Core modules

Process and Practice as Research

Interpretation and Origination: Modes of Graphic Authorship

Master's Dissertation Art and Design

Typographic Enquiry

Master's Project: Art and Design

Assessment

You’ll show your progress through a combination of portfolio work, evaluative commentaries, blog participation, group critiques, one-to-one tutorials, presentations, log books and analytical reports, and a 6,000-word research essay.

Where you'll study

Cambridge School of Art has been inspiring creativity since 1858 when it was opened by John Ruskin.

Engaging with current debates surrounding contemporary practice and with the state-of-the-art facilities, Cambridge School of Art houses light, bright studios, industry-standard film and photographic facilities, and 150-year-old printing presses alongside dedicated Apple Mac suites. Our digital art gallery, the Ruskin Gallery, exhibits both traditional shows and multimedia presentations, from national and international touring exhibitions and our own students.

We are the only university in Cambridge offering art and design courses at higher education level. A tight-knit community of artists, academics and over 900 students, we collaborate across our University, the creative industries, and other sectors. Cambridge is a centre for employment in the creative industries and there are rich opportunities for collaboration with the city’s entertainment, technological, scientific, arts and heritage industries.

Our graduates have a history of winning national and international awards and an excellent employment record. They include Pink Floyd's Syd Barrett and Dave Gilmour, Spitting Image creators Peter Fluck and Roger Law, and illustrator Ronald Searle, the creator of St Trinian's.

We’re part of the Faculty of Arts, Law and Social Sciences, a hub of creative and cultural innovation whose groundbreaking research has real social impact.



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CBU students are full members of the Cambridge Graduate Programme in Cognitive and Brain Sciences, which has been jointly established by the Unit and the Departments of Psychology and Psychiatry. Read more
CBU students are full members of the Cambridge Graduate Programme in Cognitive and Brain Sciences, which has been jointly established by the Unit and the Departments of Psychology and Psychiatry. This consists of a weekly series of theoretical seminars presented by senior researchers from the CBU and from the University. Lectures will be held on Mondays 4-5.30pm in the West Wing Seminar Room at the MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, 15 Chaucer Road, Cambridge, CB2 7EF (unless otherwise specified), or at the Psychology department on the Downing Site in Cambridge city centre. Seminars are held during Michaelmas and Lent terms only.

Visit the website: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/blcbmpbsc

Course detail

It is our aim to develop in our students the skills required to submit a satisfactory MPhil thesis at the end of their chosen duration (1 year full time or 2 years part time). In order to achieve this, a student will have acquired the essential skills required to design and conduct experiments (including applying for ethics approval where necessary), to analyse results, and to communicate these both in writing and orally. These skills will include those that can be transferred successfully to their choice of academic or other

Format

We offer a variety of theoretical and skills based training to support our wide range of topics and streams of research. A personalised training programme will be agreed for each incoming student in the first few weeks of the degree period. This will cover an agreed timetable of attendance at the various seminars, the research project planned, amd the formal review points throughout the degree.

The MPhil at the CBU is achieved by supervised research and is under the jurisdiction of the Degree Committee for the Faculty of Biology. The provision of supervision and teaching is overseen by the Graduate School of Life Sciences. Within the CBU, the internal Graduate Committee is responsible for all aspects of the running of the degrees. A suitable project falling within the interests of the supervisor, and sustainable within the limits imposed by the facilities available at the CBU, is agreed by both student and supervisor, and endorsed by the Graduate Committee. Each graduate student has a primary Supervisor, who will supervise the main body of their research, and an Advisor who acts as a supplementary source of advice and support. We also have two pastoral tutors who offer personal support and counselling throughout a student’s time at the Unit.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the programme, students will have:

• a comprehensive understanding of techniques, and a thorough knowledge of the literature, applicable to their own research;

• demonstrated originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical

understanding of how research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in their field;

• shown abilities in the critical evaluation of current research and research techniques and methodologies;

• demonstrated some self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems, and acted autonomously in the planning and implementation of research.

Assessment

Examined by thesis (20,000 words), with an oral viva to review.

Continuing

There is no automatic progression from a CBU MPhil degree to a CBU PhD. MPhil students will need to apply to be considered for a PhD place alongside all other candidates.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

For eligible applicants, several MRC funded studentships are available (see MRC eligibility details), which pay the University Composition Fee, and a small but liveable stipend (currently £13,726 p.a.), however it should be noted that this money has never been allocated to an MPhil student as we always have excellent eligible PhD students whose funding takes priority. In reality a MPhil would almost certainly need to be self-funded or have external funding. Hence, independently funded applications are very welcome, and we will also always nominate successful applicants for the various Cambridge University scholarships available, depending on individual eligibility.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.2016.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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A distinctive feature of the MA (Autism) Education is the focus on learning from the authentic voices of people with personal experience of autism and the expectation that students will engage critically with received wisdom about autism. Read more
A distinctive feature of the MA (Autism) Education is the focus on learning from the authentic voices of people with personal experience of autism and the expectation that students will engage critically with received wisdom about autism.

The MA engages with education across the age range from early years to adulthood, and is relevant to a wide diversity of settings. Students on the programme include experienced professionals, people who identify with autism and parents /allies of people on the spectrum.

The close association between the Centre for Educational Research and the MA provides opportunities to work with like-minded research-active peers within a lively and supportive learning community. LSBU is currently partnering with Research Autism and the University of Cambridge on a study which explores the value of mentoring from the perspective of young adults on the autism spectrum.

Opportunities for accreditation of prior learning are available to students with an appropriate background and this should be discussed with the course director who will also explain the CPD processes on request. Individual MA modules and sessions can be taken as Continued Professional Development (CPD).

National Award for SEN Co-ordinator

You can choose to take the recognised 'National Award for SEN Co-ordination' or options that will further deepen your understanding of autism.

Modules

All modules are assessed by a mix of assignments, presentations, research projects and portfolio development.

Year 1

Two optional modules (list below)

• Teaching and learning: The needs of learners with special needs, autism and disability
• Special educational needs and disability
• Understanding autism and learning
• Autism individuality and identity

Year 2

• Research methods (compulsory)
In addition to one of the optional modules listed above

Year 3

• Dissertation

Options

• Part 1 SENCO National Award
• Part 2 SENCO National Award

Study hours

In year one you'll typically study two modules of 36 hours contact time each plus self-managed study hours.

Teaching and learning

You'll be taught by Dr Nicola Martin who has substantial experience in the field of autism including working with Professor Baron-Cohen on the Cambridge University Autism Project. She was also formerly director of the Autism Centre at Sheffield Hallam University. Dr Martin is currently a lecturer at LSBU and is a Principal Investigator for Research Autism.

You'll benefit from an up to date Virtual Learning Environment via Moodle and be actively encouraged to make use of the extensive range of support services across the university. You'll have access to a supervisor during the dissertation phase.

Placements

Access to the workplace (including voluntary work) is essential for most of the modules within the MA. Prospective students who are not currently in (paid or unpaid) employment should talk to the course director.

Professional links

The department has wide professional links within and beyond the university and the UK. Examples include:

• The Equality Challenge Unit
• The Alliance for Inclusive Education
• Equality and Diversity Forum Research Network
• The Leadership Foundation
• Research Autism
• Theorising Autism Project
• Teacher Education for Equality and Sustainability Network (TEESNet)
• National Association of Disability Practitioners
• Commonworks (for a just and sustainable world)

Recent guest lectures have been given by researchers from Research Autism and The Theorising Autism Project.

Employability

This programme will contribute to your employability and the National SENco award may be a requirement of your workplace.

The Autism Act 2009 and The Adult Autism Strategy 2009 require professionals from a wide variety of disciplines to understand autism. The MA could open up opportunities in areas within and beyond educational settings. Professionals with an MA providing an in-depth and critical understanding of autism may achieve promotion or develop a career in education. Universities are beginning to advertise for autism specific posts within disability services.

Students wishing to achieve promotion or develop a career in education benefit from having a higher degree. Progression from the MA to the Doctorate in Education. further enhances employability and promotion prospects, particularly in academia and research. CVs are improved by having publications in referred journals and this is encouraged and supported on the MA as well as the Doctorate in Education.

The MA in Education - Autism is designed to deepen your understanding of working with pupils /students in any educational setting, across the age range into adult education. It is therefore relevant to employment in school, college, alternative education settings and to work with disabled students at university. Content is applicable to teachers and staff in non- teaching roles, such as mentor, disability officer or learning support assistant. The content is also relevant to staff in strategic and operational leadership roles.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

• Direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
• Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
• Mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

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A specialised distance MSc in Applied Linguistics and TESOL/MFL. Read more

A specialised distance MSc in Applied Linguistics and TESOL/MFL

The MSc ALLT is a degree aimed at professionals of TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) or modern foreign languages, which is taught primarily via distance/online learning. This innovative two-year part-time course offers a cutting-edge introduction to the linguistic and pedagogic knowledge and skills needed for teaching language in higher education. 

While the concepts covered in the course can be applied to all languages in most contexts, there is a strong opportunity for students to specialize in the teaching of English language in university settings.

A low-residency course, it is characterised by intense online interaction and feedback, using a range of communication media. Its small-group teaching format pursues the Oxford tradition of demanding much of students and giving them much in return. 

Is this course for you?

Are you preparing students for university studies in an English-medium institution? Are you teaching English to students in arts, science or social science subjects who need to access literature in English in their discipline? Are you co-teaching at university level with content lecturers whose first language is not English? Are you aspiring to move on to teaching in one of the many university settings worldwide where English is important? If so, this course offers you a stimulating environment in which you can broaden your knowledge, deepen your understanding and sharpen your skills in contact with current research in applied linguistics.

What prior experience do you need?

Applicants are expected to have English teaching experience (normally at least one year), a willingness to reflect upon their teaching, and a commitment to work very hard undertaking an exciting intellectual endeavour.

How is the course taught?

The course is taught over two academic years, preceded by a week’s residential module in Oxford. Numbers on the course are kept low, to ensure quality of teaching and learning.

There are three distance-taught modules per year, spread over two eight-week terms from October to April. The assessment for each module comprises a take-home examination. In the third term of each year (May to July), students work on a dissertation project.

Students are admitted in the first instance as students on the Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip) in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching. If you complete all the PGDip modules you may then progress to the MSc, subject to a satisfactory dissertation research proposal. You will then matriculate in absentia in Trinity term of your second year and complete your dissertation during that term, under the supervision of a member of the applied linguistics group.

Who teaches the course?

The tutor for this course is Dr. Heath Rose. Heath is an experienced teacher educator, having coordinated the M.Phil. in English Language Teaching at Trinity College Dublin before coming to Oxford, and previously having worked on The University of Sydney’s M.Ed in TESOL. Heath has been engaged in English Language Teaching since 1997, and has worked with students in university settings since 2003. In delivering the course, he combines this practical experience with his research background in second language teaching and learning. Heath is the co-author of Introducing Global Englishes (Routledge), and the forthcoming books Global Englishes for Language Teaching (Cambridge University Press), and Doing Research in Applied Linguistics (Routledge).

Heath will be supported by other lecturers and tutors in Oxford's applied linguistics research group, as well as a teaching assistant. This means that for each module there will always be two of three academics working with students and helping with learning questions and technical questions.



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The MPhil in Architecture and Urban Studies (MAUS) is a one-year full-time programme of advanced study on contemporary architecture and the continued development of cities around the world. Read more
The MPhil in Architecture and Urban Studies (MAUS) is a one-year full-time programme of advanced study on contemporary architecture and the continued development of cities around the world.

The MPhil in Architecture and Urban Studies (MAUS) is a 1-year programme of advanced study on modern and contemporary architecture and the continued development of cities around the world. Students from a variety of academic backgrounds work in an interdisciplinary environment with urbanists, environmental specialists, architectural theorists and historians and design practitioners. Students will explore a wide range of ideas, research methods and theoretical approaches in order to undertake critical and rigorous analysis of issues relating to both architecture and the challenges and complexities of the world’s rapidly changing cities.

Key benefits

- In the 2014 Research Excellent Framework, Cambridge Architecture’s research work was ranked 1st in the UK, achieving the highest proportion of combined World Leading research. 88% of the research produced by the Department was rated as World Leading or Internationally Excellent (Unit of Assessment 16: Architecture, Built Environment and Planning). This consolidates our top ranking established in the previous Research Assessment Exercise of 2008.

- Ranked 1st for Architecture by the Guardian's 2015 University Guide.

Visit the website: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/aharmpaus

Course detail

The course offers a flexible structure that is tailored to the needs of individual student’s research interests. Seminars and lectures are organised along two basic streams: 1) one focuses on sustainability and environmental design from a more technical point of view; 2) the other emphasises the socio- political and cultural context of architecture and cities with an approach rooted in the humanities and social sciences. Students may participate in both streams, but can also focus on one only. In the second term there is choice of more specialist seminars within both streams. Students are actively encouraged to explore issues across these basic disciplinary boundaries. The course asks students to expand upon their own experiences by pursuing research in their areas of interest.

Format

Teaching in the course is closely integrated with the Department’s research arm, the Martin Centre for Architecture and Urban Studies -http://www.martincentre.arct.cam.ac.uk/ which has a world reputation for research on a wide range of issues and geographical areas. The MPhil benefits from direct input in the form of lectures and seminars and/or individual supervision from the Martin Centre’s research groups:

- Cities and Transport - http://www.martincentre.arct.cam.ac.uk/research/citiesandtransport
- Behaviour and Building Performance - http://www.martincentre.arct.cam.ac.uk/research/behaviour-and-building
- Centre for Urban Conflicts Research - http://www.martincentre.arct.cam.ac.uk/research/conflict-in-cities
- Sustainable Building - http://www.martincentre.arct.cam.ac.uk/research/sustainablebuilding
- Cities South of Cancer - http://citiessouthofcancer.org/
- Digital Studio - http://www.martincentre.arct.cam.ac.uk/research/digital-studio
- History and Theory of Architecture - http://www.martincentre.arct.cam.ac.uk/research/history-and-theory
- Cambridge University Centre for Risk in the Built Environment (CURBE) - http://www.martincentre.arct.cam.ac.uk/research/risk
- Natural Materials and Structures - http://www.martincentre.arct.cam.ac.uk/research/natural-materials-and-st...

Professor Richard Sennett - http://www.richardsennett.com/site/senn/templates/home.aspx?pageid=1&cc=gb, The Department of Architecture’s Sir Arthur Marshall Visiting Professor, contributes a workshop to the programme in the second term. The course also entertains close connections with the Masters in Architectural and Urban Design (ARB/ RIBA Pt2) (MAUD) - http://www.arct.cam.ac.uk/courses/mphil-degree-in-architecture-and-urban-design-maud-arb-riba-pt2 programme enabling research-driven dialogue with designers.

Teaching is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars and workshops, which are supported by individual supervisions. Individual supervisions are an essential part of the programme, they help to assist, direct and monitor progress of students’ work while, at the same time, help to provide continuous feedback throughout the course.

There is also a range of activities in the Department of Architecture, and throughout the University, that will help students to develop their research interests and to meet the programme outcomes. These include the Martin Centre lunchtime seminar, the City Seminar and ARCSOC Talks. Students may choose to attend units on the MPhil in Sustainable Engineering, Faculty of Engineering Faculty - http://www-esdmphil.eng.cam.ac.uk/ and the MPhil in Screen and Media Cultures, Faculty of Modern and Medieval Languages - http://www.mml.cam.ac.uk/graduates/mphil_SMC.html with whom we have a reciprocal arrangement. MAUS students are welcome to be involved with MAUD in reviews and discussions. The programme includes research skills training designed specifically for the needs of our students.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the programme, students will have acquired the type of research training required to carry on to the PhD, or if conceived as a standalone degree, will have acquired the skills to specialise and enhance their professional prospects.

Assessment

- The dissertation of not more than 20,000 words represents 50% of the overall mark. The word count includes footnotes but excludes the bibliography. Any appendices will require the formal permission of your Supervisor who may consult the Degree Committee. Students submit two hard copies and one electronic copy of their thesis for examination at the end of July.

- An oral examination (viva voce) on the dissertation and on the general field of knowledge within which the work submitted falls may be required. Students must remain in or be prepared to return to Cambridge for such oral examinations, which will be held in September.

- Three essays of 3,000 - 5,000 words including footnotes but excluding the bibliography, on topics approved by your supervisor and the Faculty will be presented for examination. One will be submitted at the beginning of the Lent (Spring) term and the additional two at the beginning of the Easter (Summer) term respectively. The three essays represent 50% of the total mark.

- Students undertake a review of their work on a termly basis day which take place at the end of the Michaelmas (Autumn) and Lent (Spring) Terms and the beginning of the Easter (Summer) Term. Students present their work to a supportive forum which will include academic critics who will provide constructive criticism about the students' proposed essays and dissertations.

Continuing

To continue to read for the PhD degree following the course, MPhil in Architecture & Urban Studies students must achieve an overall total score of at least 70%. Continuation is also subject to Faculty approval of the proposed research proposal, and, the availability of an appropriate supervisor.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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Note that this course is delivered by the Cambridge Institute for Sustainability Leadership (CISL). The Postgraduate Certificate in Sustainable Business (PCSB) is a Master's-level accredited programme from the University of Cambridge. Read more

Note that this course is delivered by the Cambridge Institute for Sustainability Leadership (CISL).

The Postgraduate Certificate in Sustainable Business (PCSB) is a Master's-level accredited programme from the University of Cambridge. Designed for senior and mid-career professionals, it is a flexible, practically-applied option for continued professional development, exploring innovations in sustainable business. This course is part of CISL’s mission to empower individuals and organisations to take leadership to tackle critical global challenges.

More specifically, it aims to provide an academically grounded, highly participatory and applied forum for learning around topical sustainability issues, to help professionals develop:

  • a strong foundation in wider global social, environmental and economic trends, and the strategic business case for change
  • the knowledge, skills and confidence to critically engage with a range of strategies and tools for practical action
  • an on-going capacity to work with others to co-create solutions to complex problems, and contribute to a wider community of learning and practice.

About the Cambridge Institute for Sustainability Leadership (CISL)

The University of Cambridge Institute for Sustainability Leadership (CISL), an institute within the School of Technology, has run executive development programmes in sustainability for 25 years, with open programmes in the UK, Europe, North America, South America, South Africa and Australia, and customised programmes for many leading organisations.

Who is the course designed for?

The course has been designed for current and future leaders working in organisations that recognise the importance of sustainable development, and are committed to sharing their knowledge/experience and learning from others. It is an award of the University of Cambridge.

It is assumed that participants will have a reasonably good general knowledge of some of the issues dealt with during the programme. However, it is not essential to have specialised knowledge, and it is not assumed that participants have direct responsibility for sustainability or related areas, such as CSR or environmental affairs.

Structure

The course compromises of two parts:

Part 1 consists of completing one of the Postgraduate Certificates in Sustainable Business (PCSB) or Sustainable Value Chains (PCSVC). Following successful completion of one of the Postgraduate Certificates, participants move to the individually tailored PG Dip Part 2.

Please visit our website for details of part two.

Aims of the programme

Participants successfully completing the programme will:

  • Gain a Postgraduate Diploma in Sustainable Business accredited by the University of Cambridge;
  • Deepen their understanding of how sustainability issues impact on their sector, their organisation and their role;
  • Develop the means to articulate the business case for sustainability, whilst balancing stakeholders' needs;
  • Analyse global business challenges, responses and organisational change;
  • Build confidence to discuss emerging trends and issues which affect the business agenda with senior colleagues;
  • Explore best practice and learn collaboratively with other professionals with different perspectives and experts in the field;
  • Enhance their skills and experience in embedding sustainability in mainstream business operations and driving organisational change
  • Become a member of the Cambridge Sustainability Network, which includes over 5,000 CISL alumni, faculty and contributors from around the world, who are leading the way in turning sustainability thinking into practice.

Format

The Postgraduate Diploma in Sustainable Business is completed in two parts, with the second part offering considerable flexibility and choice. Part 1 lasts 10 months (part-time) and students complete with the Postgraduate Certificate in Sustainable Business or the Postgraduate Certificate in Sustainable Value Chains

Part 2 is completed in 6 months – 3 years depending on the student’s circumstances.

During PG Dip Part 1 participants will:

  • Attend two four-day residential workshops in Cambridge
  • Engage in a range of structured e-learning, reading and reflection, in preparation for the residential workshops
  • Undertake two individual practical assignments based on applying learning in their own organisational context
  • Complete a group project with a small group of 5-8 participants, supported by a programme tutor. Groups work on their projects at and between workshops, and an online platform is provided to aid collaboration.
  • Co-operate with fellow participants, share ideas generously and contribute to the fullest extent.

Having successfully completed the PG Dip Part1, participants will move to the PG Dip Part 2, during which they will:

  • Attend three two-day Sustainability Leadership Laboratories of their choice, according to business relevance or area of interest. The Sustainability Leadership Laboratories take place in Cambridge at least four times per year and are currently delivered under the following four broad themes: Operationalising Sustainability, Sustainability Leadership, Sustainable Innovation and Sustainable Finance.
  • Attend two half-day supervisions to meet their Director of Studies and assignment Supervisors. These take place in Cambridge on days adjacent to the Sustainability Leadership Laboratories.
  • Engage in self-study preparatory readings, webinars and an e-learning module.

Assessment

Students:

  • Complete two individual assignments – an analytical case study and a thought leadership essay.
  • Host an interactive webinar on a theme of relevance to sustainability leadership.

Continuation

The department are currently exploring with the University of Cambridge the possibility of Diploma students continuing their study on to a Master’s degree.



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Do you want to launch your graduate career in a competitive, dynamic global industry? At Plymouth you can develop vital editorial, production and marketing skills with industry relevant digital technologies. Read more
Do you want to launch your graduate career in a competitive, dynamic global industry? At Plymouth you can develop vital editorial, production and marketing skills with industry relevant digital technologies. Gain a network of professional contacts and invaluable experience through work placements and collaborative projects. Benefit from international events, such as London Book Fair, while exploring key publishing processes. You’ll also learn specialist software and create original publications.

This course is also available to study part-time.

Key features

-Engage with contemporary digital technologies, academic debate and research through Plymouth University’s Centre for Media, Art and Design research (MADr).
-Network with industry professionals, attend exclusive seminars and discover the global reach of publishing by attending London Book Fair through our MA programme.
-Take advantage of a range of professionally equipped facilities, including a suite of Apple Mac computers, small and large scale digital printers, a letterpress workshop and digital sound and video editing suites.
-Gain a vocational qualification endorsed by the publishing sector and establish your career in an industry that contributes £4.7 billion to the UK economy.
-Focus your specialist skills and graduate with an individually tailored exit award, by studying one of our specialist strands in editorial design, design commentary, digital futures or illustration.
-Develop an in-depth understanding of the publishing industry in context, through practical workshops with Rooks Books, to behind-the-scenes trips to commercial printers and international distributors.
-Refine and test your newly acquired skills by undertaking a proofreading and copyediting qualification, as part of your masters degree.
-Benefit from a long-standing partnership with the University of Plymouth Press, enabling you to gain work experience and collaborate on live publishing projects.
-Immerse yourself in the regional publishing and arts sector through involvement with projects such as Plymouth International Book Festival, the Peninsula Arts Programme or INK magazine.
-Join the list of our previous graduates who work for global publishers such as Oxford University Press, Cambridge University Press, Wiley, HarperCollins, Macmillan Publishers, FW Media and Quadrille Publishing.
-Establish a network of contacts through a dedicated work placement module. Benefit from invaluable partnerships with publishing professionals and a team of academic staff with extensive and diverse experience in the industry.
-Get ahead in a competitive, fast-paced sector by developing skills in editing, production, marketing, digital publishing, product development and publication design.
-Tailor your time at university to meet your needs by fitting your study around work and personal commitments. Our part-time route allows you to study over two years, giving you the flexibility to study at a pace which suits you.

Course details

Study our MA Publishing and you’ll gain insight into key areas of the publishing industry and achieve a qualification endorsed by the sector. You’ll also get the opportunity to focus your studies through one of our specialist strands. You’ll immerse yourself in the world of digital publishing, discovering new technologies and the impact these have on the industry. Through dedicated modules, you’ll develop an understanding of the skills and responsibilities essential to becoming a publishing professional, as well as the roles and collaborative processes vital to the industry. Engage with the different stages of the publishing process, from production and distribution to marketing and financial viability. You’ll be able to network with guest lecturers from established publishing companies and negotiate invaluable work experience, through placements and collaborative projects. Benefit from key industry partnerships with publishers such as FW Media and University of Plymouth Press.

Core modules
-MAPU713 Publishing process
-MAPU714 Publishing work experience/collaboration
-MAPU715 Publishing dissertation or Publishing project and report
-MAPU711 Publishing practice and target market
-MAPU712 Publishing as a Creative Industry

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The MA in Education - SEND is relevant to a wide variety of settings and across the age range from early years through to post compulsory education in college, university and other contexts. Read more
The MA in Education - SEND is relevant to a wide variety of settings and across the age range from early years through to post compulsory education in college, university and other contexts. There is a strong focus on social justice and inclusion and the opportunity to reflect on your own professional practice throughout the courses.

MA in Education SEND is designed for people with an interest in autism and critical disability studies and for practitioners across the age range into post compulsory education. Based on the principles on 'nothing about us without us' content is informed by the experiences of people who identify personally with autism and /or SEND.

You'll develop a particular strand of interest into the dissertation and have opportunities to disseminate your findings to the work place and throughout the course. The Centre for Educational Research has a number of ongoing disability focused research projects and hosts the Disability Equality Research Network (DERN). This provides a vibrant supportive environment for your research and ensures that course content is always research-informed.

The programme will take place at LSBU (K2 Building) or in Special Educational Needs partners' schools and be delivered by academics and experts from the Special Educational Needs sector. Evening and weekend taught sessions are complemented by an extensive virtual learning environment and delivered on campus or elsewhere by arrangement. Students, wherever located, become part of diverse and stimulating LSBU community and the vibrant Centre for Education Research.

National Award for SEN Co-ordinator

You can also choose to take the recognised award of 'National Award for SEN Co-ordination' or options that will further deepen your understanding of SEND.

Modules

All modules are assessed by a mix of assignments, presentations, research projects and portfolio development.

Year 1

Students take two of the optional modules list below in year 1:

Special educational needs and disability
Part 2 SENCO National Award
Teaching and learning:
Understanding autism and learning
Autism individuality and identity
Part 1 SENCO National Award

Year 2

In addition to one of the modules listed above

Research Methods (compulsory)

Year 3

Dissertation (compulsory)

Timetable

Weekly evening seminars during term time.

Bespoke CPD sessions can be delivered on request.

Teaching and learning

You'll be taught by Dr Nicola Martin who has substantial experience in the field of autism including working with Professor Baron-Cohen on the Cambridge University Autism Project. She was also formerly director of the Autism Centre at Sheffield Hallam University. Dr Martin is currently a lecturer at LSBU and is a Principal Investigator for Research Autism.

You'll also be taught by Gianna Knowles who has considerable experience of working with school staff to develop their Special Educational Needs Departments. Gianna has published a range of academic textbooks that support staff development in this area.

You'll benefit from an up to date Virtual Learning Environment via Moodle and be actively encouraged to make use of the extensive range of support services across the university. You'll have access to a supervisor during the dissertation phase.

Placements

Access to the workplace (including voluntary work) is essential for most of the modules within the MA.

Professional links

The department has wide professional links within and beyond the university and the UK. Examples include:

• The Equality Challenge Unit
• The Alliance for Inclusive Education
• Equality and Diversity Forum Research Network
• The Leadership Foundation
• Research Autism
• Theorising Autism Project
• Teacher Education for Equality and Sustainability Network (TEESNet)
• National Association of Disability Practitioners
• Commonworks (for a just and sustainable world)

Recent guest lectures have been given by disabled academics and parents of pupils who have experienced special education.

Employability

MA Education Special Educational Needs and Disability (SEND) is designed to deepen your understanding of working with pupils /students in any educational setting, across the age range into adult education. It is therefore relevant to employment in school, college, alternative education settings and to work with disabled students at university. Content is applicable to teachers and staff in non- teaching roles, such as mentor, disability officer or learning support assistant. The content is also relevant to staff in strategic and operational leadership roles.

It is a professional and academic degree that provides an in-depth understanding of inclusive practice in education across the age range (in keeping with the 0-25 framework in the Children and Families Act 2014). The degree is relevant from early years to post-compulsory education in a wide variety of settings. The diverse requirements of learners identified with SEND and best practice to support inclusive learning and achievement will be explored. You'll be encouraged to critically engage with relevant theory and legislation contextualised and applied in practice.

This programme will contribute to your employability and the National SENco award may be a requirement of your workplace.

Students wishing to achieve promotion or develop a career in education benefit from having a higher degree. Progression from the MA to the EdD further enhances employability and promotion prospects, particularly in academia and research. CVs are improved by having publications in refereed journals and this is encouraged and supported on the MA as well as the Doctorate in Education.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

• Direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
• Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
• Mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

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This Military History MA offers an in-depth study of warfare on land, sea and air across a range of periods and continents, from the Classical Age to the present. Read more

About the course

This Military History MA offers an in-depth study of warfare on land, sea and air across a range of periods and continents, from the Classical Age to the present.

The core modules on the course examine:

- the Royal Navy in the twentieth century.
- warfare in ancient and medieval times.
- the impact of the French and Industrial Revolutions on warfare in the age of 'total war'

Optional modules give students the opportunity to study the Second World War, warfare in modern Africa and, additionally, the programme draws on Brunel’s expertise in intelligence studies. Students have the chance to take an optional module in this area with Brunel's Centre for Intelligence and Security Studies (BCISS).

Students will also complete a 15,000 dissertation on any military history topic, drawing on the wide expertise of staff in the department.

Aims

The MA in Military History will provide students with a systematic understanding and critical awareness of debates and interpretations of military history.

Students will gain a comprehensive and practical understanding of how established techniques of research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in specific subject areas.

Students will be encouraged to extend and develop their analytical, evaluative and critical capacities, and increase their ability to reflect on their own learning and intellectual development.

The MA in Military History will give students transferable skills in writing, discussion, analysis, and independent judgement.

Students will also work independently, thus demonstrating initiative and the ability to organise their time and work through their research project (a dissertation) of 15,000 words.

Course Content

The MA consists of both compulsory and optional modules, a typical selection can be found below. Modules can vary from year to year, but these offer a good idea of what we teach.

Compulsory modules:

Dissertation
War in History, 1789 to present
The Royal Navy in the Twentieth Century
European Warfare in the Age of Muscle.

Optional modules:

Intelligence History: Failure and Success
The Second World War
War and the Military in Modern African History
International Security

Special Features

Taught by internationally recognised academics in the field of Military History, Naval History, War Studies, Intelligence History and Security/Intelligence Studies.

Situated in London, the MA Military History has established links to world-renowned archives and libraries based in and close to London including the Caird Library (National Maritime Museum), The National Archives and the Imperial War Museum, among others.

Students on the MA Military History can automatically receive membership to the Royal Institute for International Affairs.

Students have access to the Specialist Angus Boulton Military History library held at Brunel University.

The MA in Military History regularly invites guest speakers to lecture on specialist subjects. Previous speakers have included, Professor Ilan Pappe (University of Exeter), Emeritus Professor Avi Shlaim (Oxford University), Sir Tony Brenton (Cambridge University), and Professor Brian Holden-Reid (KCL).

Research at Brunel

The Isambard Centre for Historical Research
The Isambard Centre for Historical Research brings together scholars at Brunel whose work examines the tensions inherent in the transnational connections that have shaped the modern world. The Centre takes its title from the University’s namesake, Isambard Kingdom Brunel. During the nineteenth century, the dockyards, steamships and railways that he built, revolutionised transportation and communication, helping to create the infrastructure that underpinned increasing global trade. People, products, ideas and cultural artefacts were all transmitted along these routes, producing transnational exchanges that stretched across traditional political, cultural and geographic divides. But such processes helped to make borders as well as transcend them. They stimulated anxieties that led to new efforts to control, define and regulate ownership, identity and exchange. Attending to these dual impulses is crucial if we are to understand the social, cultural and political landscapes of the modern world.

Brunel Centre for Intelligence and Security Studies
Brunel's Centre for Intelligence and Security Studies (BCISS) is a University Inter-Disciplinary Research Centre, taking in members from the School of Engineering and Design, School of Law, and from the Department of Economics and Finance from the School of Social Sciences, as well as core members from the Department of Politics and History. BCISS is the first academic Centre established in the UK to deal specifically with intelligence issues, policy and institutions. Established in November 2003 the Centre aims to promote and develop social science and policy-oriented approaches to intelligence.

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