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Masters Degrees (Cambridge Mphil)

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The MPhil degree offered by the Department of Oncology is a 12 month full time programme and involves minimal formal teaching; students are integrated into the research culture of the Department and the Institute in which they are based. Read more
The MPhil degree offered by the Department of Oncology is a 12 month full time programme and involves minimal formal teaching; students are integrated into the research culture of the Department and the Institute in which they are based.

Each student conducts their MPhil project under the direction of their Principal Supervisor, with additional teaching and guidance provided by a Second Supervisor and often a Practical Supervisor. The role of each Supervisor is:

- Principal Supervisor: takes responsibility for experimental oversight of the student's research project and provides day-to-day supervision.
- Second Supervisor: acts as a mentor to the student and is someone who can who can offer impartial advice. The Second Supervisor is a Group Leader or equivalent who is independent from the student's research group and is appointed by the Principal Supervisor before the student arrives.
- Practical Supervisor: provides day-to-day experimental supervision when the Principal Supervisor is unavailable, i.e. during very busy periods. The Practical Supervisor is a senior member of the student's research team and is appointed by the Principal Supervisor before the student arrives. For those Principal Supervisors who are unable to monitor their students on a daily basis, we would expect that they meet semi-formally with their student at least once a month.

The subject of the research project is determined during the application process and is influenced by the research interests of the student’s Principal Supervisor, i.e. students should apply to study with a Group Leader whose area of research most appeals to them. The Department of Oncology’s research interests focus on the prevention, diagnosis and treatments of cancer. This involves using a wide variety of research methods and techniques, encompassing basic laboratory science, translational research and clinical trials. Our students therefore have the opportunity to choose from an extensive range of cancer related research projects. In addition, being based on the Cambridge Biomedical Research Campus, our students also have access world leading scientists and state-of-the-art equipment.

To broaden their knowledge of their chosen field, students are strongly encouraged to attend relevant seminars, lectures and training courses. The Cambridge Cancer Cluster, of which we are a member department, provides the 'Lectures in Cancer Biology' seminar series, which is specifically designed to equip graduate students with a solid background in all major aspects of cancer biology. Students may also attend undergraduate lectures in their chosen field of research, if their Principal Supervisor considers this to be appropriate. We also require our students to attend their research group’s ‘research in progress/laboratory meetings’, at which they are expected to regularly present their ongoing work.

At the end of the course, examination for the MPhil degree involves submission of a written dissertation (of 20,000 words or less), followed by an oral examination based on both the dissertation and a broader knowledge of the chosen area of research.

Course objectives

The structure of the MPhil course is designed to produce graduates with rigorous research and analytical skills, who are exceptionally well-equipped to go onto doctoral research, or employment in industry and the public service.

The MPhil course provides:

- a period of sustained in-depth study of a specific topic;
- an environment that encourages the student’s originality and creativity in their research;
- skills to enable the student to critically examine the background literature relevant to their specific research area;
- the opportunity to develop skills in making and testing hypotheses, in developing new theories, and in planning and conducting experiments;
- the opportunity to expand the student’s knowledge of their research area, including its theoretical foundations and the specific techniques used to study it;
- the opportunity to gain knowledge of the broader field of cancer research;
- an environment in which to develop skills in written work, oral presentation and publishing the results of their research in high-profile scientific journals, through constructive feedback of written work and oral presentations.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/cvocmpmsc

Format

The MPhil course is a full time research course. Most research training provided within the structure of the student’s research group and is overseen by their Principal Supervisor. However, informal opportunities to develop research skills also exist through mentoring by fellow students and members of staff. To enhance their research, students are expected to attend seminars and graduate courses relevant to their area of interest. Students are also encouraged to undertake transferable skills training provided by the Graduate School of Life Sciences. At the end of the course, examination for the MPhil degree involves submission of a written dissertation, followed by an oral examination based on both the dissertation and a broader knowledge of the chosen area of research.

Learning Outcomes

At the end of their MPhil course, students should:

- have a thorough knowledge of the literature and a comprehensive understanding of scientific methods and techniques applicable to their own research;
- be able to demonstrate originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of how research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in their field;
- the ability to critically evaluate current research and research techniques and methodologies;
- demonstrate self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems;
- be able to act autonomously in the planning and implementation of research; and
- have developed skills in oral presentation, scientific writing and publishing the results of their research.

Assessment

Examination for the MPhil degree involves submission of a written dissertation of not more than 20,000 words in length, excluding figures, tables, footnotes, appendices and bibliography, on a subject approved by the Degree Committee for the Faculties of Clinical Medicine and Veterinary Medicine. This is followed by an oral examination based on both the dissertation and a broader knowledge of the chosen area of research.

Continuing

The MPhil Medical Sciences degree is designed to accommodate the needs of those students who have only one year available to them or, who have only managed to obtain funding for one year, i.e. it is not intended to be a probationary year for a three-year PhD degree. However, it is possible to continue from the MPhil to the PhD in Oncology (Basic Science) course via the following 2 options:

(i) Complete the MPhil then continue to the three-year PhD course:

If the student has time and funding for a further THREE years, after completion of their MPhil they may apply to be admitted to the PhD course as a continuing student. The student would be formally examined for the MPhil and if successful, they would then continue onto the three year PhD course as a probationary PhD student, i.e. the MPhil is not counted as the first year of the PhD degree; or

(ii) Transfer from the MPhil to the PhD course:

If the student has time and funding for only TWO more years, they can apply for permission to change their registration from the MPhil to probationary PhD; note, transfer must be approved before completion of the MPhil. If granted permission to change registration, the student will undergo a formal probationary PhD assessment (submission of a written report and an oral examination) towards the end of their first year and if successful, will then be registered for the PhD, i.e. the first year would count as the first year of the PhD degree.

Please note that continuation from the MPhil to the PhD, or changing registration is not automatic; all cases are judged on their own merits based on a number of factors including: evidence of progress and research potential; a sound research proposal; the availability of a suitable supervisor and of resources required for the research; acceptance by the Head of Department and Degree Committee.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

The Department of Oncology does not have specific funds for MPhil courses. However, applicants are encouraged to apply to University funding competitions: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding and the Cambridge Cancer Centre: http://www.cambridgecancercentre.org.uk/education-and-training

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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This MPhil caters both for beginners in Akkadian and those with some previous knowledge of the language. A demanding course, this MPhil delivers competence in language and specialist knowledge of culture and history over a relatively short time. Read more
This MPhil caters both for beginners in Akkadian and those with some previous knowledge of the language. A demanding course, this MPhil delivers competence in language and specialist knowledge of culture and history over a relatively short time. All MPhil students in the Division of Archaeology take a Research Skills Module and write a dissertation (15,000 words maximum). The MPhil in Assyriology also includes three taught modules, chosen in consultation with the supervisor according to the student's interests. The student's first choice must be a language course. The student's second and third modules can be chosen from the modules listed below, and with the consent of the module's instructor and the MPhil in Assyriology Coordinator one of these may be any other appropriate MPhil module offered in the Division of Archaeology. Modules typically offered include:

- Akkadian (Akkadian language and texts or Advanced Akkadian language and texts)
- Sumerian language and texts (Sumerian is only available to those with some previous knowledge of Akkadian).
- Mesopotamian culture (Mesopotamian literature or Mesopotamian scholarship & religion)
- Archaeology of Mesopotamia (Archaeology of Mesopotamia: Early period to 2000 BC or Archaeology of Mesopotamia: Late period, 2000-539 BC)
- Topics in Mesopotamian history and archaeology
- Any other appropriate MPhil module taught in the Division of Archaeology, consent of the module's instructor and the MPhil in Assyriology Coordinator.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/hsarmpass

Course detail

The MPhil in Assyriology delivers competence in language and specialist knowledge of culture and history over a relatively short time. All MPhil students in the Division of Archaeology take a Research Skills Module and write a dissertation (15,000 words maximum). The MPhil in Assyriology also includes three taught modules, chosen in consultation with the supervisor according to the student's interests. Students will learn Akkadian at either an introductory or more advanced level depending on previous experience.

Assessment

The dissertation is an extended piece of independent, original research. Students work with their supervisor to formulate a dissertation project, carry out research and write it up. The topic of the dissertation has to be approved by the Faculty Degree Committee; the dissertation is of maximum 15,000 words (excluding bibliography and appendices) and is due at the end of August; it counts as 50% of the student’s final mark.

Students taking the MPhil in Assyriology are usually required to produce between 1 and 4 assessed essays depending on their chosen course of study and the modules they select. The essays are between 3000 and 4000 words and are submitted in Michaelmas, Lent and Easter Terms.

Students taking the MPhil in Assyriology are required to sit written examinations for some modules. Language modules are assessed through a written exam in Easter Term. For language modules, choice of module is subject to the student’s prior experience to make sure that they have the preparation to benefit from the module taken; the course co-ordinator will provide guidance upon this.

Attendance at the relevant Research Skills Workshops is required of all MPhil students in the Division of Archaeology. MPhil students are required to submit a 2000 word research proposal and give a presentation to teaching staff and peers which form the assessed part of the Research Skills module and are worth 5% of the overall MPhil degree.

Continuing

MPhil students wishing to continue to the PhD in Archaeology are required to achieve a High Pass mark of 68 overall and no less than 68 in their dissertation, and to obtain the support of an appropriate supervisor. In some circumstances additional academic conditions may be set to ensure appropriate skills, such as language competence, are in place prior to admittance on the PhD programme.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are many different sources of funding available to support UK/EU and international students at the Division of Archaeology but full scholarships for MPhil students are highly competitive. The Division of Archaeology enters exceptionally strong MPhil candidates for Gates Cambridge, CHESS and AHRC scholarships and scholarship schemes administered by the Cambridge Trust.

The Division of Archaeology also administers several funds which aim to support Archaeological fieldwork, Egyptology and Assyriology at MPhil level and will endeavour to support students in obtaining funding from University and external sources.

For further information about funding opportunities at the Division of Archaeology consult the Division website: http://www.arch.cam.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduate-funding or contact the Graduate Administrator: .

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This MPhil is appropriate for students who are prepared for graduate work and who wish to undertake research in Egyptology, but who need further training in either the language(s) or the archaeology of the region. Read more
This MPhil is appropriate for students who are prepared for graduate work and who wish to undertake research in Egyptology, but who need further training in either the language(s) or the archaeology of the region. The student may choose either an archaeological or a linguistic emphasis. All MPhil students in the Division of Archaeology take a Research Skills module and write a dissertation (maximum 15,000 words). In addition, students taking the MPhil in Egyptology select three taught modules, chosen in consultation with the supervisor.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/hsarmpegy

Course detail

Modules on offer include:

- Introduction to Egyptian Language;
- Advanced Egyptian Language;
- Coptic;
- Demotic;
- Landscapes, Built Environment, and Material Culture of Ancient Egypt;
- Historical Archaeology of Ancient Egypt I;
- Historical Archaeology of Ancient Egypt II;
- Topics in Egyptology;

or any other MPhil module offered in the Division of Archaeology (with consent of the module's instructor and the MPhil in Egyptology Coordinator).

Format

The MPhil in Egyptology delivers competence in language and a detailed knowledge of the cultures of ancient Egypt, emphasizing historical archaeology, landscape and the built environment, art, and the language and/or literature of ancient Egypt. All MPhil students in the Division of Archaeology take a Research Skills Module and write a dissertation (15,000 words maximum). The MPhil in Egyptology also includes three taught modules, chosen in consultation with the supervisor according to the student's interests. Students will learn an Ancient Egyptian language at either an introductory or more advanced level depending on previous experience.

Students receive written feedback on all assessed essays and reports from internal markers via the Graduate Administrator. Coursework and exam marks are communicated to students following the first examiners meeting at the end of Easter Term. Feedback on dissertations are available to students on request following the second examiners meeting in September.

Assessment

The dissertation is an extended piece of independent, original research. Students work with their supervisor to formulate a dissertation project, carry out research and write it up. The topic of the dissertation has to be approved by the Faculty Degree Committee; the dissertation is of maximum 15,000 words (excluding bibliography and appendices) and is due at the end of August; it counts as 50% of the student’s final mark.

Students taking the MPhil in Egyptology are usually required to produce between 1 and 4 assessed essays depending on their chosen course of study and the modules they select. The essays are between 3000 and 4000 words and are submitted in Michaelmas, Lent and Easter Terms.

Students taking the MPhil in Egyptology are required to sit written examinations for some modules. Language modules are assessed through a written exam in Easter Term. For language modules, choice of module is subject to the student’s prior experience to make sure that they have the preparation to benefit from the module taken; the course co-ordinator will provide guidance upon this.

Attendance at the relevant Research Skills Workshops is required of all MPhil students in the Division of Archaeology. MPhil students are required to submit a 2000 word research proposal and give a presentation to teaching staff and peers which form the assessed part of the Research Skills module and are worth 5% of the overall MPhil degree.

Continuing

MPhil students wishing to continue to the PhD in Archaeology are required to achieve a High Pass mark of 68 overall and no less than 68 in their dissertation, and to obtain the support of an appropriate supervisor. In some circumstances additional academic conditions may be set to ensure appropriate skills, such as language competence, are in place prior to admittance on the PhD programme.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are many different sources of funding available to support UK/EU and international students at the Division of Archaeology but full scholarships for MPhil students are highly competitive. The Division of Archaeology enters exceptionally strong MPhil candidates for Gates Cambridge, CHESS and AHRC scholarships and scholarship schemes administered by the Cambridge Trust.

The Division of Archaeology also administers several funds which aim to support Archaeological fieldwork, Egyptology and Assyriology at MPhil level and will endeavour to support students in obtaining funding from University and external sources.

For further information about funding opportunities at the Division of Archaeology consult the Division website: http://www.arch.cam.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduate-funding or contact the Graduate Administrator: .

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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The Core Archaeology course introduces current debates in archaeological theory and the history of archaeological thought, as well as archaeological methods (ranging from the study of prehistoric exchange to bio-archaeological techniques to artefact studies, quantitative analyses and dating methods). Read more
The Core Archaeology course introduces current debates in archaeological theory and the history of archaeological thought, as well as archaeological methods (ranging from the study of prehistoric exchange to bio-archaeological techniques to artefact studies, quantitative analyses and dating methods). Area option courses examine the archaeology of a particular region of the world (such as South Asia or Europe) in detail. Students are encouraged to choose a third module from the range of MPhil options on offer in the Division of Archaeology to complement their specific interests (e.g., heritage, science, material culture, etc). All module choices must have the approval of the module's instructor and the MPhil in Archaeology Coordinator.

Students may choose to specialise in any of the following options:

- Archaeological Heritage and Museums
- Archaeological Science
- Archaeology of the Americas
- Egyptian Archaeology
- European Prehistory
- Medieval Archaeology
- Mesopotamian Archaeology
- Palaeolithic and Mesolithic Archaeology
- South Asian Archaeology

Visit the website: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/hsarmpmar

Course detail

Students electing the Archaeological Heritage option will take three taught modules:
1. The Socio-politics of the Past
2. Museums: History, Theory, and Practice
3. Management of the Archaeological Heritage. This course concentrates on issues of differentiation of interpretation.

The topics are all of academic importance and the teaching focuses on a theoretical understanding of the issues involved, with practical examples used as case studies. The aim is to educate you within this expanding field and to activate further research.

Students choosing the Archaeological Science option will take:
1. Archaeological Science
2. Practical Application of Scientific Methods modules
3. One other module offered by the Division of Archaeology (chosen in consultation with the supervisor and MPhil Coordinator).

This course covers a broad range of scientific archaeological approaches with geo- and bioarchaeological foci, from theoretical, methodological and practical points of view. A series of recurrent case studies is used to introduce the questions, techniques and ideas applicable in each archaeological situation. In addition, this MPhil equips students with analytical skills in archaeological science.

Format

All MPhil students in the Division of Archaeology take a Research Skills Module and write a dissertation (15,000 words maximum). Students choosing Archaeology of the Americas, Archaeology of Egypt, European Archaeology, Medieval Archaeology, Mesopotamian Archaeology, Palaeolithic and Mesolithic Archaeology, or South Asian Archaeology take:

1. the Core Archaeology course
2. the appropriate area option course
3. any other module offered by the Division of Archaeology (in consultation with the supervisor and MPhil coordinator).

The assessed components of the three selected modules each represent 15% of the final mark. The assessed components of Research Skills module represents 5%, while the dissertation counts for 50% of the final mark.

Assessment

- The dissertation is an extended piece of independent, original research. Students work with their supervisor to formulate a dissertation project, carry out research and write it up. The topic of the dissertation has to be approved by the Faculty Degree Committee. The dissertation is of maximum 15,000 words (excluding bibliography and appendices) and is due at the end of August; it counts as 50% of the student’s final mark.

- Students taking the MPhil in Archaeology are usually required to produce between 3 and 6 assessed essays depending on their chosen course of study and the modules they select. The essays are between 3000 and 4000 words and are submitted in Michaelmas, Lent and Easter Terms.

- Students taking the MPhil in Archaeology are required to sit written examinations for some modules.

- Attendance at the relevant Research Skills Workshops is required of all MPhil students in the Division of Archaeology. MPhil students submit a 2000 word research proposal and give a presentation to teaching staff and peers which form the assessed part of the Research Skills module and are worth 5% of the overall MPhil degree.

Continuing

MPhil students wishing to continue to the PhD in Archaeology are required to achieve a High Pass mark of 68 overall and no less than 68 in their dissertation, and to obtain the support of an appropriate supervisor. In some circumstances additional academic conditions may be set to ensure appropriate skills, such as language competence, are in place prior to admittance on the PhD programme.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are many different sources of funding available to support UK/EU and international students at the Division of Archaeology but full scholarships for MPhil students are highly competitive. The Division of Archaeology enters exceptionally strong MPhil candidates for Gates Cambridge, CHESS and AHRC scholarships and scholarship schemes administered by the Cambridge Trust. The Division of Archaeology also administers several funds which aim to support Archaeological fieldwork, Egyptology and Assyriology at MPhil level and will endeavour to support students in obtaining funding from University and external sources. For further information about funding opportunities at the Division of Archaeology consult the Division website: http://www.arch.cam.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduate-funding or contact the Graduate Administrator: .

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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- Aims. It is our aim to develop in our students the skills required to submit a satisfactory MPhil thesis at the end of their chosen duration (1 year full time or 2 years part time). Read more

Overview

- Aims
It is our aim to develop in our students the skills required to submit a satisfactory MPhil thesis at the end of their chosen duration (1 year full time or 2 years part time). In order to achieve this, a student will have acquired the essential skills required to design and conduct experiments (including applying for ethics approval where necessary), to analyse results, and to communicate these both in writing and orally. These skills will include those that can be transferred successfully to their choice of academic or other career.

- Support
The MPhil at the CBU is achieved by supervised research and is under the jurisdiction of the Degree Committee for the Faculty of Biology. The provision of supervision and teaching is overseen by the Graduate School of Life Sciences. Within the CBU, the internal Graduate Committee is responsible for all aspects of the running of the degrees. A suitable project falling within the interests of the supervisor, and sustainable within the limits imposed by the facilities available at the CBU, is agreed by both student and supervisor, and endorsed by the Graduate Committee. Each graduate student has a primary Supervisor, who will supervise the main body of their research, and an Advisor who acts as a supplementary source of advice and support. We also have two pastoral tutors who offer personal support and counselling throughout a student’s time at the Unit.

- Seminars
Students attend a variety of Unit Seminars given by distinguished scientists. They are able to draw from the CBU’s panels of research volunteers, both normal and clinical, and enjoy the benefits of superb computing facilities and support staff, including a Graphics/Multimedia Officer.

- The Cambridge Graduate Programme in Cognitive and Brain Sciences
CBU students are full members of the Cambridge Graduate Programme in Cognitive and Brain Sciences, which has been jointly established by the Unit and the Departments of Psychology and Psychiatry. This consists of a weekly series of theoretical seminars presented by senior researchers from the CBU and from the University. Lectures will be held on Mondays 4-5.30pm in the West Wing Seminar Room at the MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, 15 Chaucer Road, Cambridge, CB2 7EF (unless otherwise specified), or at the Psychology department on the Downing Site in Cambridge city centre. Seminars are held during Michaelmas and Lent terms only.
All public talks are publicised on the University talks website, which also contains an archive of older lectures. All scientists at the CBU are expected to attend the two public talk series, held on Wednesdays and Thursdays.

- Facilities and Linkages
The CBU has excellent facilities for experimental behavioural studies involving normal populations and patients with brain damage, as well as institutional links with Addenbrooke’s hospital giving access to various types of patient populations, including stroke and progressive neural degenerative diseases. There is a 3 Tesla MRI scanner on the premises, as well as MEG and EEG facilities. Through its partnership with the University of Cambridge Wolfson Brain Imaging Centre, the CBU has excellent access to PET and additional fMRI (3 Tesla) facilities. The CBU also offers state of the art computing facilities, supporting Unix, PC, and Mac platforms, and handling the large volumes of neuro-imaging data as well as extensive computational modelling. All students have their own networked desktop computer, with internet access through JANET.
The Unit’s close links with the University Department of Psychology and the Department of Psychiatry are strengthened through the Cambridge Graduate Programme in Cognitive and Brain Sciences, a joint programme of termly Seminars given by members of each Department and attended by all graduate students.
The CBU is also an active member of the wider neuroscience community in Cambridge, supported by the Cambridge Neuroscience network.

- Completion on time
For MPhil students a personalised training and research programme will be agreed during the early weeks of the degree.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/blcbmpbsc

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the programme, students will have:
• a comprehensive understanding of techniques, and a thorough knowledge of the literature, applicable to their own research;
• demonstrated originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical

understanding of how research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in their field;
• shown abilities in the critical evaluation of current research and research techniques and methodologies;
• demonstrated some self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems, and acted autonomously in the planning and implementation of research.

Continuing

There is no automatic progression from a CBU MPhil degree to a CBU PhD. MPhil students will need to apply to be considered for a PhD place alongside all other candidates.

Teaching

We offer a variety of theoretical and skills based training to support our wide range of topics and streams of research. A personalised training programme will be agreed for each incoming student in the first few weeks of the degree period. This will cover an agreed timetable of attendance at the various seminars, the research project planned, amd the formal review points throughout the degree.

- Feedback
Continuous assessment and supervision. Students can expect to receive an online feedback report each term.

Funding Opportunities

For eligible applicants, several MRC funded studentships are available, which pay the University Composition Fee, and a small but liveable stipend (currently £13,726 p.a.), however it should be noted that this money has never been allocated to an MPhil student as we always have excellent eligible PhD students whose funding takes priority. In reality a MPhil would almost certainly need to be self-funded or have external funding. Hence, independently funded applications are very welcome, and we will also always nominate successful applicants for the various Cambridge University scholarships available, depending on individual eligibility.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

Find out how to apply here http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/blcbmpbsc/apply

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/blcbmpbsc

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The Department of Psychiatry is an internationally leading centre for research and teaching in psychiatry, with particular focus on the determinants of mental health conditions, their treatments and the promotion of mental health through innovative translational research. Read more
The Department of Psychiatry is an internationally leading centre for research and teaching in psychiatry, with particular focus on the determinants of mental health conditions, their treatments and the promotion of mental health through innovative translational research. The Department’s senior staff support several research groups, covering various aspects of mental health and disorder throughout the life course.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/cvpcmpmsc

Course detail

The MPhil degree offered by the Department of Psychiatry is a 12 month full time programme and involves minimal formal teaching; students are integrated into the research culture of the Department and the Institute in which they are based.

Each student conducts their MPhil project under the direction of their Principal Supervisor, with additional teaching and guidance provided by an Advisor, to increase access to staff members and accommodate a diversity of viewpoints.

The subject of the research project is determined during the application process and is influenced by the research interests of the student’s supervisor, i.e. students should apply to study with a group leader whose area of research most appeals to them.

To broaden their knowledge of their chosen field, students are strongly encouraged to attend relevant seminars, lectures and training courses. We also require our students to attend their research group’s research-in-progress/laboratory meetings, at which they are expected to regularly present their ongoing work.

Format

The MPhil course is a full time research course. The supervisor and details of the proposed research project are determined during the application process.

Most research training is provided within the structure of the student’s research group and is overseen by their Principal Supervisor. The student should expect to receive one to one supervision at least weekly in term time.

The structure of the MPhil course enables the students to significantly develop their analytical and research skills, and is intended as preparation for further research.

The MPhil programme provides:

- a period of sustained in-depth study of a specific topic;
- an environment that encourages the student’s originality and creativity in their research;
- skills to enable the student to critically examine the background literature relevant to their specific research area;
the opportunity to develop skills in making and testing hypotheses, in developing new theories, and in planning and conducting experiments;
- the opportunity to expand the student’s knowledge of their research area, including its theoretical foundations and the specific techniques used to study it;
- the opportunity to gain knowledge of the broader field of research in psychiatry;
- an environment in which to develop skills in written work, oral presentation and publishing the results of their research in high-profile scientific journals, through constructive feedback of written work and oral presentations.

At the end of the course, examination for the MPhil degree involves submission of a written dissertation, followed by an oral examination based on both the dissertation and a broader knowledge of the chosen area of research.

Continuing

The MPhil in Medical Science (Psychiatry) degree is a one-year degree, i.e. it is not intended to be a probationary year for a three-year PhD degree.

However, it is possible to continue from the MPhil to the PhD in Psychiatry course via the following options:

1. Complete the MPhil then continue to the three year PhD course:

If the student would like to continue with their research and has secured funding for a further THREE years, after completion of their MPhil they may apply to be admitted to the PhD course as a continuing student. The student would be formally examined for the MPhil and if successful, they would then continue onto the three year PhD course as a probationary PhD student, i.e. the MPhil is not counted as the first year of the PhD degree; or

2. Transfer from the MPhil to the PhD course:

If the student has time and funding for only TWO more years, they can apply for permission to change their registration from the MPhil to probationary PhD; note, transfer must be approved before completion of the MPhil.

If granted permission to change registration, the student will undergo a formal probationary PhD assessment (submission of a written report and an oral examination) towards the end of their first year and if successful, will then be registered for the PhD, i.e. the first year would count as the first year of the PhD degree.

Please note that continuation from the MPhil to the PhD, or changing registration is not automatic; all cases are judged on their own merits based on a number of factors including: evidence of progress and research potential; a sound research proposal; the availability of a suitable supervisor and of resources required for the research; acceptance by the Head of Department and Degree Committee.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

Pinsent Darwin Fund (managed by the Graduate School of Life Sciences)

Sims Fund (administered by Fees & Graduate Funding, Student Registry)

Other funding opportunities (e.g. through research grants) might become available depending on funds

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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The MPhil programme in Chinese Studies is offered as a one-year programme which aims to give graduate students an opportunity to develop their analytical, research and writing skills in preparation for further academic research or entry to professions requiring such skills. Read more
The MPhil programme in Chinese Studies is offered as a one-year programme which aims to give graduate students an opportunity to develop their analytical, research and writing skills in preparation for further academic research or entry to professions requiring such skills.

This MPhil programme is taken by dissertation only. This entails working closely with one supervisor throughout the year on a 25,000 word dissertation to be submitted in mid-August.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/amammpchr

Course detail

At the end of the MPhil programme, students will be expected to have:

- acquired the ability to read, interpret and translate primary sources in Modern and/or Classical Chinese;
- acquired a good knowledge of the general scholarship on Modern and/or Pre-Modern Chinese culture(s);
- acquired an in-depth knowledge of the secondary literature relevant to the subject of their dissertation;
- developed the ability to formulate original research questions and produce a well-constructed, argument to answer them, in the form of an independent piece of research based on the use of primary and secondary sources;
- acquired the skills to use library and internet resources independently.

Format

The MPhil in Asian and Middle Eastern Studies by Research (Chinese Studies) is studied entirely by research.

All prospective MPhil applicants are advised to peruse the staff profiles on our website to familiarise themselves with the research and teaching interests of staff members. Applicants should contact potential supervisors by email and discuss potential MPhil dissertation topics.

Assessment

For the MPhil in Asian and Middle Eastern Studies by Research (Chinese Studies), students will submit a thesis of not more than 25,000 words, including footnotes and appendices but excluding bibliography on a subject approved by the Degree Committee. All MPhil dissertations must include a brief Abstract at the start of the dissertation of no more than 400 words.

Students who take the MPhil in Asian and Middle Eastern Studies by Research (Chinese Studies) must have a viva examination, which is normally held in September.

Continuing

Applicants for the PhD will be expected to have scored at least 67% or above (or the equivalent from an overseas University) in their Master's degree which should be related to the PhD programme they wish to pursue. All applicants should submit with their GRADSAF (graduate application) a workable and interesting research proposal and demonstrate that they have the required academic knowledge and skills to carry out their project.

Admission is at the discretion of the Degree Committee, which judges each graduate applicant on his or her own merits and in accordance with its own set rules and regulations.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

- Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) -

NB: Applicants should check the Faculty's website before the academic year 2016 - 2017 is due to start to see if AHRC funding is available to apply for. Home PhD and MPhil students and EU students who satisfy home residency criteria may be eligible for a full studentship which covers the University Composition Fee and College Fees plus an annual maintenance stipend. EU students are eligible for a fees-only award.

Further information: http://www.cambridgestudents.cam.ac.uk/fees-and-funding/funding/ahrc-funded-students

- University Composition Fee Waivers 2016-2017 for the 1-Year MPhil in Asian and Middle Eastern Studies (Chinese Studies) -

The Department of East Asian Studies proposes to award one or two University Composition Fee waivers at Home and EU rates for the academic year 2016-2017. These awards will be made to applicants who intend to take the one-year MPhil in Asian and Middle Eastern Studies (Chinese Studies). Candidates should indicate their wish to be considered for this award in the Personal Statement section which they submit as part of their GRADSAF (graduate application). For further information, please contact Professor Roel Sterckx:

- Louis Cha Scholarship in Pre-Modern Chinese Studies at St John's College -

St John's College at the University of Cambridge is offering a Louis Cha Scholarship, which will commence in October 2015 to help financially assist students to undertake their research in the fields of Chinese Literature, Chinese History and/or the Culture of Early and Dynastic China (Pre-1912). The successful applicant will be selected from those who have secured a place at St John's College in Cambridge to read for the MPhil or PhD degree in a relevant subject. The scholarship will be available for the duration of the student's course and given for us up a maximum of three years. The scholarship will comprise of (a) a maintenance grant of up to £13,500 per annum and (b) approved University fees. Applicants applying for this award should note payments which they have secured from other sources. For further information, please refer to the following webpage on the Faculty's website:

http://www.ames.cam.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding/other

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The MPhil in Anglo-Saxon, Norse, and Celtic is designed for students who have already done a first degree incorporating work in some of the subjects encompassed by the Department. Read more
The MPhil in Anglo-Saxon, Norse, and Celtic is designed for students who have already done a first degree incorporating work in some of the subjects encompassed by the Department. Our MPhil programme provides a 9-month course (October to June) in the scholarly methods and disciplines relevant to the study of the history, languages, literatures, and material culture of the peoples of Britain and Ireland, Brittany and Scandinavia in the earlier Middle Ages.

The course enables candidates to achieve an understanding of early Insular culture as a whole, as well as specialising in aspects of particular interest, whether historical, palaeographical, literary, or linguistic. Training is given in scholarly methods and practices, complemented by instruction in the particular fields of the candidate's interests.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/elasmpanc

Course detail

During the MPhil, students should have:

(1) developed a deeper knowledge of their chosen area within Anglo- Saxon, Norse & Celtic and of the critical debates within it;
(2) developed an understanding of critical debates which allows the evaluation of current research in their dissertation field;
(3) shown independent judgement based on their own research.
(4) acquired and/or consolidated linguistic, palaeographical or other scholarly skills;
(5) participated effectively in seminar discussions and made an oral presentation of their research;
(6) learnt how to schedule independent research to produce written work of a high standard to a strict deadline.

Format

After two weeks of orientation and study-skills training, MPhil students meet for a weekly hour-long text-seminar throughout the first two terms of the course. The text-seminar focuses on a sequence of literary texts (studied in translation), including key Latin and vernacular texts from all the fields within ASNC, preceded by a group of earlier works that provided the intellectual background to the medieval world.

Alongside this core seminar, students are expected to attend the two courses they have chosen to pursue from among the selection of linguistic/literary and historical subjects offered in the Department, which are taught through a varying combination of lectures, classes and seminars. In this way, a significant proportion of the taught element of this MPhil is tailored to the individual needs of each student, hence the possible variation in weekly hours of seminars, classes and lectures.

Assessment

The MPhil dissertation (between 10,000 and 15,000 words) makes up 50% of the total mark for the course, and is submitted in the last week of the third term (mid-June). Students are required to submit a dissertation title, with abstract, by the mid-point of the second term (February).

At the end of the first term of the course (December), students are required to submit a 5000-word Review of Scholarship essay, intended as a survey and assessment of scholarship on the topic of the projected MPhil dissertation. The mark for the Review of Scholarship essay constitutes 10% of the overall MPhil grade.

Over the course of four days in the first week of the third term (April), students write a 3000-word take-home essay, on a broad topic chosen from a selection, and drawing on at least three of the works of literature discussed during the course of the MPhil text-seminar, which runs throughout the first two terms of the course. The mark for the take-home essay makes up 10% of the overall mark.

Students are required to take two 3-hour written examinations which assess knowledge and skills acquired during the first two terms of the academic year, in two courses chosen from among those taught in the Department. Courses on offer include Anglo-Saxon history, Scandinavian history, Brittonic and Gaelic history, Old English, Old Norse, Medieval Welsh, Medieval Irish, Insular Latin, and palaeography, most of which can be pursued at beginner, intermediate or advanced level; Germanic philology, Celtic philology, and textual criticism are further options for students with the appropriate prior knowledge. Each written examination is worth 15% of the total MPhil mark, and is assessed independently by two examiners.

Continuing

MPhil students may apply to continue to a PhD in ASNC; the academic condition for continuation is an overall mark of 70 or more in the MPhil course, and 70 or more for the dissertation. A viva on the dissertation is compulsory for all students who have been made an offer for continuation to PhD.

Find out how to apply here http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/elasmpanc/apply

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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Often a stepping-stone toward PhD studies, this course allows students considerable freedom in designing an independent course of study under the direction of a supervisor. Read more
Often a stepping-stone toward PhD studies, this course allows students considerable freedom in designing an independent course of study under the direction of a supervisor. Applicants will normally have already assembled an appropriate data set and questions for their dissertation at the time of application. The MPhil provides training in archaeological research methods and associated transferable skills, and the opportunity to complete a research thesis under academic guidance. This thesis and its topic are normally considered as a vehicle for working out detailed plans for pursuing a PhD, but may also be taken as a stand-alone one-year MPhil degree.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/hsarmparr

Course detail

The MPhil in Archaeological Research consists of three components, structured around independent study:

1. A Research Paper (6000 words)
2. A Research Skills module
3. The Dissertation (25,000 words).

This course is for students who have a substantial and appropriate background in Archaeology (at the first degree level and in fieldwork) accompanied by considerable maturity in the development of their research topic. Training in specific research skills (archaeological computing, quantitative methods, GIS and/or laboratory-based techniques) are arranged as appropriate to the student's needs.

Assessment

The dissertation is an extended piece of independent, original research. Students work with their supervisor to formulate a dissertation project, carry out research and write it up. The topic of the dissertation has to be approved by the Faculty Degree Committee; the dissertation is of maximum 25,000 words (excluding bibliography and appendices) and is due at the end of August; it counts as 70% of the student’s final mark.

A Research Paper of up to 6000 words will account for 25% of the final mark for the degree, and will be developed under guidance from the student’s supervisor. The Research Paper is an important milestone which helps students progress towards the dissertation.

Attendance at the relevant Research Skills Workshops is required of all MPhil students in the Division of Archaeology. MPhil students are required to submit a 2000 word research proposal and give a presentation to teaching staff and peers which form the assessed part of the Research Skills module and are worth 5% of the overall MPhil degree.

Continuing

MPhil students wishing to continue to the PhD in Archaeology are required to achieve a High Pass mark of 68 overall and no less than 68 in their dissertation, and to obtain the support of an appropriate supervisor. In some circumstances additional academic conditions may be set to ensure appropriate skills, such as language competence, are in place prior to admittance on the PhD programme.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are many different sources of funding available to support UK/EU and International students at the Division of Archaeology but full scholarships for MPhil students are highly competitive. The Division of Archaeology enters exceptionally strong MPhil candidates for Gates Cambridge, CHSS and AHRC scholarships and scholarship schemes administered by the Cambridge Trust. The Division of Archaeology also administers several funds which aim to support Archaeological fieldwork, Egyptology and Assyriology at MPhil level and will endeavour to support students in obtaining funding from University and external sources. For further information about funding opportunities at the Division of Archaeology consult the Division website: http://www.arch.cam.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduate-funding or contact the Graduate Administrator: .

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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The MPhil in Asian and Middle Eastern Studies (Arabic Studies) is text based. Students taking the MPhil in Asian and Middle Eastern Studies (Arabic) will be introduced to the analytical tools required for studying texts in Arabic Literary and Grammatical Tradition, Science and Religion, Qu'ran and Hadith, Islamic Law. Read more
The MPhil in Asian and Middle Eastern Studies (Arabic Studies) is text based. Students taking the MPhil in Asian and Middle Eastern Studies (Arabic) will be introduced to the analytical tools required for studying texts in Arabic Literary and Grammatical Tradition, Science and Religion, Qu'ran and Hadith, Islamic Law. Students will also be introduced to primary sources and bibliographical methods.

During the year, MPhil students attend various training courses offered by the Department in subjects such as codicology, text reading, and other skills. They are also encouraged to attend fourth-year undergraduate lectures and language courses where relevant. They must attend graduate work-in-progress seminars where they have an opportunity to present their own work to their peers for feedback in a supportive environment.

Visit the website: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/amammparb

Course detail

The one year course MPhil in Asian and Middle Eastern Studies (Arabic Studies) will have the following structure:

- (i) three modules each assessed by a written examination or a 5,000 word essay or by an Alternative Exercise.

The cumulative score of these three papers will be worth 50% of the final mark.

- (ii) a 15,000 word dissertation. The mark for the dissertation constitutes 50% of the overall mark for this course.

The following papers will be available for the MPhil pathway in Classical Arabic Studies in 2016 - 2017. You need to choose three of the following papers:

- Classical Arabic Literary Creativity
- Science and Religion in Medieval Islam
- Qur’an and Hadith
- Islamic Law
- The Arabic Grammatical Tradition
- Modes of Legitimation in the pre-modern Islamic world
- Alternative Exercise [to be arranged with specific instructors]

An individual student or a group of students sharing similar interests can arrange an 'Alternative Exercise'. Possible topics include:

- Al-Jahiz and the Ninth Century
- The Qira’at Tradition
- The Arabic Geographical Tradition
- Al-Ash’ari’s K. Maqalat al-Islamiyyin

Learning Outcomes

At the end of the MPhil programme, students will be expected to have:
- acquired the ability to read, interpret and translate primary sources in Classical Arabic;
- acquired a good knowledge of the general scholarship on Pre-Modern Middle Eastern culture(s);
- acquired an in-depth knowledge of the secondary literature relevant to the subject of their dissertation;
- developed the ability to formulate original research questions and produce a well-constructed, argument to answer them, in the form - of an independent piece of research based on the use of primary and secondary sources;
- acquired the skills to use library and internet resources independently.

Assessment

- For the MPhil in Asian and Middle Eastern Studies (Arabic Studies), students will submit a thesis of not more than 15,000 words, including footnotes and appendices but excluding bibliography on a subject approved by the Degree Committee. All MPhil dissertations must include a brief Abstract at the start of the dissertation of no more than 400 words.

- For the MPhil in Asian and Middle Eastern Studies (Arabic Studies), students may submit essays as part of their degree:
With the approval of the Degree Committee, a candidate may offer, in place of one or more of the examination papers, the same number of essays, each of not more than 5,000 words, including footnotes, but excluding bibliography, or equivalent Alternative Exercises approved by the Degree Committee.

- For the MPhil in Asian and Middle Eastern Studies (Arabic Studies), students may take examinations as part of their degree:
Three written examination papers on subjects approved by the Degree Committee, which shall fall within one of the fields specified in the Schedule to these regulations. With the approval of the Degree Committee, a candidate may offer, in place of one or more of those papers, the same number of essays, each of not more than 5,000 words, including footnotes, but excluding bibliography, or equivalent Alternative Exercises approved by the Degree Committee.

- There is no practical assessment associated with this course.

- An oral examination on the thesis and on the general field of knowledge within which it falls, but at the Degree Committee’s discretion the requirement for an oral examination may be waived.

Continuing

Applicants for the PhD will be expected to have scored at least 67% or above (or the equivalent from an overseas University) in their Master's degree which should be related to the PhD programme they wish to pursue. All applicants should submit with their GRADSAF (graduate application) a workable and interesting research proposal and demonstrate that they have the required academic knowledge and skills to carry out their project.

Admission is at the discretion of the Degree Committee, which judges each graduate applicant on his or her own merits and in accordance with its own set rules and regulations.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

- Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) -

NB: Applicants should check the Faculty's website before the academic year 2016 - 2017 is due to start to see if AHRC funding is available to apply for. Home PhD and MPhil students and EU students who satisfy home residency criteria may be eligible for a full studentship which covers the University Composition Fee and College Fees plus an annual maintenance stipend. EU students are eligible for a fees-only award.

Further information: http://www.cambridgestudents.cam.ac.uk/fees-and-funding/funding/ahrc-funded-students

- Pembroke College Graduate Studentship in Arabic and Islamic Studies -

This studentship covers the University and College fees at the UK Home rate for applicants who are applying for a PhD and MPhil in Arabic Studies, Persian Studies or Islamic Studies and who are affiliated with Pembroke College.

Further information for this studentship can be found at the following web address:
http://www.pem.cam.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduates/fees-and-financial-support/scholarships-and-bursaries/

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All prospective MPhil applicants are advised to peruse the staff profiles on our website to familiarise themselves with the research and teaching interests of staff members. Read more
All prospective MPhil applicants are advised to peruse the staff profiles on our website to familiarise themselves with the research and teaching interests of staff members. Applicants should contact potential supervisors by email and discuss potential MPhil dissertation topics.

Once admitted into the MPhil in Asian and Middle Eastern Studies (Chinese Studies), applicants will have the option of studying one of two streams:

Modern and contemporary Chinese Studies; or
Pre-modern Chinese Studies
With the consent of their supervisor and the relevant teacher(s), applicants may combine papers from both streams. Students can expect to receive one-to-one supervisions four times per year.

Students are required to choose three papers – courses usually run over two terms – in addition to doing a 15,000-word MPhil dissertation under the supervision of a supervisor. The dissertations are submitted no later than mid-August following the start of the course.

Visit the website: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/amammpchs

Course detail]

Students admitted for the MPhil in Asian and Middle Eastern Studies (Chinese Studies) will have the option to choose from one of the following programmes of study:

(1) Modern and Contemporary Chinese Studies or (2) Pre-Modern Chinese Studies.

With the consent of their supervisor and relevant teachers, students may be permitted to combine papers from options (1) and (2).
Students taking the MPhil in Asian and Middle Eastern Studies (Chinese Studies) choose three papers from either:

(1) Modern and Contemporary Chinese Studies:

REQUIRED: Asia in Theory - [Team taught; theoretical and methodological approaches]

Students then choose TWO optional papers from the following list:

- War and Modern China
- The Anthropology of China
- Japanese Imperialism in East Asia
- Chinese Linguistics
- Advanced Readings in Chinese on a relevant subject [e.g. Qing and Republican historical documents, Modern Literary texts etc.]
- Alternative Exercise (to be arranged with specific instructors).

or from:

(2) Pre-Modern Chinese Studies:

For pre-modern Chinese Studies, students need to choose THREE of the following papers:

- Classical and Literary Chinese Texts (received and excavated texts, manuscripts)
- Early China, specified topic - Medieval China, specified topic
- Asia in Theory [team-taught; theoretical and methodological approaches: with the supervisor's permission as the focus of this paper is on the modern period]
- Japanese for Sinologists [reading Japanese scholarship on pre-modern China]
- Alternative Exercise (to be arranged with specific instructors).

Most papers are assessed by long essays and research projects. Some advanced text papers are assessed through examination. Please note that not all papers will be available every year and are subject to modifications if necessary.

Learning Outcomes

At the end of the MPhil programme, students will be expected to have:
- acquired the ability to read, interpret and translate primary sources in Modern and/or Classical Chinese;
- acquired a good knowledge of the general scholarship on Modern and/or Pre-Modern Chinese culture(s);
- acquired an in-depth knowledge of the secondary literature relevant to the subject of their dissertation;
- developed the ability to formulate original research questions and produce a well-constructed, argument to answer them, in the form - of an independent piece of research based on the use of primary and secondary sources;
- acquired the skills to use library and internet resources independently.

Continuing

Applicants for the PhD will be expected to have scored at least 67% or above (or the equivalent from an overseas University) in their Master's degree which should be related to the PhD programme they wish to pursue. All applicants should submit with their GRADSAF (graduate application) a workable and interesting research proposal and demonstrate that they have the required academic knowledge and skills to carry out their project.

Admission is at the discretion of the Degree Committee, which judges each graduate applicant on his or her own merits and in accordance with its own set rules and regulations.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

- Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) -

NB: Applicants should check the Faculty's website before the academic year 2016 - 2017 is due to start to see if AHRC funding is available to apply for. Home PhD and MPhil students and EU students who satisfy home residency criteria may be eligible for a full studentship which covers the University Composition Fee and College Fees plus an annual maintenance stipend. EU students are eligible for a fees-only award.

Further information: http://www.cambridgestudents.cam.ac.uk/fees-and-funding/funding/ahrc-funded-students

- Louis Cha Scholarship in Pre-Modern Chinese Studies at St John's College -

St John's College at the University of Cambridge is offering a Louis Cha Scholarship, which will commence in October 2015 to help financially assist students to undertake their research in the fields of Chinese Literature, Chinese History and/or the Culture of Early and Dynastic China (Pre-1912). The successful applicant will be selected from those who have secured a place at St John's College in Cambridge to read for the MPhil or PhD degree in a relevant subject. The scholarship will be available for the duration of the student's course and given for us up a maximum of three years. The scholarship will comprise of (a) a maintenance grant of up to £13,500 per annum and (b) approved College and University fees. Applicants applying for this award should note payments which they have secured from other sources. For further information, please refer to the following webpage on the Faculty's website:

http://www.ames.cam.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding/other

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The MPhil programme in Hebrew Studies is offered as a one-year programme which aims to give graduate students an opportunity to develop their analytical, research and writing skills in preparation for further academic research or entry to professions requiring such skills. Read more
The MPhil programme in Hebrew Studies is offered as a one-year programme which aims to give graduate students an opportunity to develop their analytical, research and writing skills in preparation for further academic research or entry to professions requiring such skills.

This MPhil programme is taken by dissertation only. This entails working closely with one supervisor throughout the year on a 25,000 word dissertation to be submitted in mid-August.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/amammphbr

Course detail

At the end of the MPhil programme, students will be expected to have:

- acquired the ability to read, interpret and translate primary sources in Modern and/or Medieval Hebrew;
- acquired a good knowledge of the general scholarship on Modern and/or Medieval Hebrew culture(s);
- acquired an in-depth knowledge of the secondary literature relevant to the subject of their dissertation;
- developed the ability to formulate original research questions and produce a well-constructed, argument to answer them, in the form of an independent piece of research based on the use of primary and secondary sources;
- acquired the skills to use library and internet resources independently.

Format

Students who take the MPhil in Asian and Middle Eastern Studies by Research (Hebrew Studies) by dissertation only are expected to work closely with their supervisor throughout the year on a 25,000 word dissertation which is submitted by mid-August.

During the year, MPhil students attend various training courses offered by the Department in codicology, text reading, and other skills. They are also encouraged to attend fourth year undergraduate lectures and language courses where relevant. They also attend graduate work-in-progress seminars where they have an opportunity to present their own work to their peers for feedback in a supportive environment.

All prospective MPhil applicants are advised to peruse the staff profiles on our website to familiarise themselves with the research and teaching interests of staff members. Applicants should contact potential supervisors by email and discuss potential MPhil dissertation topics.

Assessment

For the MPhil in Asian and Middle Eastern Studies by Research (Hebrew Studies), students will submit a thesis of not more than 25,000 words, including footnotes and appendices but excluding bibliography on a subject approved by the Degree Committee. All MPhil dissertations must include a brief Abstract at the start of the dissertation of no more than 400 words.

Those students who take the MPhil by research will be required to take a viva examination.

Continuing

Applicants for the PhD will be expected to have scored at least 67% or above (or the equivalent from an overseas University) in their Master's degree which should be related to the PhD programme they wish to pursue. All applicants should submit with their GRADSAF (graduate application) a workable and interesting research proposal and demonstrate that they have the required academic knowledge and skills to carry out their project.

Admission is at the discretion of the Degree Committee, which judges each graduate applicant on his or her own merits and in accordance with its own set rules and regulations.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

- Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) -

NB: Applicants should check the Faculty's website before the academic year 2016 - 2017 is due to start to see if AHRC funding is available to apply for. Home PhD and MPhil students and EU students who satisfy home residency criteria may be eligible for a full studentship which covers the University Composition Fee and College Fees plus an annual maintenance stipend. EU students are eligible for a fees-only award.

Further information: http://www.cambridgestudents.cam.ac.uk/fees-and-funding/funding/ahrc-funded-students

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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The one year MPhil programmes in Criminology and Criminological Research regularly recruit around 40 students each year. Read more
The one year MPhil programmes in Criminology and Criminological Research regularly recruit around 40 students each year. The programmes have a high national and international standing, and the MPhil in Criminological Research is a recognised Doctoral Training Centre pathway towards a PhD and so candidates can apply to the Institute of Criminology for Economic and Social Research Council 1+3 funding.

The MPhil programmes consist of core modules and seminars on topics in key areas. The core modules are compulsory and familiarise students with current criminological thinking and research. The other seminars cover a range of topics which include criminal justice, comparative criminology, mental health and crime, a sociology of punishment, developmental criminology, a sociology of prison life, policing, social contexts of crime and crime prevention (please note that not all optional courses are run each year).

The MPhil in Criminological Research includes compulsory participation in the Social Sciences Research Methods course (which provides additional research methods training).

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/lwcrmpcmr

Course detail

The basic aims of the MPhil programme are:

1. to offer an up-to-date and high-quality course, introducing students to some of the most important theory and research in criminology
2. to offer a sound foundation for more advanced work, such as that involved in research and teaching careers in criminology, and in particular for progression to the Institute’s PhD in Criminology
3. to provide those who wish to proceed to careers beyond academic or research contexts with a sound foundation of knowledge and methodological skills, which can be used effectively in relation to work in criminal justice agencies, the legal profession or other professional or voluntary organisations.

Learning Outcomes

Students should acquire:

- an understanding of core criminological and criminal justice theories; a critical awareness of current problems and debates within the field; originality in application of knowledge to current issues; and skills in critical evaluation of theoretical and empirical literature relevant to criminological and criminal justice research;

- a comprehensive understanding of qualitative and quantitative research methods used in criminology; the ability to use acquired knowledge to propose new hypotheses and address research problems; the ability to organise research; the ability to independently acquire and interpret additional knowledge needed for their own research; and an understanding of the quality of work required to satisfy peer review;

- the ability to use national data banks and develop competencies in devising and implementing surveys, active mastery of advanced statistics; the ability to use a range of qualitative methods such as interviews, observation and ethnography, and documentary and discourse analysis, and the ability to apply those research techniques to current research questions; students should also acquire the ability to use theoretical knowledge creatively and independently in order to be able to handle practical issues arising in empirical work; to understand the problems of knowledge transfer to non-specialist audiences, and develop skills in communicating criminological knowledge to specialist and non-specialist audiences.

Continuing

For progression from the MPhil to the PhD: the Institute strongly recommends that students who intend to register for the PhD apply for the MPhil in Criminological Research in the first instance. Progression to the PhD is dependent on a good performance on the MPhil programme.

Continuation to the PhD programme will involve a separate application process, undertaken during the MPhil year. Prospective PhD students are encouraged to discuss their plans with their MPhil supervisor as early as possible during the MPhil year. Please see our web pages at: http://www.crim.cam.ac.uk/courses/phd/prospective/#applications

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

The Institute of Criminology is pleased to be able to offer a number of Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) 1+3 or +3 studentships. Each of the studentships covers the cost of the University Composition Fee for four years, together with a maintenance stipend for each year. Where appropriate, the Institute can apply for an enhanced stipend for anyone wishing to pursue research which is likely to involve advanced quantitative research. The studentship enables each successful applicant to study for the M.Phil. in Criminological Research in the first year, followed by three years of doctoral research leading to the award of a Ph.D.

For further information on the ESRC studentships, and other possible sources of funding, please see our funding pages.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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The MPhil in Applied Biological Anthropology is a full-time interdisciplinary course, taken over a period of ten months, with core teaching in human nutritional ecology, growth and development, epidemiology and disease, reproductive ecology, conservation and molecular genetics. Read more
The MPhil in Applied Biological Anthropology is a full-time interdisciplinary course, taken over a period of ten months, with core teaching in human nutritional ecology, growth and development, epidemiology and disease, reproductive ecology, conservation and molecular genetics. There are strong biostatistical and laboratory elements to the course as well as a focus on field studies.

The lecturers are primarily involved in research and teaching within the Division of Biological Anthropology, in the Department of Archaeology and Anthropology. This taught MPhil recruits students who are prepared for graduate work and wish to receive interdisciplinary training, but who do not have sufficient background in Applied Biological Anthropology to be considered for the research MPhil or doctoral work. This is a demanding course that enables students to obtain specialist training and knowledge in an area of Applied Biological Anthropology over a relatively short time frame. Subject to performance in the examination, the course prepares students to undertake an advanced degree.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/hsbampaba

Format

The MPhil in Applied Biological Anthropology is a full-time one year interdisciplinary course, taken over a period of ten months, with core teaching in human nutritional ecology, growth and development, epidemiology and disease, reproductive ecology, conservation and molecular genetics. There are strong biostatistical and laboratory elements to the course as well as a focus on field studies.

This taught MPhil recruits students who are prepared for graduate work and wish to receive interdisciplinary training, but who do not have sufficient background in Applied Biological Anthropology to be considered for the research MPhil or doctoral work. This is a demanding course that enables students to obtain specialist training and knowledge in an area of Applied Biological Anthropology over a relatively short time frame. Subject to performance in the examination, the course prepares students to undertake an advanced degree.

Assessment

- All students will write a thesis of not more than 20,000 words in length, excluding tables, appendices, and references, on a subject approved by the Degree Committee for the Faculty of Human, Social, and Political Science. This is worth 50% of the final mark.
- All students will undertake a quantitative exercise on statistical analysis and interpretation, worth 10% of the final mark.
- All students will write two essays of each not more than 2,500 words in length, excluding tables and references, based upon material from the core courses. These are worth 10% each of the final mark.
- All students will undertake two written assignments (either two essays or one essay and one lab report) based on material from the option courses. These are worth 10% each of the final mark.
- Lab report based on one of the two lab practicals that will be carried out. The lab practicals will be based on hormones and genetics. This will contribute towards 10% of the final mark.

Continuing

MPhil students are registered for one year only. Those who hope to read for a PhD at Cambridge immediately after the MPhil wil need to obtain support from a potential supervisor. This need not be the same person who supervises your MPhil thesis. But you will need to work hard to let the potential PhD supervisor see substantive work that you have written, in addition to your draft thesis proposal, at an early stage in the academic year. Once you have applied for the PhD a definite decision will be taken after your performance in the MPhil can be fully assessed; the Committee wil set conditions for your related to the entry requirements of the PhD. If you do not achieve these targets it is unlikely you wil be able to continue to reads towards a PhD.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

Students have the opportunity to apply for relevant funding during the application process. General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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The MPhil in African Studies offers a taught course with a substantial research component, and provides an excellent foundation for students wanting to develop their knowledge of Africa. Read more
The MPhil in African Studies offers a taught course with a substantial research component, and provides an excellent foundation for students wanting to develop their knowledge of Africa. It is designed for students who wish to enhance their historical and contemporary understanding of Africa’s societies, politics, economies, and cultures, as well as for those who wish to apply for advanced research degrees. The degree thus offers a highly regarded postgraduate qualification relevant to a wide range of professional careers, as well as intensive research and language training for students planning to prepare a doctoral dissertation.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/hsafmpafs

Course detail

The course introduces the latest research approaches and methodologies in African studies at an advanced level. Students have the advantage of developing an interdisciplinary approach to critical thinking and academic writing, the opportunity to develop skills in an African language, and also receive specialist research training.

By the end of the course, students should have acquired:

1. A deeper knowledge and understanding of African studies and its critical debates.
2. A conceptual and contextual understanding enabling the evaluation of past and present research on Africa and its methodologies.
3. The knowledge and technical skills required for pursuing original research in their chosen area.
4. The ability to situate their own research within current and past methodological and interpretative developments in the field.
5. Increased proficiency in speaking an African language and/or in using an African language for academic purposes.

Format

The MPhil in African Studies is structured by four key elements: a core course, an option course, a dissertation and language training.

African Language Training is also not a formal part of the degree assessment, but all students are required to demonstrate that they have attended language teaching and have made good progress at language acquisition. The language element of the MPhil course is jointly managed by the University of Cambridge Language Centre and the Centre of African Studies. All students are enrolled for Swahili Basic 1 at the University of Cambridge Language Centre, which is taught over 15 weeks during Michaelmas and Lent terms.

Assessment

Formal assessment consists of two parts: coursework essays (submitted for the Core Course and the Option Course) and a dissertation (submitted at the end of the course). You are also required to submit a ‘practice essay’ on a topic related to your dissertation research, and also a formal dissertation proposal, but these are not formally assessed.

The dissertation must be submitted on the last day of Easter full term, and should be between 15,000 and 20,000 words (including footnotes but excluding bibliography). It counts for 60% of the final mark. If the examiners consider it necessary, they may conduct an oral examination on the dissertation before the final MPhil Examiners' meeting in early July.

The Core Course is assessed by means of an essay of no more than 5,000 words (including footnotes but excluding bibliography) on a topic chosen from a prescribed list of questions, which is distributed by the MPhil Office in the first week of Lent Term. The Option Courses are also assessed by means of an essay of not more than 5,000 words (including footnotes but excluding bibliography). The Core Course essay and Option Course essay each count for 20% of the final mark and are submitted in Lent Term.
A compulsory practice essay on a topic related to the dissertation is to be submitted in Lent term. This essay does not count towards the final mark but a 'pass' mark is a progression requirement.

All students are enrolled for Swahili Basic 1 at the University of Cambridge Language Centre, which is taught over 15 weeks during Michaelmas and Lent Terms. Formal assessment consists of coursework (2 pieces of homework, 10% each) and two exams at the end of the course in Reading Comprehension (30%) and Listening Comprehension (20%) as well as one Oral Presentation (30%).

Progression requirement to proceed to examined coursework essays: 'Pass' mark for the compulsory practice essay submitted in Lent term (candidates are permitted one resubmission of the practice essay).

Continuing

The Centre of African Studies does not offer a PhD course, but every year several of our MPhil students go on to study for a PhD in Cambridge or elsewhere.

Find out how to apply here http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

UAC Nigeria Fund (departmental grant for fieldwork)

Centre for History and Economics Prize Research Grant (grant for fieldwork)

The Charlie Bayne Travel Trust (travel grants for students with a disability)

For more information http://www.african.cam.ac.uk/fellowship

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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