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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study High Performance and Scientific Computing at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study High Performance and Scientific Computing at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MSc in High Performance and Scientific Computing is for you if you are a graduate in a scientific or engineering discipline and want to specialise in applications of High Performance computing in your chosen scientific area. During your studies in High Performance and Scientific Computing you will develop your computational and scientific knowledge and skills in tandem helping emphasise their inter-dependence.

On the course in High Performance and Scientific Computing you will develop a solid knowledge base of high performance computing tools and concepts with a flexibility in terms of techniques and applications. As s student of the MSc High Performance and Scientific Computing you will take core computational modules in addition to specialising in high performance computing applications in a scientific discipline that defines the route you have chosen (Biosciences, Computer Science, Geography or Physics). You will also be encouraged to take at least one module in a related discipline.

Modules of High Performance and Scientific Computing MSc

The modules you study on the High Performance and Scientific Computing MSc depend on the route you choose and routes are as follows:

Biosciences route (High Performance and Scientific Computing MSc):

Graphics Processor Programming

High Performance Computing in C/C++

Operating Systems and Architectures

Software Testing

Programming in C/C++

Conservation of Aquatic Resources or Environmental Impact Assessment

Ecosystems

Research Project in Environmental Biology

+ 10 credits from optional modules

Computer Science route (High Performance and Scientific Computing MSc):

Graphics Processor Programming

High Performance Computing in C/C++

Operating Systems and Architectures

Software Testing

Programming in C/C++

Partial Differential Equations

Numerics of ODEs and PDEs

Software Engineering

Data Visualization

MSc Project

+ 30 credits from optional modules

Geography route (High Performance and Scientific Computing MSc):

Graphics Processor Programming

High Performance Computing in C/C++

Operating Systems and Architectures

Software Testing

Programming in C/C++

Partial Differential Equations

Numerics of ODEs and PDEs

Modelling Earth Systems or Satellite Remote Sensing or Climate Change – Past, Present and Future or Geographical Information Systems

Research Project

+ 10 credits from optional modules

Physics route (High Performance and Scientific Computing MSc):

Graphics Processor Programming

High Performance Computing in C/C++

Operating Systems and Architectures

Software Testing

Programming in C/C++

Partial Differential Equations

Numerics of ODEs and PDEs

Monte Carlo Methods

Quantum Information Processing

Phase Transitions and Critical Phenomena

Physics Project

+ 20 credits from optional modules

Optional Modules (High Performance and Scientific Computing MSc):

Software Engineering

Data Visualization

Monte Carlo Methods

Quantum Information Processing

Phase Transitions and Critical Phenomena

Modelling Earth Systems

Satellite Remote Sensing

Climate Change – Past, Present and Future

Geographical Information Systems

Conservation of Aquatic Resources

Environmental Impact Assessment

Ecosystems

Facilities

Students of the High Performance and Scientific Computing programme will benefit from the Department that is well-resourced to support research. Swansea physics graduates are more fortunate than most, gaining unique insights into exciting cutting-edge areas of physics due to the specialized research interests of all the teaching staff. This combined with a great staff-student ratio enables individual supervision in advanced final year research projects. Projects range from superconductivity and nano-technology to superstring theory and anti-matter. The success of this programme is apparent in the large proportion of our M.Phys. students who seek to continue with postgraduate programmes in research.

Specialist equipment includes:

a low-energy positron beam with a highfield superconducting magnet for the study of positronium

a number of CW and pulsed laser systems

scanning tunnelling electron and nearfield optical microscopes

a Raman microscope

a 72 CPU parallel cluster

access to the IBM-built ‘Blue C’ Supercomputer at Swansea University and is part of the shared use of the teraflop QCDOC facility based in Edinburgh

The Physics laboratories and teaching rooms were refurbished during 2012 and were officially opened by Professor Lyn Evans, Project Leader of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. This major refurbishment was made possible through the University’s capital programme, the College of Science, and a generous bequest made to the Physics Department by Dr Gething Morgan Lewis FRSE, an eminent physicist who grew up in Ystalyfera in the Swansea Valley and was educated at Brecon College.



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Change the world with the Master of Environmental Studies program. The Master of Environmental Studies (MES) program at the University of Pennsylvania helps you translate your passion for the environment into a fulfilling career. Read more
Change the world with the Master of Environmental Studies program
The Master of Environmental Studies (MES) program at the University of Pennsylvania helps you translate your passion for the environment into a fulfilling career. The program offers you a rigorous academic grounding in environmental science and exceptional opportunities to conduct research in the field. In addition, you gain the professional networks and individualized professional development you need to excel in your work, whether as a researcher, policy advocate, teacher or business executive.

The Master of Environmental Studies program provides an innovative, interdisciplinary approach to the study of the environment. Built with flexibility in mind, you can choose from a variety of concentrations or create your own path to suit your interests, experience and goals, all with the guidance of our world-class faculty and built upon the foundation of Ivy League science courses. You will gain the breadth of knowledge necessary to address complex issues in the environment, while also developing the depth of expertise required to become a successful environmental professional.

Where theory meets practice
Our students don’t wait until they leave the program to start making a difference. The heart of the Master of Environmental Studies program is the passion of our students and faculty to create change in the world, from helping to conserve endangered species to implementing energy-efficient policies at the local and national levels. Many of our distinguished professors also influence professional practice outside the University, bringing their experience and broad networks from the worlds of policy, business and consulting into the classroom.

From the beginning of the program, your education occurs both in the classroom and in the field. Our faculty and staff work one-on-one with you to connect you with relevant, engaging internships and fieldwork opportunities that give you hands-on experience in the field of your choice.

Designed for practicing and aspiring environmental professionals
The Master of Environmental Studies program is designed to encourage your ongoing professional contributions and career development while you earn your degree. Many of our students find meaningful ways to blend their academic and current professional experiences throughout the program, by partnering with faculty to design projects and research experiences that tackle real-world challenges from their workplace.

We provide you with a rigorous, elite educational experience that you can access part time and in the evenings while you continue to work. Full-time students can earn the 12-course degree in two years, while part-time students finish in between two and four years, depending on their course load each semester.

Connect with us today
The Penn Master of Environmental Studies program is built upon the strong personal connections between students, teachers and program staff. We welcome you to give us a call with any questions you may have, or meet with us in person on campus.

Courses and Curriculum

Tailor your curriculum to your interests
The Master of Environmental Studies program provides you with the knowledge base you need to understand complex environmental issues — and allows you the flexibility to develop unique expertise and professional experience in the field of your choice. Penn’s degree is exceptional among environmental studies programs for the breadth of options it offers. With the help of a dedicated academic advisor, you create a curriculum suited precisely to your interests.

At the beginning of your studies, you will be assigned an academic advisor to help you through the course selection process. Together, you’ll determine which skills you hope to develop and which academic and internship experiences match your goals. Not only will you sample a broad range of courses in your first year to aid you in narrowing your focus, but we also provide resources — such as professional development retreats, alumni talks and more — to help you find the path that’s best for you.

As a Master of Environmental Studies student, you’ll complete 12 course units (c.u.)* that reflect our balance between core learning and individual exploration. Your course of study includes the following elements (you can read about each curricular element in further depth below):

The Proseminar: Contemporary Issues in Environmental Studies (1 c.u)
Research Methods course (1 c.u.)
Foundation courses (4 c.u.)
Professional concentration courses (5 c.u.)
Capstone project (1 c.u.)
The Proseminar: Contemporary Issues in Environmental Studies (1 c.u.)

This course reviews the key sciences fundamental to an interdisciplinary study of the environment: biology, geology, chemistry and physics. It takes a systems approach to the environment with a look at the atmosphere, lithosphere, hydrosphere and biosphere and the intersection of humans with each. This required course also acquaints students with issues, debates and current opinions in the study of the environment. Different styles of writing, from white papers to blogs, will be assigned throughout the semester.

Research Methods course (1 c.u.)
Designing research is a key building block of the Master of Environmental Studies program. The research methods course prepares students to ask, and confidently answer, the innovative questions they will pose in their capstone projects. The requirement can be fulfilled by taking a methodology course that provides students with the data gathering and analysis skills they’ll use to begin their research projects.

Foundation courses (4 c.u.)
At both the local and international scale, issues such as climate change, diminishing natural resources, water access, energy security, low-level toxins and habitat destruction all require not only the best science available, but the ability to integrate this knowledge to make decisions even when considerable uncertainties exist.

Environmental challenges are complex, and their solutions never come from just one sector of society. We believe that in order to become a leading problem-solver in the environmental arena, you need to be able to draw connections between many disciplines.

Foundation courses help broaden your knowledge in areas outside of your chosen concentration, and complement your chosen field. For example, if you are studying sustainability, your foundation course credits are an opportunity to learn about environmental law and policy, or become versed in business, which will be necessary while working in the sustainability sector. Foundation courses allow you to speak the language of many different sectors, and offer the opportunity to discover unexpected synergies and resonances in fields beyond your own. Your academic advisor will consult with you as you choose your courses from areas such as:

Environmental Chemistry
Environmental Biology
Environmental Geology
Environmental Law
Environmental Policy
Environmental Business
Professional concentration courses (5 c.u.)
While foundation courses give you a broad understanding of environmental issues, your professional concentration courses let you develop the expertise you need to pursue a career in your chosen field.

Concentration courses may be taken in any of the 12 graduate Schools at the University (School of Engineering and Applied Science, Graduate School of Education, School of Design, School of Social Policy & Practice, The Wharton School of Business, Penn Law, etc.). Your advisor will help you select courses that best fit your goals and skills gaps.

You may choose from the following concentrations:

Environmental Advocacy & Education
Environmental Biology
Environmental Policy
Environmental Sustainability
Resource Management
Urban Environment
If your professional aspirations are not reflected in one of the above concentrations, you can develop an Individualized concentration in conjunction with your faculty advisor and with the approval of the Faculty Advisory Committee.

Capstone project (1 c.u.)

The capstone project is a distinguishing feature of the Master of Environmental Studies program, blending academic and professional experiences and serving as the culmination of your work in the program. You will design a project drawing from your learning in and outside the classroom to demonstrate mastery of your concentration area.

During your first year, your academic advisor will help you choose a topic for your capstone project. Once you’ve done so, you’ll seek out two readers for your capstone. These can be faculty members or professionals in a relevant field. The readers serve as advisors and mentors, and our students frequently find their first jobs after graduation as a result of the connections they make during the capstone process.

The capstone projects themselves vary widely, from research papers to videos, business plans, photojournals and websites. However, all projects demonstrate students’ ability to:

Define a research question
Design a protocol to address this question
Acquire the data necessary to clarify, if not resolve, the question
Critically assess the quality of the data acquired
Draw defensible conclusions from those data
Communicate this process and conclusions to professional colleagues with clarity and precision
Time frame

Master of Environmental Studies students may enroll on either a part-time or full-time basis. Your time to graduation will vary depending on how many classes you take each semester and whether you take summer classes. Full-time students can complete the program in two years, taking three or four classes per semester. Part-time students typically complete their work in four years, taking one or two classes per semester. Individuals working full time are advised to take no more than two courses per term.

Transferring graduate credits

Incoming students may petition to transfer up to two graduate-level credits from classes completed prior to their admission at Penn. Students seeking transfer credit should fill out a form after they matriculate into the program, along with an official transcript, to the Program Director before the end of their first semester at Penn. A transfer credit form is available on the program’s Blackboard site, which is accessible to current students only. Transfer credit is evaluated on a case-by-case basis by the faculty advisory committee.

*Academic credit is defined by the University of Pennsylvania as a course unit (c.u.). Generally, a 1 c.u. course at Penn is equivalent to a three or four semester hour course elsewhere. In general, the average course offered at Penn is listed as being worth 1 c.u.; courses that include a lecture and a lab are often worth 1.5 c.u.

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Penn’s Master of Chemical Sciences is designed for your success. Chemistry professionals are at the forefront of the human quest to solve ever-evolving challenges in agriculture, healthcare and the environment. Read more
Penn’s Master of Chemical Sciences is designed for your success
Chemistry professionals are at the forefront of the human quest to solve ever-evolving challenges in agriculture, healthcare and the environment. As new discoveries are made, so are new industries — and new opportunities. Whether you’re currently a chemistry professional or seeking to enter the field, Penn’s rigorous Master of Chemical Sciences (MCS) builds on your level of expertise to prepare you to take advantage of the myriad career possibilities available in the chemical sciences. With a faculty of leading academic researchers and experienced industry consultants, we provide the academic and professional opportunities you need to achieve your unique goals.

The Penn Master of Chemical Sciences connects you with the resources of an Ivy League institution and provides you with theoretical and technical expertise in biological chemistry, inorganic chemistry, organic chemistry, physical chemistry, environmental chemistry and materials. In our various seminar series, you will also regularly hear from chemistry professionals who work in a variety of research and applied settings, allowing you to consider new paths and how best to take advantage of the program itself to prepare for your ideal career.

Preparation for professional success
If you’ve recently graduated from college and have a strong background in chemistry, the Master of Chemical Sciences offers you a exceptional preparation to enter a chemistry profession. In our program, you will gain the skills and confidence to become a competitive candidate for potential employers as you discover and pursue your individual interests within the field of chemistry. Our faculty members bring a wealth of research expertise and industry knowledge to help you define your career direction.

For working professionals in the chemical or pharmaceutical industries, the Master of Chemical Sciences accelerates your career by expanding and refreshing your expertise and enhancing your research experiences. We provide full- and part-time options so you can pursue your education without interrupting your career. You can complete the 10-course program in one and a half to four years, depending on course load.

The culminating element of our curriculum, the capstone project, both tests and defines your program mastery. During the capstone exercise, you will propose and defend a complex project of your choice, that allows you to stake out a new professional niche and demonstrate your abilities to current or prospective employers.

Graduates will pursue fulfilling careers in a variety of cutting-edge jobs across government, education and corporate sectors. As part of the Penn Alumni network, you’ll join a group of professionals that spans the globe and expands your professional horizons.

Courses and Curriculum

The Master of Chemical Sciences degree is designed to give you a well-rounded, mechanistic foundation in a blend of chemistry topics. To that end, the curriculum is structured with a combination of core concentration courses and electives, which allow you to focus on topics best suited to your interests and goals.

As a new student in the Master of Chemical Sciences program, you will meet with your academic advisor to review your previous experiences and your future goals. Based on this discussion, you will create an individualized academic schedule.

The Master of Chemical Sciences requires the minimum completion of 10 course units (c.u.)* as follows:

Pro-Seminar (1 c.u.)
Core concentration courses (4-6 c.u., depending on concentration and advisor recommendations)
Elective courses in Chemistry, such as computational chemistry, environmental chemistry, medicinal chemistry, catalysis and energy (2-4 c.u., depending on concentration and advisor recommendations)
Optional Independent Studies (1 c.u.)
Capstone project (1 c.u.)
Pro-Seminar course (CHEM 599: 1 c.u.)
The Pro-Seminar will review fundamental concepts regarding research design, the scientific method and professional scientific communication. The course will also familiarize students with techniques for searching scientific databases and with the basis of ethical conduct in science.

Concentration courses
The concentration courses allow you to develop specific expertise and also signify your mastery of a field to potential employers.

The number of elective courses you take will depend upon the requirements for your area of concentration, and upon the curriculum that you plan with your academic advisor. These concentration courses allow you to acquire the skills and the critical perspective necessary to master a chemical sciences subdiscipline, and will help prepare you to pursue the final capstone project (below).

You may choose from the following six chemical sciences concentrations:

Biological Chemistry
Inorganic Chemistry
Organic Chemistry
Physical Chemistry
Environmental Chemistry
Materials
Independent Studies
The optional Independent Studies course will be offered each fall and spring semester, giving you an opportunity to participate in one of the research projects being conducted in one of our chemistry laboratories. During the study, you will also learn analytical skills relevant to your capstone research project and career goals. You can participate in the Independent Studies course during your first year in the program as a one-course unit elective course option. (CHEM 910: 1 c.u. maximum)

Capstone project (1 c.u.)

The capstone project is a distinguishing feature of the Master of Chemical Sciences program, blending academic and professional experiences and serving as the culmination of your work in the program. You will develop a project drawing from your learning in and outside of the classroom to demonstrate mastery of an area in the chemical sciences.

The subject of this project is related to your professional concentration and may be selected to complement or further develop a work-related interest. It's an opportunity to showcase your specialization and your unique perspective within the field.

Your capstone component may be a Penn laboratory research project, an off-campus laboratory research project or a literature-based review project. All components will require a completed scientific report. It is expected that the capstone project will take an average of six months to complete. Most students are expected to start at the end of the first academic year in the summer and conclude at the end of fall semester of the second year. Depending on the capstone option selected, students may begin to work on the capstone as early as the spring semester of their first year in the program.

All capstone project proposals must be pre-approved by your concentration advisor, Master of Chemical Sciences Program Director and if applicable, your off-campus project supervisor. If necessary, nondisclosure agreements will be signed by students securing projects with private companies. Additionally, students from private industry may be able to complete a defined capstone project at their current place of employment. All capstone projects culminate in a final written report, to be graded by the student's concentration advisor who is a member of the standing faculty or staff instructor in the Chemistry Department.

*Academic credit is defined by the University of Pennsylvania as a course unit (c.u.). Generally, a 1 c.u. course at Penn is equivalent to a three or four semester hour course elsewhere. In general, the average course offered at Penn is listed as being worth 1 c.u.; courses that include a lecture and a lab are often worth 1.5 c.u.

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This course is designed to give graduates a systematic training in the application of modern scientific methods in archaeology. It provides the necessary practical, analytical and interpretative skills to apply a wide range of specialist approaches in archaeology. Read more
This course is designed to give graduates a systematic training in the application of modern scientific methods in archaeology. It provides the necessary practical, analytical and interpretative skills to apply a wide range of specialist approaches in archaeology. It aims to prepare students not only for research in archaeological science, but also to further career prospects in all areas of mainstream archaeology. Students normally follow one of three pathways.
-Environmental Archaeology focuses on subsistence and health through studies of animal bones, plant remains and biomarkers in human and non-human hard tissue. It also introduces environmental issues which impact on human beings, including environmental change.
-Landscape Archaeology focuses on understanding and interpreting landscapes in the past using scientific methods.
-Biomolecular Archaeology allows students to specialise in the use of biomolecular methods to study both human remains and artefacts.

The pathways are intended to guide students through appropriate modules; they are indicative rather than prescriptive and students may choose to take the optional modules offered in any combination, subject to timetabling.

For more information on the part time version of this course, please view this web-page: http://www.brad.ac.uk/study/courses/info/archaeological-sciences-msc-part-time

Why Bradford?

-Individual modules are available to candidates wishing to enhance their specialist knowledge in a particular area
-This course includes hands-on experience in the Division's laboratories, a substantial individual research dissertation and has a wide range of option choices
-First destination figures indicate that about 85% of postgraduates in Archaeological Sciences achieve work or further studies in the discipline or cognate areas

Modules

(C) = Core, (O) = Option

Semester 1 (60 Credits - 3 x (C) Modules and 30 Credits from the (O) Modules listed):
-Quantitative Methods (10 Credits) (C)
-Analytical Methods 1* (10 Credits) (C)
-The Nature of Matter 1 (10 Credits) (C)
-Analysis of Human Remains (20 Credits) (O)
-GIS: Theory and Practice (10 Credits) (O)
-Archaeozoology (10 Credits) (O)
-Introduction to Forensic Archaeology (20 Credits) (O)

Semester 2 (60 Credits - 4 x (C) Modules and 20 Credits from the (O) Modules listed):
-Analytical Methods 2* (10 Credits) (C)
-Research Skills (10 Credits) (C)
-Techniques and Interpretation in Instrumental Analysis (10 Credits) (C)
-Topics in Archaeometry (10 Credits) (C)
-Forensic Taphonomy (20 Credits) (O)
-Funerary Archaeology (10 Credits) (O)
-Past Environments (20 Credits) (O)
-Site Evaluation Strategies (20 Credits) (O)
-Soils and Chemical Prospection (10 Credits) (O)

End of Semester 2 onwards (60 Credits - 1 x (C) Module):
-Dissertation (MSc) (60 Credits) (C)

* Students must take at least 20 credits from Analytical Methods 1 and 2. These comprise a wide choice of 10 credit modules run as short courses are shared with the MSc Analytical Sciences. These modules are run as short courses.

Semester 1:
-X-Ray Diffraction
-Separation Science
-Vibrational Spectroscopy

Semester 2:
-Mass Spectrometry
-Stable Light Isotope Analysis
-Electron Microscopy

Career support and prospects

The University is committed to helping students develop and enhance employability and this is an integral part of many programmes. Specialist support is available throughout the course from Career and Employability Services including help to find part-time work while studying, placements, vacation work and graduate vacancies. Students are encouraged to access this support at an early stage and to use the extensive resources on the Careers website.

Discussing options with specialist advisers helps to clarify plans through exploring options and refining skills of job-hunting. In most of our programmes there is direct input by Career Development Advisers into the curriculum or through specially arranged workshops.

The course prepares students not only for research in archaeological science, but also furthers career prospects in mainstream archaeology or scientific analysis. The course is well-suited both to students who wish to use it as a foundation from which to commence research or as vocational training to enhance employment prospects in archaeology.

Career destinations have included PhDs at Universities of York, Bradford, Oxford, Texas A&M, Catamarca; UNESCO research; archaeological project managers; conservation science and teaching.

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This course is designed to give graduates a systematic training in the application of modern scientific methods in archaeology. It provides the necessary practical, analytical and interpretative skills to apply a wide range of specialist approaches in archaeology. Read more
This course is designed to give graduates a systematic training in the application of modern scientific methods in archaeology. It provides the necessary practical, analytical and interpretative skills to apply a wide range of specialist approaches in archaeology.

It aims to prepare students not only for research in archaeological science, but also to further career prospects in all areas of mainstream archaeology.

Students normally follow one of three pathways.
-Environmental Archaeology focuses on subsistence and health through studies of animal bones, plant remains and biomarkers in human and non-human hard tissue. It also introduces environmental issues which impact on human beings, including environmental change.
-Landscape Archaeology focuses on understanding and interpreting landscapes in the past using scientific methods.
-Biomolecular Archaeology allows students to specialise in the use of biomolecular methods to study both human remains and artefacts.

The pathways are intended to guide students through appropriate modules; they are indicative rather than prescriptive and students may choose to take the optional modules offered in any combination, subject to timetabling.

To find out more about the part time version of this course, please view this web-page: http://www.brad.ac.uk/study/courses/info/archaeological-sciences-pgdip-part-time

Why Bradford?

-Individual modules are available to candidates wishing to enhance their specialist knowledge in a particular area
-This course includes hands-on experience in the Division's laboratories, a substantial individual research dissertation and has a wide range of option choices
-First destination figures indicate that about 85% of postgraduates in Archaeological Sciences achieve work or further studies in the discipline or cognate areas

Modules

(C) = Core, (O) = Option

Semester 1 (60 Credits - 3 x (C) Modules and 30 Credits from the (O) Modules listed):
-Quantitative Methods (10 Credits) (C)
-Analytical Methods 1* (10 Credits) (C)
-The Nature of Matter 1 (10 Credits) (C)
-Analysis of Human Remains (20 Credits) (O)
-GIS: Theory and Practice (10 Credits) (O)
-Archaeozoology (10 Credits) (O)
-Introduction to Forensic Archaeology (20 Credits) (O)

Semester 2 (60 Credits - 4 x (C) Modules and 20 Credits from the (O) Modules listed):
-Analytical Methods 2* (10 Credits) (C)
-Research Skills (10 Credits) (C)
-Techniques and Interpretation in Instrumental Analysis (10 Credits) (C)
-Topics in Archaeometry (10 Credits) (C)
-Forensic Taphonomy (20 Credits) (O)
-Funerary Archaeology (10 Credits) (O)
-Past Environments (20 Credits) (O)
-Site Evaluation Strategies (20 Credits) (O)
-Soils and Chemical Prospection (10 Credits) (O)

* Students must take at least 20 credits from Analytical Methods 1 and 2. These comprise a wide choice of 10 credit modules run as short courses are shared with the MSc Analytical Sciences. These modules are run as short courses.

Semester 1:
-X-Ray Diffraction
-Separation Science
-Vibrational Spectroscopy

Semester 2:
-Mass Spectrometry
-Stable Light Isotope Analysis
-Electron Microscopy

Career support and prospects

The University is committed to helping students develop and enhance employability and this is an integral part of many programmes. Specialist support is available throughout the course from Career and Employability Services including help to find part-time work while studying, placements, vacation work and graduate vacancies. Students are encouraged to access this support at an early stage and to use the extensive resources on the Careers website.

Discussing options with specialist advisers helps to clarify plans through exploring options and refining skills of job-hunting. In most of our programmes there is direct input by Career Development Advisers into the curriculum or through specially arranged workshops.

The course prepares students not only for research in archaeological science, but also furthers career prospects in mainstream archaeology or scientific analysis. The course is well-suited both to students who wish to use it as a foundation from which to commence research or as vocational training to enhance employment prospects in archaeology.

Career destinations have included PhDs at Universities of York, Bradford, Oxford, Texas A&M, Catamarca; UNESCO research; archaeological project managers; conservation science and teaching.

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Under the Health and Social Care Act (2012), the responsibility for approving Approved Mental Health Professional (AMHP) programmes in England now rests with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC). Read more
Under the Health and Social Care Act (2012), the responsibility for approving Approved Mental Health Professional (AMHP) programmes in England now rests with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC). The two interdependent elements in this qualification are:
-Approved Mental Health Professional (AMHP) training
-Either a Postgraduate Certificate, Postgraduate Diploma or MA in Mental Health Practice

Employers are responsible for sponsoring students for this programme. They also provide practice placements to enable students to develop and their practice. This is assessed by means of a portfolio.

Why Bradford?

On completion of the first five modules, students will be eligible for the Post Graduate Diploma in Mental Health Practice and for approval as an AMHP by their employer. The AMHP Programme is approved by the HCPC, in line with their criteria for the approval of AMHP programmes.

Modules

(C) = Core. (O) = Option
Stage 1 (60 Credits - 3 x (C) Modules):
-Law, Policies and Procedures (and AMHP role) (20 Credits) (C)
-Critical Perspectives in Mental Health (20 Credits) (C)
-Collaborative Practice in Mental Health (20 Credits) (C)

Stage 2 (60 Credits - 2 x (C) Modules and 1 x (O) Module):
-Risk: Evidence-based Decision Making and Communication (20 Credits) (C)
-AMHP Practice (40 Credits) (C)

Stage 3 (60 Credits - 1 x (C) Module):
-Master's Dissertation in Mental Health Practice (60 Credits) (C)

Career support and prospects

The University is committed to helping students develop and enhance employability and this is an integral part of many programmes. Specialist support is available throughout the course from Career and Employability Services including help to find part-time work while studying, placements, vacation work and graduate vacancies. Students are encouraged to access this support at an early stage and to use the extensive resources on the Careers website.

Discussing options with specialist advisers helps to clarify plans through exploring options and refining skills of job-hunting. In most of our programmes there is direct input by Career Development Advisers into the curriculum or through specially arranged workshops.

Read less
This course emphasises the study of archaeological human remains within their funerary context. It builds upon the School's extensive research in human osteology and palaeopathology and related research expertise in field archaeology, archaeozoology, molecular archaeology and archaeological biogeochemistry. Read more
This course emphasises the study of archaeological human remains within their funerary context.

It builds upon the School's extensive research in human osteology and palaeopathology and related research expertise in field archaeology, archaeozoology, molecular archaeology and archaeological biogeochemistry.

The course strongly emphasises the integration of biological and archaeological evidence to address problem-orientated research themes and the application of scientific methods to unravelling the human past.

It provides advanced instruction in the identification and analysis of human remains, the techniques and methods applied to understanding human skeletal morphological variation, and the means by which to assess pathological conditions affecting the skeleton.

The course can be used either as vocational training or, for the MSc, as a foundation from which to commence further research. The course is normally offered on a full-time basis but a part-time route is feasible as well. Individual modules are available to candidates wishing to enhance their specialist knowledge in a particular area.

For more information on the part time version of this course, please view this web-page: http://www.brad.ac.uk/study/courses/info/human-osteology-and-palaeopathology-msc-part-time

Professional Accreditation

The course provides access to our world renowned collection of reference material (The Bradford Human Remains Collection), hands-on experience in the School's laboratories, and a substantial individual research dissertation.

A part-time route is feasible, accumulating module credits over a period of study. Individual modules are available to candidates wishing to enhance their specialist knowledge in a particular area.

Modules

(C) = Core, (O) = Option
Semester 1 (60 Credits - 4 x (C) Modules):
-Analysis of Human Remains (20 Credits) (C)
-Archaeozoology (10 Credits) (C)
-Quantitative Methods (10 Credits) (C)
-Musculoskeletal Anatomy (20 Credits) (C)

Semester 2 (60 Credits - 2 x (C) Modules and 20 Credits from the (O) Modules listed):
-Palaeopathology (30 Credits) (C)
-Research Skills (10 Credits) (C)
-Funerary Archaeology (10 Credits) (O)
-Stable Light Isotope Analysis (10 Credits) (O)
-Topics in Archaeometry (10 Credits) (O)

Career support and prospects

The University is committed to helping students develop and enhance employability and this is an integral part of many programmes. Specialist support is available throughout the course from Career and Employability Services including help to find part-time work while studying, placements, vacation work and graduate vacancies. Students are encouraged to access this support at an early stage and to use the extensive resources on the Careers website.

Discussing options with specialist advisers helps to clarify plans through exploring options and refining skills of job-hunting. In most of our programmes there is direct input by Career Development Advisers into the curriculum or through specially arranged workshops.

Career destinations after the MSc Human Osteology and Palaeopathology have included:
-Lecturers, teaching assistants and post-doctoral researchers at universities in the UK and overseas
-Osteologists and archaeologists working in commercial archaeology
-Research, curatorial and education staff in museums
-Other professional careers

The MSc Human Osteology and Palaeopathology has also produced a large number of doctoral research students. They have undertaken research in Bradford and at other universities in the UK and overseas, including Ireland, Sweden, Australia, New Zealand, the USA and Canada.

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This course emphasises the study of archaeological human remains within their funerary context. It builds upon the School's extensive research in human osteology and palaeopathology and related research expertise in field archaeology, archaeozoology, molecular archaeology and archaeological biogeochemistry. Read more
This course emphasises the study of archaeological human remains within their funerary context.

It builds upon the School's extensive research in human osteology and palaeopathology and related research expertise in field archaeology, archaeozoology, molecular archaeology and archaeological biogeochemistry.

The course strongly emphasises the integration of biological and archaeological evidence to address problem-orientated research themes and the application of scientific methods to unravelling the human past.

It provides advanced instruction in the identification and analysis of human remains, the techniques and methods applied to understanding human skeletal morphological variation, and the means by which to assess pathological conditions affecting the skeleton.

The course can be used either as vocational training or, for the MSc, as a foundation from which to commence further research. The course is normally offered on a full-time basis but a part-time route is feasible as well. Individual modules are available to candidates wishing to enhance their specialist knowledge in a particular area.

Professional Accreditation

-The course provides access to our world renowned collection of reference material (The Bradford Human Remains Collection), hands-on experience in the School's laboratories, and a substantial individual research dissertation.
-A part-time route is feasible, accumulating module credits over a period of study. Individual modules are available to candidates wishing to enhance their specialist knowledge in a particular area.

For more information on the part time version of this course, please view this web-page: http://www.brad.ac.uk/study/courses/info/human-osteology-and-palaeopathology-pgdip-part-time

Modules

(C) = Core, (O) = Option

Semester 1 (60 Credits - 4 x (C) Modules):
-Analysis of Human Remains (20 Credits) (C)
-Archaeozoology (10 Credits) (C)
-Quantitative Methods (10 Credits) (C)
-Musculoskeletal Anatomy (20 Credits) (C)

Semester 2 (60 Credits - 2 x (C) Modules and 20 Credits from the (O) Modules listed):
-Palaeopathology (30 Credits) (C)
-Research Skills (10 Credits) (C)
-Funerary Archaeology (10 Credits) (O)
-Stable Light Isotope Analysis (10 Credits) (O)
-Topics in Archaeometry (10 Credits) (O)

Career support and prospects

The University is committed to helping students develop and enhance employability and this is an integral part of many programmes. Specialist support is available throughout the course from Career and Employability Services including help to find part-time work while studying, placements, vacation work and graduate vacancies. Students are encouraged to access this support at an early stage and to use the extensive resources on the Careers website.

Discussing options with specialist advisers helps to clarify plans through exploring options and refining skills of job-hunting. In most of our programmes there is direct input by Career Development Advisers into the curriculum or through specially arranged workshops.

Career destinations after the MSc Human Osteology and Palaeopathology have included:
-Lecturers, teaching assistants and post-doctoral researchers at universities in the UK and overseas
-Osteologists and archaeologists working in commercial archaeology
-Research, curatorial and education staff in museums
-Other professional careers

The MSc Human Osteology and Palaeopathology has also produced a large number of doctoral research students. They have undertaken research in Bradford and at other universities in the UK and overseas, including Ireland, Sweden, Australia, New Zealand, the USA and Canada.

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This Master of Design is new for 2017. A professionally focused program of advanced study in contemporary design practice, the Master of Design course includes specialisations in interaction design, multimedia design and collaborative design. Read more
This Master of Design is new for 2017.

A professionally focused program of advanced study in contemporary design practice, the Master of Design course includes specialisations in interaction design, multimedia design and collaborative design.

You can also take a range of units from across these three to construct an advanced studies in design specialisation. This program is ideal for those keen to enter the expanding fields of professional design engagement, or design practitioners aiming to upgrade their expertise. You’ll be trained in advanced design thinking and processes that’ll equip you to create design solutions that engage experiential, communication, object and spatial contexts.

Visit the website http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2017/design-f6002?domestic=true

Overview

Please select a specialisation for more details:

- Advanced studies in design
This pathway allows you to construct, with approval, an individual program of study from across interaction design, multimedia design and collaborative design. This enables you to tailor your unit choices while addressing the fundamental principles of advanced design practice and thinking. It’ll inspire you to connect research and practice across the design disciplines, and to become a thoughtful design practitioner. You’ll broaden your knowledge of key design constructs, deepen your professional learning in design areas of interest, and advance your capacity as a design professional.

- Collaborative design
Collaborative design places you conceptually and practically at the intersection of interior, graphic and industrial design practice. The program will set you design challenges involving image, text, products, narratives, systems, ervices, public and private space, materiality and virtuality. You’ll develop independent conceptual and practical design skills alongside an ability to be part of collaborative design processes. You’ll expand your awareness across design disciplines; develop multidisciplinary design expertise; and build broader skills in leadership, professional adaptability and complex project planning.

- Interaction design
The interaction design specialisation develops your skills in the design of contemporary artefacts, products and services that engage with interactive, user-focused technologies and processes. These can include, but aren’t limited to, health and medical equipment, ‘smart’ furniture, educational toys, wearable technologies, information kiosks and transport systems. You’ll use a diverse range of interactive processes, including the application of advanced technologies; electronics and programming; physical and virtual interface manipulation; engineering and material fabrication; and rapid prototyping. The specialisation gives you an understanding of the relationship between interactive activities, products and human behaviour.

- Multimedia design
Multimedia design develops your skills in digital communication environments. This includes: designing for the web; motion and animation; and interactive touchscreen devices and surfaces. Emphasising an advanced knowledge of existing and emerging digital design processes and systems, this specialisation embraces projects of varied scale, from hand-held smart devices to large public interactive screens. It develops your ability to build a communication narrative; use multimedia processes to fill community and business needs; and understand the end-user’s engagement with projects or products such as websites, apps and other screen-based media.

Course Structure

The course comprises 96 points structured into 3 parts:

Part A. Preparatory Studies for Advanced Design (24 points), Part B. Advanced Design Studies (24 points), and Part C. Advanced Design Applications (48 points).

- Students admitted at Entry level 1 complete 96 points, comprising Part A, B & C
- Students admitted at Entry level 2 complete 72 points, comprising Part B & C
- Students admitted at Entry level 3 complete 48 points, comprising Part C

Note: Students eligible for credit for prior studies may elect not to receive the credit and complete one of the higher credit-point options. A zero credit point unit in Art, Design and Architecture Occupational Health and Safety will also be undertaken. This unit is required of all students in the Master of Design and must be undertaken even if credit is obtained for Parts A or B.

Part A: Preparatory studies for advanced design
These studies provide you with the conceptual thinking and technical skill set required for advanced postgraduate study in this area. The studio unit brings together conceptual and technical abilities developed in the other two units.

Part B: Advanced design studies
In these studies you will focus on the application of conceptual thinking and technical skills to advanced design problem solving. You will analyse and create a project outcome based on research, critique, and the application of design processes appropriate to your specialisation. You will also choose a selective unit that will further build capacity in your chosen specialisation.

Part C: Advanced design applications
In these studies you will focus on the application of advanced design problem solving skills at a professional level. You will consolidate skills and practice of design research methodologies and may extend your research trajectory to further study. Part C is also supported by a selective unit to allow you to build capabilities in your chosen specialisation.

In the final semester you will pursue a major design project or participate in a leading industry project. The exegesis unit formalises the research component of Part C. The final semester brings together advanced technical ability, conceptual thinking, entrepreneurial studies and design management in practice.

For more information visit the faculty website - http://www.study.monash/media/links/faculty-websites/design-and-architecture

Find out how to apply here - http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2017/design-f6002?domestic=true

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This course is aimed primarily at staff who are currently employed in the higher education sector in teaching and/or learner support roles. Read more
This course is aimed primarily at staff who are currently employed in the higher education sector in teaching and/or learner support roles.

Courses of this nature are an accepted part of the career development of HE teaching staff.

Why Bradford?

-It serves the needs of you and your fellow participants, in terms of helping to support you to build on and develop your existing professional knowledge, skills and values associated with being a teacher and enabler of student learning in higher education
-Unusually for the field of education, many people start work as teachers in HE without having had much experience or training. In this course we therefore support people in making the transition to becoming an established HE teaching professional. As an accredited programme, successful participants will be eligible to become Fellows of the Higher Education Academy
-The course is a work-based learning course developed in collaboration with the employer (the University), and this is recognised by the fact that the PGCHEP is one of the University's ESCALATE programmes (the University's employer engagement initiative). The course forms a key part of the University of Bradford's framework for the professional development of teaching staff, and will act as a platform for your ongoing CPD in this area
-The course is addressed to the needs of students - through engaging with the course, you will be in a better position to evaluate and enhance the quality of your own students' experiences

Modules

(C) = Core, (O) = Option
Stage 1 (30 Credits - 2 x (C) Modules and 1 x (O) Module):
-Inclusive Curriculum Design (20 Credits split over both Stages, 10 Credits per Stage) (C)
-Teaching Practice and Professional Development (20 Credits split over both Stages, 10 Credits per Stage) (C)
-Learning and Teaching in Higher Education (20 Credits split over both Stages, 10 Credits per Stage) (O)
-Learning and Teaching in Higher Education (GTAa and P/T Tutors) (20 Credits split over both Stages, 10 Credits per Stage) (O)

Stage 2 (30 Credits - 2 x (C) Modules and 1 x (O) Module)
-Inclusive Curriculum Design (20 Credits split over both Stages, 10 Credits per Stage) (C)
-Learning and Teaching in Higher Education (20 Credits split over both Stages, 10 Credits per Stage) (O)
-Learning and Teaching in Higher Education (GTAa and P/T Tutors) (20 Credits split over both Stages, 10 Credits per Stage) (O)
-Teaching Practice and Professional Development (20 Credits split over both Stages, 10 Credits per Stage) (C)

Career support and prospects

The University is committed to helping students develop and enhance employability and this is an integral part of many programmes. Specialist support is available throughout the course from Career and Employability Services including help to find part-time work while studying, placements, vacation work and graduate vacancies. Students are encouraged to access this support at an early stage and to use the extensive resources on the Careers website.

Discussing options with specialist advisers helps to clarify plans through exploring options and refining skills of job-hunting. In most of our programmes there is direct input by Career Development Advisers into the curriculum or through specially arranged workshops.

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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Computer Science. Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Computer Science: Informatique at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MSc in Computer Science: Informatique is a Dual Degree scheme between Swansea University and Université Grenoble Alpes for computer science.

The MSc in Computer Science: Informatique Grenoble dual degree scheme is a two year programme that provides students with an opportunity to study in both Swansea, UK and Grenoble, France. One year of the Computer Science: Informatique programme students study at Swansea University and the second year of the programme students study at Université Grenoble Alpes. Upon successful completion of the programme, students will receive an M.Sc. in Advanced Computer Science from Swansea University and a Master from Université Grenoble Alpes.

Key Features of Computer Science: Informatique MSc

- We are top in the UK for career prospects [Guardian University Guide 2018]

- 5th in the UK overall [Guardian University Guide 2018]7th in the UK for student satisfaction with 98% [National Student Survey 2016]

- We are in the UK Top 10 for teaching quality [Times & Sunday Times University Guide 2017]

- 12th in the UK overall and Top in Wales [Times & Sunday Times University Guide 2017]

- 92% in graduate employment or further study six months after leaving University [HESA data 2014/15]

- UK TOP 20 for Research Excellence [Research Excellence Framework 2014]

- Our Project Fair allows students to present their work to local industry

- Strong links with industry

- £31m Computational Foundry for computer and mathematical sciences will provide the most up-to-date and high quality teaching facilities featuring world-leading experimental set-ups, devices and prototypes to accelerate innovation and ensure students will be ready for exciting and successful careers. (From September 2018)

- Top University in Wales [Times & Sunday Times University Guide 2017]

Modules of Computer Science: Informatique MSc

Modules on the MSc in Computer Science: Informatique may include:

Critical Systems; IT-Security: Theory and Practice; Visual Analytics; Data Science Research Methods and Seminars; Big Data and Data Mining; Data Visualization; Human Computer Interaction; Big Data and Machine Learning; Web Application Development; High Performance Computing in C/C++; Software Testing; Graphics Processor Programming; Embedded System Design; Mathematical Skills for Data Scientists; Logic in Computer Science; Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition; High-Performance Computing in C/C++; Hardware and Devices; Modelling and Verification Techniques; Operating Systems and Architectures.

Facilities

The Department of Computer Science is well equipped for teaching, and is continually upgrading its laboratories to ensure equipment is up-to-date – equipment is never more than three years old, and rarely more than two. Currently, Computer Science students use three fully networked laboratories: one, running Windows; another running Linux; and a project laboratory, containing specialised equipment. These laboratories support a wide range of software, including the programming languages Java, C# and the .net framework, C, C++, Haskell and Prolog among many; integrated programme development environments such as Visual Studio and Netbeans; the widely-used Microsoft Office package; web access tools; and many special purpose software tools including graphical rendering and image manipulation tools; expert system production tools; concurrent system modelling tools; World Wide Web authoring tools; and databases.

As part of our expansion, we are building the Computational Foundry on our Bay Campus for computer and mathematical sciences. This development is exciting news for Swansea Mathematics who are part of the vibrant and growing community of world-class research leaders drawn from computer and mathematical sciences.

Careers

All Computer Science courses will provide you the transferable skills and knowledge to help you take advantage of the excellent employment and career development prospects in an ever growing and changing computing and ICT industry.

94% of our Postgraduate Taught Computer Science Graduates were in professional level work or study [DLHE 14/15].

Some example job titles include:

Software Engineer: Motorola Solutions

Change Coordinator: Logica

Software Developer/Engineer: NS Technology

Workflow Developer: Irwin Mitchell

IT Developer: Crimsan Consultants

Consultant: Crimsan Consultants

Programmer: Evil Twin Artworks

Web Developer & Web Support: VSI Thinking

Software Developer: Wireless Innovations

Associate Business Application Analyst: CDC Software

Software Developer: OpenBet Technologies

Technical Support Consultant: Alterian

Programming: Rock It

Software Developer: BMJ Group

Research

The results of the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 show that Swansea Computer Science ranked 11th in the UK for percentage of world-leading research, and 1st in Wales for research excellence. 40% of our submitted research assessed as world-leading quality (4*).



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Applications are invited for a fully-funded part-time two-year MRes studentship at St Mary’s University, Twickenham, London, to begin on 30th August 2017 [completed proposal due 31st July 2017]. Read more
Applications are invited for a fully-funded part-time two-year MRes studentship at St Mary’s University, Twickenham, London, to begin on 30th August 2017 [completed proposal due 31st July 2017]. The successful candidate will work under the supervision of Senior Lecturers to complete a MRes in the area of expert performance in dance, whilst also providing strength and conditioning (S&C) coaching support to the students of The Royal Ballet School, Covent Garden. Subject to ratification of contract.

A topic to investigate will be agreed through collaboration between the student, supervisor and Royal Ballet School Healthcare Manager. The studentship will provide part-time MRes student fees of £5,500 and a bursary of £11,000 p.a. Please note that the initial stipend payment will be paid upon successful registration in August 2017.

The successful applicant will split their time between the Royal Ballet School in central London and St Mary’s University in Twickenham. As a member of the S&C team working with the international students of The Royal Ballet School you will contribute towards the planning, delivery and evaluation of a programme of world-class S&C support. We are looking for a coach with experience of supporting young athletes in a high-performance setting and who understands how academic research can be used to inform training decisions in an S&C context.

Data collection will be alongside delivery of Strength and Conditioning (S&C) services to The Royal Ballet School’s students. Delivery will be a minimum of 18 hours per week, for 47 weeks per year.

Applicants should possess:
- an undergraduate degree (minimum upper second class) in sport science (or a similar subject)
- Scored a minimum of an upper second class in an undergraduate degree research project
- Hold professional accreditation with the UKSCA (inc. first aid qualified) or have the ability to achieve within 6 months
- Have at least 3 years S&C coaching experience
- Excellent teamwork and communication skills
- Knowledge of research methods and designing projects with a high-level of scientific rigor

The closing date for applications is 5th July 2017
Interviews will be held on the 17th or 18th July 2017

For more information or to apply (please send CV and covering letter) please contact: Matt Springham ()

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These programmes are designed to meet the needs of existing or aspiring managers in health and social care organisations (including the voluntary or independent sector) who wish to develop new strategic management skills to enhance their career prospects. Read more
These programmes are designed to meet the needs of existing or aspiring managers in health and social care organisations (including the voluntary or independent sector) who wish to develop new strategic management skills to enhance their career prospects. They meet the professional and academic needs of health and social care managers and through this, the needs of the individual's organisation.

Most students who undertake this programme of study are already employed in practising and/or in management roles within the fields of health, social care, public, voluntary/community sector organisations.

For more information on the part time version of this course, please view this web-page: http://www.brad.ac.uk/study/courses/info/health-and-social-care-management-msc-part-time.

Why Bradford?

Continuing professional development funding may be available for some modules and courses. However, access to funding for part or all of an award cannot be guaranteed.

Modules

(C) = Core, (O) = Option

Semester 1 - 60 Credits (2 x (C) Modules):
-Managing In Organisations (30 credits) (C)
-Managing Self and Others (30 credits) (C)

Semester 2 - 60 Credits (2 x (O) Modules):
-Coaching and Mentoring (30 credits) (O)
-Developing Organisational Health (30 credits) (O)
-Human Resource Development (30 credits) (O)
-Human Resource Management (30 credits) (O)
-Independent Management Study (10 or 20 credits - to be used where there is a deficit in credit from previous study) (O)
-Project Management (30 credits) (O)
-Quality and Service Improvement (30 credits) (O)
-Strategic Business and Service Planning (30 credits) (O)

End of Semester 2 onwards - 60 Credits (1 x (C) Module):
-Management Project (60 credits) (C)

Career support and prospects

The University is committed to helping students develop and enhance employability and this is an integral part of many programmes. Specialist support is available throughout the course from Career and Employability Services including help to find part-time work while studying, placements, vacation work and graduate vacancies. Students are encouraged to access this support at an early stage and to use the extensive resources on the Careers website.

Discussing options with specialist advisers helps to clarify plans through exploring options and refining skills of job-hunting. In most of our programmes there is direct input by Career Development Advisers into the curriculum or through specially arranged workshops.

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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Data Science at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Data Science at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

MSc in Data Science aims to equip students with a solid grounding in data science concepts and technologies for extracting information and constructing knowledge from data. Students of the MSc Data Science will study the computational principles, methods, and systems for a variety of real world applications that require mathematical foundations, programming skills, critical thinking, and ingenuity. Development of research skills will be an essential element of the Data Science programme so that students can bring a critical perspective to current data science discipline and apply this to future developments in a rapidly changing technological environment.

Key Features of the MSc Data Science

The MSc Data Science programme focuses on three core technical themes: data mining, machine learning, and visualisation. Data mining is fundamental to data science and the students will learn how to mine both structured data and unstructured data. Students will gain practical data mining experience and will gain a systematic understanding of the fundamental concepts of analysing complex and heterogeneous data. They will be able to manipulate large heterogeneous datasets, from storage to processing, be able to extract information from large datasets, gain experience of data mining algorithms and techniques, and be able to apply them in real world applications. Machine learning has proven to be an effective and exciting technology for data and it is of high value when it comes to employment. Students of the Data Science programme will learn the fundamentals of both conventional and state-of-the-art machine learning techniques, be able to apply the methods and techniques to synthesise solutions using machine learning, and will have the necessary practical skills to apply their understanding to big data problems. We will train students to explore a variety visualisation concepts and techniques for data analysis. Students will be able to apply important concepts in data visualisation, information visualisation, and visual analytics to support data process and knowledge discovery. The students of the Data Science programme also learn important mathematical concepts and methods required by a data scientist. A specifically designed module that is accessible to students with different background will cover the basics of algebra, optimisation techniques, statistics, and so on. More advanced mathematical concepts are integrated in individual modules where necessary.

The MSc Data Science programme delivers the practical components using a number of programming languages and software packages, such as Hadoop, Python, Matlab, C++, OpenGL, OpenCV, and Spark. Students will also be exposed to a range of closely related subject areas, including pattern recognition, high performance computing, GPU processing, computer vision, human computer interaction, and software validation and verification. The delivery of both core and optional modules leverage on the research strength and capacity in the department. The modules are delivered by lecturers who are actively engaged in world leading researches in this field. Students of the Data Science programme will benefit from state-of-the-art materials and contents, and will work on individual degree projects that can be research-led or application driven.

Modules

Modules for the MSc Data Science programme include:

- Visual Analytics

- Data Science Research Methods and Seminars

- Big Data and Data Mining

- Big Data and Machine Learning

- Mathematical Skills for Data Scientists

- Data Visualization

- Human Computer Interaction

- High Performance Computing in C/C++

- Graphics Processor Programming

- Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition

- Modelling and Verification Techniques

- Operating Systems and Architectures

Facilities

The Department of Computer Science is well equipped for teaching, and is continually upgrading its laboratories to ensure equipment is up-to-date – equipment is never more than three years old, and rarely more than two. Currently, our Computer Science students use three fully networked laboratories: one, running Windows; another running Linux; and a project laboratory, containing specialised equipment. These laboratories support a wide range of software, including the programming languages Java, C# and the .net framework, C, C++, Haskell and Prolog among many; integrated programme development environments such as Visual Studio and Netbeans; the widely-used Microsoft Office package; web access tools; and many special purpose software tools including graphical rendering and image manipulation tools; expert system production tools; concurrent system modelling tools; World Wide Web authoring tools; and databases.

As part of the expansion of the Department of Computer Science, we are building the Computational Foundry on our Bay Campus for computer science and mathematical science.

Career Destinations

- Data Analyst

- Data mining Developer

- Machine Learning Developer

- Visual Analytics Developer

- Visualisation Developer

- Visual Computing Software Developer

- Database Developer

- Data Science Researcher

- Computer Vision Developer

- Medical Computing Developer

- Informatics Developer

- Software Engineer



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This industry-focused course is for Computer Science graduates and experienced professional programmers interested in developing high-quality, complex software systems. Read more
This industry-focused course is for Computer Science graduates and experienced professional programmers interested in developing high-quality, complex software systems.

Who is it for?

This industry-focused course is for Computer Science graduates and experienced professional programmers interested in developing high-quality, complex software systems and aiming at a high-quality career in the industry, e.g. software houses, consultancies, and major software users across different sectors.

Students will have a keen interest in designing complex software systems, coding them in a programming language using the latest technologies (SOA, cloud, etc.), and ensuring that they are of high quality and that they actually meet the needs of their stakeholders.

Objectives

You will develop skills in analysing requirements and designing appropriate software solutions; designing and creating complex software systems to solve real-world problems, evaluating and using advanced software engineering environments, design methods and programming languages, and evaluating and responding to recent trends in interoperability and software development.

The course focuses on advanced engineering concepts and methods, as well as design issues for the systematic development of high-quality complex software systems. These are explored using industrial strength technologies, like the C++ and Java programming languages and the UML modelling language.

The course covers significant trends in systems development, including service-oriented architecture, cloud computing, and big data. The course is delivered by acknowledged experts and draws on City's world-class research in Systems and Software Engineering, which has one of the largest groups of academics working in this area in London, covering almost all aspects - from requirements, to designing reliable systems for the nuclear industry.

Placements

Postgraduate students on a Computing and Information Systems course are offered the opportunity to complete up to six months of professional experience as part of their degree.

Our longstanding internship scheme gives students the chance to apply the knowledge and skills gained from their taught modules within a real business environment. An internship also provides students with professional development opportunities that enhance their technical skills and business knowledge.

Internships delivered by City, University of London offer an exceptional opportunity to help students stand out in the competitive IT industry job market. The structure of the course extends the period for dissertation submission to January, allowing students to work full-time for up to six months. Students will be supported by our outstanding Professional Liaison Unit (PLU) should they wish to consider undertaking this route.

Teaching and learning

Software Engineering MSc is available full-time (12 months) as well as part-time (up to 28 months).

Students successfully completing eight taught modules and the dissertation for their individual project will be awarded 180 credits and a Master's level qualification. Alternatively, students who do not complete the dissertation but have successfully completed eight taught modules will be awarded 120 credits and a postgraduate diploma. Successful completion of four taught modules (60 credits) will lead to the award of a postgraduate certificate.

Assessment

Each module is assessed through a combination of coursework and examination.

Modules

You will develop skills in analysing requirements and designing appropriate software solutions; designing and creating complex software systems to solve real-world problems, evaluating and using advanced software engineering environments, design methods and programming languages and evaluating and responding to recent trends in interoperability and software development.

The focus of the course is on advanced engineering concepts and methods, as well as design issues for the systematic development of high-quality complex software systems. These are explored using industrial strength technologies, such as the C++ and Java object-oriented programming languages and the UML modelling language.

The course covers significant trends in systems development, including service-oriented architecture, mobile and pervasive computing, cloud computing, big data, and XML-enabled interoperable services. The course is delivered by acknowledged experts and draws on City's world-class research in Systems and Software Engineering. City has one of the largest groups of academics working in the area in London, working on almost all aspects of the area - from requirements, to designing reliable systems for the nuclear industry.

Core modules - there are five core modules:
-Advanced Database Technologies (15 credits)
-Research Methods and Professional Issues (15 credits)
-Service Oriented Architectures (15 credits)
-Software Systems Design (15 credits)
-Advanced Programming: Concurrency (15 credits)

Elective modules - you will be required to take three elective modules, choosing from the following:
-Advanced Algorithms and Data Structures (15 credits)
-Big Data (15 credits)
-Programming in C++ (15 credits)
-Business Engineering with ERP Solutions (15 credits)
-Mobile and Pervasive Computing (15 credits)
-Data Visualization (15 credits)
-Cloud Computing (15 credits)

Career prospects

The MSc in Software Engineering aims to meet the significant demand for graduates with a good knowledge of computing. This demand arises from consultancies, software houses, major software users such as banks, large manufacturers, retailers, and the public services, defence, aerospace and telecommunications companies.

Typical entrants to the course have a degree in an engineering or scientific discipline, and wish to either move into the software engineering field or to the development of software for their current field. Entrants must have previous exposure to computing, especially to programming (particularly in Java or C#) and relational databases (from either academic or professional experience).

From this base, the course provides solid technical coverage of advanced software development, including such widely used languages as C++, Java, UML and XML for which demand is particularly high. The course is therefore quite demanding; its success in providing advanced academic education along these lines is evident from the fact that recent graduates of the course are currently employed in a wide spectrum of organisations.

Of course, the employment value of a master's degree is not just short term. Although on-the-job training and experience as well as technology specific skills are valuable, they can be rather narrow and difficult to validate, and to transfer. The structure of this course ensures that there is a strong balance between the development of particular skills and a solid education in the enduring principles and concepts that underlie complex software system development.

SAP Certification - in parallel to your degree you will be able to register for a SAP TERP10 Certification course at a substantial discount, thus obtaining an additional, much sought-after qualification

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