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Delivered fully online, the course-based Master of Science (MSc) in One Health degree program is designed to equip veterinarians, animal scientists, medical doctors, health professionals and biological scientists with an in-depth understanding of the principles of, and issues associated with, One Health. Read more

Program Description

Delivered fully online, the course-based Master of Science (MSc) in One Health degree program is designed to equip veterinarians, animal scientists, medical doctors, health professionals and biological scientists with an in-depth understanding of the principles of, and issues associated with, One Health. Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine (RUSVM) is committed to a One Health approach to sectoral and multidisciplinary integrative mechanism to enable research aimed at sustainably reducing the burden of zoonoses. RUSVM’s geographical location in the Caribbean, its existing research focus on One Health, its experienced faculty and its global partnerships will allow students to gain a hands-on educational experience on one of the most topical global issues.

Zoonoses and other diseases affecting livestock production and health have serious impacts on the economic growth, health and food security and alleviation of poverty in tropical and resource constrained countries. Students will have the opportunity to explore the complex interplay of altered environments and infectious diseases as an increasing threat to agriculture, public health and endangered/threatened species, on a global basis.

The MSc One Health degree program requires 41 credits ( based on guidelines from the United States Department of Education), obtained through coursework and a project, leading to the submission of a thesis. Students are required to undertake specified core courses amounting to 23 credits. The MSc program is delivered over 1 year on a full-time basis as well as part-time over 2 or 3 years.

Course Structure

• Applied Epidemiology and Biostatistics (5 cr.)
• Public Policy Formulation & Implementation (3 cr.)
• Leadership and Organizational Behavior (3 cr.)
• Research project design (1 cr.)
• Conservation medicine/ecosystem health (5 cr.)
• Zoonoses (intersection between human and animal health) (3 cr.)
• Surveillance and diagnostic methods (3 cr.)

The program also includes a research project/Mini Dissertation (15 cr.) and a 1-week residential in St Kitts (1cr.) as well as electives (dependent on availability) such as animal health program management (2 cr.), safety of foods of animal origin (2 cr.), disaster management (2 cr.).

Learning Outcomes

The MSc One Health degree program is designed to provide the skills and preparation needed for careers in a broad range of environments. The flexible program of study has particular strengths in:
• Tropical animal health and diseases
• The intersection of animal health and human health
• Epidemiology
• Conservation medicine
• Food safety
• Policy Formulation
• Leadership
• research and diagnostic methods
• the interface between domestic animals and wildlife

On completion of the degree program the student will have gained knowledge, research skills and research experience in topics relevant to the broad field of One Health. The program provides graduates the background and experience to assess, investigate and manage animal health and zoonotic disease risks, to design and execute targeted research in animal health, and to manage veterinary intervention in the prevention and control of animal disease. Within the program the student will have had the opportunity to focus on an area of interest, such as area disease control, vector borne diseases, zoonotic infections or conservation medicine.

Students will acquire and enhance intellectual skills in scientific assessment and research methodology, as well as practical skills in communication, organization and scientific writing.

Delivery

The taught component will be instructed by distance learning via eCollege®, our virtual learning environment. You will be taught by our faculty and specialist modules may be delivered by our partner institutions.
The research project may be carried out in St. Kitts and Nevis or in other locations, as appropriate, under the supervision of a RUSVM faculty member. The research component may be desk-based, lab-based or through fieldwork and will result in the submission of a thesis. A short residential component will allow the student cohort to share their perspective and dissertation work to the RUSVM research community.

Assessment

Assessment will be conducted through traditional and novel methods suited to an online delivery mode and will include, for example, essays, critical review of peer-reviewed articles, online tests and quizzes, blog writing, research proposal writing, research/fieldwork journal development, group discussions, group project work and social media interactions. The degree is based on certified completion of research training plus other designated projects and the completion of a thesis.

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The two contributing universities of Salford and Keele have considerable complementary research experience in the biology of parasites and the vectors which transmit them. Read more
The two contributing universities of Salford and Keele have considerable complementary research experience in the biology of parasites and the vectors which transmit them.

This has led to the development of this unique, pioneering joint Masters degree focusing on the molecular aspects of parasite infections and vector biology. It aims to give you a sound insight into the biology of parasites and their control. The course provides you with contemporary studies of research on immunological and molecular aspects of selected parasites and vector/parasite relationships. You will gain research experience in parasitology and/or entomology.

Key benefits:

• Innovative, collaborative course taught jointly by the University of Salford and Keele.
• Significant practical training in parasitology including intensive residential field trip to Malham Tarn.
• Excellent platform for a research career.

Suitable for

Graduates who wish to enter research, teaching, scientific laboratory management and careers in parasitology and vector biology including diagnostic centres and overseas fields centres.
Programme details

Course detail

Individual research projects can be based in any of the three institutions, choosing a topical aspect of parasitology, or vector biology.

This course has both full-time and part-time routes, comprising of three 14-week semesters or five 14-week semesters, which you can take within one or up to three years respectively.

Format

Teaching is delivered by research active staff from Salford and Keele Universities. Teaching sessions are primarily based at Salford, though the facilities at Keele are also utilised. Transport is provided for classes based at Keele.

Teaching sessions include lectures, laboratory practicals, field work, tutorials, guest lectures and guided reading.

The Dissertation can be based at Salford or Keele.

Part-time students study Fundamentals of Parasitology and Molecular Biology of Parasites in year 1, Vector Biology and Control, and Research Skills (Parasitology) in year 2. Students may wish to complete the Dissertation in year 2, or year 3 depending upon commitments.

Module titles

• Fundamentals of Parasitology
• Vector Biology and Control
• Molecular Biology of Parasites
• Research Skills (Parasitology)
• Dissertation

Assessment

The Research Skills (Parasitology) and Dissertation modules are assessed by coursework. The remaining modules are assessed by coursework and examination.

Career potential

Graduates from this course have entered employment as research assistants or research laboratory technicians in pharmaceuticals, drug design and pesticide research. Other careers have included pollution microbiologists with water authorities, and work in hospital laboratories investigating the haematology, molecular biology and immunology of infectious diseases.

The MSc equips students for PhD research and former students have gone onto PhD study at prestigious Universities, including Oxford, Glasgow, Liverpool and Manchester and Toledo (USA). The students at Toledo have now completed their PhD studies are have gained employment at US Ivy League Institutes (Harvard Medical School and Cornell). Other students have elected to work in hospital laboratories, or diversify their careers by taking medical sales or enter teacher training posts.

Former overseas students have returned to their home country to take academic, or government positions.

How to apply: http://www.salford.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/applying

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Project management is key to successful implementation of strategic change in any organisation. This programme develops your academic skills in modelling and evaluating the process of project management, allowing you to develop strategic and practical approaches in a wide variety of business environments. Read more

Why take this course?

Project management is key to successful implementation of strategic change in any organisation. This programme develops your academic skills in modelling and evaluating the process of project management, allowing you to develop strategic and practical approaches in a wide variety of business environments.

You will gain a broad understanding of the principles and practice of project management and the tools and techniques required to contribute to business effectiveness.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Attend lectures by practising project managers who speak about their experiences and give guidance on project management issues
Participate in live web-based chat forums to discuss your work with lecturers and other students
Tap in to our Library’s vast selection of electronic resources, which can be accessed from anywhere with an internet connection

What opportunities might it lead to?

This course is fully accredited by the Association for Project Management, demonstrating that it provides a level of knowledge recognised by a professional project management association It will provide you with the advanced ability to lead or act as part of a team progressing project issues from initiation through to completion. You can expect to find employment opportunities in virtually any industry, especially those within the commercial sector.

Here are some routes our graduates have pursued:

Project management
Consultancy
Project planning
Logistics
Product development

Module Details

You will complete a total of five units (including your dissertation) involving attendance of six or eight days for each unit. You will study several key topics covering areas of project management theory and methods, while gaining an insight into their practical application in a business context.

Here are the units you will study:

Project Environment and Planning: You will develop an understanding of the relationship between project and business management, as well as the project management environment and the factors that influence project outcomes. Strategic aspects of projects are addressed, including project selection and portfolio design. You will also learn how project managers must understand the benefits to be delivered by projects, the requirements of stakeholders and how to work within the constraints of cost, time and quality. Estimation methods and planning techniques are taught together with quality management. Approaches to the planning and control of projects that have been developed in different sectors are also covered, including agile methods and fast tracking.

Budgets and Commercial Management: This unit introduces you to raising project finance, building, monitoring and controlling project budgets and measuring Earned Value of project deliverables. It also covers the commercial aspects of procurement including tendering, contracting and the skills and practices of contract and bid negotiation, providing you with the tools and techniques for managing project budgets. The units also examines the key roles that project managers, budget managers and key project personnel play in managing project budgets.

People Management and Risk: This unit develops a critical understanding of individual, team and organisational working in order to deliver project goals successfully. It covers how individual characteristics such as personality, intelligence, ability and skills, motivation and attitudes affect individual performance. You will learn how to empower individuals and teams to achieve quality standards which enhance personal team and organisational performance, together with the development of creative and credible leadership. It also examines the key challenges in the application of risk management frameworks and models in project management, crisis management and corporate governance. Risk management strategies and the development of effective project mitigation and contingency action plans are critically evaluated.

Project Investigation and Systems Methods: This unit explores the investigation of project issues through the use of a structured research methodology and project management analysis tools to enhance the research process. Wider strategic issues are explored to place the research process into context and to illustrate how appropriate research methods can be identified for specific types of research problems. You will also look at tools for the modelling and analysis of complex problem situations (including systems thinking, soft systems methods and influence diagrams) and how these can be used to diagnose problem situations to identify relevant areas for further investigation. Project management methodologies including PRINCE2, Partnering and Programme Management as a wider context for project management research issues are examined. You will produce a research proposal that brings together the use of research methodology and project systems in identifying, justifying and investigating a research question that will feed into the research conducted in your final dissertation.

Dissertation: This unit enables you to deepen your understanding of an aspect of project management of your own choice. Many students choose to investigate topics which they intend to focus on in the next stage of their career. The unit is structured as a research project so you can demonstrate your ability to identify, design, plan and undertake research on a specific project management issue and effectively communicate your findings in an appropriate manner for a Master’s degree.

Programme Assessment

The units are structured as eight teaching blocks of three days of lectures, seminars and interactive syndicate work, with periods of self-managed study between blocks. Each of these will be assessed by coursework assignments. You will also produce a dissertation with guidance from a supervisor. The dissertation is structured as an independent research project to deepen your understanding of a chosen aspect of project management. Your choice of topic can contribute towards the next stage of your career by demonstrating your ability to identify, design, undertake and communicate your original research on a specific project management topic.

Each unit will be assessed by coursework assignments. You will also produce a dissertation with guidance from a supervisor.

Student Destinations

The key characteristic of this programme is the emphasis on strategic aspects of projects which provide a platform for a career as a senior project manager in high profile organisations, Graduate destinations have included:

Public sector management, including NHS and Fire Services
Infrastructure planning and implementation
Naval and Aerospace construction industries
Doctorate level study in Project Management

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The MSc Climate Change. Read more
The MSc Climate Change: Environment, Science and Policy programme (please see separate description for the MA programme) enables those with degrees in geography, physical sciences, engineering, computer science, etc., to focus on specific issues relating to climate and other environmental change in the Earth system, in particular on anthropogenic influences on the terrestrial, hydrological and atmospheric environments.

Key benefits

- To expose students to current understanding of the processes and nature of environmental changes occurring in Earth’s terrestrial, hydrological and atmospheric environments, to understand the linkages and causes of these forcings, and to allow them to place this knowledge within the context of our understanding of both natural variability and Earth’s history of environmental changes over the period of human societies and before.

- To expose students to the methods used to examine the potential future consequences of current environmental changes, and the potential for future significant perturbations to the Earth environment, including changes to the carbon cycle, climate, to the planet’s hydrological regimes and to its land use and land cover.

- To enable students to evaluate environmental change research critically and with regard to the strengths and weaknesses and potential societal implications of the science.

- To allow students to develop research skills in the undertaking and presentation of environmental research, and to develop specialist skills in one or more of the research tools used to investigate such issues.

- To provide an understanding of the scientific evidence needed for policy makers and society to respond to the problems associated with global and regional environmental changes happening to the Earth system, and to understand the nature of the uncertainties involved in future predictions.

- To promote initiative and the exercise of independent critical judgement in identifying, analysing and providing answers to research questions at an advanced level.

- To develop relevant transferable skills embedded in the learning and assessment schemes in the programme.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/climate-change-environment-science-and-policy-msc.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

This programme provides a focus on specific issues relating to climate and other environmental change in the Earth system, and in particular on anthropogenic influences on the terrestrial, hydrological and atmospheric environments, and their biological, physical and societal consequences. The course exposes you to:

(i) current understanding of the processes and nature of environmental changes occurring in Earth’s terrestrial, hydrological and atmospheric environments, to understand the linkages and causes of these forcings, and to allow them to place this knowledge within the context of our understanding of both natural variability and Earth’s history of environmental changes over the period of human societies and before; and

(ii) the methods used to examine the potential future consequences of current environmental changes, and the potential for future significant perturbations to the Earth environment, including changes to the carbon cycle, climate, to the planet’s hydrological regimes and to its land use and land cover.

Students following the programme can opt for either the Policy Pathway or the Science Pathway.

Part-time students: As part of your two-year schedule, plan to take the compulsory modules Methods for Environmental Research and Global Environmental Change 1 in your first year and Dissertation in your second year.

- Course format and assessment -

Compulsory taught modules are assessed by coursework-based methods (essays, presentations, practical writeups, online quizzes). Optional modules are assessed by coursework and occasionally by examination. The three-month written research dissertation is core and is based upon work conducted overseas or in the UK.

Career prospects

This MSc is designed to prepare you for a career in environmental change research, consultancy and/or policy development. It provides interdisciplinary research training for those going onto a PhD in environmental and/or Earth system science within King's or elsewhere, and students entering the job market immediately after graduation are expected to be highly marketable in three main areas: local and national governmental and non-governmental agencies (eg Environment Agency, County Councils, Nature Conservancies); environmental consultancies and businesses (eg environmental informatics providers; environmental businesses - including carbon trading; insurance; waste management and energy industries), and policy development organisations (eg such government departments as Defra). The Seminars in Environmental Research, Management and Policy module offers you the chance to hear and meet practitioners in many of these key areas.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 20 universities worldwide (2015/16 QS World Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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Conserve our environment for future generations – work with industry and governments to reduce human impacts and provide solutions to environmental problems. Read more
Conserve our environment for future generations – work with industry and governments to reduce human impacts and provide solutions to environmental problems. MSc Environmental Consultancy will help launch your career, giving you the skills and knowledge required for a job in the environment sector. Maximise your career prospects by learning the latest techniques used in the management and assessment of environmental impact, and develop your practical skills with an eight week industry placement.

Key features

-Embark on an eight week work placement in the environmental sector which will give you an invaluable insight into the environmental business sector and, in many cases, has led to permanent positions being offered by employers. See the organisations we partner with to provide student placements.
-Work towards achieving chartered environmentalist status through your masters. The award has also received considerable support and recognition from employers and professional bodies such as the Institute of Environmental Management and Assessment (IEMA).
-Benefit from our expertise in areas including species and habitat restoration, evaluation of contaminated water and terrestrial environments, environmental law, geographical information systems, waste management and marine surveys.
-Take the opportunity to carry out your own environmental impact assessment, from data acquisition to production of a full environmental statement.
-Investigate through field work how environmental issues and constraints have been managed in the South West and further afield.
-Use the University’s high specification analytical equipment for environmental monitoring and the research vessel, Falcon Spirit, for marine sampling.
-Undertake a research-based project – you’ll be encouraged to develop a solution to a problem-based research question, working where possible in association with industry and your academic advisor.
-All modules are assessed 100 per cent by coursework, designed to reflect the outputs of the industry, readying you for what you are likely to be asked to do in your job.

Course details

Learn from our environmental management expertise in areas including ecological impact assessment, protected species and habitat survey, pollution prevention, evaluation of contaminated environments, water resource management, geographical information systems, waste minimisation and marine ecological survey. The programme consists of a 12 week and 7 week period of taught modules with an 8 week environmental sector work placement and 18 week dissertation period. Modules are assessed 100 per cent by coursework and designed to mirror professional practice. You’ll be provided with subject-specific knowledge and training in research methods. You’ll carry out an environmental impact assessment, from data acquisition to public inquiry, and develop your field survey skills over the equivalent of two weeks. Practising consultants give you an insight into opportunities within the environmental sector and you’ll hear how environmental management can help protect the environment and save money.

Core modules
-ENVS5004 Work Placement Project
-GEES515 Professional Practice in the Environmental Sector
-GEES517 Environmental Assessment
-GEES519 Environmental Knowledge: From Field to Stakeholder
-GEES520 MSc Dissertation

Optional modules
-MAR515 Management of Coastal Environments
-GEES505 Sustainable Management of Freshwater Ecosystems
-MATH500 Big Data and Social Network Visualization
-ENVS5003 Ecological Survey Evaluation and Mitigation
-ENVS5002 Investigation and Assessment of Contaminated Environments
-GEES506 Climate Change: Science and Policy
-CHM5002 Analytical Chemistry Principles
-MATH501 Modelling and Analytics for Data Science

Every postgraduate taught course has a detailed programme specification document describing the programme aims, the programme structure, the teaching and learning methods, the learning outcomes and the rules of assessment.

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The overall aim of this programme is to produce educators capable of operating at the highest levels within the educational arena, with the ability to integrate theory with practice and apply intellectual and academic rigour, informed by current educational research, to their professional context. Read more

Course Overview

The overall aim of this programme is to produce educators capable of operating at the highest levels within the educational arena, with the ability to integrate theory with practice and apply intellectual and academic rigour, informed by current educational research, to their professional context.

Pathways:
- Education - MA/PgD/PgC
- Education (Leadership and Management) - MA
- Education (Managing Community Practice) – MA
- Education (Educational Research and Practice) - MA
- Education (TESOL) - MA

These awards have been developed after extensive consultation with employers, teachers, education professionals and students. The programme team aims to play a key role in supporting the continuing professional development of teachers, youth and community workers and education professionals.

The key benefits of studying this programme include:
- We take into conside​ration the 60 Master's level credits accrued by PGCE students, thus allowing them to fast track through the programme.

- Full and part-time home and international students from the various pathways study together, allowing for exchange of ideas across professions and nationalities.

- The period of candidature (up to 5 years part-time and 2 years full-time) allows students greater flexibility with their study schedule.

- Two of the modules are now delivered in blended format, allowing for a clicks and mortar approach to learning.

- In addition to a dedicated supervisor, dissertation students also have 4 advanced research sessions during their dissertation year. ​

​Course Content​​

Programme Structure:

- Taught Component:
Contains 4 taught modules, each carrying 30 credits at Level 7. Each module is assessed by coursework assignments equivalent to 6000 words. Each pathway has certain compulsory modules, and there might also be a range of optional modules available, subject to viable numbers.

- Dissertation Component:
You will complete a dissertation of approximately 12,000 words.

Intermediate Awards:
- A Certificate of Attendance is awarded after satisfactory attendance at one Master's level module (no written assessment required)

- Postgraduate Certificate in Education awarded after completion of two Master's level modules (60 credits)

- Postgraduate Diploma in Education awarded after completion of four Master's level modules (120 credits)

- MA is awarded on completion of all necessary taught modules plus a dissertation (12,000 words).

Learning & Teaching​

​The programme will be delivered through a variety of models of delivery with a focus on active learning and group interaction and participation. Typical models of delivery include:
- Lectures
- Seminar groups
- Small group discussions
- Individual and small group activities
- Directed reading
- Peer mentoring and networking
- Web-based research
- Reflective wiki areas
- Online asynchronous discussions

Students will be given opportunities to share their thoughts and work in progress with others and receive constructive feedback from tutors and fellow students. Students will also be encouraged to form learning sets of those interested in similar areas of research in an initial step towards the formation of communities of practice.

As students at Cardiff Metropolitan University, you will each have a named personal tutor who should usually be an academic member of staff from your programme of study.

You will have scheduled meetings with your personal tutor throughout the academic year – at least once per term for full-time students – to address matters including academic progress, career/professional issues, and any personal issues which may be affecting your progress.

Assessment

Assessment is by coursework assignments equivalent to 6,000 words per thirty credit module throughout the taught element of the programme. The assessments take a variety of forms including written reports of research, posters, discussion postings, reflective wikis, seminar presentations and journal style articles.

Students will be given opportunities in each module to ask questions about their assessments in order to clarify what is required of them. ​

Employability & Careers​

Graduates from the programme have gone on to promotion in the education sector, including school and community management and leadership, curriculum leadership, positions within advisory services, lecturing and research posts in higher education, and work with government education departments across the world.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/scholarships

Find out how to apply here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/howtoapply

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This programme is designed for students who wish to specialise in performance while studying for an academic degree. Students have the unique opportunity to develop performance in specific Asian and African music traditions to professional standard. Read more
This programme is designed for students who wish to specialise in performance while studying for an academic degree. Students have the unique opportunity to develop performance in specific Asian and African music traditions to professional standard. They acquire expert knowledge about performance and the geographical or stylistic region of their performance specialism.

The performance component of the programme, in which students choose an Asian or African performance tradition, includes practice-based research. Students study the music of a particular region alongside performance theory training. Through a range of optional courses they pursue additional interests as well.

The programme is particularly suited to performing musicians who wish to deepen and broaden their theoretical perspectives and musical horizons. Many former students have found their performance careers enhanced, while others have gone on to engage with their performance from more critical, academic perspectives, including MPhil/PhD research.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/music/programmes/mmusperf/

Structure

Students are required to take 4 units (one unit courses being two-terms in duration, while half unit courses are taught in one term only). In addition to these formal elements, students may attend postgraduate and public seminars and may also participate in performance ensemble classes and other activities.

Course Detail:
The formal elements of the MMus Performance programme are:

- Performance Theory (half unit)
The compulsory core course; part-time students must normally take this in year 1.

- Performance (full unit)
Performance lessons in a vocal or instrumental tradition from their selected region. Examined by a public recital in May-June (for part-time students: in May-June of year 1) and by coursework.

- Performance as Research (full unit)
Further study of the same tradition as under 3 above, but with a more specific research focus. Examined by a public recital in September (for part-time students: in September of the final year) and by coursework.

Teaching & Learning

The Department of Music has been highly rated for teaching and research in all recent assessment exercises, and is regularly ranked amongst the top Music departments in the UK in Good University Guides.

Music students have access to the large Main Library of the School which holds numerous books, journals and recordings relevant to the study of ethnomusicology and world music, as well as the nearby British Library Sound Archive and other London libraries and museums.

The SOAS Library holds copies of standard reference works on music, such as the current edition of the New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians. The Grove dictionary and the RILM database can also be accessed on line from computer terminals in the Library or elsewhere on the SOAS network. Listening facilities are provided in the Library, and most CDs are available on short loan. Among special items in the Department’s collections are:

- field recordings, films and slides
- a large working collection of musical instruments from Asia and Africa
- extensive staff collections relating to specific research interests

Performance

The Convenor will communicate by email and through meetings with all students taking Performance or Performance as Research, and must be approached for official approval of your choice of performance tradition and teacher. Such approval is signalled by the
Convenor’s signature on the Department’s standard “Performance study application form”, available from the Faculty office and online. No lessons should be taken until this form has been signed.

The staff member most closely related to your chosen tradition acts as a Sub-convenor and should be your first point of contact for any matters pertaining to the specific tradition you are studying. Convenor and Sub-convenor will liaise as necessary.

The Department will not support training in “Western” vocal or instrumental traditions. Subsidy towards the cost of lessons: The Department will pay for approved external tuition, up to a maximum amount agreed at the start of the session (currently £500 for Performance and £300 for Performance as Research). Please be aware that the cost of regular performance lessons might exceed these amounts; any excess must be paid by the student.

Claims for reimbursement must be submitted using the standard Music Performance Lesson Reimbursement Form available from the convenor, accompanied by a signed receipt or invoice from the teacher. Claims cannot be accepted after the examination. The student is also responsible for arranging regular lesson times, negotiating lesson fees, and obtaining access to any necessary instrument. You will receive an Information Sheet for External Teachers, describing payment procedures, the teacher’s obligations, and so forth; you should read through this together with your teacher at the earliest opportunity.

Employment

A postgraduate degree in Music Performance from SOAS gives students improved competency in performance and a better understanding of global music which will enable them to continue in the field of research or engage in related work. Equally, they develop a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek in many professional and creative capacities including interpersonal skills, communication skills, focus, team work, passion and dedication. A postgraduate degree is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Public affairs, lobbying and political consultancy are attractive areas for many graduates. Careers in this field are either in dedicated departments within large companies or, more commonly, within specialist consultancy firms. Read more

About the course

Public affairs, lobbying and political consultancy are attractive areas for many graduates. Careers in this field are either in dedicated departments within large companies or, more commonly, within specialist consultancy firms.

This programme will provide both academic and practical training to assist you in pursuing a career in these exciting professions.

Aims

Designed in conjunction with leading Public Affairs companies, the programme includes an integrated internship with a Public Affairs consultancy in either London or Brussels, which will provide graduates with significant advantages to pursue such a career.

The course offers a unique combination of advanced academic knowledge and practical experience that will provide graduates with the opportunity to develop a career in public affairs.

Course Content

The MSc consists of both compulsory and optional modules, a typical selection can be found below. Modules can vary from year to year, but these offer a good idea of what we teach.

Full-time

Compulsory modules:

Marketing Communications
International Business Ethics and Corporate Governance
Public Policy and the Challenges of Cultural Diversity
Parties and Voters in the UK
Public Policy Analysis

Optional modules:

Internship and Dissertation

Part-time

Compulsory modules:

Marketing Communications
International Business Ethics and Corporate Governance
Public Policy and the Challenges of Cultural Diversity
Parties and Voters in the UK
Public Policy Analysis

Optional modules:

Dissertation and Portfolio

Assessment

Two modes of assessment operate on this programme. Some modules are assessed by coursework and an advance notice examination, each counting for 50% of the marks. Other modules are assessed 100% by coursework.

Awards
A Master's degree is awarded if you reach the necessary standard on the taught part of the course and submit a dissertation of the required standard. The pass grade for all modules and the dissertation is 50%.

Students are normally required to pass all the required taught modules before being permitted to proceed to the dissertation. If you do not achieve the standard required, you may be awarded a Postgraduate Diploma or Postgraduate Certificate if eligible.

Special Features

All full-time students are required to undertake an internship of at least three months with a Public Affairs employer. This is usually arranged with help from the Department of Politics and History and takes place in London or Brussels.

During the course of the placement, you and your employer will liaise with a dedicated internship tutor to ensure that appropriate progress is being made. At the end of the internship, both you and your employer will submit reports.

Outstanding students on this programme have regularly been offered further employment with their placement organisations.

Note: The internship is for full-time students only, as part-time students must be employed in the sector prior to commencing the course.

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This course has been designed with industry to meet the challenge of interdependence between sophisticated engineered systems of all kinds. Read more
This course has been designed with industry to meet the challenge of interdependence between sophisticated engineered systems of all kinds. It is often taken in its part-time format.

It is aimed at engineers who have specialised in a traditional discipline but are now expected to understand, operate in, develop and integrate entire systems that are not only increasingly complex but rapidly changing.

The block taught format of the programme and the option to elect assessment by coursework rather than exam makes it a popular part time course and a CPD option.

Core study areas include systems thinking, systems architecture, systems design, verification and validation, and an individual project.

Optional study areas include enterprise systems management, holistic engineering (industry-led module), sensors and actuators for control, imagineering technologies, engineering and management of capability and understanding complexity.

See the website http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/eese/systems-engineering/

Programme modules

Compulsory Modules:
• Systems Thinking
• Systems Architecture
• Systems Design
• Validation & Verification
• Individual Project

Optional Modules (choose four):
• Enterprise Systems Engineering
• Holistic Engineering (industry-led module)
• Sensors and Actuators for Control
• Imagineering Technologies
• Engineering and Management of Capability
• Understanding Complexity

Block taught, individual modules are also highly suitable as CPD for professional engineers working onsystems engineering projects and challenges.

How you will learn

The curriculum stimulates thinking and extends the capabilities of technical managers and engineers to handle complexity, enabling them to remain effective in the workplace by providing:
- an integrated systems engineering view of inter-related technologies, processes, tools, techniques and their effective use;

- essential systems skills such as model-based systems architecture and design, against a background of the need for traceability in managing complex projects;

- knowledge and technical expertise in a range of systems technologies;

- experience of the importance to ultimate success of effective, integrated, multi-skilled project teams working in extended enterprises beyond the confines of any particular organisation;

- increased depth of technical and management knowledge through elective modules; and

- the ability to transfer systems skills and knowledge into the workplace through the individual master’s project.

Teaching staff comprise a varied skill set of international expertise to give the broadest perspectives and modules frequently feature master classes from industry practitioners.

- Assessment
There is the option to complete without written examinations as all compulsory modules are assessed by coursework. Where examinations are taken these are in January and May.

Facilities

We employ advanced modelling, simulation and interactive visualisation tools and techniques to enable you to gain greater understanding of the performance, behaviour and emergent properties of advanced technology and complex systems.

Many of these facilities are part of the Advanced VR Research Centre ( AVRRC) http://www.lboro.ac.uk/research/avrrc/facilities/

Careers and further study

Graduates of this course gain capabilities that are in global demand across a range of sectors and which can be applied to the challenges and issues posed by any complex system design and operation.

Promotion within their company for sponsored students is common since the course enables them to match higher job expectations and demands. Employed students often bring a work-relevant topic to their individual project giving the opportunity to display newly acquired skills.

Why choose electronic, electrical and systems engineering at Loughborough?

We develop and nurture the world’s top engineering talent to meet the challenges of an increasingly complex world. All of our Masters programmes are accredited by one or more of the following professional bodies: the IET, IMechE, InstMC, Royal Aeronautical Society and the Energy Institute.

We carefully integrate our research and education programmes in order to support the technical and commercial needs of society and to extend the boundaries of current knowledge.

Consequently, our graduates are highly sought after by industry and commerce worldwide, and our programmes are consistently ranked as excellent in student surveys, including the National Student Survey, and independent assessments.

- Facilities
Our facilities are flexible and serve to enable our research and teaching as well as modest preproduction testing for industry.
Our extensive laboratories allow you the opportunity to gain crucial practical skills and experience in some of the latest electrical and electronic experimental facilities and using industry standard software.

- Research
We are passionate about our research and continually strive to strengthen and stimulate our portfolio. We have traditionally built our expertise around the themes of communications, energy and systems, critical areas where technology and engineering impact on modern life.

- Career prospects
90% of our graduates were in employment and/or further study six months after graduating. They go on to work with companies such as Accenture, BAE Systems, E.ON, ESB International, Hewlett Packard, Mitsubishi, Renewable Energy Systems Ltd, Rolls Royce and Siemens AG.

Find out how to apply here http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/eese/systems-engineering/

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The world faces major challenges in meeting the current and future demand for sustainable and secure energy supply and use. Read more
The world faces major challenges in meeting the current and future demand for sustainable and secure energy supply and use. The one-year MPhil programme in Energy Technologies is designed for graduates who want to help tackle these problems by developing practical engineering solutions, and who want to learn more about the fundamental science and the technologies involved in energy utilization, electricity generation, energy efficiency, and alternative energy.

Energy is a huge topic, of very significant current scientific, technological, environmental, political and financial interest. The complexity and rapid change associated with energy technologies necessitates engineers with a very good grasp of the fundamentals, with exposure and good understanding of all main energy sources and technologies, but also with specialization in a few areas. This is the prevailing philosophy behind this MPhil, fully consistent with the prevailing philosophy and structure of the University of Cambridge Engineering Department as a whole.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/egegmpmet

Course detail

The educational target of the MPhil in Energy Technologies is to communicate the breadth of energy technologies and the underpinning science. The objectives of the course are:

1. To teach the fundamental sciences behind technologies involved in energy utilization, electricity generation, energy efficiency, and alternative energy.

2. To develop graduates with an overall view of energy engineering, while offering specialization in a selected area through a research project.

3. To prepare students for potential future PhD research.

Learning Outcomes

Students will be expected to have developed fundamental knwoledge on primary and secondary energy sources, on energy transformation, and on energy utilisation technologies. They will also have developed proficiencies in project management, in research skills, in team work, and in advanced calculation methods concerning energy technologies.

Graduates from this MPhil will be excellent candidates for doctoral study (at Cambridge and elsewhere) and for employment in a wide variety of jobs (for example: in industrial Research and Development departments; in policy-making bodies; in the utilities industry; in the manufacturing sector; in energy equipment manufacturing).

Format

The course is centred around taught courses in core areas, covering basic revision and skills needed (such as Communication and Organisational Skills, Mathematical and Computational Skills, Review of Basic Energy Concepts, and Research Topics), various energy technologies (such as Clean Fossil Fuels, Solar, Biofuels, Wind etc), and energy efficiency and systems level approaches.

Elective courses may be chosen from a broad range, which includes topics such as Turbulence, Acoustics, Turbomachinery, Nuclear Power Engineering, Solar Panels, and Energy Efficiency in Buildings. Elective courses are delivered mainly by the Department of Engineering with input from the Department of Chemical Engineering and other departments in Cambridge.

Research projects are chosen from a list offered by members of staff and are linked to the principal areas of energy research in the respective departments.

Students can expect to receive reports at least termly on the Cambridge Graduate Supervision Reporting System. They will receive comments on items of coursework, and will have access to a University supervisor for their dissertation. All students will also have personal access to the Course Director and the other staff delivering the course.

Assessment

Students taking 12 elective modules will write a short thesis (up to 10,000 words). Students taking 10 elective modules will write a long thesis (up to 20,000 words). In both cases, 10% of the marks will be assigned through a pre-submission presentation, and 10% of the marks will be assigned through a post-submission presentation.

Students will take 5 core modules, and then either 5 elective modules (and a long thesis) or 7 elective modules (and a short thesis). All core modules are examined purely by coursework. Some of the elective modules are also examined wholly or partly by coursework.

Some of the elective modules are examined wholly or partly by written examination.

At the discretion of the Examiners, candidates may be required to take an additional oral examination on the work submitted during the course, and on the general field of knowledge within which it falls.

Continuing

Students wishing to apply for continuation to the PhD would normally be expected to attain an overall mark of 70%.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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Ideal as a bridge to master’s study or beyond if you are new to the study of the classical world. Choose from modules on topics including Greek and Roman literature, history, art and archaeology, all from the undergraduate (BA) catalogue. Read more

About the Classical Studies Grad Dip:

Ideal as a bridge to master’s study or beyond if you are new to the study of the classical world. Choose from modules on topics including Greek and Roman literature, history, art and archaeology, all from the undergraduate (BA) catalogue. Language acquisition is undertaken with postgraduate (MA) students. Perfect as a pathway to further study and as an opportunity to significantly develop your knowledge of the classics.

Key Benefits

- One of the world's largest and most distinguished Department of Classics.

- Unrivalled location for the study of the ancient world thanks to London's unique range of specialist libraries, museums and galleries.

- Ideal preparation for further graduate study in all areas of Classics.

- King's graduates enjoy one of the best employment rates and starting salaries in the UK. Ranked 6th in the UK for graduate employment (Times and Sunday Times Good Universities Guide 2016)

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/classical-studies-grad-dip.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

The Graduate Diploma can be taken either as a self-contained programme, or as a bridge to an MA in Ancient History, Classical Art & Archaeology, Classics or Late Antique & Byzantine Studies.

You can take modules from all three years of our undergraduate (BA) programmes. You are limited to 30 credits at Levels 4 and 5, the remaining credits coming from Level 6 modules (unless you are planning to acquire Greek and/or Latin languages) to a total of 120 credits. There is a large choice of BA modules available, ranging over Greek and Roman Literature, Greek and Roman History, Classical Art and Archaeology and Late Antique and Byzantine Studies.

We also offer Greek and Latin language at beginners, intermediate and advanced levels. If you have a particular interest in acquiring or developing your knowledge of these languages then you will be taught with our MA students and take these modules at Level 7. These are the only modules taken at Level 7 by GDip students. All other teaching is shared with our undergraduate students (Levels 4, 5, 6) except that you will be assessed by coursework essays during which you will receive individual tutorial advice. You can also choose whether you wish to write a dissertation (10,000 words) on a classical topic upon which you receive close supervision. The dissertation is an optional component of the programme.

- Course purpose -

The Diploma is appropriate for you if you are a graduate in a subject not closely related to Ancient History or Classics; it provides a bridge to further study at MA level or beyond, or you can take it as a self-contained programme.

- Course format and assessment -

Modules are largely assessed by coursework but some, such as languages, have in-class tests and end-of-year examinations.

Student Destinations:

Many students go on to pursue an MA degree and then research in our department; others have developed careers in teaching, journalism, publishing, finance, politics, and the cultural or heritage sectors.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 21 universities worldwide (2015/16 QS World University Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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The Doctorate in Forensic Psychology is approved by the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC), and is the only British Psychological Society accredited programme in Wales. Read more

Course Overview

The Doctorate in Forensic Psychology is approved by the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC), and is the only British Psychological Society accredited programme in Wales. Upon completion, the programme provides students with eligibility to apply to the register to practice as Forensic Psychologists in the UK, and to gain Chartered Psychologist status with the British Psychological Society (BPS).

The intake for Top-Up Doctorate takes place in January and September each year. The Top-Up Doctorate is designed for qualified Forensic Psychologists who would like to undertake a research project on an aspect of specialism. The intake for the Full Doctorate programme takes place in September each year, and we would encourage applicants to apply before June of the year they would like to commence studies.

See the website https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/health/courses/Pages/Forensic-Psychology-Doctorate.aspx

​Course Content​​

Flexibility is the essence of our approach to student learning. The Doctorate Programme facilitates students entering and exiting at different places within the Programme depending on the individual needs of the student. Thus, the full Doctorate programme comprises:
- MSc in Forensic Psychology
- Postgraduate Diploma in Practitioner Forensic Psychology
- ‘Top-Up’ doctorate, which is the higher level research component.

The Top-Up Doctorate will be available to registered practitioners who are seeking to formalise their research and clinical skills in an area of specialism. Applicants completing the Top-Up Doctorate will submit a research thesis reporting a significantly large piece of research.

Applicants to the Doctorate Programme may apply for the Full Programme, or for the MSc or PG Diploma, depending on their own individual needs and career progression. Applicants who apply for the MSc may (on successful completion) later apply for the PG Diploma and ‘Top-Up’ Doctorate. Students, who progress through the course on individual programmes will, after successful completion of all the component programmes, be awarded the Doctorate in Forensic Psychology.

In this way, within one programme and its flexible entry and exit points, we hope to provide a full range of higher-level academic study, further training and higher level research. We are not currently accepting applications for the full Doctorate programme in its entirety.

Applicants who are unsure whether to apply for the full programme, or individual component programmes, are encouraged to ring or email the programme directors to discuss their individual needs in more detail. ​

Learning & Teaching​

​For the learning and teaching mechanisms on the component programmes, please see those specific web pages:
- MSc in Forensic Psychology
- Postgraduate Diploma in Practitioner Forensic Psychology

For the Top Up Doctorate, the thesis will be a large piece of independent research study. Each student will be assigned a supervision team who will be responsible for supporting and supervising the student during their research. At least 6 supervision meetings will be held each year, and a thorough review of training needs will be established and reviewed each year. The individual needs of the student will be met through either higher level Research Methods teaching at Cardiff Metropolitan University, or specialised external training. It is anticipated that many students on the Top Up component may be based some distant from Cardiff and in those cases the supervision team will support meetings through Skype or video conferencing. However, where additional training requires students to attend the university, it is expected that the student will factor this into their time commitments.

Assessment

The programme is assessed at the MSc programme by coursework assessment; and in the work-based practice by supervision reviews, and by coursework only, there are no exams. Examples of assessments include: case study exemplars, reflective reports, supervision and practice logs. See the specifics details on the component programme pages:
- MSc in Forensic Psychology
- Postgraduate Diploma in Practitioner Forensic Psychology

The research thesis is assessed by viva voce examination.

Employability & Careers​

A Doctorate in Forensic Psychology incorporates both Stage 1 and Stage 2 training as set out by the British Psychological Society. The Doctorate enables graduates to gain Chartered Psychologist status with the British Psychological Society (BPS) and Registered Practitioner status with the Health Care Professionals Council (HCPC)​.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/scholarships

Find out how to apply here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/howtoapply

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The MSc Advanced Computer Science course prepares students to work in roles that require the use of data management, analysis and presentation tools, the development of software to deliver services or to control complex processes and equipment, or to provide system analysis and development consultancy to a varied range of clients. Read more

Overview

The MSc Advanced Computer Science course prepares students to work in roles that require the use of data management, analysis and presentation tools, the development of software to deliver services or to control complex processes and equipment, or to provide system analysis and development consultancy to a varied range of clients. The course does not require background in programming or data analysis and for those with no such background appropriate training is offered to catch up with others who already have such training or experience. The course aims to match the needs of business that compete globally in a world driven by advances in information technology. The programme aims to develop both technical and people skills making our graduates ready for jobs that offer high satisfaction and regular challenge at the same time. The first semester of the course is organised into modules delivered intensively over three week periods. The second semester is organised using usual semester-long modules with the difference that all these modules are assessed by coursework only. The summer semester is dedicated to a Master’s level research or development project

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/advancedcomputersciencemsc/

Course Aims

The aims of the programme are to equip students with knowledge of a range cutting-edge areas of computer science research and applications and to prepare students to be successful in a variety of computer science related jobs. The course covers advanced computer science topics, including user interaction design, big data, cloud computing, security, intelligent systems and mobile-oriented web applications. The course also provides a good grounding in collaborative team work and general skills for technology consultants.

Core Modules:

User Interaction Design (15 credits – Semester 1): The module provides the knowledge and skills required for a student to be able to work on User Interaction Design based on an evaluated assessment of the factors associated with a given application or user interaction scenario.

Distributed Intelligent Systems (15 credits – Semester 1): This module provides the knowledge and skills required for a student to be able to develop applications to control intelligent systems in a distributed and collaborative context, including the programming of robots or intelligent home appliances (e.g. TV, fridge, etc. equipped with embedded computers).

Statistical Techniques for Data Analytics (15 credits – Semester 1): This module provides the knowledge and skills required for a student to be able to develop applications to store, process, distribute, visualise and analyse large volumes of big data using distributed databases, statistical techniques and machine intelligence methods.

Cloud Computing (15 credits – Semester 2): The module provides the knowledge and skills required for a student to be able to understand the principles of operations of cloud computing and to develop applications for cloud computing environments, e.g. data storage and distribution, software-as-service, interactive content services.

Web Technologies and Security (15 credits – Semester 2): To module provided an understanding of contemporary web technologies used for both server and client side development of web applications, with particular focus on mobile applications, and an understanding of security aspects of such applications and of the defence methods and techniques employed to provide security.

Collaborative Application Development (15 credits – Semester 2): The module places students in a real world scenario requiring co-operation and communication as well as analysis and design skills. This will involve work for a real world client working as a development team.

Problem Solving Skills for Consultants (15 credits – Semester 1 & 2): This module explores skills such as project management, communication and team working and building. It also provides knowledge of ethical, legal and social issues related to the development and deployment of Information Technology.

Optional Modules:

System Design & Programming (15 credits – Semester 1): This module provides the knowledge and skills required for a student to be able to design software systems and write object oriented programs in an appropriate programming language (e.g. Java, C#).

Research Horizons (15 credits – Semester 1): To module provides the knowledge for a student about a selected computer science research area and the skills required for the development of a mini-project in this area

Project or Industrial Placement

MSc Project or Industrial Placement (60 credits – Semester 3): Provides an integration of concepts taught on the course in either an academic or business environment

Teaching & Assessment

All first semester 15 – credit taught modules, with the exception of one module delivered over two semesters, will be delivered in block mode, i.e. each of these modules will be delivered over a period of six consecutive weeks. In any week at most two block mode modules will be scheduled to be delivered during the first semester. All taught modules in the second semester are delivered along the whole semester.

The taught modules are mainly assessed by coursework, with examinations in some of the modules. Project assessment is based largely on a substantial final report.

Additional Costs

Additional costs may be incurred for text books, inter-library loans and potential overdue library fines. Some travel costs may be incurred if an external project or placement is undertaken; any such costs will be discussed with the student before the project is confirmed. It will be possible for the student to select an internal project and that would not incur any additional travel costs.

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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The MA Cultural Geography (Research) is celebrating its 20th birthday in 2015-2016. The course was founded in 1995 as one of the first masters programmes in the world to offer students focused engagement with the then emerging sub-discipline of Cultural Geography. Read more
The MA Cultural Geography (Research) is celebrating its 20th birthday in 2015-2016. The course was founded in 1995 as one of the first masters programmes in the world to offer students focused engagement with the then emerging sub-discipline of Cultural Geography.

Twenty years later and Cultural Geography is one of the most dynamic sub-disciplines in contemporary geography. Our course reflects this dynamism. We combine core concepts with research methods training and interdisciplinary scholarship and practice. We develop this alongside innovative placements and research engagements with some of world’s top cultural institution, located on our doorstep in London.

Thematically cultural geography focuses on the interconnections between place,landscape, environment, mobilities and identity, and thus has profound relevance for the contemporary world. Our graduates go onto work in a range of sectors, including the arts and cultural sector, publishing, planning and urban policy, private and public sector research work as well as many carrying on to further doctoral study.

As profiles of our recent students (https://landscapesurgery.wordpress.com/2014/11/13/maculturalgeography/) show, the course attracts a diverse range of students from a range of backgrounds, not just those with geography degrees.

To see more about the activities around the MA Cultural Geography at Royal Holloway, please look at our research group blog Landscape Surgery - https://landscapesurgery.wordpress.com/ .

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/geography/coursefinder/maculturalgeography.aspx

Why choose this course?

- This well established course aims to provide research training and practice at Master’s level in Human Geography, with a particular emphasis on Cultural Geography; to prepare you for independent research at doctoral level in Human Geography; and to develop specialised knowledge and understanding of research, particularly involving cultural analysis, interpretation and practice.

- The course has a strong track record in gaining Research Council Funding for students. This includes ESRC 1+3 funding as well as funding from AHRC TECHNE. Please see the funding opportunities page for further details.

- The MA in Cultural Geography (Research) combines the vibrant research of the outstanding Social and Cultural Geography group with cutting edge teaching. The quality of our course was recognised by our external examiner as offering a gold-standard for the sector. Our teaching was nationally recognised by the student nominated award for “Best Teaching Team” (Arts and Humanities) at the National Prospects Post-Graduate Awards (2013).

- The programme includes cutting-edge conceptual teaching in themes such as theories of place and space, postcolonial geographies, geographies of knowledge, mapping and exploration, landscape, memory and heritage, geographies of consumption, material geographies, geographies of embodiment, practice and performance, critical urbanisms and creative geographies.

- At RHUL we are known for our commitment to collaborative research, offering you the chance to develop your seminar and tutorial-based learning alongside world leading cultural institutions. These include the Science Museum, V&A Museum, Museum of London, British Library, Natural History Museum, Royal Botanic Gardens Kew, Institute for International Visual Arts, and the Royal Geographical Society.

- You will be well prepared to continue to a PhD, building on the research you have completed on this course.

Department research and industry highlights

Social and Cultural Geography at Royal Holloway emphasises the cultural politics of place, space and landscape. The Group's research stresses theoretically informed and informative work, values equally contemporary and historical scholarship, and engages with diverse geographical locations within and beyond the UK.

SCG is home to a large and intellectually vibrant postgraduate community. There are around 40-50 postgraduates in the Group at any time. Many of the past graduates of the MA and SCG PhDs are now established academics in their own right.

SCG is well-known for its collaboration with a range of cultural institutions beyond the academy; recent partners include the the Science Museum, Victoria and Albert Museum, National Maritime Museum, British Library, British Museum, Museum of London and the Royal Geographical Society. The Group also has a tradition of including creative practitioners within its activities, as artists in residence, as research fellows and through participation in major research projects.

Many leading journals are edited by group staff, including Cultural Geographies, the Journal of Historical Geography, Geoforum, History Workshop Journal and GeoHumanities. Please see the Landscape Surgery blog for further information on Social and Cultural Geography activities at RHUL.

Course content and structure

The programme consists of four elements, all assessed by coursework.

- Element 1: Contemporary Cultural Geographies
This is a programme of seminars on current ideas, theory and practice in Cultural and Human Geography. It includes the following themes: theories of place; colonial and postcolonial geographies; biographies of material culture; embodiment, practice and place; geographies of consumption; culture, nature and landscape; space, politics and democracy; cultures of politics.

- Element 2: Methods and Techniques in Cultural Geography
This consists of a programme of workshops devoted to research methodologies and techniques in Cultural Geography. It includes research strategies and project design; reflexivity and ethics; ethnographic research; social survey; qualitative data analysis and computing; visual methodologies; interpreting texts; interpreting things; interpreting movement; negotiating the archives; the arts of cultural geography.

- Element 3: Research Training
You will be introduced to the culture of research in Human Geography and provided with a broad training for independent research within contemporary cultural geography. This element supplements the more specialised research training in research techniques in Element 2, and culminates in a 5,000 word research proposal for the Dissertation.

- Element 4: Dissertation
You will produce a substantial (15-18,000 word) research dissertation, under supervision.

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- advanced knowledge and expertise in the field of Cultural Geography and its current research questions
- advanced knowledge in the ideas, approaches and substantive themes of contemporary Cultural Geographies
- advanced knowledge of the research methods and techniques of Cultural Geography
- knowledge of the culture of research.

Assessment

Assessment is by coursework only. Formative feedback and detailed ongoing discussion of work before final submission is a central part of the teaching ethos of the course. Students also have significant autonomy in the selection of topics for coursework and dissertation allowing them to develop particular interests and specialisms.

Contemporary Cultural Geographies (Element 1)
Assessed by two course essays of up to 5,000 words (25% of final mark).

Methods and Techniques in Cultural Geography (Element 2)
Assessed by two workshop reports of up to 5,000 words (25% of final mark).

Research Training (Element 3)
Assessed by a 5,000-word dissertation proposal and satisfactory completion of modules taken in the element (Pass required).

Dissertation (Element 4)
Assessed by submission of a completed dissertation of 15-18,000 words. (50% of final mark).

Employability & career opportunities

Throughout the MA we spend time exploring possible career trajectories with our students.

This includes working on PhD applications – over 50% of our students go onto do PhDs and many go into academic position thereafter.

We also run a series of placement days with key cultural institutions in and around London including, British Library, Royal Geographical Society and Kew that help students develop skills, experience and contacts.

In recent years our graduates have entered a range of sectors, including the creative industries (advertising and marketing), the museum and research sectors (British Library, National Archive, and research assistantships in various academic projects).

We offer a series of course and activities to support career development:

1) Transferable Skills sessions

During the course staff on the MA not only teach key ideas and research methods, but also help students hone a series of transferable skills. As well as writing and presentation skills, activities on Element three enable the development of team-working and delegation skills. We also hold a series of dedicated skills sessions during the course including social media skills and networking skills run both by staff and by specialists from the careers office.

2) Career Development sessions and workshops

Both staff on the MA and the specialist staff at RHUL career centre offer tailored career development sessions. These might involve talking about developing an academic career, exploring careers in the cultural sector, as well as generic skills such as preparing your CV and developing a Linkedin profile.

3) Cultural Engagements and Placements

Staff on the MA course make the most of their research links with arts and cultural organisations to help students develop placement based work during their course.

Element three activities are designed to help students build up their CVs but also their contacts, and we are happy to help arrange shorter placements during element 1 and 2 pieces or longer-term placements for dissertation work. Past placements have seen students working with a range of key cultural institutions in and around London including the Royal Geographical Society, Kew Gardens, Furtherfield Digital Media and The British Museum.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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This programme is intended to look at the representation of particular cultural issues across a range of texts. Read more
This programme is intended to look at the representation of particular cultural issues across a range of texts. You will be asked to consider the representation of a particular topic or concept in a range of texts across time and to ask how these representations respond to each other and to the changing political and social circumstances for the text. You will also be asked to consider how a range of texts from a short historical period respond differently to a shared set of historical circumstances. Modules ask you to engage with the major contemporary theoretical and critical issues in modern literary studies.

For the MA, you take three 30-credit modules, two 15-credit research methods modules, plus a dissertation (equivalent to four 15-credit modules). The Postgraduate Diploma requires three 30-credit modules (plus the research methods modules) and the Postgraduate Certificate requires two 30-credit modules. Assessment of modules is normally by coursework, either two pieces of about 2-3,000 words, or one piece of 4-5,000 words.

The English Literature subject group organises a range of literary activities including visits from influential speakers, a postgraduate research forum and conference, and a number of highly successful international conferences. These include the Open Graves Open Minds conference on the literary undead; Worlds Apart Science Fiction Conference, The Bram Stoker Symposium and the Locations of Austen Conference.

For details about the planned suite of modules please contact the Literature MA Co-ordinator, Dr Anna Tripp, on 01707 285654 or email

Why choose this course?

The MA in Modern Literary Cultures offers you the opportunity to explore culturally charged themes and critical debates across a diverse range of texts. You will be asked to consider the representation of a particular topic or concept in a range of texts across time and to ask how these representations respond to each other and to the changing political and social circumstances for the text. You will also be asked to explore how a range of texts from a short historical period respond differently to a shared set of historical circumstances. Modules ask you to engage with the major contemporary theoretical and critical issues in modern literary studies.

Careers

The advanced research skills the programme gives you are of value in a wide range of careers.

Teaching methods

Assessment is normally by coursework only. Taught modules require either two pieces of coursework of approximately 2-3,000 words, or one piece of coursework of 4-5,000 words. The dissertation is an extended piece of research, normally 15,000 words in length.

Structure

Modules
-Dandies, Decadents and New Women: Fin de siecle Literary Culture 1880-1900
-Earth Words: Literature, Place and Environment B
-Literature Dissertation
-Literature Research Methods 1: Critical and Theoretical Debates
-Literature Research Methods 2: Advanced Research Skills B
-Reading the Vampire: Science, Sexuality and Alterity in Modern Culture

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