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Masters Degrees (Bursaries Available)

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Our postgraduate teacher training programme is one of the largest in the country. You will develop a sound understanding of pedagogical theory and gain extensive practical classroom experience. Read more
Our postgraduate teacher training programme is one of the largest in the country. You will develop a sound understanding of pedagogical theory and gain extensive practical classroom experience.

We offer a range of teacher training subjects and routes, emphasising practical school-based training supported by a thorough introduction to current educational theory.

Upon successful completion of our teacher training courses, you will achieve:

a Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE)
Qualified Teacher Status by meeting Teacher Standards

All our Initial Teacher Training courses are highly rated locally and many of our students go on to work in partner schools each year. Ofsted recently judged the PGCE course to be outstanding, commenting that:

‘Expert teams of tutors, with a blend of professional and academic expertise, work together extremely well to support trainees and provide excellent training in subject and professional studies.’ Ofsted 2010

Courses Available:

Primary - National SCITT
One year full-time
Distance learning, with Study Schools
Based in a school of your choice from a national consortium of around 50 'outstanding' schools

Primary - School Direct
One year full-time
School-based
Based in local partnership school
One day a week at University
Tuition fee loan and bursaries available

Primary - School Direct (salaried)
One year full-time
School-based (salaried)
Based in local partnership school
One day a week at University
Employed by a school with a salary on unqualified teacher scale (grade 1)

Secondary - PGCE
One year full-time
University based
School placements in local partnership schools

Secondary - School Direct
One year full-time
School-based
Based in local partnership school
One day a week at University
Tuition fee loan and bursaries available

Secondary - School Direct (salaried)
One year full-time
School-based (salaried)
Based in local partnership school
One day a week at University
Employed by a school with a salary on unqualified teacher scale (grade 1)

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Develop your knowledge across a range of fields including urban studies, gender studies, race studies, travel writing, postcolonial writing, autobiographical and epistolary studies. Read more

About the course

Develop your knowledge across a range of fields including urban studies, gender studies, race studies, travel writing, postcolonial writing, autobiographical and epistolary studies. You’ll cover contemporary and recent American fiction and the way ‘real history’ appears in the texts. You are also able to take modules in American history offered by the History Department. If you intend to continue to PhD study, you’ll get essential research training.

Your career

You’ll examine early modern texts, language and culture. Staff expertise includes palaeography, rhetoric, news writing, the sermon, drama, and issues of political, sectarian and national identity between 1400 and 1700. Modules (including modules from History) can be tailored to suit your interests. You’ll complete one core module, optional modules and a dissertation.

Cultural life

There is always something going on, and there are plenty of chances to get involved. We have extensive links with arts and heritage organisations including Arts Council England and Sheffield Theatres. Recent poetry readings featured Carol Ann Duffy and Ciaran Carson. Our Arts/Science Encounters events bring together musicians, writers, architects and academics to explore ideas. The English Society, run by our students, organises theatre trips, guest lectures, and seminars. Students also get the chance to take part in drama and readings.

First-rate facilities

We’re based in a brand new building at the heart of the campus. There are computer workstations especially for postgraduates and a DVD library with viewing facilities. Our theatre workshop is a fully equipped teaching/performance area with excellent film-viewing facilities and audio suites.

Specialist resources

The University Library subscribes to the major periodicals and full-text electronic archives, including Early English Books Online and Eighteenth-Century Collections Online. Special collections include an outstanding collection of Restoration drama, the Hope Collection of eighteenth-century periodicals, the Jack Rosenthal scripts collection, and papers of contemporary writers such as Anita Brookner, Marina Warner, Fay Weldon and Peter Redgrove.

Funding

There are a number of studentships and fee bursaries available, funded by the University. Deadlines for funding applications are usually in winter/early spring. For details, see our website.

Research training for PhD

If you intend to progress to a PhD, your course can be tailored to include essential research training. The same applies to students on the online course.

Part-time study

Part-time students usually take one taught module in each semester. In the second year, you’ll also take a dissertation module. For most courses, you’ll need to come in for one half-day per week. The MA Creative Writing is taught in the evening. Some modules, such as Theatre and Performance, may require greater time commitment. We try to be as flexible as possible to accommodate the different needs of our students.

Core module

Reconsidering the Renaissance.

Examples of optional modules – literature

Modules may include: Early Modern Paleography (i.e. training in reading sixteenth and seventeenth-century manuscripts); The English Civil War; The Country House; Directed Reading: Early Modern Books; Pastoral Literature (online module) and Shakespeare and Early Women Dramatists (online module).

Teaching and assessment

Teaching is by seminars. You’ll be assessed on your essays, coursework and a 15,000-word dissertation.

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You’ll study contemporary creative writing and develop your skills in different genres and styles. You’ll also develop and explore your own writing through practical workshops. Read more

About the course

You’ll study contemporary creative writing and develop your skills in different genres and styles. You’ll also develop and explore your own writing through practical workshops. You’ll complete two core modules, optional modules and a dissertation. Your final portfolio of work may take the form of short stories, a novel extract, script or poetry.

Your career

You’ll examine early modern texts, language and culture. Staff expertise includes palaeography, rhetoric, news writing, the sermon, drama, and issues of political, sectarian and national identity between 1400 and 1700. Modules (including modules from History) can be tailored to suit your interests. You’ll complete one core module, optional modules and a dissertation.

Cultural life

Study eighteenth-century literature to develop a broad range of advanced skills. The focus is on the interface between historical and literary approaches, and you’ll be introduced to current academic debates and research methods in the field. Spanning eighteenth century prose and poetry, Romantic poetry, prose, and drama, and Gothic literature, there’s an incredible range to choose between.

First-rate facilities

We’re based in a brand new building at the heart of the campus. There are computer workstations especially for postgraduates and a DVD library with viewing facilities. Our theatre workshop is a fully equipped teaching/performance area with excellent film-viewing facilities and audio suites.

Specialist resources

The University Library subscribes to the major periodicals and full-text electronic archives, including Early English Books Online and Eighteenth-Century Collections Online. Special collections include an outstanding collection of Restoration drama, the Hope Collection of eighteenth-century periodicals, the Jack Rosenthal scripts collection, and papers of contemporary writers such as Anita Brookner, Marina Warner, Fay Weldon and Peter Redgrove.

Funding

There are a number of studentships and fee bursaries available, funded by the University. Deadlines for funding applications are usually in winter/early spring. For details, see our website.

Research training for PhD

If you intend to progress to a PhD, your course can be tailored to include essential research training. The same applies to students on the online course.

Part-time study

Part-time students usually take one taught module in each semester. In the second year, you’ll also take a dissertation module. For most courses, you’ll need to come in for one half-day per week. The MA Creative Writing is taught in the evening. Some modules, such as Theatre and Performance, may require greater time commitment. We try to be as flexible as possible to accommodate the different needs of our students.

Core module

The Eighteenth Century: Research Approaches.

Examples of optional modules – literature

May include: British Poetry in the Long Eighteenth-Century; The Rise of the Gothic; Poetry and History; Fiction and Reality; Humans, Animals, Monsters and Machines: from Gulliver’s Travels to King Kong; Sex and Death in the Eighteenth Century.

Examples of optional modules – history

May include: The Historical Novel; Framing the Past: the eighteenth century on film; Arguments about Eighteenth-Century Crime; Eighteenth-Century British American Colonies; Material Life and Culture in the Early Modern World.

Teaching and assessment

Teaching takes place through seminars. You’ll be assessed on your essays and a 15,000-word dissertation.

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This is our most flexible course. It’s designed to let you explore, then specialise in the specific pathway that interests you. An English Literature masters from Sheffield is the mark of an independent thinker, a skilled researcher, someone who can bring complex projects to fruition. Read more

About the course

This is our most flexible course. It’s designed to let you explore, then specialise in the specific pathway that interests you.

Your career

An English Literature masters from Sheffield is the mark of an independent thinker, a skilled researcher, someone who can bring complex projects to fruition. Our graduates go into teaching, management and consultancy, advertising, journalism, publishing, and all branches of the arts – especially theatre, film, and creative writing. Our courses are also excellent preparation for a PhD.

Cultural life

There is always something going on, and there are plenty of chances to get involved. We have extensive links with arts and heritage organisations including Arts Council England and Sheffield Theatres. Recent poetry readings featured Carol Ann Duffy and Ciaran Carson. Our Arts/Science Encounters events bring together musicians, writers, architects and academics to explore ideas. The English Society, run by our students, organises theatre trips, guest lectures, and seminars. Students also get the chance to take part in drama and readings.

First-rate facilities

We’re based in a brand new building at the heart of the campus. There are computer workstations especially for postgraduates and a DVD library with viewing facilities. Our theatre workshop is a fully equipped teaching/performance area with excellent film-viewing facilities and audio suites.

Specialist resources

The University Library subscribes to the major periodicals and full-text electronic archives, including Early English Books Online and Eighteenth-Century Collections Online. Special collections include an outstanding collection of Restoration drama, the Hope Collection of eighteenth-century periodicals, the Jack Rosenthal scripts collection, and papers of contemporary writers such as Anita Brookner, Marina Warner, Fay Weldon and Peter Redgrove.

Funding

There are a number of studentships and fee bursaries available, funded by the University. Deadlines for funding applications are usually in winter/early spring. For details, see our website.

Research training for PhD

If you intend to progress to a PhD, your course can be tailored to include essential research training. The same applies to students on the online course.

Part-time study

Part-time students usually take one taught module in each semester. In the second year, you’ll also take a dissertation module. For most courses, you’ll need to come in for one half-day per week. The MA Creative Writing is taught in the evening. Some modules, such as Theatre and Performance, may require greater time commitment. We try to be as flexible as possible to accommodate the different needs of our students.

Examples of optional modules

Modules may include, but are not limited to: Memory and Narrative in Contemporary Literature; Exchanging Letters: Art and Correspondence in Twentieth-Century American Culture; Tales of the City; Analysis of Film; Animal Writes: Beasts and Humans in 20th and 21st Century Fiction; White Like Me; Rocket-State Cosmology; The Rise of the Gothic.

Teaching and assessment

Essays, 15,000-word dissertation.

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This interdisciplinary course will give you a firm grounding in nineteenth-century British and European culture. You’ll complete one core module that will introduce you to key concepts by examining literary, artistic or historical texts. Read more

About the course

This interdisciplinary course will give you a firm grounding in nineteenth-century British and European culture. You’ll complete one core module that will introduce you to key concepts by examining literary, artistic or historical texts. You’ll also take optional modules and complete a dissertation.

Your career

You’ll examine early modern texts, language and culture. Staff expertise includes palaeography, rhetoric, news writing, the sermon, drama, and issues of political, sectarian and national identity between 1400 and 1700. Modules (including modules from History) can be tailored to suit your interests. You’ll complete one core module, optional modules and a dissertation.

Cultural life

Study eighteenth-century literature to develop a broad range of advanced skills. The focus is on the interface between historical and literary approaches, and you’ll be introduced to current academic debates and research methods in the field. Spanning eighteenth century prose and poetry, Romantic poetry, prose, and drama, and Gothic literature, there’s an incredible range to choose between.

First-rate facilities

We’re based in a brand new building at the heart of the campus. There are computer workstations especially for postgraduates and a DVD library with viewing facilities. Our theatre workshop is a fully equipped teaching/performance area with excellent film-viewing facilities and audio suites.

Specialist resources

The University Library subscribes to the major periodicals and full-text electronic archives, including Early English Books Online and Eighteenth-Century Collections Online. Special collections include an outstanding collection of Restoration drama, the Hope Collection of eighteenth-century periodicals, the Jack Rosenthal scripts collection, and papers of contemporary writers such as Anita Brookner, Marina Warner, Fay Weldon and Peter Redgrove.

Funding

There are a number of studentships and fee bursaries available, funded by the University. Deadlines for funding applications are usually in winter/early spring. For details, see our website.

Research training for PhD

If you intend to progress to a PhD, your course can be tailored to include essential research training. The same applies to students on the online course.

Part-time study

Part-time students usually take one taught module in each semester. In the second year, you’ll also take a dissertation module. For most courses, you’ll need to come in for one half-day per week. The MA Creative Writing is taught in the evening. Some modules, such as Theatre and Performance, may require greater time commitment. We try to be as flexible as possible to accommodate the different needs of our students.

Core module

Interdisciplinary Approaches to Nineteenth- Century Studies.

Examples of optional modules – literature

May include: The Rise of The Gothic; Fiction and Reality; Poetry and History; Language and Literature in the Workplace; Study of Texts; Murderers and Degenerates: contextualising the fin-de- siècle Gothic; Humans, Animals, Monsters and Machines: from Gulliver’s Travels to King Kong. You can also take School of English research methodology seminars.

Examples of optional modules – other departments

May include: The Fin-de-Siècle; Nineteenth-Century German Literature; The Scramble for Africa; Jacksonian America 1828–1846.

Teaching and assessment

Teaching takes place through seminars. You’ll be assessed on your essays and a 15,000-word dissertation.

Modern languages modules

In addition to your course modules you can take optional 15-credit modules in the Modern Languages Teaching Centre in Arabic, French, German, Italian and Spanish. Assessment of these modules ties your language learning to your research interests.

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Explore diverse forms of contemporary theatre with this practical course. You’ll study areas including devised performance and live art, community and applied theatres, new playwriting, classic texts on the contemporary stage, and documentary and verbatim theatre. Read more

About the course

Explore diverse forms of contemporary theatre with this practical course. You’ll study areas including devised performance and live art, community and applied theatres, new playwriting, classic texts on the contemporary stage, and documentary and verbatim theatre. Our teaching team has strong links with many major venues, theatre companies and practitioners, with Sheffield recently named best theatre city outside London.

Improve both your research and performance skills by working with practising theatre-makers and arts organisations. We have a fully equipped theatre workshop and studio spaces, a publicly licensed drama studio, and excellent editing and recording facilities.

Your career

You’ll examine early modern texts, language and culture. Staff expertise includes palaeography, rhetoric, news writing, the sermon, drama, and issues of political, sectarian and national identity between 1400 and 1700. Modules (including modules from History) can be tailored to suit your interests. You’ll complete one core module, optional modules and a dissertation.

Cultural life

Study eighteenth-century literature to develop a broad range of advanced skills. The focus is on the interface between historical and literary approaches, and you’ll be introduced to current academic debates and research methods in the field. Spanning eighteenth century prose and poetry, Romantic poetry, prose, and drama, and Gothic literature, there’s an incredible range to choose between.

First-rate facilities

We’re based in a brand new building at the heart of the campus. There are computer workstations especially for postgraduates and a DVD library with viewing facilities. Our theatre workshop is a fully equipped teaching/performance area with excellent film-viewing facilities and audio suites.

Specialist resources

The University Library subscribes to the major periodicals and full-text electronic archives, including Early English Books Online and Eighteenth-Century Collections Online. Special collections include an outstanding collection of Restoration drama, the Hope Collection of eighteenth-century periodicals, the Jack Rosenthal scripts collection, and papers of contemporary writers such as Anita Brookner, Marina Warner, Fay Weldon and Peter Redgrove.

Funding

There are a number of studentships and fee bursaries available, funded by the University. Deadlines for funding applications are usually in winter/early spring. For details, see our website.

Research training for PhD

If you intend to progress to a PhD, your course can be tailored to include essential research training. The same applies to students on the online course.

Part-time study

Part-time students usually take one taught module in each semester. In the second year, you’ll also take a dissertation module. For most courses, you’ll need to come in for one half-day per week. The MA Creative Writing is taught in the evening. Some modules, such as Theatre and Performance, may require greater time commitment. We try to be as flexible as possible to accommodate the different needs of our students.

Core modules

Text, Politics and Performance; Issues in Contemporary Performance; Theatre Practice 1: practical research projects; Theatre Practice 2: independent practice; Dissertation of 15,000 or 9,000 words plus integrated practice component.

Teaching and assessment

You’ll be taught through practical workshops, productions and seminars. You’ll be assessed on performance practice, written coursework and a dissertation.

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This course delivers advanced training in the theory and techniques of applied linguistics with an emphasis on second language acquisition. Read more

About the course

This course delivers advanced training in the theory and techniques of applied linguistics with an emphasis on second language acquisition. We also have expertise in related disciplines including sociolinguistics, critical discourse analysis and corpus linguistics, and in the field of TESOL we offer particular expertise in Academic Writing, ESP, Materials Design and Testing.

Our graduates go on to advanced careers in TESOL all over the world. They also work in business, publishing, translation and interpreting.

Your career

Our graduates are working in teaching (primary, secondary, FE, HE and TESOL), publishing, marketing, libraries, fundraising, charities and the public sector. A masters from Sheffield is a sound basis for a PhD at any leading university.

How we teach

Our expertise covers all aspects of the subject, so whatever you’re interested in you’ll get the best possible advice and support. We provide training in research methods and you can choose to go on a work placement as part of your course.

You’ll be taught by academics whose work is published internationally. Their specialisms include language acquisition, historical language studies, applied linguistics, literary linguistics, discourse analysis and sociolinguistics.

We have a lively research culture. Through lectures and weekly seminars we’ll introduce you to the latest ideas. You’ll have the opportunity to explore these ideas in your own research.

With the School of Languages and Cultures, we established the new University Centre for Linguistic Research to gather and support postgraduate linguistics research across the University.

Our resources

We have specialist recording equipment for fieldwork and experimental work. Interactive computer-based workshops will introduce you to corpus-linguistic technology.

The University library subscribes to several electronic databases including JStor, Early English Texts online and Eighteenth-century Collections online. For more advanced reading, there’s a regular free minibus service to the British Library at Boston Spa.
Funding

There are a number of studentships and fee bursaries available, funded by either the University or the Arts and Humanities Research Council. Deadlines for funding applications are usually in winter/early spring. For details, see our website.

Core modules

Introduction to Language and Linguistics; English Grammar and Discourse; Language Teaching Methodology; Second Language Acquisition; Research Methods; Dissertation (MA only).

Examples of optional modules

Corpus Linguistics; Current Issues in Second Language Acquisition; Discourse and Genre Analysis; English for Specific Purposes; Intercultural Communication; Researching Writing in TESOL; Teaching Practice; Theory and Practice of Language Teaching; World Englishes.

Teaching and assessment

You’ll be taught by a dedicated and enthusiastic team of teachers. Our internationally recognised research feeds straight into our teaching, with students sometimes taking a hands-on role in our research activities. The staff are leading figures in their fields, in many cases having written the books and papers you will be studying: Kook-hee Gil (Second Language Acquisition), Nigel Harwood (TESOL Materials), Gabriel Ozon (English Grammar) and Jane Mulderrig (Critical Discourse Analysis).

You’ll spend about eight hours a week in lectures, seminars and workshops.

And there are chances to take part in classroom-based research projects in the UK and overseas.

Assessment depends on the module, but includes essay assignments and classroom coursework tasks. You’ll write your dissertation (MA only) over the summer.

If you don’t complete the dissertation you’ll be awarded a diploma.

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Develop your knowledge across a range of fields including urban studies, gender studies, race studies, travel writing, postcolonial writing, autobiographical and epistolary studies. Read more

About the course

Develop your knowledge across a range of fields including urban studies, gender studies, race studies, travel writing, postcolonial writing, autobiographical and epistolary studies. You’ll cover contemporary and recent American fiction and the way ‘real history’ appears in the texts. You are also able to take modules in American history offered by the History Department. If you intend to continue to PhD study, you’ll get essential research training.

Your career

An English Literature masters from Sheffield is the mark of an independent thinker, a skilled researcher, someone who can bring complex projects to fruition. Our graduates go into teaching, management and consultancy, advertising, journalism, publishing, and all branches of the arts – especially theatre, film, and creative writing. Our courses are also excellent preparation for a PhD.

Cultural life

There is always something going on, and there are plenty of chances to get involved. We have extensive links with arts and heritage organisations including Arts Council England and Sheffield Theatres. Recent poetry readings featured Carol Ann Duffy and Ciaran Carson. Our Arts/Science Encounters events bring together musicians, writers, architects and academics to explore ideas. The English Society, run by our students, organises theatre trips, guest lectures, and seminars. Students also get the chance to take part in drama and readings.

First-rate facilities

We’re based in a brand new building at the heart of the campus. There are computer workstations especially for postgraduates and a DVD library with viewing facilities. Our theatre workshop is a fully equipped teaching/performance area with excellent film-viewing facilities and audio suites.

Specialist resources

The University Library subscribes to the major periodicals and full-text electronic archives, including Early English Books Online and Eighteenth-Century Collections Online. Special collections include an outstanding collection of Restoration drama, the Hope Collection of eighteenth-century periodicals, the Jack Rosenthal scripts collection, and papers of contemporary writers such as Anita Brookner, Marina Warner, Fay Weldon and Peter Redgrove.

Funding

There are a number of studentships and fee bursaries available, funded by the University. Deadlines for funding applications are usually in winter/early spring. For details, see our website.

Research training for PhD

If you intend to progress to a PhD, your course can be tailored to include essential research training. The same applies to students on the online course.

Part-time study

Part-time students usually take one taught module in each semester. In the second year, you’ll also take a dissertation module. For most courses, you’ll need to come in for one half-day per week. The MA Creative Writing is taught in the evening. Some modules, such as Theatre and Performance, may require greater time commitment. We try to be as flexible as possible to accommodate the different needs of our students.

Modules

Memory and Narrative in Contemporary Literature; Exchanging Letters: art and Correspondence in twentieth-century American culture; Tales of the City; Analysis of Film; White Like Me; Rocket-State Cosmology.

Teaching and assessment

Teaching is by seminars. You’ll be assessed on your essays, coursework and a 15,000-word dissertation.

Read less
You’ll develop skills in textual and theoretical interrogation of narrative film, in both popular and art cinema. Close textual analysis of the moving image is supplemented by a range of optional national cinema studies, including Australian cinema and British visual culture. Read more

About the course

You’ll develop skills in textual and theoretical interrogation of narrative film, in both popular and art cinema. Close textual analysis of the moving image is supplemented by a range of optional national cinema studies, including Australian cinema and British visual culture. You’ll complete one core module, optional modules and a dissertation.

Your career

You’ll examine early modern texts, language and culture. Staff expertise includes palaeography, rhetoric, news writing, the sermon, drama, and issues of political, sectarian and national identity between 1400 and 1700. Modules (including modules from History) can be tailored to suit your interests. You’ll complete one core module, optional modules and a dissertation.

Cultural life

There is always something going on, and there are plenty of chances to get involved. We have extensive links with arts and heritage organisations including Arts Council England and Sheffield Theatres. Recent poetry readings featured Carol Ann Duffy and Ciaran Carson. Our Arts/Science Encounters events bring together musicians, writers, architects and academics to explore ideas. The English Society, run by our students, organises theatre trips, guest lectures, and seminars. Students also get the chance to take part in drama and readings.

First-rate facilities

We’re based in a brand new building at the heart of the campus. There are computer workstations especially for postgraduates and a DVD library with viewing facilities. Our theatre workshop is a fully equipped teaching/performance area with excellent film-viewing facilities and audio suites.

Specialist resources

The University Library subscribes to the major periodicals and full-text electronic archives, including Early English Books Online and Eighteenth-Century Collections Online. Special collections include an outstanding collection of Restoration drama, the Hope Collection of eighteenth-century periodicals, the Jack Rosenthal scripts collection, and papers of contemporary writers such as Anita Brookner, Marina Warner, Fay Weldon and Peter Redgrove.

Funding

There are a number of studentships and fee bursaries available, funded by the University. Deadlines for funding applications are usually in winter/early spring. For details, see our website.

Research training for PhD

If you intend to progress to a PhD, your course can be tailored to include essential research training. The same applies to students on the online course.

Part-time study

Part-time students usually take one taught module in each semester. In the second year, you’ll also take a dissertation module. For most courses, you’ll need to come in for one half-day per week. The MA Creative Writing is taught in the evening. Some modules, such as Theatre and Performance, may require greater time commitment. We try to be as flexible as possible to accommodate the different needs of our students.

Examples of optional modules

Modules may include: Analysis of Film; Approaches to the American Gothic (spring semester); Postwar British Drama, Film and Television.

Teaching and assessment

Teaching is by seminars. You’ll be assessed on your essays, coursework and a 15,000-word dissertation.

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Develop your knowledge of literature and literary linguistics. You’ll be supported by our expertise in areas including Renaissance and contemporary literatures in English. Read more

About the course

Develop your knowledge of literature and literary linguistics. You’ll be supported by our expertise in areas including Renaissance and contemporary literatures in English.

This course is taught completely online, so you can study while working, wherever you live. Most class texts can be accessed electronically through the University libraries. You’ll complete one 30-credit core module, optional modules worth 90 credits and a dissertation worth 60 credits.

Your career

You’ll examine early modern texts, language and culture. Staff expertise includes palaeography, rhetoric, news writing, the sermon, drama, and issues of political, sectarian and national identity between 1400 and 1700. Modules (including modules from History) can be tailored to suit your interests. You’ll complete one core module, optional modules and a dissertation.

Cultural life

Study eighteenth-century literature to develop a broad range of advanced skills. The focus is on the interface between historical and literary approaches, and you’ll be introduced to current academic debates and research methods in the field. Spanning eighteenth century prose and poetry, Romantic poetry, prose, and drama, and Gothic literature, there’s an incredible range to choose between.

First-rate facilities

We’re based in a brand new building at the heart of the campus. There are computer workstations especially for postgraduates and a DVD library with viewing facilities. Our theatre workshop is a fully equipped teaching/performance area with excellent film-viewing facilities and audio suites.

Specialist resources

The University Library subscribes to the major periodicals and full-text electronic archives, including Early English Books Online and Eighteenth-Century Collections Online. Special collections include an outstanding collection of Restoration drama, the Hope Collection of eighteenth-century periodicals, the Jack Rosenthal scripts collection, and papers of contemporary writers such as Anita Brookner, Marina Warner, Fay Weldon and Peter Redgrove.

Funding

There are a number of studentships and fee bursaries available, funded by the University. Deadlines for funding applications are usually in winter/early spring. For details, see our website.

Research training for PhD

If you intend to progress to a PhD, your course can be tailored to include essential research training. The same applies to students on the online course.

Part-time study

Part-time students usually take one taught module in each semester. In the second year, you’ll also take a dissertation module. For most courses, you’ll need to come in for one half-day per week. The MA Creative Writing is taught in the evening. Some modules, such as Theatre and Performance, may require greater time commitment. We try to be as flexible as possible to accommodate the different needs of our students.

Core module

Research Methods in English Studies.

Examples of optional modules

May include: Literature and the Mind; Shakespeare and Early Women Dramatists; Introduction to Literary Linguistics.

NB: All MA students can take optional modules from the online course, with the agreement of their course tutor.

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Now more than ever, we need to invite everyone in society, of all ages, to be part of the solution. The Master of Arts in Environmental Education and Communication program will empower you, and give you the depth and insight to lead and motivate others in developing a sustainable, environmentally sound society. Read more
Now more than ever, we need to invite everyone in society, of all ages, to be part of the solution. The Master of Arts in Environmental Education and Communication program will empower you, and give you the depth and insight to lead and motivate others in developing a sustainable, environmentally sound society.

Who It’s For

The MA in Environmental Education and Communication is for those interested in how education and communication can help develop environmentally sustainable social and economic systems. Learning how we can educate and communicate to engage those in our workplaces, communities and nations towards such a goal involves all sectors of society– agriculture, health, governance, media, business, architecture, community development, science, education, recreation and more.

Students likely already know about the complexities of our current unsustainability and the challenges faced by environmental educators and communicators trying to address this problem. Our program is designed for those who wish to widen their perspective on environmental and related social issues, deepen their understanding of those areas essential to a skilled educator and/or communicator, explore different ways of understanding the causes of our current unsustainable society, and develop attributes essential to effective leadership.

Participants seek opportunities to learn with others from diverse backgrounds, to engage in core classes, co-operative projects, team planning, and group discussions to reach a better understanding of the language, expertise, and concerns of a wide range of education and communication professionals.

Students are typically professionals with bachelor's degrees and at least two years' experience working or interest in environmental education and communication.

Graduates of the program have gone on to advance in a variety of fields, from creating schools within the public and private education systems, to leading communications sections within major national and international non-profit organizations, to advising senior government ministers and Premiers, to gaining their PhD degrees with one alumni recently taking on a professorial position in a North American university.

Financial Awards

Royal Roads University has a variety of awards, scholarships, and bursaries available to help offset your tuition fees. The MA in Environmental Education and Communication program has a comparatively high success rate in Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) grant competitions and many of the program’s students win significant financial awards. The SSHRC award at the MA level often aids the competitiveness of students for future grants, and grant writing is a marketable skill The unique advising structure and ability to gain one-to-one aid in grant writing are important features of RRU that help account for this success.

Outcomes

Graduates will return to their career with a range of theoretical knowledge and analytical and communications skills and competencies. Graduates have the skills and knowledge to develop and implement innovative programs to provide students, clients and other audiences with science-based information, psychologically-sound strategies, and culturally-appropriate, philosophically-nuanced and educationally-sophisticated approaches to current environmental issues.

Graduates will be able to:
-Develop and implement programs to provide students, clients and other audiences with up-to-date, reputable scientific and technological information, as well as traditional knowledge, about current environmental issues and opportunities
-Apply the best current knowledge of learning and cognition to the design, development, and implementation of programs about environmental education and communication
-Design, develop and implement environmental communications and education programs using a range of formats and incorporating relevant current technologies and media
-Evaluate the status of public information and prior knowledge concerning environmental values, issues and opportunities
-Possess a sophisticated awareness of the range of perspectives (e.g., attitudes, beliefs, values) towards the environment and human activity in the environment
-Evaluate environmental information and education programs
-Develop and implement strategies to foster conflict resolution, constructive dialogue and community knowledge construction concerning environmental issues
-Develop approaches to nurture effective and responsible environmental actions on the part of corporations, governmental and non-governmental organizations and citizens' coalitions
-Provide up to date information about innovations in environmental communication and education
-Possess a sophisticated awareness of the nature of contemporary human-environment issues and their implications for education and communications programs
-Develop a systems perspective on problems in environmental education and communications
-Develop an understanding of environmental education and communication functions within organizational contexts

Delivery Method

Combining the best of short residencies and innovative web-based instruction, the MA in Environmental Education and Communication program allows both busy working professionals and those just beginning their careers to get the most out of their academic experience. This combination of learning experiences allows students to benefit from the intensity of the program while still being able to meet the demands of family and workplace.

Participants in the MA program take 11 courses (41 credits) including the thesis course. Six courses are taken on-campus, and five are delivered at a distance through Internet-based technologies.

Certificate students take the first three courses in the schedule for a total of 9 credits. Diploma students take the first nine courses for a total of 24 credits.

We will utilize a range of educational methodologies, including case studies, field studies, cultural studies, team projects, lectures and seminar discussions, and online modules. RRU has become a leader in the delivery of web-based interactive distance education courses, and these will be of great value during non-residential periods.

Residency
Over two years, MA students attend two separate three-week residencies and one final two-week residency. The first residency introduces the cohort of students to each other, the faculty, and the RRU style of education as they participate in their first two courses. The middle residency incorporates two courses, may have a more directed field-based orientation, and helps prepare students for their thesis research. The final residency allows completing students to present their thesis findings to the larger environmental education and RRU community and incorporates their final courses, preparing them to be leaders in the field.

Students should expect to be fully occupied during the residency period. The regular classroom schedule is Monday to Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. with homework, readings, and team meetings done outside of these hours. There are activities during the regular workday and in the evenings. In addition to educational activities, there are a number of planned field trips and recreational events.

Online Courses
Online courses are delivered through the innovative use of internet technologies. Students draw on a range of learning resources, while using online discussion groups and drop boxes to develop and complete the electronic submission of both individual and team assignments.

Students take one nine-week distance course at a time. Each distance course requires an average time commitment of 10 - 20 hours per week.

Program Laddering
The structure of the program is laddered so that individuals are able to complete a Graduate Certificate, Graduate Diploma, or full Master's degree.

-The Graduate Certificate program was designed to be taken on its own, or to ladder into the Diploma or Master of Arts in Environmental Education and Communication. The Certificate would be awarded upon successful completion of a residency and one distance-based semester (approximately five months). Students may apply for transfer to the Diploma or MA stream during the Graduate Certificate program, or apply to the Diploma or MA program once they have completed the Certificate
-The Graduate Diploma program was designed to be taken on its own, or to ladder into the MA in Environmental Education and Communication. The Diploma would be awarded upon successful completion of two residencies and one distance-based semester (approximately 12 months). Students may apply for transfer to the MA stream during the Graduate Diploma program, or apply to the MA program once they have completed the Diploma
-The full two-year program leading to the MA is delivered through a combination of three residential periods, three distance-based semesters, and a thesis

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Now more than ever, we need to invite everyone in society, of all ages, to be part of the solution. The Master of Arts in Environmental Education and Communication program will empower you, and give you the depth and insight to lead and motivate others in developing a sustainable, environmentally sound society. Read more
Now more than ever, we need to invite everyone in society, of all ages, to be part of the solution. The Master of Arts in Environmental Education and Communication program will empower you, and give you the depth and insight to lead and motivate others in developing a sustainable, environmentally sound society.

Who It’s For

The MA in Environmental Education and Communication is for those interested in how education and communication can help develop environmentally sustainable social and economic systems. Learning how we can educate and communicate to engage those in our workplaces, communities and nations towards such a goal involves all sectors of society– agriculture, health, governance, media, business, architecture, community development, science, education, recreation and more.

Students likely already know about the complexities of our current unsustainability and the challenges faced by environmental educators and communicators trying to address this problem. Our program is designed for those who wish to widen their perspective on environmental and related social issues, deepen their understanding of those areas essential to a skilled educator and/or communicator, explore different ways of understanding the causes of our current unsustainable society, and develop attributes essential to effective leadership.

Participants seek opportunities to learn with others from diverse backgrounds, to engage in core classes, co-operative projects, team planning, and group discussions to reach a better understanding of the language, expertise, and concerns of a wide range of education and communication professionals.

Students are typically professionals with bachelor's degrees and at least two years' experience working or interest in environmental education and communication.

Applicants who do not have the formal academic education to qualify for admission may be assessed on the basis of both their formal education and their informal learning, in accordance with the Flexible Admission Process.

Graduates of the program have gone on to advance in a variety of fields, from creating schools within the public and private education systems, to leading communications sections within major national and international non-profit organizations, to advising senior government ministers and Premiers, to gaining their PhD degrees with one alumni recently taking on a professorial position in a North American university.

Financial Awards

Royal Roads University has a variety of awards, scholarships, and bursaries available to help offset your tuition fees. The MA in Environmental Education and Communication program has a comparatively high success rate in Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) grant competitions and many of the program’s students win significant financial awards. The SSHRC award at the MA level often aids the competitiveness of students for future grants, and grant writing is a marketable skill The unique advising structure and ability to gain one-to-one aid in grant writing are important features of RRU that help account for this success.

Outcomes

Graduates will return to their career with a range of theoretical knowledge and analytical and communications skills and competencies. Graduates have the skills and knowledge to develop and implement innovative programs to provide students, clients and other audiences with science-based information, psychologically-sound strategies, and culturally-appropriate, philosophically-nuanced and educationally-sophisticated approaches to current environmental issues.

Graduates will be able to:
-Develop and implement programs to provide students, clients and other audiences with up-to-date, reputable scientific and technological information, as well as traditional knowledge, about current environmental issues and opportunities
-Apply the best current knowledge of learning and cognition to the design, development, and implementation of programs about environmental education and communication
-Design, develop and implement environmental communications and education programs using a range of formats and incorporating relevant current technologies and media
-Evaluate the status of public information and prior knowledge concerning environmental values, issues and opportunities
-Possess a sophisticated awareness of the range of perspectives (e.g., attitudes, beliefs, values) towards the environment and human activity in the environment
-Evaluate environmental information and education programs
-Develop and implement strategies to foster conflict resolution, constructive dialogue and community knowledge construction concerning environmental issues
-Develop approaches to nurture effective and responsible environmental actions on the part of corporations, governmental and non-governmental organizations and citizens' coalitions
-Provide up to date information about innovations in environmental communication and education
-Possess a sophisticated awareness of the nature of contemporary human-environment issues and their implications for education and communications programs
-Develop a systems perspective on problems in environmental education and communications
-Develop an understanding of environmental education and communication functions within organizational contexts

Delivery Model

Combining the best of short residencies and innovative web-based instruction, the MA in Environmental Education and Communication program allows both busy working professionals and those just beginning their careers to get the most out of their academic experience. This combination of learning experiences allows students to benefit from the intensity of the program while still being able to meet the demands of family and workplace.

Participants in the MA program take 11 courses (41 credits) including the thesis course. Six courses are taken on-campus, and five are delivered at a distance through Internet-based technologies.

Certificate students take the first three courses in the schedule for a total of 9 credits. Diploma students take the first nine courses for a total of 24 credits.

We will utilize a range of educational methodologies, including case studies, field studies, cultural studies, team projects, lectures and seminar discussions, and online modules. RRU has become a leader in the delivery of web-based interactive distance education courses, and these will be of great value during non-residential periods.

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You’ll study contemporary creative writing and develop your skills in different genres and styles. You’ll also develop and explore your own writing through practical workshops. Read more

About the course

You’ll study contemporary creative writing and develop your skills in different genres and styles. You’ll also develop and explore your own writing through practical workshops. You’ll complete two core modules, optional modules and a dissertation. Your final portfolio of work may take the form of short stories, a novel extract, script or poetry.

Your career

You’ll examine early modern texts, language and culture. Staff expertise includes palaeography, rhetoric, news writing, the sermon, drama, and issues of political, sectarian and national identity between 1400 and 1700. Modules (including modules from History) can be tailored to suit your interests. You’ll complete one core module, optional modules and a dissertation.

Cultural life

There is always something going on, and there are plenty of chances to get involved. We have extensive links with arts and heritage organisations including Arts Council England and Sheffield Theatres. Recent poetry readings featured Carol Ann Duffy and Ciaran Carson. Our Arts/Science Encounters events bring together musicians, writers, architects and academics to explore ideas. The English Society, run by our students, organises theatre trips, guest lectures, and seminars. Students also get the chance to take part in drama and readings.

First-rate facilities

We’re based in a brand new building at the heart of the campus. There are computer workstations especially for postgraduates and a DVD library with viewing facilities. Our theatre workshop is a fully equipped teaching/performance area with excellent film-viewing facilities and audio suites.

Specialist resources

The University Library subscribes to the major periodicals and full-text electronic archives, including Early English Books Online and Eighteenth-Century Collections Online. Special collections include an outstanding collection of Restoration drama, the Hope Collection of eighteenth-century periodicals, the Jack Rosenthal scripts collection, and papers of contemporary writers such as Anita Brookner, Marina Warner, Fay Weldon and Peter Redgrove.

Funding

There are a number of studentships and fee bursaries available, funded by the University. Deadlines for funding applications are usually in winter/early spring. For details, see our website.

Research training for PhD

If you intend to progress to a PhD, your course can be tailored to include essential research training. The same applies to students on the online course.

Part-time study

Part-time students usually take one taught module in each semester. In the second year, you’ll also take a dissertation module. For most courses, you’ll need to come in for one half-day per week. The MA Creative Writing is taught in the evening. Some modules, such as Theatre and Performance, may require greater time commitment. We try to be as flexible as possible to accommodate the different needs of our students.

Core modules

Choose two from: Creative Writing: Fiction 1; Creative Writing: Fiction 2; Creative Writing: Poetry 1; Creative Writing: Poetry 2.

Examples of optional modules

May include: ‘Tales of the City’: the living space in contemporary american fiction; Contemporary British Poetry; Memory and Narrative in Contemporary Literature; Language and Literature in the Workplace; Study of Texts or any from the many modules listed under the general MA in English Literature.

Teaching and assessment

Teaching takes place through workshops and seminars. You’ll be assessed on your essays, a creative writing dissertation and portfolio. Fiction writers and dramatists: 12,000 words of creative work. Poets: 50 poems or equivalent. All students complete a 3,000-word critical essay.

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The Faculty of Education has a longstanding national reputation for providing high-calibre initial teacher training with over 20 Secondary specialisms available. Read more
The Faculty of Education has a longstanding national reputation for providing high-calibre initial teacher training with over 20 Secondary specialisms available. We have a well established partnership with over 800 secondary school and colleges across the North West region and beyond.

MFL is a national shortage subject and government priority with training bursaries available and this course has an excellent reputation. There is a growing need for high calibre language teachers and as such our trainees are very employable. Where appropriate, sessions are conducted in the relevant target language. We welcome applications from native speakers.

We offer specialisms in French, German, Mandarin and Spanish. Subject to confirmation of DfE funding, we usually run Subject Knowledge Enhancement courses as part of the PGCE. These will be identified at interview for applicants who need support learning a second language and confirmed with a PGCE place offer.

Trainees take a course of supporting study, including English as an additional language (EAL) and special educational needs (SEN).
A minimum of 120 days school based practice training is combined with university based training and periods of independent study. Trainees are supported throughout by university and placement mentors.

These courses are available via University led and School Direct routes.

We also offer an Assessment-Only route to Qualified Teacher Status (QTS) aimed at experienced, but unqualified graduate teachers, wishing to complete a formal qualification.

Features and benefits of the course

-State-of-the-art teaching facilities at our Brooks Building in Manchester
-Experience in a diverse range of schools and colleges
-Choice of University led, School Direct or Assessment Only routes to Qualified Teacher Status
-Subject Knowledge Enhancement courses available (subject to DfE funding and eligibility)
-Opportunity to undertake course enrichment overseas
-Course includes 60 Masters Level CATS points, or one third of a Masters degree
-Access to NQT alumni support in your first year of teaching
-Close links with our Educational and Social Research Institute

Placement options

School placements are central to the course. Trainees on the University-led ('Core') route typically spend at least 120 days on school-based training. As an intending teacher you will begin by developing professional awareness, understanding and skills common to learning and teaching in a variety of settings. You will begin to understand the inter-relationship between the school and its community.

Placements are organised by Manchester Met and will be in at least two different schools or colleges and ranging from inner city to rural settings, mixed and single gender schools, City Academies, Comprehensives and Selective Schools, 11-16, 11-18, sixth form and further education colleges.

School Direct trainees are attached to a specified ('lead') school within an alliance of schools and will typically spend at least 135 days on school-based training, depending on the term-times of the school(s) involved. The lead school organises placements.

In addition we have exchanges with France, German and Spain to offer placements abroad during the Enrichment phase of the course. We are also working closely with the Confucius Institute to develop links with China.

About the Course

The duration of this one year full time programme is 36 weeks (September to June). 24 weeks will be spent in school and 12 weeks in university.

In addition to your main language, you will take one of the other three languages as your second language. You will be prepared to teach your main language throughout the 11-18 age range. In your second language, you will be prepared to teach up to either key stage 3 or key stage 4/GCSE, according to qualifications and linguistic competence. Where possible, we take into consideration other languages you may have. We offer SKE (Subject Knowledge Enhancement) in French, German, Spanish and Mandarin to support trainees learning a language from scratch. In addition we have exchanges with France, German and Spain to offer placements abroad during Enrichment phase of the course. We are also working closely with the Confucius Institute to develop links with China.

This course enables you to acquire and develop language teaching skills. You will become aware of the needs of pupils of different abilities and of the goals and methods appropriate to them. You will be prepared for a wide variety of teaching situations by observing good practice in schools and modelling in university sessions, through discussions, peer teaching and practical workshops and through intensive practical teaching to a range of abilities. Feedback from experienced teachers and tutors facilitates your professional development.

Classroom management skills are given high priority both at the University and during school placements. Equally, an emphasis is placed upon careful planning, and you will develop the skills of linguistic analysis and sequencing.

You will learn how to teach both the spoken and written language, how to approach teaching grammar and how to plan for using the target language in the classroom. The course aims to develop a thoughtful and critical approach to the relationship between teaching strategies and the pupils' language learning in the classroom. You will learn how to assess and evaluate pupils' learning and how to use this in future planning. Other issues that form part of the course include language acquisition, cultural background, global citizenship and equal opportunities.

In addition to preparation for Key Stages 3-5, we also include provision for Key Stage 2 and you will compile a Primary Languages Portfolio. Methodology sessions in the university are conducted in your main foreign language where appropriate foreign language tutors will help you develop or maintain your language skills in your second foreign language.

We aim to develop analytical, successful and enthusiastic beginning teachers who are fully aware of the excitement and challenges which lie ahead and who can work effectively in a variety of educational settings.

Trainees will engage with current educational issues and recent and relevant research in order to further develop their understanding and to generate challenging and lively debate. There will be a focus on:
-Promoting an inclusive learning and teaching environment
-Working in multi-professional teams
-Creating a climate for learning in the classroom
-Learning and teaching strategies
-Managing students' behaviour
-Planning and evaluating students' learning
-Developing knowledge and understanding of teachers' professional responsibilities

Assessment details

Our PGCE Secondary programme combines practical teaching experience with written assignments. Trainees will complete a portfolio detailing their Record of Professional Development and a Career Entry Profile. Satisfactory attendance and professional engagement with the programme are also necessary factors in the successful completion of your chosen route.

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MA Exhibition Studies is a unique programme dedicated to the understanding of, and imaginative engagement with, the history, theory and practice of worldwide exhibition cultures. Read more
MA Exhibition Studies is a unique programme dedicated to the understanding of, and imaginative engagement with, the history, theory and practice of worldwide exhibition cultures. It explores a dynamic field of creative practice which crosses disciplinary boundaries and explores shifting ideas about art intersecting with larger curatorial trends and ideas, in a global context.

-Full time 1 year, part time two years
-Supported by internationally renowned arts organisations, including Liverpool Biennial, Tate Liverpool, FACT, RIBA North and Aarhus University, Denmark
-Benefit directly from the degree's links to the Exhibition Research Lab and a range of international collaborations and partnerships developed by staff
-Offers best practice and the very latest in innovative forms of exhibition and curatorial practices
-Students can apply for the prestigious Susan Cotton Travel Awards and a range of other study bursaries available

The programme is underpinned by the work of the Exhibition Research Lab. It draws upon the internationally distinguished expertise of staff and visiting staff engaged in theoretical and applied research in the field of exhibitions studies and curating, in collaboration with key cultural local and international institutions.
Operating in close partnership with Tate Liverpool, Liverpool Biennial, FACT (Foundation for Creative Art and Technology) and RIBA North (Royal Institute of British Architects), we can offer our students opportunities to develop public presentations, curatorial projects, and exhibitions in real-life contexts.

In addition, the programme benefits from the context of our own Exhibition Research Lab Gallery located at the School Art and Design John Lennon Building; LJMU Library, Special Collections and Archives (including Liverpool Biennial Archives) as well as a range of international collaborations and partnerships developed by staff, such as a partnership with the MA Curating programme at Aarhus University, Denmark.

Teaching on the programme is delivered within the studio environment, with a combination of lectures, seminars, workshops, study visits and field trips.

What you will study on this degree

Please see guidance below on core modules for further information on what you will study.

Exhibition Studio Practice (Exhibition Studies)

You will be introduced to the professional practice of exhibition making during this module. It provides an opportunity to share, investigate and contextualise experiences of exhibition making. The module is assessed through a portfolio of written work and related documentation, presentation of exhibition proposal, and a viva

Research and Practice 1

This shared module for all Liverpool School of Art and Design taught postgraduate programmes provides an introduction to practice-based research, history and theory as applied to the wider field of Art and Design. It will introduce you to a variety of research methods and skills and offers an exploration of the diversity of contemporary practice at the forefront of the represented disciplines

Research and Practice 2

You will be introduced to the field of Exhibition Studies through the study of significant historic exhibitions with key contextual readings. You will be introduced to various case study examples to test and develop ideas for the written assignment through analysis, discussion and reflection. The module introduces the histories and practices of exhibition-making and develops your interpretative theoretical and discursive skills. It offers a critical environment within which you can develop the skills necessary to debate and critically evaluate exhibition studies


Collaborative Practice

An exciting shared module for all Liverpool School of Art and Design taught postgraduate programmes which will provide you with an opportunity to work closely with departments and internal partners within the School and the wider LJMU community, and with external partners in the UK and internationally. Outcomes should include proposals for applied creative projects and demonstrable practice based artefacts relevant for exhibition purposes. An emphasis will be placed on you furthering the understanding of your chosen pathways within the programme and developing professional links and experience in disseminating work to the public/professional bodies

Major Project – Exhibition Studies

You will undertake and complete a sustained research project in the field of Exhibition Studies on a topic agreed with the module supervisor. Building on advanced skills in practice, research and scholarship assessed at Certificate and Diploma modules, you will identify, research, and organise a significant piece of scholarly writing or undertake a practical project. Both options are undertaken with the support and advice provided through general, small-group, and tutorial meetings. The module is assessed through a written dissertation or practical project (thesis exhibition) accompanied by a written report.

Further guidance on modules

The information listed in the section entitled 'What you will study' is an overview of the academic content of the programme that will take the form of either core or option modules. Modules are designated as core or option in accordance with professional body requirements and internal Academic Framework review, so may be subject to change. Students will be required to undertake modules that the University designates as core and will have a choice of designated option modules. Additionally, option modules may be offered subject to meeting minimum student numbers.

Please email if you require further guidance or clarification.

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