• Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University Featured Masters Courses
  • Imperial College London Featured Masters Courses
  • University of York Featured Masters Courses
  • Leeds Beckett University Featured Masters Courses
  • Swansea University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
  • Regent’s University London Featured Masters Courses
King’s College London Featured Masters Courses
Coventry University Featured Masters Courses
Queen Margaret University, Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
University of Kent Featured Masters Courses
University of Kent Featured Masters Courses
"burial"×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Burial)

  • "burial" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 15
Order by 
Study the field that brings past people to life. Past societies responded to and treated their dead in a huge diversity of ways, providing archaeologists with crucial insights into their workings. Read more
Study the field that brings past people to life

Why choose this course?

Past societies responded to and treated their dead in a huge diversity of ways, providing archaeologists with crucial insights into their workings. Funerary archaeology combines analysis of human remains with their archaeological context to take a truly interdisciplinary approach to studying both life and death in the past. The course at York offers the chance to develop skills in a range of different methods and techniques, but all centred on learning how to investigate death and burial in the past. The flexible nature of the course enables you to pursue your own particular period or methodological interests.
-Explore the varied archaeological and methodological approaches to funerary archaeology
-Work alongside internationally renowned specialists in a range of different periods and methodologies, by choosing either the MA or MSc route
-Gain ‘hands on’ experience of the analysis of human remains
-Learn through fieldtrips to local museums and relevant sites, e.g. the prehistoric monuments in the Yorkshire Wolds
-Choose modules to support your own research interests
-Use the latest techniques and equipment to build key practical skills
-Receive advice on developing your career and research interests from knowledgeable staff

What does the course cover?
The course focuses a range of topics from identity, landscape, social structure, commemoration and memory, ritual and belief, and the body. It covers attitudes and repsonses to death from the first evidence for the special treatment of human remains by homids up to the place of funeray rites in modern day societies, but with a particular focus on the interpretively challenging evidence from Prehistory. The analysis of human remains and their archaeological context are both taught in a flexible modular system, that allows you to tailor the course to your particular methodological or period interests.

The MA and MSc pathways offer a chance to specialise in different areas of Funerary Archaeology research. There is also an opportunity to learn valuable practical skills, which are essential for a wide range of archaeological and associated careers.

Who is it for?
This degree is for anyone interested in studying Funerary Archaeology from a range of perspectives, which are at the frontiers of both archaeological method and theoretical approach. It is primarily for students with previous experience in archaeology, anthropology, history, art history, biology or related fields, but students from a wide variety of academic backgrounds are encouraged.

What can it lead to?
The course provides a solid foundation for a wide range of careers and further studies. Postgraduate students at York have gone on to research degrees, academic or teaching careers, museum positions and archaeology posts at local councils, regional authorities, field units, and heritage bodies such as English Heritage.

Careers

By the end of the MA or MSc Funerary Archaeology course you will be able to:
-A thorough understanding of the history of research and the theoretical approaches to Funerary Archaeology
-A broad foundation in the key aspects of studying death and burial in the past
-Identify and record human bone assemblages
-Age, sex and assess pathologies from human bones
-Explore selected methods and periods in detail, through the option modules
-Critically evaluate published research and datasets
-Orally present knowledge and concepts
-Plan, design and undertake a piece of independent research

These skills and techniques are deployed widely in the field of archaeological research and exploration, but they are also valuable for a wide range of careers and further studies.

Many of York's Masters postgraduates go on to further research, academic or teaching careers, museum positions and archaeology posts at local councils, regional authorities, field units and heritage bodies. Some of the organisations our students now work for include:
-Archaeological field units
-Environmental archaeology
-Professional archaeologists – field and laboratory based
-Laboratory technicians
-Demonstrators
-University/research technicians
-Academia
-On-site osteoarchaeologists
-Medical humanities

Read less
If you choose to study our MA in Archaeology then you will be joining a vibrant, active Postgraduate community in a setting surrounded by sites of archaeological interest. Read more
If you choose to study our MA in Archaeology then you will be joining a vibrant, active Postgraduate community in a setting surrounded by sites of archaeological interest. We are lucky in the West Country to have prehistoric Dartmoor on our doorstep, where the recent Whitehorse Hill burial was uncovered. Exeter itself is a city built on Roman foundations and the nearby Ipplepen dig is shedding further light on Romano-British history. The Anglo-Saxons too were active in our part of the world and we have excellent interdisciplinary ties with the History Department and Centre for Medieval Studies. In the past there have been opportunities for Exeter students to participate in fieldwork and outreach activities in as diverse locations as Argentina, Sri Lanka, Kazakhstan, South Dakota and Texas. In some cases, fieldwork may consist of archaeological work in a museum rather than excavation.

The MA Archaeology programme is flexible, so you can choose the modules that interest you – including those on Experimental Archaeology, Human Osteoarchaeology and Zooarchaeology. If you’re interested in going on to doctoral study then our MA will give you the right training and our academic staff will be happy to support you through the process of funding applications.

Programme Structure

The programme is divided into units of study called 'modules' .

Compulsory modules

The compulsory modules can include; Research Methods and Archaeological Theory; Field Study; Landscape Archaeology: Understanding the historic environment; Material Culture and Dissertation

Optional modules

You can choose from a variety of modules on offer within our other Masters, some examples of these are; Advanced Project; Experimental Archaeology in Practice; Advanced Human Osteology; Zooarchaeology; Funerary Osteoarchaeology and Musculo-skeletal Anatomy

The modules listed here provide examples of what you can expect to learn on this degree course based on recent academic teaching. The precise modules available to you in future years may vary depending on staff availability and research interests, new topics of study, timetabling and student demand.

Learning and teaching

Most of our teaching is done collaboratively in small groups because we feel this is the best way to help you develop. Your classes will be a mix of lectures, seminars and workshops where you will learn the methodology and practical skills you need. We have a range of specialist equipment and excellent facilities including laboratories, kiln room, and spaces for experimental archaeology.

Research areas

Our research at Exeter is world-leading and all our academic staff are actively engaged in both Britain and further afield. We are particularly unique for our expertise in the fields of Bioarchaeology and Experimental Archaeology. Our interests run from early prehistory through to the post-medieval period. Our geographic specialisations include the Americas, the British Isles, Europe, South Asia and North Africa.

Read less
The MSc Archaeological Practice is a world-leading archaeology course which equips you with the tools for work in the real world. Read more
The MSc Archaeological Practice is a world-leading archaeology course which equips you with the tools for work in the real world.

The course combines an emphasis on the key practical skills essential for a career within the archaeological profession with a critical study of the advanced theoretical and methodological concepts underpinning the discipline.

We stress the acquisition of vocational skills through practical experience using as our 'laboratory' the rich archaeological resource of Orkney, home to some of the world's most renowned archaeological monuments.

Core modules will introduce you to the principles, philosophy and theory of cultural heritage management and immerse you in a suite of practical archaeological techniques including excavation, non-intrusive field archaeology, digital means of exploring and recording archaeological materials, environmental archaeology and post-excavation analysis.

There is flexibility to pursue an interest in period-based modules which reflect the research specialisms of the Archaeology Institute UHI staff, or you may choose to focus entirely on our professional skills modules.

Special Features

• A limited number of funded places are available for full-time, Scottish or EU fee status students.
• Loans for tuition fees are available from the Students Award Agency for Scotland (SAAS) for eligible Scotland domiciled and EU students, and loans for living costs for eligible Scottish students.
• Study in the outstanding archaeological landscape of the Orkney Islands
• Contribute to cutting edge archaeology research at world renowned sites including the Ness of Brodgar World Heritage site excavations
• A three month placement module offers the opportunity to develop your professional skills and gain valuable fieldwork experience
• Flexibility is build into the course to match your personal and professional life - you can study individual modules or work towards the PgDip or develop your expertise to gain a full masters degree

Modules

PgDip
Core modules are: Cultural heritage management; Practical archaeology.
You will also choose four option modules which may include: Death and Burial Archaeology; Vikings and Norse in the North Atlantic; Neolithic Studies; From Vikings to VE Day: Scottish Medieval and Later Society; Iron Age Scotland in the Atlantic World; Archaeological and Geophysical Survey; Maritime Archaeological Heritage; Digital Analysis; Sustainability Past and Present; Excavation; Art and Archaeology: Contemporary Theory and Practice; Geoarchaeology of the North Atlantic

MSc
To achieve the award of MSc Archaeological Practice you must complete a 60 credit professional placement or dissertation

Locations

This course is available at Orkney College UHI, East Road, Kirkwall, KW15 1LX

How will I study

There is also a significant amount of fieldwork that involves excavation, investigation and curation techniques in one of the world's best archaeological classrooms - The Orkney Islands

Funding

The University of the Highlands and Islands is pleased to offer a limited number of places with full tuition fee support for Scottish-domiciled/EU students, studying full time, on this course starting in September 2017 to help talented students join this key growth sector for the Scottish economy. Fees will be funded by the European Social Fund and Scottish Funding Council as part of Developing Scotland’s Workforce in the Scotland 2014-2020 European Structural and Investment Fund Programmes.

From 2017, eligible Scotland domiciled students studying full time can access loans up to 10,000 from the Student Awards Agency for Scotland (SAAS).This comprises a tuition fee loan up to £5,500 and a non-income assessed living cost loan of £4,500. EU students studying full time can apply for a tuition fee loan up to £5500.

Part-time students undertaking any taught postgraduate course over two years up to Masters level who meet the residency eligibility can apply for a for a tuition fee loan up to £2,750 per year.

See Scholarships tab below for full details

Top five reasons to study at UHI

1. Do something different: our reputation is built on our innovative approach to learning and our distinctive research and curriculum which often reflects the unique environment and culture of our region and closely links to vocational skills required by a range of sectors.
2. Flexible learning options mean that you can usually study part time or full time. Some courses can be studied fully online from home or work, others are campus-based.
3. Choice of campuses – we have campuses across the Highlands and Islands of Scotland. Each campus is different from rich cultural life of the islands; the spectacular coasts and mountains; to the bright lights of our city locations.
4. Small class sizes mean that you have a more personal experience of university and receive all the support you need from our expert staff
5. The affordable option - if you already live in the Highlands and Islands of Scotland you don't have to leave home and incur huge debts to go to university; we're right here on your doorstep

How to apply

If you want to apply for this postgraduate programme click on the ‘visit website’ button below which will take you to the relevant course page on our website, from there select the Apply tab to complete our online application.
If you still have any questions please get in touch with our information line by email using the links beow or call on 0845 272 3600.

International Students

An exciting and diverse student life awaits our international students. Choose to study in one of the larger urban centres of the region, such as Perth, Inverness or Elgin, or in one of the smaller towns or island communities, including the Western and Northern Isles. http://www.uhi.ac.uk/en/studying-at-uhi/international

English Language Requirements

Our programmes are taught and examined in English. To make the most of your studies, you must be able to communicate fluently and accurately in spoken and written English and provide certified proof of your competence before starting your course. Please note that English language tests need to have been taken no more than two years prior to the start date of the course. The standard English Language criteria to study at the University of the Highlands and Islands are detailed on our English language requirements page http://www.uhi.ac.uk/en/studying-at-uhi/international/how-to-apply-to-uhi/english-language-requirements

Read less
Our history programme offers research opportunities in areas as diverse as medicine, death, historical demography, gender, women's history and urban culture. Read more

Course overview

Our history programme offers research opportunities in areas as diverse as medicine, death, historical demography, gender, women's history and urban culture. As an MPhil or PhD student you will enjoy a research environment in which ambitious and original ideas can flourish.

Many of the research opportunities in history are interdisciplinary and are available for most periods of history and in most geographical regions.

You can find out more about MPhil and PhD supervision areas from the School of History, Classics and Archaeology. There are opportunities for joint supervision with Latin American researchers in the School of Modern Languages.

Supervision is normally available in the following subject areas: Classical, medieval and early modern medicine; Death and burial; Gender, women's history and the history of sexuality; Historical demography; History of ideas; History of psychiatry; National identity, inter-ethnic relations and border issues; Politics, international relations and the impact of war; Urban history and urban culture.

For detailed information on research areas see http://www.ncl.ac.uk/postgraduate/courses/degrees/history-mphil-phd/#profile

Training and Skills

As a research student you will receive a tailored package of academic and administrative support to ensure you maximise your research and future career. The academic information is in the programme profile and you will be supported by our doctoral training centres, Faculty Training Programme and Research Student Support Team.

For further information see http://www.ncl.ac.uk/postgraduate/courses/degrees/history-mphil-phd/#training&skills

How to apply

For course application information see http://www.ncl.ac.uk/postgraduate/courses/degrees/history-mphil-phd/#howtoapply

Read less
The Masters in Celtic & Viking Archaeology provides an introduction to both theory and practice in approaches to early medieval archaeology, based on our particular research strengths in the settlements and material culture of Celtic, Pictish and Viking peoples, and in the archaeology of kingship and political development. Read more
The Masters in Celtic & Viking Archaeology provides an introduction to both theory and practice in approaches to early medieval archaeology, based on our particular research strengths in the settlements and material culture of Celtic, Pictish and Viking peoples, and in the archaeology of kingship and political development.

Why this programme

-If you want to further your career in archaeology, our new approaches to early medieval studies bring fresh insights into the life and ideas of the period and provide you with a stimulating environment, learning from internationally-renowned scholars
-You will have the opportunity to take fieldtrips to a number of sites relevant to your studies.
-Our programme has strong links with the University's Hunterian Museum, and Glasgow Life giving you access to primary source material, including objects and archives.

Programme structure

You will take two core courses and three optional courses. For the MLitt you will produce a dissertation on a specialist topic agreed with the course convenor.

The core courses provides you with a theoretical background to the study of early medieval archaeology, examining themes such as burial, settlement, material culture, religion through a series of case studies. You will also get training and support in a wide variety of research methods including library skills, humanities computing, writing and presenting papers.

Core courses
-Approaches to Celtic and Viking Archaeology
-Research Skills

Optional courses - three optional courses must be selected, two of which from the following
-Themes in Early Medieval Scottish archaeology
-Early Christian monuments of Scotland
-Early Medieval artefacts
-Viking and late Norse artefacts
-Norse in the North Atlantic, AD 800–1500
-Viking and late Norse British Isles.

You may also choose one of the following options
-Thematic studies: any one of the thematic courses offered via other MLitt programmes, by agreement with the course convener. These may include courses available via other Masters programmes within the University (most relevant are those offered as part of Celtic Studies and Scottish Medieval Studies).
-Independent study on a topic agreed with the course convenor.
-Artefact studies: any one of the specialist courses offered in the MLitt Material Culture & Artefact Studies.
-Multimedia analysis and design or 2D digitisation.

Career prospects

Graduates have gone on to work for various heritage bodies such as the National Museum of Scotland, and for UK-based commercial archaeology firms.

The programme provides an excellent platform for you to move onto PhD studies and an academic career. The wide variety of specialist optional courses allow you to tailor your particular programme experience towards a direction that best suits your future plans upon completion.

Positions held by recent graduates include Field Archaeologist, Open Learning Tutor, University lectureships and research managers.

Read less
Taught at our Parkgate Road Campus in Chester, our MA in Archaeology of Death and Memory explores the complex history of death and memory from the hunter-gatherer societies of the Palaeolithic to recent times. Read more
Taught at our Parkgate Road Campus in Chester, our MA in Archaeology of Death and Memory explores the complex history of death and memory from the hunter-gatherer societies of the Palaeolithic to recent times. Our course is an exciting, cross-period postgraduate course of global application. It will allow you to study and gain advanced expertise in the study of death, burial and commemoration in the human past, shedding light on debates and concerns of our present day.

The course focuses on archaeology but is unusually cross-disciplinary. You will explore debates that connect archaeology to research themes shared across the humanities and social sciences, including studies of ritual, the body, material culture, memory and mortality. Consequently, this degree will interest those with first degrees in archaeology or history, and also those with backgrounds in other disciplines.

Read less
Our History MLitt is a tailor-made programme with taught and research-based elements, providing you with an ideal opportunity for the detailed study of specific periods or themes. Read more

Course Overview

Our History MLitt is a tailor-made programme with taught and research-based elements, providing you with an ideal opportunity for the detailed study of specific periods or themes. Dissertation topics include historical medicine, political history and urban culture.

The programme is well-suited as preparation for PhD research.

Dissertation supervision is available in the following research areas: classical, medieval and early modern medicine; death and burial; early medieval Britain and Europe; gender; women's history and the history of sexuality; historical demography; history of ideas; history of psychiatry; national identity; inter-ethnic relations and border issues; politics; international relations and the impact of war; urban history; urban culture.

Training and Skills

For detailed module, training, and skills information see http://www.ncl.ac.uk/postgraduate/courses/degrees/history-mlitt/#training&skills

How to apply

For course application information see http://www.ncl.ac.uk/postgraduate/courses/degrees/history-mlitt/#howtoapply

Read less
Christie’s Education is the first British institution to offer a Master’s programme devoted exclusively to Chinese art. While acquiring experience in object analysis, you will explore archaeological and historical contexts and the multiple narratives in the story of Chinese art. Read more
Christie’s Education is the first British institution to offer a Master’s programme devoted exclusively to Chinese art. While acquiring experience in object analysis, you will explore archaeological and historical contexts and the multiple narratives in the story of Chinese art. Starting from the Neolithic and Bronze Age art, the course covers pottery, bronze, lacquer, silk and jade, then examines Buddhism from the Han dynasty onwards, to the global reach of the ‘Silk Road’ in the Tang dynasty. Extensive treatment of artistic production during late imperial China—from the ’golden age’ of the Song dynasty to the High Qing—range through a variety of media such architecture, painting, printing, ceramics and luxury goods. The course also explores cultural developments from the 19th to the 21st century, when intensified contact with foreigners generated new practices, functions and meanings in Chinese art.

Crucially, the course will propel you into Chinese art-world practice and introduce you to the curators, scholars, artists, and dealers who shape the discipline. You will gain exposure to historical and current trends in the circulation of art within China and abroad, historically and to the present day. The programme takes on only a small and exclusive group of students each year and has already trained many of the next generation of art-world professionals in the field of Chinese art.


•The core lecture series from the Neolithic period to the present underpins all components of the programme
•You will participate in a study trip to China and regular visits to museums and collections throughout the year
•Object-based study is central to our teaching and will provide you with relevant training for the public and commercial art worlds. This includes practical and research based study of materials and techniques, scientific analysis, style, dating, quality and authenticity
•You will be trained in cataloguing to auction house and museum standards. Handling sessions and warehouse and museum visits all occur during the course
•Being engaged with current debates about curating will enable you to devise fresh approaches to the display of art works. You'll explore practices in art criticism, developing skills to review exhibitions and produce reports
•Our Culture and Ideology Seminars will enable you to discuss the relationship between specific objects and broader debates around ancient and modern Chinese art in small groups. You will acquire the skills to deliver presentations and generate seminar discussion
•You'll be involved in Methodology Seminars - the analysis of technical, art-historical and interpretative texts that provide transferable skills for independent research and individual development
•If you're doing a Master's degree you will prepare a thesis. This is your opportunity to create an exhibition on a small group of objects, independently researched and catalogued, where the key academic and professional skills learned on the programme are utilised.


•Neolithic and Bronze Age art, culture and burial practices
•The establishment of lacquer, silk, jade and painting traditions
•Buddhist art in China from the Han to the Qing dynasties
•The Silk Road and the international status of ceramics, precious metals, paper making and printing
•The golden age of the Song dynasty: ceramics, painting, calligraphy, lacquer and sculpture and the reinvention of the past
•Liao and Yuan artistic production under foreign rule
•The rise of Jingdezhen, China’s major porcelain centre
•The re-establishment of Chinese rule under the Ming dynasty and its artistic expression
•Imperial patronage of court and religious art, imperial academies and ateliers.
•Exchange between China and the West and the export arts of China
•The efflorescence of the arts during the reigns of the three great Qing emperors
•Modern and contemporary art and society

Read less
This versatile programme provides a basis both for doctoral study and for career development in archaeology and in heritage and cultural environment professions. Read more
This versatile programme provides a basis both for doctoral study and for career development in archaeology and in heritage and cultural environment professions.

It comprises a major individual research project, supervised by a specialist in the field of study, and a taught component that develops research and analytical skills. Potential research projects can be on any archaeological subject, as agreed with the supervisor, and there is a wide range of choice for the taught component, enabling students to build their own unique programme of study.

The principal element of the programme, and of assessment, is the 20,000-word research dissertation on a subject agreed by you and a member of staff with appropriate research interests.

This research project also forms the core of your application to study, and we recommend that you discuss your proposed research project with a potential supervisor in advance of applying. The thesis can be regarded as an independent piece of research or a foundation for doctoral-level study.

The potential areas for research are very diverse and include British and European prehistory, the archaeology of the Roman World, Late Antiquity and Greece, and thematic areas such as environment, landscape, material culture, death and burial, age and gender, warfare, ritual and religion, and archaeological theory and method.

Alongside the dissertation, you take three taught modules to complement your research topic and your existing skills profile.

About the School of History and Culture

The programmes in the School of History and Cultures offer students enquiry based learning within a rich and diverse environment to stimulate debate and challenge conventional thinking.
The programmes derive from departments which are all excellently rated by the QAA both in teaching and research terms (Medieval History 5, Modern History 5 and African Studies 5*). Our staff publish widely, and we are developing and consolidating a strong, supportive research culture in the School.
We are extremely proud to announce in June 2016, that History at Birmingham was ranked the top research department in the country by the Research Excellence Framework (REF). The national REF exercise assessed research publications and the public impact of research carried out in all universities in the UK between 2008-2014. Our department had an impressive 45% of its research judged to be ‘world-leading’.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/pgfunding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/pgopendays

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

Read less
A research degree offers you the opportunity to acquire a highly advanced set of conceptual skills developed in the pursuit of new knowledge, which can be applied within or beyond an academic or scholarly context. Read more
A research degree offers you the opportunity to acquire a highly advanced set of conceptual skills developed in the pursuit of new knowledge, which can be applied within or beyond an academic or scholarly context. Research training in any academic discipline helps to channel creativity into critical innovatory reasoning. The legitimate authority of original, independent research depends upon persuasive analytical arguments supported by critically evaluated evidence.

Our research areas include: classical Greek, Hellenistic and Roman Republican archaeology; Roman provincial archaeology; and late antique and early medieval Western European archaeology. Key specialisms include: archaeology of urban settlement, archaeology of cult and ritual, death and burial, social archaeology, attitudes to the past, and interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary studies in history and archaeology.

Why study this course at Birkbeck?

Arts and humanities courses at Birkbeck are ranked third best in London and 11th in the UK in the Times Higher Education 2015-16 World University Subject Rankings.

Our research

Birkbeck is one of the world’s leading research-intensive institutions. Our cutting-edge scholarship informs public policy, achieves scientific advances, supports the economy, promotes culture and the arts, and makes a positive difference to society.

Birkbeck’s research excellence was confirmed in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework, which placed Birkbeck 30th in the UK for research, with 73% of our research rated world-leading or internationally excellent.

In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF), History at Birkbeck was ranked 6th in the UK for the percentage of our research deemed world-leading or internationally excellent. 94% of our eligible staff submitted research and we achieved 100% for a research environment supporting world-leading and internationally excellent research.

Read less
The University of Buckingham has introduced as part of its London-based Programmes a new research MA in Archaeology. Stonehenge and the First Britons which offers a unique opportunity to study the subject of archaeology and the celebrated site. Read more
The University of Buckingham has introduced as part of its London-based Programmes a new research MA in Archaeology: Stonehenge and the First Britons which offers a unique opportunity to study the subject of archaeology and the celebrated site.

The World Heritage Site of Stonehenge has intrigued scholars for centuries, with each succeeding generation learning more about the site and its setting, among the other henges and richly furnished burial barrows located on Salisbury Plain.

This groundbreaking London-based programme is led by Professor David Jacques, director of the internationally significant excavations at Blick Mead and Vespasian’s Camp, near Stonehenge, and supported by the latest generation of archaeologists to work in the area. Located just over 2km from Stonehenge, the Blick Mead site is providing new evidence of the first humans to occupy the Stonehenge landscape during the Mesolithic period (7960-4041 cal BC). Tantalising new evidence from these excavations suggests that this site may begin to explain why Stonehenge was built where it was.

This programme will provide opportunities for students to take part in fieldwork at the site, as well as visit the archaeological sites in the Stonehenge landscape.

The programme runs from October to September and will consist of a series of ten research seminars. These are supplemented by two optional three-day weekend field trips, each of which combines visits to major archaeological sites with first-hand fieldwork at Blick Mead and Vespasian’s Camp, and two dissertation workshops. Examination will be by original dissertation of no less than 20,000 words.

Find out more about our School of Humanities on http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/humanities.

Teaching methods

The research seminar programme has two strands. The first offers a broadly chronological survey of British prehistory focusing on the internationally important landscape of Salisbury Plain and the Stonehenge World Heritage Site, enabling students to place their own individual research within the broader context of developments in human society and culture since the end of the last Ice Age.

The second strand offers support to students considering how to devise a successful research project, and structure a dissertation. The seminar series complements their individual research project and dissertation; and at the heart of this MA is the close working relationship between student and supervisor. Dissertations may be either library- or fieldwork-based, and address themselves to any of archaeology’s sub-fields. While the final thesis topic is chosen by the student and must be an independent work, it is the supervisor who offers advice on refining the topic as necessary, on primary sources, on secondary reading, on research techniques and on writing the final text, which should be not less than 20,000 words. Supervisors and students will meet frequently throughout the year, and not less than twice a term; and the supervisor is the student’s primary contact for academic advice and support.

The MA is taught by staff from the University of Buckingham, with the participation of a number of renowned scholars who give lectures and lead some of the seminars.

Associate Students

For those taking the course as Associate Students, this seminar programme may be enjoyed as a self-contained survey of Stonehenge and its landscape and of British prehistoric archaeology. This status will enable the student to attend the ten research seminars and take a full part in the seminar and buffet dinner discussions, as well as optional field trips, but does not require the submission of written work. Associate Students are not registered for, and do not receive, the MA degree.

Apply here http://www.buckingham.ac.uk/humanities/ma/archaeology.

Read less
This course is unique in its focus on the Highlands and Islands of Scotland. It offers the opportunity to consider wider archaeological concepts and theoretical issues utilising world-class sites in Orkney and the North Atlantic region. Read more
This course is unique in its focus on the Highlands and Islands of Scotland. It offers the opportunity to consider wider archaeological concepts and theoretical issues utilising world-class sites in Orkney and the North Atlantic region.

The MLitt Archaeological Studies will enable you to engage critically with current themes and debates in archaeological practice, theory and method.

There are a wide range of module options which draw on the research specialisms of the Archaeology Institute staff and these provide you with the flexibility to combine taught modules and dissertation research.

You can develop chronological specialisms grounded in the archaeology and heritage of the region; for example, in Prehistoric Archaeology or in Celtic through to Viking/Norse and Medieval Archaeology. Or you may choose to combine period-based modules with our professional skills modules to gain a broader knowledge and understanding of the diversity of methods and theory practiced within archaeology.

Special Features

• A limited number of funded places are available for full-time, Scottish or EU fee status students.
• Loans for tuition fees are available from the Students Award Agency for Scotland (SAAS) for eligible Scotland domiciled and EU students, and loans for living costs for eligible Scottish students.
• Study in the outstanding archaeological landscape of the Orkney Islands
• You will be taught by internationally recognised experts in the field and take advantage of cutting edge research taking place at world renowned sites including the Ness of Brodgar World Heritage site excavations
• You can study individual modules for personal or professional development, or work towards the PgCert, PgDip, or full Masters degree
• The course offers preparation for specialised research at PhD level

Study Options

The course is available to study full time in September and part time in September and January by self directed study.
You will study this course through a combination video conference seminars and online learning through the UHI virtual learning environment (VLE), with support from your tutors and student advisor

Modules

PgCert

Core modules are: Archaeology of the Highlands and Islands; Research and Dissertation Skills
You will also choose one option module listed under the PgDip

PgDip

Option modules, from which you must choose three, may include:
Death and Burial Archaeology; Vikings and Norse in the North Atlantic; Neolithic Studies; From Vikings to VE Day: Scottish Medieval and Later Society; Iron Age Scotland in the Atlantic World; Archaeological & Geophysical Survey; Maritime Archaeological Heritage; Digital Analysis; Sustainability Past and Present; Excavation; Art and Archaeology: Contemporary Theory and Practice

MLitt

To achieve the MLitt award you must complete a research dissertation.

Access routes

Students can access the programme from a range of UHI undergraduate programmes

Locations

Inverness College UHI, 1 Inverness Campus, Inverness, IV2 5NA
Lews Castle College UHI, Stornoway, Isle of Lewis, HS2 0XR
Orkney College UHI, East Road, Kirkwall, KW15 1LX
Highland Theological College UHI, High Street, Dingwall, IV15 9HA
Perth College UHI, Crieff Road, Perth, PH1 2NX

Funding

The University of the Highlands and Islands is pleased to offer a limited number of places with full tuition fee support for Scottish-domiciled/EU students, studying full time, on this course starting in September 2017 to help talented students join this key growth sector for the Scottish economy. Fees will be funded by the European Social Fund and Scottish Funding Council as part of Developing Scotland’s Workforce in the Scotland 2014-2020 European Structural and Investment Fund Programmes.

From 2017, eligible Scotland domiciled students studying full time can access loans up to 10,000 from the Student Awards Agency for Scotland (SAAS).This comprises a tuition fee loan up to £5,500 and a non-income assessed living cost loan of £4,500. EU students studying full time can apply for a tuition fee loan up to £5500.

Part-time students undertaking any taught postgraduate course over two years up to Masters level who meet the residency eligibility can apply for a for a tuition fee loan up to £2,750 per year.

See Scholarships tab below for full details

Top reasons to study at UHI

1. Do something different: our reputation is built on our innovative approach to learning and our distinctive research and curriculum which often reflects the unique environment and culture of our region and closely links to vocational skills required by a range of sectors.
2. We have campuses across the Highlands and Islands of Scotland. Each campus is different from rich cultural life of the islands; the spectacular coasts and mountains; to the bright lights of our city locations.
3. Small class sizes mean that you have a more personal experience of university
4. The affordable option - if you already live in the Highlands and Islands of Scotland you don't have to leave home and incur huge debts to go to university; we're right here on your doorstep

How to apply

If you want to apply for this postgraduate programme click on the ‘visit website’ button below which will take you to the relevant course page on our website, from there select the Apply tab to complete our online application.
If you still have any questions please get in touch with our information line by email using the links beow or call on 0845 272 3600.

International Students

An exciting and diverse student life awaits our international students. Choose to study in one of the larger urban centres of the region, such as Perth, Inverness or Elgin, or in one of the smaller towns or island communities, including the Western and Northern Isles. http://www.uhi.ac.uk/en/studying-at-uhi/international

English Language Requirements

Our programmes are taught and examined in English. To make the most of your studies, you must be able to communicate fluently and accurately in spoken and written English and provide certified proof of your competence before starting your course. Please note that English language tests need to have been taken no more than two years prior to the start date of the course. The standard English Language criteria to study at the University of the Highlands and Islands are detailed on our English language requirements page http://www.uhi.ac.uk/en/studying-at-uhi/international/how-to-apply-to-uhi/english-language-requirements

Read less
The Msc programme Cultural Geography aims to train students to become professionally competent in the field of geography and liveability so that they can make a useful contribution to improving place-related liveability, quality of life and wellbeing in society. Read more
The Msc programme Cultural Geography aims to train students to become professionally competent in the field of geography and liveability so that they can make a useful contribution to improving place-related liveability, quality of life and wellbeing in society.

The programme deals with the qualities of a place (neighborhood, village, city, region) that add to the quality of life as experienced by inhabitants and visitors. Aspects that influence the liveability of places and communities are safety, health, quality of the residential environment (housing, facilities and services), social interaction and participation, community involvement, possibilities for recreation and tourism, quality and unicity of the landscape. Feelings of rootedness and belonging, but also curiosity and excitement about new places, positively influence the liveability of places at local, regional, national and global levels. This may support social cohesion, community resilience and the adaptive potential of people and communities to innovate.

Why in Groningen?

Groningen is the only university in the Netherlands where you can do a Master in Cultural Geography. Students are trained with the necessary critical, analytical, methodological and theoretical tools to contribute to place-related liveability in society. Career perspectives vary from governments, NGOs and corporate roles.

Job perspectives

You will find graduates of the Msc. Cultural Geography in a variety of places.

Three types of work stand out: 1. conducting scientific research or do research for a company, 2. the formulation of policy and advice and representing spatial interests, 3. the transfer of information in areas such as historic preservation, tourism, journalism, or education,. For example, you work in a municipality, a county, a consulting firm, a heritage organization, a housing association or tourist agencies.

To optimize the connection between the Master's program and the labour market, we try to stay in touch with our alumni, for example via the LinkedIn group Master Cultural Geography.

Research in the Master

The research in the Master Cultural Geography is strongly embedded in the research of its staff, on the themes of Place, Identity and Well-being.

Central focus is the lived experiences of local peoples all over the world. Topics of recent research projects are: community engagement; ageing and wellbeing; innovation and rural transformation; socio-spatial consequences of population decline; heritage; historical landscape change; perception and evaluation of nature and landscape; nature and health; death and burial; entrepreneurship and corporate social responsibility; employment opportunities; housing and the living environments of various groups within society; social impact assessment; social aspects of new technology; governance of places; social aspects of agriculture and farming; social aspects of natural resource management; and visitor and host experiences of tourism.

Our research embraces the social relations between people and places, emotional geographies, and the experience of spatial transformation and liveability. We believe that knowing one's 'place' is fundamental to the formation of human identity and to wellbeing. Forms of cultural expression such as art, architecture, ritual and language, and our understanding and appreciation of nature and landscape all interact with the physical environment in the creation of our individual and community life-stories. As such, the ways in which we construct and transform spaces and places manifest our imagination and self-awareness. In doing so, we make sense of, define, and celebrate our personal and collective identities, communities and localities.

Our research is strongly empirically embedded. During the master, students learn qualitative and quantitative research methodologies regarding place attachment, identities and liveability. In the Master thesis, there is room for innovative methods including visual methodologies and location-based applications (social or soft GIS).

The research theme of Place, Identity and Wellbeing fits within the faculty research programme 'towards Wellbeing, Innovation and Spatial Transformation' (tWIST) and the themes population decline and Healthy Ageing.

Read less
Study at the world centre for Mesolithic research. The University of York is the only place in the world where you can study a Masters programme Mesolithic archaeology. Read more
Study at the world centre for Mesolithic research

Why choose this course?

The University of York is the only place in the world where you can study a Masters programme Mesolithic archaeology. Mesolithic studies have gathered huge momentum in recent years, with academics at York leading the way in uncovering significant new evidence on sites such as Howick and the internationally renowned Star Carr – not far from York.

The lack of detailed study into the Mesolithic period means there is a huge amount waiting to be discovered. Almost any project investigating the period is sure to uncover something new and previously unknown. That gives our students an incredible opportunity to become leading specialists in the period, and to get involved in truly pioneering projects.
-Study in the globally recognised centre for Mesolithic archaeology
-Make new discoveries in this under-researched field of study
-Get involved in globally significant Mesolithic field projects
-Gain ‘hands-on’ experience of experimental archaeology at our Mesolithic camp
-Work alongside world leaders conducting pioneering research
-Learn about cutting-edge techniques, such as ancient DNA and stable isotope analysis and climate-change reconstruction
-Receive career and research guidance from experienced and knowledgeable staff

What does the course cover?
The MA in Mesolithic Studies provides an important review of the European Mesolithic, exploring the ways in which the period has been interpreted from the 19th century, up to the present day. It also explores key topics such as technology, consumption practices, death and burial, plants and animals, and settlement, drawing on the research carried out in the department.

Students have the opportunity to get involved in one of several Mesolithic excavation projects, including nearby Star Carr, site of the oldest house and oldest carpentry in Europe, Howick in Northumberland, and coastal shell middens in Europe, all of which have featured on TV and in the media.

Who is it for?
This course is suitable for graduates of archaeology, anthropology, biology or related fields, as well as for people with relevant experience or enthusiasm for the subject.

What can it lead to?
This masters course gives you the chance to specialise in an exciting area of archaeology, but also gives you the essential skills and knowledge required for many different archaeological and related careers or further study. While some students take the course as the gateway to further specialist research at PhD level, others go on to a wide variety of careers.

Careers

By the end of the MA in Mesolithic Studies course you will have:
-A thorough understanding of the history of research and the theoretical approaches in Mesolithic Studies
-A broad foundation in the key aspects of Mesolithic lifeways
-Developed a critical understanding of the key debates in the period
-Developed an ability to gather and organise information and arguments in a critical and independent manner through writing essays under various conditions
-Undertaken a piece of independent research on a topic within the field of Mesolithic archaeology
-Developed presentation skills through the delivery of seminar papers on a range of diverse themes

Many course graduates go on to further specialist research at PhD level, many of which have been funded, and then pursue careers in academia. Others have gone into a range of careers, from teaching and digital archiving to commercial archaeology work and wilderness training.

Some of the organisations our past students now work for include the Chartered Institute for Archaeologists, Council for British Archaeology, Yorkshire Museums Trust, archaeological consultancies and even Wikipedia.

Read less

  • 1
Show 10 15 30 per page


Share this page:

Cookie Policy    X