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Masters Degrees (Bureaucracy)

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In Research in Public Administration and Organizational Science you will gain knowledge about societal problems and critical challenges for organisations in the public domain. Read more

Research in Public Administration and Organisational Science

In Research in Public Administration and Organizational Science you will gain knowledge about societal problems and critical challenges for organisations in the public domain.

This programme focuses on the new challenges that public governments at all levels face. These flow from long-term trends such as globalization, changing information and communication technologies, climate change and societal fragmentation caused by migration, individualisation and cultural pluralisation.

You will study the core theoretical themes in Public Administration and Organisation Science, such as public policy, public management, bureaucracy and public service, and human resource management. You will also get a solid foundation and advanced study in the fields of philosophy of science and a wide variety of research methods.

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This Anthropology MA provides an understanding of the ways in which anthropological approaches and debates inform the study of meanings and concepts in development, its priorities, policies and practice. Read more
This Anthropology MA provides an understanding of the ways in which anthropological approaches and debates inform the study of meanings and concepts in development, its priorities, policies and practice. It attracts students with diverse backgrounds and study/work experiences which makes for a lively and challenging atmosphere.

The degree is designed to provide students with a fairly detailed knowledge of anthropology, development issues, research methods and either an ethnographic region (and/or language) and/or thematic interest in health/gender/food/ media. Advice will be given to match the choice of optional components to the requirements, interests, and qualifications of individual students whose background may be in general social science, regional, language or other studies. While the focus of the degree is on development issues and practice, its disciplinary orientation remains anthropological.

Students explore the contribution of anthropology to contemporary development debates, for example, on donors/aid agencies and NGOs, poverty, migration and development, dominating discourses, human rights, violence and complex emergencies, refugees, gender, social capital and community action, health, climate change, the ‘market’ (as a core metaphor of globalised development), whether there are alternatives to the market, the role of business in development (corporate social responsibility and markets for the poor) and the importance of ethical, professional conduct by anthropologists. Anthropological studies provide the basis for understanding issues of state and governance in development, as well as the meaning of community development, and of popular ‘participation’ and ‘empowerment’. Throughout the programme, the role of, and opportunities for anthropologists as professionals in development is discussed, in part through a dedicated series of seminars in term 2.

Note: (1) Students registered in other departments who wish to take this course MUST write to the Director of Study for this course for permission to take it.

The programme consists of four elements: three assessed course units and a dissertation of 10,000 words.

The degree’s core course – ‘Anthropology of Development’ – provides an up-to-date and in-depth understanding of anthropological perspectives on policy and practice in contemporary international development, and gives a theoretical overview of the relationship between development and anthropology. The course examines the politics of aid, shifting aid frameworks, and concrete intervention programmes, bridging the disparate worlds of planners and beneficiaries. This involves close reading of anthropological monographs/studies which examine the nature of policy-making, bureaucracy and programmes in a variety of sectors – health, agriculture, water and others – while always paying close attention to the specific cultural contexts of intervention. Students should note that the course is continuously assessed which each term students are expected to write 1 book review, 1 essay and sit a 50 minute examination. This form of assessment has been found to be much fairer to overseas students whose first language is not English. While continuous assessment requires students to organize their studies efficiently from the very beginning of the year, we have found that a much higher proportion of our students graduate having achieved a distinction.

Commonwealth Shared Scholarship Scheme

The Commonwealth Shared Scholarship scheme (http://www.soas.ac.uk/registry/scholarships/soas-hakluyt-scholarship.html) has been extended to cover the MA Social Anthropology of Development.

Note (2). Students registered in other departments at SOAS, notably in Development Studies, must apply in writing/email to the Director of Studies for permission to take this course as part of their degree.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/masocanthdev/

Structure

Overview
The programme consists of four units in total: three units of examined taught courses and a one unit dissertation of 10,000 words.

Core Courses:
- Anthropology of Development - 15PANC090 (1.0 unit).

- Dissertation in Anthropology and Sociology - 15PANC999 (1.0 unit). This is a 10,000 word dissertation on a topic agreed with the Programme Convenor of the MA Social Anthropology of Development and the candidate’s supervisor.

- Additionally all MA Anthropology students 'audit' the course Ethnographic Research Methods during term 1 - this will not count towards your 4 units.

Foundation Course:
- Theoretical Approaches to Social Anthropology - 15PANC008 (1.0 unit). This is compulsory only for students without a previous anthropology degree.

Option Courses:
- The remaining unit(s) of your programme can be selected from the Option Courses list below.

- A total of either 1 unit of option courses (if taking Theoretical Approaches to Social Anthropology) or 2 units (if exempted from Theoretical Approaches to Social Anthropology), may be selected.

- Your 1 or 2 total units may be made up of any combination of 0.5 or 1 unit option courses.

- However, courses without a "15PANxxxx" course code are taught outside of the Anthropology Department. No more than 1 unit in total of these courses may be selected.

- Alternatively, one language course may be taken from the Faculty of Languages and Cultures.

Programme Specification

Programme Specification 2012/2013 (pdf; 134kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/masocanthdev/file39771.pdf

Employment

A postgraduate degree in the Social Anthropology of Development at SOAS develops students’ understanding of the world, other peoples’ ways of life and how society is organised with a particular focus on how anthropological approaches and debates inform the study of meanings and concepts in development, its priorities, policies and practice. Over the years the SOAS department has trained numerous leading anthropologists who have gone on to occupy lectureships and professorships throughout the world. Equally, students gain skills during their degree that transfer well to areas such as information and technology, government service, the media and tourism.

Postgraduate students leave SOAS with a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek, including analytical and critical skills; ability to gather, assess and interpret data; high level of cultural awareness; and problem-solving. A postgraduate degree is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The SOAS LLM degree is a postgraduate qualification for those who hold an undergraduate degree in law. A specialist LLM in International Economic Law will be of interest to those who wish to focus on legal aspects of international economic activity. Read more
The SOAS LLM degree is a postgraduate qualification for those who hold an undergraduate degree in law.

A specialist LLM in International Economic Law will be of interest to those who wish to focus on legal aspects of international economic activity.

Students following the SOAS International Economic Law LLM are immersed in one of the youngest and most dynamic fields of international legal theory and practice.

The questions they confront are difficult, urgent and compelling:
- When we regulate international trade, do we sometimes do more harm than good?
- What impact do bureaucracy and corruption have on foreign investment levels?
- What might international institutions do to prevent a future global economic crisis?
- What changes are China and India bringing to international economic law?
- What is the impact of economic liberalization on labour law and social welfare ?

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/llm/llminteconlaw/

Duration: One calendar year (full-time)
Two, three of fours years (part-time, daytime only)
We recommend that part-time students have between two-and-a-half and three days a week free to pursue their course of study.

Structure

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised LLM are required to take at least three (3.0) of the four (4.0) units within their chosen specialism, including the dissertation. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (within the LLM specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The fourth unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules or the following modules associated with the International Economic Law specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information

Full Module Units (1.0):
Banking Law - 15PLAC105 (1 Unit)
Comparative Commercial Law - 15PLAC175 (1 Unit)
International and Comparative Copyright Law: Copyright in the global village - 15PLAC115 (1 Unit)
International and Comparative Corporate Law - 15PLAC116 (1 Unit)
International Commercial and Investment Arbitration - 15PLAC153 (1 Unit)
International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAC169 (1 Unit)
International Trade Law - 15PLAC120 (1 Unit)
Law and International Inequality: Critical legal analysis of political economy from colonialism to globalisation - 15PLAC131 (1 Unit)
Law of International Finance - 15PLAC135 (1 Unit)
Law of Islamic Finance - 15PLAC159 (1 Unit)
Multinational Enterprises and the Law - 15PLAC140 (1 Unit)
Law and Natural Resources - 15PLAC126 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):
EU Law in Global Context - 15PLAH051 (0.5 Unit)
Foundations of Comparative Law - 15PLAH031 (0.5 Unit)
Foundations of International Corporate Law - 15PLAH059 (0.5 Unit)

Dissertation (1.0):
The dissertation module unit forms part of the required three (3.0) units within the chosen LLM specialism. Please see the dissertation module units below. You will need to attend the teaching on the module and then submit a dissertation in place of the module method of assessment.

Banking Law - 15PLAD105 (1 Unit)
Comparative Commercial Law - 15PLAD175 (1 Unit)
International and Comparative Copyright Law: Copyright in the global village - 15PLAD115 (1 Unit)
International and Comparative Corporate Law - 15PLAD116 (1 Unit)
International Commercial and Investment Arbitration - 15PLAD153 (1 Unit)
International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAD169 (1 Unit)
International Trade Law - 15PLAD120 (1 Unit)
Law and International Inequality: Critical legal analysis of political economy from colonialism to globalisation - 15PLAD131 (1 Unit)
Law of International Finance - 15PLAD135 (1 Unit)
Law of Islamic Finance - 15PLAD159 (1 Unit)
Multinational Enterprises and the Law - 15PLAD140 (1 Unit)
Law and Natural Resources - 15PLAD126 (1 Unit)

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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This MSc programme seeks to explain state-society relations and development in Asia, Africa and (where appropriate) Latin America through the sub-disciplines of comparative political sociology and comparative/international political economy. Read more
This MSc programme seeks to explain state-society relations and development in Asia, Africa and (where appropriate) Latin America through the sub-disciplines of comparative political sociology and comparative/international political economy. Students will study the core concepts of these sub-disciplines such as: state; civil society; social closure; class; bureaucracy; patrimonialism; hegemony; late-industrialisation; product cycle; developmental state; rent-seeking; good governance; and globalization. They will also be exposed to the principal analytical perspectives of political science such as historical institutionalism, rational choice theory and Marxism. These intellectual foundations will enable students to gain a better understanding of the shaping factors behind phenomena such as: state collapse and criminalisation in Africa; cronyism in Southeast Asia and Latin America; religious fundamentalism in South Asia; economic take-off in East Asia; linguistic nationalism in Central Asia; the ‘third wave’ of democratisation; global financial instability; and the relationship between the Washington Institutions and the South. Students will also come to understand the usefulness of cross-regional comparison by seeing how the study of one region can illuminate similar issues elsewhere, despite differing cultural contexts.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/politics/programmes/mscstsocdev/

Programme Specification

Programme Specification 2012 (pdf; 214kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/politics/programmes/mscstsocdev/file51882.pdf

Teaching & Learning

Courses are taught by a combination of methods, principally lectures, tutorial classes, seminars and supervised individual study projects.

The MSc programme consists of three taught courses (corresponding to three examination papers) and a dissertation.

- Lectures

Most courses involve a 50-minute lecture as a key component with linked tutorial classes.

- Seminars

At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work. Students make full-scale presentations for each unit that they take, and are expected to write papers that often require significant independent work.

- Dissertation

A quarter of the work for the degree is given over to the writing of an adequately researched 10,000-word dissertation. Students are encouraged to take up topics which relate the study of a particular region to a body of theory.

Learning Resources

SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world.

The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

- Excellent student satisfaction for Faculty of Law and Social Sciences
The Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (LSS) at SOAS, University of London has performed extremely well according to the 2014 National Student Survey (NSS).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The MSc Global Governance is designed to ensure that you develop an in-depth understanding of global governance and the increasingly intertwined nature of government, business and non-governmental organisations (NGO) activities. Read more
The MSc Global Governance is designed to ensure that you develop an in-depth understanding of global governance and the increasingly intertwined nature of government, business and non-governmental organisations (NGO) activities. The course focuses on debates relating to sustainable development.

It is delivered by leading academics who are experts in their field, and boasts an international teaching team who are able to share their first hand experience of cross cultural negotiation, global partnerships and new security challenges.

On completion of this postgraduate governance course, you will be well equipped for senior roles in some of the top international organisations.

See the website http://courses.southwales.ac.uk/courses/1647-msc-global-governance

What you will study

The MSc Global Governance is uniquely underpinned by the principles of the United Nations Global Compact and United Nations Principles in Responsible Management Education. The University of South Wales is a signatory of both the United Nations Global Compact and the Principles in Responsible Management Education.

You will study 180 credits in total. Modules include:

- International Human Rights Law
Study the historical development and procedural and institutional framework of human rights protection; gaining a critical awareness of both substantive and procedural aspects.

- Global Ethics
Consider current controversies in global ethics from migration, climate change to terrorism and war whilst studying this module whilst applying a range of specific concepts such as ‘human rights’ and ‘global justice’ in the process.

- Globalisation
Explore the concept of globalisation, its history and the causes of globalising process whilst addressing the different contexts in which globalisation applies such as governance, culture, economics and security.

- New Security Challenges
An introduction to the concepts and theories of security in international relations, examining security challenges such as cyberterrorism, nuclear non-proliferation and resource wars.

- Global Governance: Shared approaches to shared challenges
Gain an understanding of Global Governance and its institutions and processes set up to deal with issues that underpin the United Nations Global Compact relating to labour rights, human rights, environmental degradation and anti-corruption.

- Conducting Research
An introduction to the basics of how to conduct a small-scale research project and write a dissertation. This module will prepare you for working on your dissertation.

- Dissertation

You'll also study two of the following option modules:

- Planning for Disasters and Civil Contingencies
- Economies, Markets and Strategic Decision Making
- Global and Strategic Issues in Leadership and Management

Learning and teaching methods

We use a variety of teaching styles and assessment methods. The course is taught face to face and online through interactive workshops and simulations. You will also engage in supervised research. The course also benefits from strong links with international organisations, government and business and therefore, there will be optional study visits and special lectures at European institutions, the U.S. Embassy and private sector organisations.

If you choose to study full-time the course length is approximately 12 months.

Work Experience and Employment Prospects

There is high demand for graduates with an in-depth understanding of the intertwined activities of states, businesses and nongovernmental organisations. Global governance has particular relevance to policy makers and following graduation, you will be well prepared to enter or progress further in careers in government, international organisations, the diplomatic service, nongovernmental organisations, policy work, and the voluntary sector.

- Industry endorsements
“Today’s students need to have a perspective on critical global issues. This MSc programme provides knowledge on issues like human rights, good workplace and environmental standards and governance which are based on key United Nations norms and conventions. It is an innovative programme which I have not seen in this form at many other higher education institutions. I would recommend this to students who intend to become future organizational and business leaders.”
Jonas Haertle, Head, Principles of Responsible Management Education Secretariat, United Nations Global Compact Office

“Governance is becoming an increasingly important topic throughout many aspects of the world we live in today. It’s not any longer just the preserve of the Corporate or Banking world, it applies equally to pan continental and global organisations and agreements. The trick is to show that governance can enhance the effectiveness and efficiency of an organisation or programme and not just add a layer of bureaucracy or become ineffective because of compromise. The course content at the University of South Wales looks like a good mix of theory and practical applications that will be both interesting and fun to learn and will allow an individual to evaluate world and corporate events from a more informed standpoint."
Geoff Cousins, former Global Director of Jaguar Cars

Assessment methods

Formal examinations are not a feature of the course, each module will be typically assessed through coursework and presentations.

The supervised research project will take the form of a written report. Some modules will require you to develop podcasts as part of your assessments, which will become part of a collection of online educational resources. Full training and support will be given to ensure that you have appropriate levels of digital literacy to undertake all assessments.

Teaching

Programme Leader:
Our global governance Masters degree is led by Dr Bela Arora who has 15 years experience of lecturing in international relations. She has provided guest lectures for a wide range of organisations including the Joint Services Command and Staff College. She has also worked on consultancy projects relating to corporate social responsibility, businesses in zones of conflict and blood diamonds.

She has a strong track record in learning and teaching innovation and always ensures a high quality student experience. She has had experience of teaching on executive programmes, and MBA modules, and is committed to providing professional delivery for students looking to enhance their careers. All members of the teaching team have been recognised for their teaching experience. Our expert practitioners have been acknowledged for their first hand experience of shaping policy and professional practice at an international level.

Work and Study Placements

Students on the MSc Global Governance will have the opportunity to apply for a competitively selected funded work experience placement in another EU country.

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The Human Resources and Development Management pathway is aimed at those who are interested in management in the public, state or NGO sectors in developing, transitional or newly-industrialised countries. Read more
The Human Resources and Development Management pathway is aimed at those who are interested in management in the public, state or NGO sectors in developing, transitional or newly-industrialised countries. This is primarily a public sector management, not a business management, programme, although some of the themes covered are relevant to both sectors. The pathway encourages students to consider and analyse how a changing global environment has shaped the ways in which work is organized and managed and how ideas about leadership and management may be applied differently across cultures and contexts.

The pathway explores the relationship between hard and soft approaches to the analysis and practice of management, for example between human resources management and human resource development, between leadership and management and between vertical bureaucracy and decentralised collaborative management. The pathway considers the interaction between organizational structure, culture, power and motivation in public administration and in international organizations.

Who is the programme for?

The programme is designed for officials, policy analysts and researchers concerned with economic and social development. They may work in central or local government, public enterprises, non-governmental organisations, and research or training organisations. The programme is also appropriate for those who are hoping to enter a career in the field of development.

About the School of Government and Society

The School of Government and Society is one of the leading UK and International centres for governance, politics, international development, sociology, public management, Russian and European studies.

Established in 2008, the School comprises three Departments: Politics and International Studies (POLSIS); International Development (IDD) and Local Government Studies (INLOGOV).

POLSIS: The Department of Political Science and International Studies (POLSIS), one of the largest and most academically vibrant departments of Political Science and International Studies in the UK. In the latest Research Excellence Framework (REF) Politics and International Studies at Birmingham was ranked the 6th best in the power rankings highlighting the large number of staff in POLSIS producing world-leading and internationally excellent research.

IDD: Be part of global effort to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals. Contribute to conflict resolution and post-conflict reconstruction. Help build capacity of nations and communities to adapt to climate change. Study with us to gain the skills and knowledge essential for working in international development in the 21st Century.

INLOGOV: The Institute of Local Government Studies (INLOGOV) is the leading academic centre for research and teaching on local governance and strategic public management. We enrich the world of local public service with research evidence and innovative ideas, making a positive difference.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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Humber’s Public Administration graduate certificate program is the first of its kind in Canada and provides all of the knowledge, skills and experience graduates need to become successful public service employees. Read more
Humber’s Public Administration graduate certificate program is the first of its kind in Canada and provides all of the knowledge, skills and experience graduates need to become successful public service employees. Designed and taught by public administration professionals, this program is your key to succeeding quickly in a public sector job. You will receive advanced training in communications, policy analysis, project management, information technology, public finance, governance, leadership and human resources management. Experienced faculty, most of whom currently work in the public sector, will guide you through the core of the curriculum, with guest speakers addressing specific topical issues. As well, Humber is a proud member of the Canadian Association of Programs in Public Administration. The practical, skills-based curriculum provides the foundation for long-term career success by exposing you to the primary public administration activities and by providing networking opportunities with civil servants from across the public sector.

Course detail

Upon successful completion of the program, a graduate will:

• Describe the machinery of government in Canada, including the roles and responsibilities of executives, legislatures and the judiciary, as well as the relationships between all levels of government.
• Define ethics and values which are key to public administration and explain how they apply at all levels of public administration.
• Explore and compare public administration practices found in industrialized countries, especially member states of the European Union and the United States.
• Discuss current issues affecting Canadian public administration and examine how those issues are managed from a public management perspective.
• Discuss key elements of strategic planning processes and examine how these apply to public administration.
• Understand and relate to governments from two perspectives: as business entities with strategic plans, budgets, and core businesses; and as organizations composed of complex human behaviour.
• Explain key economic and finance concepts such as externalities, public and private goods, deficit financing, debt repayment, and fiscal federalism.
• Demonstrate how governments plan, manage and report on the collection and expenditure of public funds.
• Discuss information technology and software applications used in public administration as well as current information technology issues faced by public sector IT managers.
• Prepare and manage human resources in public administration, including the preparation of HR plans, recruitment and selection processes, supervisory skills, negotiating skills and conflict resolution skills.
• Describe the role that communications plays in the public sector and work with stakeholders and partners to meet the information needs of the public, the media, political staff and the bureaucracy.
• Examine how governments develop, implement and evaluate programs in general and learn how to use specific research and analysis tools to contribute to that process in particular.
• Identify the methodological and conceptual issues associated with evaluating and maintaining quality services in the public sector.
• Identify the skills and knowledge required by project managers and project management teams in the public sector.
• Understand and fulfill leadership responsibilities in the public sector by assessing individual leadership traits and behaviours and apply this understanding to the broader theories and concepts of leadership.
• Understand, contribute to, and manage partnerships in the public sector, broadly defined.

Modules

Semester 1
• HRM 5510: Human Resources and the Learning Organization
• PPA 5000: Machinery of Government
• PPA 5002: Current Issues in Public Administration
• PPA 5003: Orientation to Government and the Public Sector
• PPA 5004: Information Technology in Public Administration
• PPA 5505: Project Management

Semester 2
• FIN 5501: Public Sector Finance
• PPA 5007: Municipal Government in Canada
• PPA 5500: International Trends in Public Administration
• PPA 5503: Communications in Public Administration
• PPA 5504: Public Policy Research and Analysis
• PPA 5506: Managing Partnerships and Relationships

Semester 3
• PPA 5005: Overview of Strategic Planning
• PPA 5006: Service Quality in Public Administration
• PPA 5008: Leadership Development
• WORK 5009: Research Project in Public Administration
• WORK 5011: Career Orientation and Speaker Series

Work Placement

You will gain on-the-job work experience with an eight-week (minimum) work placement within the public sector. With faculty support, you will find placements with an appropriate organization. The foundation for the work placement is established over the winter semester.

Your Career

The federal government is the largest single employer in Canada. The provincial governments are a close second, and municipal governments employ hundreds of thousands across the country. The 3.2 million people in the public sector account for almost 20 per cent of all employment. And public sector employees tend to earn higher than average salaries with excellent benefits and working conditions. Shifting demographic factors are rapidly increasing governments’ and public sector agencies’ need for talented people with a broad range of public administration skills and knowledge – and the desire to make a difference – to continue the important work of the public service. Find exceptional career opportunities in positions such as policy analyst, communications officer and program officer.

Federal government employers include Service Canada, and Citizenship and Immigration Canada. Provincial government employers include the Ministry of Community and Social Services, and the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care.

How to apply

Click here to apply: http://humber.ca/admissions/how-apply.html

Funding

For information on funding, please use the following link: http://humber.ca/admissions/financial-aid.html

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