• Jacobs University Bremen gGmbH Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Derby Online Learning Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Bristol Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Leeds Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
  • Aberystwyth University Featured Masters Courses
  • Northumbria University Featured Masters Courses

Postgrad LIVE! Study Fair

Birmingham | Bristol | Sheffield | Liverpool | Edinburgh

University of Hertfordshire Featured Masters Courses
Cranfield University Featured Masters Courses
University of Cambridge Featured Masters Courses
Durham University Featured Masters Courses
London School of Economics and Political Science Featured Masters Courses
"bureaucracy"×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Bureaucracy)

We have 6 Masters Degrees (Bureaucracy)

  • "bureaucracy" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 6 of 6
Order by 
This Anthropology MA provides an understanding of the ways in which anthropological approaches and debates inform the study of meanings and concepts in development, its priorities, policies and practice. Read more
This Anthropology MA provides an understanding of the ways in which anthropological approaches and debates inform the study of meanings and concepts in development, its priorities, policies and practice. It attracts students with diverse backgrounds and study/work experiences which makes for a lively and challenging atmosphere.

The degree is designed to provide students with a fairly detailed knowledge of anthropology, development issues, research methods and either an ethnographic region (and/or language) and/or thematic interest in health/gender/food/ media. Advice will be given to match the choice of optional components to the requirements, interests, and qualifications of individual students whose background may be in general social science, regional, language or other studies. While the focus of the degree is on development issues and practice, its disciplinary orientation remains anthropological.

Students explore the contribution of anthropology to contemporary development debates, for example, on donors/aid agencies and NGOs, poverty, migration and development, dominating discourses, human rights, violence and complex emergencies, refugees, gender, social capital and community action, health, climate change, the ‘market’ (as a core metaphor of globalised development), whether there are alternatives to the market, the role of business in development (corporate social responsibility and markets for the poor) and the importance of ethical, professional conduct by anthropologists. Anthropological studies provide the basis for understanding issues of state and governance in development, as well as the meaning of community development, and of popular ‘participation’ and ‘empowerment’. Throughout the programme, the role of, and opportunities for anthropologists as professionals in development is discussed, in part through a dedicated series of seminars in term 2.

Note: (1) Students registered in other departments who wish to take this course MUST write to the Director of Study for this course for permission to take it.

The programme consists of four elements: three assessed course units and a dissertation of 10,000 words.

The degree’s core course – ‘Anthropology of Development’ – provides an up-to-date and in-depth understanding of anthropological perspectives on policy and practice in contemporary international development, and gives a theoretical overview of the relationship between development and anthropology. The course examines the politics of aid, shifting aid frameworks, and concrete intervention programmes, bridging the disparate worlds of planners and beneficiaries. This involves close reading of anthropological monographs/studies which examine the nature of policy-making, bureaucracy and programmes in a variety of sectors – health, agriculture, water and others – while always paying close attention to the specific cultural contexts of intervention. Students should note that the course is continuously assessed which each term students are expected to write 1 book review, 1 essay and sit a 50 minute examination. This form of assessment has been found to be much fairer to overseas students whose first language is not English. While continuous assessment requires students to organize their studies efficiently from the very beginning of the year, we have found that a much higher proportion of our students graduate having achieved a distinction.

Commonwealth Shared Scholarship Scheme

The Commonwealth Shared Scholarship scheme (http://www.soas.ac.uk/registry/scholarships/soas-hakluyt-scholarship.html) has been extended to cover the MA Social Anthropology of Development.

Note (2). Students registered in other departments at SOAS, notably in Development Studies, must apply in writing/email to the Director of Studies for permission to take this course as part of their degree.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/masocanthdev/

Structure

Overview
The programme consists of four units in total: three units of examined taught courses and a one unit dissertation of 10,000 words.

Core Courses:
- Anthropology of Development - 15PANC090 (1.0 unit).

- Dissertation in Anthropology and Sociology - 15PANC999 (1.0 unit). This is a 10,000 word dissertation on a topic agreed with the Programme Convenor of the MA Social Anthropology of Development and the candidate’s supervisor.

- Additionally all MA Anthropology students 'audit' the course Ethnographic Research Methods during term 1 - this will not count towards your 4 units.

Foundation Course:
- Theoretical Approaches to Social Anthropology - 15PANC008 (1.0 unit). This is compulsory only for students without a previous anthropology degree.

Option Courses:
- The remaining unit(s) of your programme can be selected from the Option Courses list below.

- A total of either 1 unit of option courses (if taking Theoretical Approaches to Social Anthropology) or 2 units (if exempted from Theoretical Approaches to Social Anthropology), may be selected.

- Your 1 or 2 total units may be made up of any combination of 0.5 or 1 unit option courses.

- However, courses without a "15PANxxxx" course code are taught outside of the Anthropology Department. No more than 1 unit in total of these courses may be selected.

- Alternatively, one language course may be taken from the Faculty of Languages and Cultures.

Programme Specification

Programme Specification 2012/2013 (pdf; 134kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/masocanthdev/file39771.pdf

Employment

A postgraduate degree in the Social Anthropology of Development at SOAS develops students’ understanding of the world, other peoples’ ways of life and how society is organised with a particular focus on how anthropological approaches and debates inform the study of meanings and concepts in development, its priorities, policies and practice. Over the years the SOAS department has trained numerous leading anthropologists who have gone on to occupy lectureships and professorships throughout the world. Equally, students gain skills during their degree that transfer well to areas such as information and technology, government service, the media and tourism.

Postgraduate students leave SOAS with a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek, including analytical and critical skills; ability to gather, assess and interpret data; high level of cultural awareness; and problem-solving. A postgraduate degree is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

Read less
The SOAS LLM degree is a postgraduate qualification for those who hold an undergraduate degree in law. A specialist LLM in International Economic Law will be of interest to those who wish to focus on legal aspects of international economic activity. Read more
The SOAS LLM degree is a postgraduate qualification for those who hold an undergraduate degree in law.

A specialist LLM in International Economic Law will be of interest to those who wish to focus on legal aspects of international economic activity.

Students following the SOAS International Economic Law LLM are immersed in one of the youngest and most dynamic fields of international legal theory and practice.

The questions they confront are difficult, urgent and compelling:
- When we regulate international trade, do we sometimes do more harm than good?
- What impact do bureaucracy and corruption have on foreign investment levels?
- What might international institutions do to prevent a future global economic crisis?
- What changes are China and India bringing to international economic law?
- What is the impact of economic liberalization on labour law and social welfare ?

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/llm/llminteconlaw/

Duration: One calendar year (full-time)
Two, three of fours years (part-time, daytime only)
We recommend that part-time students have between two-and-a-half and three days a week free to pursue their course of study.

Structure

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised LLM are required to take at least three (3.0) of the four (4.0) units within their chosen specialism, including the dissertation. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (within the LLM specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The fourth unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules or the following modules associated with the International Economic Law specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information

Full Module Units (1.0):
Banking Law - 15PLAC105 (1 Unit)
Comparative Commercial Law - 15PLAC175 (1 Unit)
International and Comparative Copyright Law: Copyright in the global village - 15PLAC115 (1 Unit)
International and Comparative Corporate Law - 15PLAC116 (1 Unit)
International Commercial and Investment Arbitration - 15PLAC153 (1 Unit)
International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAC169 (1 Unit)
International Trade Law - 15PLAC120 (1 Unit)
Law and International Inequality: Critical legal analysis of political economy from colonialism to globalisation - 15PLAC131 (1 Unit)
Law of International Finance - 15PLAC135 (1 Unit)
Law of Islamic Finance - 15PLAC159 (1 Unit)
Multinational Enterprises and the Law - 15PLAC140 (1 Unit)
Law and Natural Resources - 15PLAC126 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):
EU Law in Global Context - 15PLAH051 (0.5 Unit)
Foundations of Comparative Law - 15PLAH031 (0.5 Unit)
Foundations of International Corporate Law - 15PLAH059 (0.5 Unit)

Dissertation (1.0):
The dissertation module unit forms part of the required three (3.0) units within the chosen LLM specialism. Please see the dissertation module units below. You will need to attend the teaching on the module and then submit a dissertation in place of the module method of assessment.

Banking Law - 15PLAD105 (1 Unit)
Comparative Commercial Law - 15PLAD175 (1 Unit)
International and Comparative Copyright Law: Copyright in the global village - 15PLAD115 (1 Unit)
International and Comparative Corporate Law - 15PLAD116 (1 Unit)
International Commercial and Investment Arbitration - 15PLAD153 (1 Unit)
International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAD169 (1 Unit)
International Trade Law - 15PLAD120 (1 Unit)
Law and International Inequality: Critical legal analysis of political economy from colonialism to globalisation - 15PLAD131 (1 Unit)
Law of International Finance - 15PLAD135 (1 Unit)
Law of Islamic Finance - 15PLAD159 (1 Unit)
Multinational Enterprises and the Law - 15PLAD140 (1 Unit)
Law and Natural Resources - 15PLAD126 (1 Unit)

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

Read less
This MSc programme seeks to explain state-society relations and development in Asia, Africa and (where appropriate) Latin America through the sub-disciplines of comparative political sociology and comparative/international political economy. Read more
This MSc programme seeks to explain state-society relations and development in Asia, Africa and (where appropriate) Latin America through the sub-disciplines of comparative political sociology and comparative/international political economy. Students will study the core concepts of these sub-disciplines such as: state; civil society; social closure; class; bureaucracy; patrimonialism; hegemony; late-industrialisation; product cycle; developmental state; rent-seeking; good governance; and globalization. They will also be exposed to the principal analytical perspectives of political science such as historical institutionalism, rational choice theory and Marxism. These intellectual foundations will enable students to gain a better understanding of the shaping factors behind phenomena such as: state collapse and criminalisation in Africa; cronyism in Southeast Asia and Latin America; religious fundamentalism in South Asia; economic take-off in East Asia; linguistic nationalism in Central Asia; the ‘third wave’ of democratisation; global financial instability; and the relationship between the Washington Institutions and the South. Students will also come to understand the usefulness of cross-regional comparison by seeing how the study of one region can illuminate similar issues elsewhere, despite differing cultural contexts.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/politics/programmes/mscstsocdev/

Programme Specification

Programme Specification 2012 (pdf; 214kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/politics/programmes/mscstsocdev/file51882.pdf

Teaching & Learning

Courses are taught by a combination of methods, principally lectures, tutorial classes, seminars and supervised individual study projects.

The MSc programme consists of three taught courses (corresponding to three examination papers) and a dissertation.

- Lectures

Most courses involve a 50-minute lecture as a key component with linked tutorial classes.

- Seminars

At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work. Students make full-scale presentations for each unit that they take, and are expected to write papers that often require significant independent work.

- Dissertation

A quarter of the work for the degree is given over to the writing of an adequately researched 10,000-word dissertation. Students are encouraged to take up topics which relate the study of a particular region to a body of theory.

Learning Resources

SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world.

The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

- Excellent student satisfaction for Faculty of Law and Social Sciences
The Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (LSS) at SOAS, University of London has performed extremely well according to the 2014 National Student Survey (NSS).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

Read less
The MSc Global Governance is designed to ensure that you develop an in-depth understanding of global governance and the increasingly intertwined nature of government, business and non-governmental organisations (NGO) activities. Read more
The MSc Global Governance is designed to ensure that you develop an in-depth understanding of global governance and the increasingly intertwined nature of government, business and non-governmental organisations (NGO) activities. The course focuses on debates relating to sustainable development.

It is delivered by leading academics who are experts in their field, and boasts an international teaching team who are able to share their first hand experience of cross cultural negotiation, global partnerships and new security challenges.

On completion of this postgraduate governance course, you will be well equipped for senior roles in some of the top international organisations.

See the website http://courses.southwales.ac.uk/courses/1647-msc-global-governance

What you will study

The MSc Global Governance is uniquely underpinned by the principles of the United Nations Global Compact and United Nations Principles in Responsible Management Education. The University of South Wales is a signatory of both the United Nations Global Compact and the Principles in Responsible Management Education.

You will study 180 credits in total. Modules include:

- International Human Rights Law
Study the historical development and procedural and institutional framework of human rights protection; gaining a critical awareness of both substantive and procedural aspects.

- Global Ethics
Consider current controversies in global ethics from migration, climate change to terrorism and war whilst studying this module whilst applying a range of specific concepts such as ‘human rights’ and ‘global justice’ in the process.

- Globalisation
Explore the concept of globalisation, its history and the causes of globalising process whilst addressing the different contexts in which globalisation applies such as governance, culture, economics and security.

- New Security Challenges
An introduction to the concepts and theories of security in international relations, examining security challenges such as cyberterrorism, nuclear non-proliferation and resource wars.

- Global Governance: Shared approaches to shared challenges
Gain an understanding of Global Governance and its institutions and processes set up to deal with issues that underpin the United Nations Global Compact relating to labour rights, human rights, environmental degradation and anti-corruption.

- Conducting Research
An introduction to the basics of how to conduct a small-scale research project and write a dissertation. This module will prepare you for working on your dissertation.

- Dissertation

You'll also study two of the following option modules:

- Planning for Disasters and Civil Contingencies
- Economies, Markets and Strategic Decision Making
- Global and Strategic Issues in Leadership and Management

Learning and teaching methods

We use a variety of teaching styles and assessment methods. The course is taught face to face and online through interactive workshops and simulations. You will also engage in supervised research. The course also benefits from strong links with international organisations, government and business and therefore, there will be optional study visits and special lectures at European institutions, the U.S. Embassy and private sector organisations.

If you choose to study full-time the course length is approximately 12 months.

Work Experience and Employment Prospects

There is high demand for graduates with an in-depth understanding of the intertwined activities of states, businesses and nongovernmental organisations. Global governance has particular relevance to policy makers and following graduation, you will be well prepared to enter or progress further in careers in government, international organisations, the diplomatic service, nongovernmental organisations, policy work, and the voluntary sector.

- Industry endorsements
“Today’s students need to have a perspective on critical global issues. This MSc programme provides knowledge on issues like human rights, good workplace and environmental standards and governance which are based on key United Nations norms and conventions. It is an innovative programme which I have not seen in this form at many other higher education institutions. I would recommend this to students who intend to become future organizational and business leaders.”
Jonas Haertle, Head, Principles of Responsible Management Education Secretariat, United Nations Global Compact Office

“Governance is becoming an increasingly important topic throughout many aspects of the world we live in today. It’s not any longer just the preserve of the Corporate or Banking world, it applies equally to pan continental and global organisations and agreements. The trick is to show that governance can enhance the effectiveness and efficiency of an organisation or programme and not just add a layer of bureaucracy or become ineffective because of compromise. The course content at the University of South Wales looks like a good mix of theory and practical applications that will be both interesting and fun to learn and will allow an individual to evaluate world and corporate events from a more informed standpoint."
Geoff Cousins, former Global Director of Jaguar Cars

Assessment methods

Formal examinations are not a feature of the course, each module will be typically assessed through coursework and presentations.

The supervised research project will take the form of a written report. Some modules will require you to develop podcasts as part of your assessments, which will become part of a collection of online educational resources. Full training and support will be given to ensure that you have appropriate levels of digital literacy to undertake all assessments.

Teaching

Programme Leader:
Our global governance Masters degree is led by Dr Bela Arora who has 15 years experience of lecturing in international relations. She has provided guest lectures for a wide range of organisations including the Joint Services Command and Staff College. She has also worked on consultancy projects relating to corporate social responsibility, businesses in zones of conflict and blood diamonds.

She has a strong track record in learning and teaching innovation and always ensures a high quality student experience. She has had experience of teaching on executive programmes, and MBA modules, and is committed to providing professional delivery for students looking to enhance their careers. All members of the teaching team have been recognised for their teaching experience. Our expert practitioners have been acknowledged for their first hand experience of shaping policy and professional practice at an international level.

Work and Study Placements

Students on the MSc Global Governance will have the opportunity to apply for a competitively selected funded work experience placement in another EU country.

Read less
Created by GCU in partnership with the Scottish Council for Voluntary Organisations, this first-of-its-kind, work-based programme will empower you to promote the principles of human rights. Read more

Created by GCU in partnership with the Scottish Council for Voluntary Organisations, this first-of-its-kind, work-based programme will empower you to promote the principles of human rights. Unlock your potential, as well as that of your organisation, and contribute to practical and positive change in your community.

Designed for professionals and volunteers in the voluntary and public sectors, our MSc Citizenship and Human Rights allows you to engage meaningfully with issues of citizenship, justice and globalisation – and learn how to lead the way to greater equality, social responsibility and a more participative democracy.

This programme also offers a reward for work you may already be doing (often unrecognised as being about citizenship and human rights) and accredits your skills and knowledge.

Accessible, applied and portable, this blended-learning (primarily online) programme will open new doors to a career that truly serves the common good, with opportunities to network and grow your understanding of diverse viewpoints within your workplace and beyond.

You'll take a holistic approach and learn to apply academic theory to practical outcomes – leading to better social inclusion, higher productivity, happier employees and clients and lower churn (turnover). Through the shared beliefs of the open and diverse GCU community, we'll help you build the confidence and ability to bring citizenship and human rights to the centre of your community, work and life.

What you will study

Globalisation and Migration

Through study of the globalisation of the labour market you will gain a unique insight into political and economic fluctuations, and patterns of legal and illegal human traffic worldwide. You will also learn to identify migratory patterns and their impact on diversity and community.

Leadership, Equality and Social Responsibility

Reflects upon changes within society, within which there are fewer resources and more people striving to overcome barriers such as bureaucracy, financial limitations and discrimination. Discussion over the source of new leadership who recognise the value of civic and social responsibility will take place.

Human Rights

Examines international human rights; who is right and what constitutes as a valid claim to rights? Debates over prisoner rights to vote, detention camps, asylum seeker issues and mistreatment of elderly people in care homes, amongst other topics will be discussed.

Citizenship and Practice

Promotion of rights, equality and citizenship lie at the heart of many voluntary organisations and NGO's. This module, examines individuals participating within their communities to help strengthen civil society and democracy to promote justice.

Masters Dissertation

The dissertation provides the most exciting opportunity to focus on the area of your work that most interests you and to turn it into an extended mediation that will benefit your clients and their communities.

The sequence of the modules will be dependent on a number of factors including student numbers.

Awards

Postgraduate Certificate (PgC) comprises 60 credits, a Postgraduate Diploma (PgD) comprises 120 credits and a Masters (MSc) comprises 180 credits.

Mode of study

The programme is delivered in a blended learning mode, that is, through distance learning on the universitys Virtual Learning Environment, GCU Learn, in combination with face to face seminars at GCUs city campus two or three times a year.

Work Based Learning generally describes learning while a person is employed. The learning is usually based on the needs of the individual's career and employer, and leads to nationally recognised qualifications.

In order to participate in the programme you must be aware of the following:

  • You need to be in full-time or part-time employment, to be self motivated and be capable of independent learning.
  • You need to be able to access and use a computer, for example, to receive University e-correspondence and to word process your assignments and projects for assessment.

Graduate prospects

Our graduates adopt leadership roles in a variety of fields – helping promote and develop a culture of rights, social justice and equality across industries and sectors in the UK and abroad.

With GCU's reputation for academic excellence, including our top 5% world ranking and international network in teaching and research – you'll have the tools you need to advance your career and change the world around you.



Read less

  • 1
Show 10 15 30 per page



Cookie Policy    X