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This course will examine the diverse ways in which twentieth century British history has been understood, and will offer specialist study linked to your own interests. Read more
This course will examine the diverse ways in which twentieth century British history has been understood, and will offer specialist study linked to your own interests. You will also have the opportunity to develop relevant research skills.

Why study Greater Britain in the Twentieth Century?

This degree offers flexible study, either full-time (1 year) or part-time (2 years), of key aspects of the history of Britain and Ireland in the twentieth century. It is taught by leading researchers in their fields, and students attracted to this degree pathway will benefit from the latest research and historiography. You will also have the opportunity to gain research skills in areas such as historical data basing, historical statistics and oral history.

The dissertation will provide an opportunity for you to further develop and demonstrate advanced research skills, particularly important if you are interested in doctoral study.

The MLitt in Greater Britain in the Twentieth Century is also a pathway on the MLitt in Humanities with Specialisation programme.

What's great about Greater Britain in the Twentieth Century?

As the leading History department in Scotland for research output at international standard (RAE2008 results), we offer students an unparalleled opportunity to experience teaching at the sharp end of current research scholarship. Postgraduate students participate in many aspects of our programme including our regular research seminars.

"Study at Dundee was a rewarding experience in a welcoming academic community"
Blair Smith, postgraduate student.

Who should study this course?

As well as being a research preparation degree for students who intend to proceed to a PhD, this course also caters directly for students who wish to take their first degree to a higher level of advanced study, for either career development or merely general interest.

The course starts in September each year and lasts for 12 months on a full time basis or 24 months on a part time basis.

How you will be taught

All the core teaching is conducted 5.30-7.30pm to allow attendance by part-time and full-time students alike. Other classes are scheduled for the mutual convenience of staff and students. A variety of teaching methods will be used, including: small group teaching, supervised study, seminars and presentations.

Learning methods will include oral and written presentations, as well as research essays and a dissertation. One-to-one supervision of a dissertation is designed to promote continuity in the learning experiences provided and students with the opportunity to work on a topic of their own choosing (subject to approval by the tutor).

What you will study

The course is made up of the following modules:

Approaches to the Study of Twentieth Century Britain (semester 1)
History Skills & Sources (semesters 1 & 2)
our flexible Taught History MLitt module, (semester 2)

plus a History dissertation (summer).

How you will be assessed

Assessment includes essays, skills tests, a presentation and a dissertation. Students whose dissertation fails to satisfy the examiners will be awarded the PG Diploma, provided that the taught elements of the course have been successfully completed

Careers

Students who take this course will gain a solid foundation from which they can proceed to doctoral research.

However, due to the non-vocational nature of a History degree many students also enter jobs unrelated to their course of study. For these students this course provides them with an opportunity to further develop their written presentation skills, as well as the ability to work independently and plan independent research and study.

For those wishing to use their studies more directly, for example in heritage, museum or archivist work, the job market is competitive, and the MLitt will provide students with a chance to further their knowledge and understanding of History and to demonstrate advanced research skills necessary for work in archives or heritage.

Learn more about careers related to the Humanities on our Careers Service website.

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Census data shows that Muslims are now the second largest faith community in British society. Read more
Census data shows that Muslims are now the second largest faith community in British society. Our rewarding programme delivers a comprehensive understanding of the development of Muslim communities in the UK, the current challenges they face, and an introduction to the scholarly study of Islam in a modern Western European society.

On this programme, you will gain the social science skills essential to pursue high calibre research on Islam in Britain today within our flagship Centre for the Study of Islam in the UK.

You will gain an in-depth understanding of the theoretical and conceptual vocabulary surrounding British Islam and the skills to undertake high quality research according to social sciences professional ethics codes.

Our recognised qualifications are recognised as indicators of professional competence to work with British Muslims.

Encouraged to contribute to the Centre’s highly respected Public Seminar Series, you will have ample opportunity to engage in placements and volunteer with local Muslim organisations.

You are encouraged to undertake voluntary work with Muslim communities in Cardiff in activities ranging from assisting with homework clubs run via local mosques to contributing to the Muslim Council of Wales ‘iLead’ programme which aims to support young Muslims developing leadership skills.

Distinctive features

• Gain in-depth understanding of the theoretical and conceptual vocabulary surrounding British Islam

• Develops essential skills for high quality research on Islam in Britain in accordance with codes of professional ethics in the social
sciences

• Recognised qualification indicating competence to work in a professional capacity with British Muslims

• Opportunities to engage in placements/volunteering with local Muslim organisations

• Ideal for professional development within the public sector

• Excellent resources and facilities including excellent library resources, access to a wide range of relevant journals and online sources and extensive audio-visual resources via Vimeo

• Dedicated seminar room.

Structure

The PGDip or MA can be completed in 1 year with full-time study or over 3 years with part-time study.

For the taught element of the programme you will study three core modules (60 credits) and choose a further three optional modules (60 credits).

On successful completion of the taught stage, you will progress to your dissertation if you are completing the MA. Your dissertation is an essay of up to 20,000 words on a topic of your choice (approved in consultation with your tutor).

Core modules:

Skills and Methods for Postgraduate Study
History and Development of Muslim Communities in Britain
Contemporary Debates in British Muslim Studies
Module Title: Muslims in Britain Today
Qualitative Research Methods
Social Theory and Research Design
Dissertation (MA only)

Teaching

Teaching is via lectures, small group tutorials, seminars, audio-visual resources, guest speakers, and optional placement/voluntary work.

You are encouraged to attend and contribute to our Islam UK Centre Public Lecture Series, known for bringing high-profile speakers to the region to discuss a wide range of topical research.

Assessment

You will be assessed via essays, other assignments (such as book reviews and presentations), or written exams depending on the modules chosen.

Placements

You are encouraged to undertake voluntary work with Muslim communities in Cardiff in activities ranging from assisting with homework clubs run via local mosques to contributing to the Muslim Council of Wales ‘iLead’ programme which aims to support young Muslims developing leadership skills.

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Our Masters programme in Medieval Britain and Europe draws on the expertise of our team of medieval staff at the department, all of whom contribute to the MA from their own particular specialisms and interests. Read more

About the course

Our Masters programme in Medieval Britain and Europe draws on the expertise of our team of medieval staff at the department, all of whom contribute to the MA from their own particular specialisms and interests.

In semester 1, you’ll follow a core module which discusses British society in context in the 12th–14th centuries. This is followed in semester 2 by a range of options that address, for instance, the study of peasant societies, medieval London, Matthew Paris, and Gerald of Wales.

Alongside this study, you will benefit from specialist research training in Palaeography & Diplomatic, supported by tuition in Latin.

There are also classes to help you research and write your MA dissertation, an original research project (15,000 words) undertaken by you and written over the course of the year under the close supervision of a specialist within the Department.

All our lecturers are active researchers who publish their work, and you will benefit from being taught the latest historical theories and techniques. In the most recent Research Excellence Framework (2014) assessment the university was placed in the top 50 institutions for research power and intensity. It submitted 77% of eligible staff and 95% of the university's research was of an internationally recognised standard.

Course content

Core modules:

Dissertation *
England in Context in the Long Thirteenth Century
Latin for Postgraduate Study
Medieval and Post -Medieval Palaeography and Diplomatic
Research Methods and Professional Skills in History
Texts that made the Middle Ages: advanced Latin reading for postgraduate students

Optional modules:

Working with History
Gerald of Wales
History & Identity in the Age of Magna Carta: the World of Matthew Paris

* Also available partially or entirely through the medium of Welsh

Contact time

Approximately 6 hours a week in the first two semesters. During semester three you will arrange your level of contact time with your assigned supervisor.

Assessment

The course is assessed through a diverse range of assignments, including the 15,000 word MA dissertation.

Employability

Many of our Masters graduates go on to PhD study and academic careers. Others apply their skills in heritage administration, in tourism, museums and archives, or related branches of public administration, the civil service and local government, or go on to careers in related fields such as teaching, journalism or the broadcast media.

Work placements in collaboration with the National Library of Wales, the Royal Commission on Ancient and Historic Monuments in Wales, or another of the heritage agencies based in and around Aberystwyth, are available for course credit in some schemes (please contact us for further information).

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Develop a critical understanding of the Celtic world in this interdisciplinary programme drawing on archaeological, historical, literary and mythological sources. Read more
Develop a critical understanding of the Celtic world in this interdisciplinary programme drawing on archaeological, historical, literary and mythological sources.

Studying in a modern Celtic capital with experts from Archaeology, English, History and Welsh, you are additionally well-placed to access key specialist collections and western Britain’s major Celtic sites.

You will be able to critically assess the work of others and of your own, to engage effectively in debate at an advanced level, to plan, design and carry out a coherent research strategy, and to produce detailed and coherent reports and presentations.

The wide-range of non-transferable skills acquired are a particular strength for the pursuit of careers outside of archaeology and the heritage sector.

You will develop a critical understanding of people to whom the term Celtic has been applied, from the earliest European evidence through to the historical and literary evidence of early medieval Britain.

Distinctive features:

• Detailed concentration on the Celtic world.
• Literary, historical and archaeological approaches.
• Opportunities for interdisciplinary approaches.
• Expert supervision of dissertation topics.
• You may have the opportunity to build on your existing skill-set through participation in projects and excavations.
• Specialist library facilities.
• Cardiff's location in western Britain makes it geographically central to much of the material under discussion.

Structure

You take a total of 180 credits of modules over one year (full-time) or three years (part-time) consisting of:

• core skill modules (40 credits)
• your choice of option modules (80 credits)
• dissertation (60 credits)

Following successful completion of the taught stage you will progress to the dissertation (60 credits).

For this element of the programme you research and write your 20,000 words on a subject of your choice, approved in consultation with academic staff.

Core modules:

Postgraduate Skills in Archaeology and Conservation
Skills and Methods for Postgraduate Study
Dissertation

Optional modules:

Pwnc Arbennig 1 / Special Subject 1
Pwnc Arbennig 2 / Special Subject 2
Special Period/ Topic Study 1
Special Period/ Topic Study 2
Later Prehistory of Britain
Post-Roman Britain and Ireland
The Early Celts
Celtic Mythology and Religion

Teaching

You will be taught through a mix of seminars, lectures and tutorials (depending on modules chosen).

On successful completion of the taught elements of the programme you will progress to a dissertation of up to 20,000 words on a topic or theme of your choice (subject to the approval of your supervisor).

Teaching is through the medium of English though there are many opportunities to learn Welsh.

Assessment

Taught stage assessment is via essays, presentation and coursework. As part of the programme, you will deliver presentations to your fellow MA students within our supportive community.

Career prospects

Graduates of this and similar degree programmes have embarked on careers in a range of professions from academia, the heritage sector, journalism and law to media research (media, commercial, academic), teaching and publishing. A significant number choose to continue studies at PhD level.

Recent graduate destinations include CADW, Church in Wales, Council for British Archaeology, Glamorgan Archives, Heritage Lottery Fund, National Trust, Tate Gallery, Welsh Assembly Government and a range of universities in the UK and overseas.

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Our history programme offers research opportunities in areas as diverse as medicine, death, historical demography, gender, women's history and urban culture. Read more
Our history programme offers research opportunities in areas as diverse as medicine, death, historical demography, gender, women's history and urban culture. As an MPhil or PhD student you will enjoy a research environment in which ambitious and original ideas can flourish.

Many of the research opportunities in history are interdisciplinary and are available for most periods of history and in most geographical regions.

You can find out more about MPhil and PhD supervision areas from the School of History, Classics and Archaeology. There are opportunities for joint supervision with Latin American researchers in the School of Modern Languages.

Supervision is normally available in the following subject areas:

Classical, medieval and early modern medicine

Topics include:
-Reception(s) of Hippocratic medicine and Hippocratic Oath
-History of medical ethics
-History and iconography of melancholy and psychopathology
-Medical history/historiography as an academic discipline
-Genres of medical writing
-Interface between medicine and literature, Thomas Mann and medicine
-Medicine and philosophy; medicine and law

The supervisor in this area is Dr T Rütten.

Death and burial

The history of poverty and poor relief in pre-industrial England (Professor J Boulton).

Gender, women's history and the history of sexuality

Britain (Dr H Berry); the modern Atlantic world (Dr D Paton); Greece (Dr V Hionidou).

Historical demography

The history of nutrition, famine and mortality; the history of fertility, birth control and contraception (Dr V Hionidou).

History of ideas

Revolutionary ideology in 18th and 19th century Britain and France (Dr R Hammersley); European historiography (Dr L Racaut).

History of psychiatry

Mental health and the 'asylum'; forensic psychiatry, criminal lunacy and crime; the history of the body; early modern social and cultural history of health; history of hospitals; history of sexuality; domestic/household medicine; travel and medicine (Dr J Andrews).

Early medieval Britain and Europe (Dr S Ashley, Ms A Redgate).

National identity, inter-ethnic relations and border issues

Japan (Dr M Dusinberre); North America (Dr B Houston); Russia and Ukraine (Professor D Saunders); Mexico and Cuba (Dr K Brewster); the Caribbean (Dr D Paton); Spain (Dr A Quiroga); Ireland (Dr S Ashley, Dr F Campbell); the Irish in Britain (Dr J Allen).

Politics, international relations and the impact of war

Modern British politics (Dr J Allen, Dr M Farr, Dr F Campbell); European fascism and the Nazi new order (Professor T Kirk); 20th century France (Dr M Perry); 20th century Italy (Dr C Baldoli); transwar Japan (Dr M Dusinberre); American Civil War and the United States in the 19th century (Professor S M Grant); the United States in the 20th century (Dr B Houston).

Urban history and urban culture

History of the press in early modern France (Dr L Racaut); 19th century Newcastle and the North East (Dr J Allen); 18th century urban cultures in Britain (Dr H Berry); 17th century London (Professor J Boulton); urban culture in the Habsburg Empire (Professor T Kirk).

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This postgraduate course is designed for students who wish to develop their knowledge and understanding of history across a range of periods, regions and theoretical perspectives. Read more
This postgraduate course is designed for students who wish to develop their knowledge and understanding of history across a range of periods, regions and theoretical perspectives.

The MA in History provides students with opportunities to study the subject at an advanced level. It allows students to undertake detailed study of a range of periods and processes – from Britain’s experience of warfare to the material culture of the English country house. By studying particular topics in depth, students are encouraged to think not only about the diversity of the past, but also how history itself is constructed.

Students will develop the skills necessary to understand, critique, utilise and communicate concepts and theories used within the discipline of History. They will acquire methodological skills for historical research, particularly the selection, evaluation and interpretation of primary sources.

The course comprises 120 credits of taught modules and a 60 credit dissertation. Students must take the History Research Methods module and complete a dissertation. The remainder of the programme is made up from a selection of specialist modules (normally three 30 credit modules) which reflect staff research expertise.

Course content

The MA is taught on a full time and part time basis, with the opportunity to complete in one and two years respectively. The year is split into three trimesters.

Full time students take 60 credits in each of the first two trimesters, running from September to January and February to May. They then complete their dissertation over the spring and summer trimesters, from February to September.

Part time students take 60 credits of modules in their first year (normally two 30 credit modules in each of the first two trimesters) and 60 credits of modules in their second years, plus the 60 credit dissertation.

Modules are normally fourteen weeks in duration – alternating fortnightly between evening classes on campus (typically 6pm to 9pm on a weekday) and online learning activities. Students are also encouraged to attend the History Research Seminar, which runs monthly in the evening. All students must take History Research Methods before proceeding to their dissertation.

Course modules (16/17)

-History Research Methods
-British Colonialism and Islamic Politics, c. 1800-1970
-Men at Arms: Masculinity and War in Britain, 1756-1918
-Consumption and the Country House, 1660-1830
-Exploring English Society, 1500-1750
-Medicine and Healing Through the Ages
-Violence and the Law in English Society
-Britain and the First World War
-From Privilege to Pressure: English Landed Society, 1850-1950
-Breeding Supermen: Eugenics in Britain, America and Germany
-Narrating the Nation: Rethinking Modern British History
-Dissertation
-Fascism and Anti-Fascism in Britain from 1945 to the Present Day

Methods of Learning

At Master’s level study, we aim to encourage student-led debates and exchange of ideas. Modules will typically alternate fortnightly between classes on campus and online learning activities. Each module incorporates a variety of teaching methods in class, including workshops, student presentations and discussions of primary and secondary materials (such as film, images, documentary sources and online resources). Online learning activities include online seminars, discussion boards, podcasts and blogs.

Full-time students get six hours of timetabled contact per week, part-time students will have three hours. This does not include individual tutorials or dissertation supervision.

Independent study and assessment time equate to approximately 18 hours per week full time or nine hours part time.

Schedule

One year full time or two years part time.

Assessments

Assessment is by coursework only, consisting of assessments such as essays, student presentations, book reviews and seminar portfolios.

For the award of Master’s, students must accumulate a total of 180 credits, including a 15,000 word dissertation, undertaken under the supervision of an appropriate member of the course team. A Postgraduate Certificate is awarded for 60 credits and a Postgraduate Diploma for 120 credits.

Facilities and Special Features

-Teaching takes place in evening classes, blended with online learning activities, providing a convenient programme for postgraduate learners.
-Students study a range of specialist topics in-depth with staff who are engaged in research and publication.
-Much of the teaching is centred on the use and interpretation of primary sources, giving students the opportunity to engage in active learning.

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Our History MLitt course offers you detailed investigation into the periods of history that interest you the most, together with thorough research training. Read more
Our History MLitt course offers you detailed investigation into the periods of history that interest you the most, together with thorough research training. You will gain skills in various historical approaches as well as practical skills in areas such as oral history or historical databases.

Why study History at Dundee?

This degree offers flexible study, either full-time (1 year) or part-time (2 years), in wide areas of the history of Britain, Scotland, Europe, Russia and North America. Themes range across political, cultural, military, religious, economic and social history, taught within a department of research specialists. You will also have the opportunity to gain research skills in areas such as palaeography, historical data basing, historical statistics and oral history.

The dissertation will provide an opportunity for you to develop and demonstrate advanced research skills, particularly important if you are interested in doctoral study.

Students can choose either a generic MLitt in History, or named pathways in:
Global Empires
Greater Britain in the Twentieth Century
Scottish History

The MLitt in History is also a pathway on the MLitt in Humanities with Specialisation programme.

What's so good about History at Dundee?

As the leading History department in Scotland for research output at international standard (RAE2008 results), we offer students an unparalleled opportunity to experience teaching at the sharp end of current research scholarship. Postgraduate students participate in many aspects of our programme including our regular research seminars.

"Study at Dundee was a rewarding experience in a welcoming academic community"
Blair Smith, postgraduate student.

Who should study this course?

As well as being a research preparation degree for students who intend to proceed to a PhD, this course also caters directly for students who wish to take their first degree to a higher level of advanced study, for either career development or merely general interest.

How you will be taught

The course starts in September each year and lasts for 12 months on a full time basis or 24 months on a part time basis. All the core teaching is conducted 5.30-7.30pm to allow attendance by part-time and full-time students alike. Other classes are scheduled for the mutual convenience of staff and students. Due to this a variety of teaching methods will be used, including: small group teaching, supervised study, seminars and presentations.

Learning methods will include oral and written presentations, as well as research essays and a dissertation. One-to-one supervision of a dissertation is designed to promote continuity in the learning experiences provided and students with the opportunity to work on a topic of their own choosing (subject to approval by the tutor).

What you will study

All our History MLitt degrees have a common core module (40 credits):

History Skills and Sources (semesters 1 & 2)
If you are enrolled on the general History degree, you then choose two further modules, either specialist modules:

Global Empires (semester 1)
Approaches to the Study of Twentieth Century Britain (semester 1)
Interpretations in Scottish History (semester 1)
History of the Book (semester 2)
or one or two of our flexible modules, where you choose the topic:

Taught History MLitt module, (semester 1)
Taught History MLitt module, (semester 2)
All students then complete a History dissertation (summer).

If you are enrolled on a specialist degree, then you replace the semester 1 flexible module with the relevant specialist module. Visit the course webpage for full details:

Global Empires
Greater Britain in the Twentieth Century
Scottish History

How you will be assessed

Assessment includes essays, skills tests, a presentation and a dissertation. Students whose dissertation fails to satisfy the examiners will be awarded the PG Diploma, provided that the taught elements of the course have been successfully completed.

Careers

Students who take this course will gain a solid foundation from which they can proceed to doctoral research.

However, due to the non-vocational nature of a History degree many students also enter jobs unrelated to their course of study. For these students this course provides them with an opportunity to further develop their written presentation skills, as well as the ability to work independently and plan independent research and study.

For those wishing to use their studies more directly, for example in heritage, museum or archivist work, the job market is competitive, and the MLitt will provide students with a chance to further their knowledge and understanding of History and to demonstrate advanced research skills necessary for work in archives or heritage.

Learn more about careers related to the Humanities on our Careers Service website.

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This programme offers a unrivalled range of courses that explore Scotland’s past across a broad chronological period – from the early medieval period to post-Union through to Scottish diaspora and contemporary developments – and Scotland’s place in a comparative and global context. Read more

This programme offers a unrivalled range of courses that explore Scotland’s past across a broad chronological period – from the early medieval period to post-Union through to Scottish diaspora and contemporary developments – and Scotland’s place in a comparative and global context.

The examination of Scotland’s past has been at the centre of history teaching at the University of Edinburgh since the prestigious Sir William Fraser Chair of Scottish History and Palaeography was established in 1901. You’ll have access to some of the most impressive archival collections in the UK, both within the university and nearby. Taught by one of the largest groups of specialist Scottish historians found at any UK university, Edinburgh’s Scottish History programme is world-leading.

Programme structure

You take two compulsory courses that are common to all history students,and then choose four option courses from a wide range of subjects. You will also complete an independently researched dissertation.

The compulsory courses are:

  • Historical Methodology
  • Historical Research: Skills and Sources

Option courses previously available include:

  • The Material Culture of Gender in Eighteenth Century Britain
  • Slavery in the British Atlantic World, 1650-1834
  • War and Identities in Twentieth Century Britain and Ireland
  • Propaganda in Renaissance Scotland
  • Literature and History in Early Medieval Britain and Ireland
  • The British Empire in Political Thought
  • Directed Reading & Research (PGT-Sem 1)
  • Directed Reading & Research (PGT-Sem 2)
  • Gender, Crime and Deviancy: Britain c. 1860-1960
  • Currents of Radicalism, 1776-1848
  • Scotland and Ireland, 1800 to 1945
  • Athens of the North: the Origins and Ideas of the Scottish Enlightenment
  • British Empires, 1601-1948 (ODL)
  • Maps and Mappery in Historical Research: The Case of Scotland (ODL)
  • British Politics and Policy in the Second World War (ODL)

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of this programme, you will have gained:

  • a specialised knowledge and understanding of Scottish history
  • a detailed knowledge and understanding of the central historiographical issues of this area
  • an understanding of the interaction between historical sources and explanation
  • an appreciation of the historical and historiographical context of the student's individual area of research

Career opportunities

Our students view the programme and a graduate degree from Edinburgh as an advanced qualification valued and respected by many employers. Those students interested in long-term academic careers consider the MSc as preparation for a PhD.

The combination of specialised skills training courses and seminars, and the opportunity for independent research provides you with transferable skills that will be beneficial whatever path you choose. Graduates pursue work in related areas such as museums, policy think-tanks, national and international civil services, non-governmental organisations, galleries, libraries and historic trusts whilst others build on the transferable skills gained and enter areas as diverse as business, media, public administration and marketing.



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Our MA in History at Kingston University offers an exciting and wide-ranging programme, teaching within a friendly and supportive department, and access to London's unrivalled research archives, libraries and museums. Read more
Our MA in History at Kingston University offers an exciting and wide-ranging programme, teaching within a friendly and supportive department, and access to London's unrivalled research archives, libraries and museums. Taught modules from which you can choose are built around our research expertise in 20th-century and contemporary Britain, modern international and imperial history, and the 18th century and French Revolutionary period. The course is also tailored to your interests and needs, with full- and part-time routes, and a dissertation on your own research interest.

Key features
-Taught modules built around our research expertise in 20th-century Britain, modern international and imperial history and the 18th century and French Revolutionary period.
-Benefit from London's vast range of historical centres, museums and resources, including the National Archives at nearby Kew and the British Library, and from access to cultural and policy-making figures working in the capital.
-Be taught in our friendly and supportive environment, in small groups, and with one to one supervision for your dissertation on a research project of your choice. Enjoy flexibility, with our full- and part-time routes.
-Engage with our programme of eminent visiting speakers, who give talks on their latest historical research
-Training in historical skills, such as using archives and exploring history through ICT. Also, contribute to our department's highly active history blog.

What will you study?

You will take a core module, Doing History, which ranges across historical debates, archives and digital resources. It will expose you to the latest debates within the historical profession, while also providing training in historical skills, such as using archives and exploring history through ICT. This will help equip you for your dissertation, on your chosen research topic, on which you will work one-to-one with an assigned specialist supervisor. Module assignments can be tailored to fit your research interests. You will also choose two option modules from the following three: Twentieth-Century Britain: Politics, Society and Culture; International History; and The Eighteenth Century: Revolution, Empire and Society.

We offer a wide range of events and social activities, through our student History Society, a guest speaker programme, and departmental blog: http://historyatkingston.wordpress.com/.

Assessment

Essays, written assignments, presentations, and dissertation.

Course structure

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list.

Core modules
-Doing History: Theory Methods and Practice
-Dissertation

Option modules (choose two)
-Twentieth-Century Britain: Politics, Society and Culture
-International History
-The Eighteenth Century: Revolution, Empire and Society

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This course is for you if you need to improve your English language skills and subject knowledge of history before going on to a Masters course. Read more
This course is for you if you need to improve your English language skills and subject knowledge of history before going on to a Masters course. You improve your language fluency and academic vocabulary, develop your academic skills, and gain experience of western methods of teaching and learning so that you can progress onto a relevant Masters course in our Department of History.

At Essex, you can progress onto our MA History, MA History (Cultural and Social History Pathway), MA History (Local and Regional History Pathway), or MA History (Public History Pathway).

Our International Academy offers some of the best routes for international students to enter higher education in the UK. Our innovative courses and programmes have proved very successful with international students and have also attracted UK students because of the distinctive learning environment we offer.

If you are an international student, you may find that the education system in the UK is slightly different from other countries and, sometimes, that the transition to the British system can be challenging. Our courses help you to settle in and adapt to life in the UK.

Alongside improving your academic English skills, you also gain knowledge of history and an understanding of the methods and techniques of the historical discipline.

Our Department of History has developed a strong research and teaching profile, with the majority of our research rated as ‘world leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’ (REF 2014). We provide you with opportunities to explore local history, and have strong links with the Essex Record Office, one of the best county record offices in the UK.

Our expert staff

Our staff are among world leaders in their field, and our enthusiasm for our subject is infectious. Our flexible course is combined with a supportive structure which helps you to pursue the modules best-suited to your interests.

We take the time to get to know you as an individual, welcome you into our scholarly community, and value your views.

Specialist facilities

By studying within our International Academy, you will have access to all of the facilities that the University of Essex has to offer:
-We provide computer labs for internet research; classrooms with access to PowerPoint facilities for student presentations; AV facilities for teaching and access to web-based learning materials
-Our new Student Services Hub will support you and provide information for all your needs as a student
-Our social space is stocked with hot magazines and newspapers, and provides an informal setting to meet with your lecturers, tutors and friends

You can also take advantage of our excellent history facilities:
-We have several Special Collections in history, including the Essex Society for Archaeology and History Library, the Harsnett Collection, the Hervey Benham Oral History Sound Archive, the Bensusan Collection, and the Colchester Medical Society Library
-Access the UK Data Archive, a national service provider digital resources for historians, which is particularly strong in 19th and 20th-century economic and social history
-Attend an exciting programme of events
-Access a variety of textbooks and journals in our Albert Sloman Library which houses materials on Latin America, Russia and the US that are of national significance

Example structure

-English for Academic Purposes
-Making Histories: Concepts, Themes and Sources
-Advanced English for Academic Purposes
-Critical Reading and Seminar Skills
-Extended English for Academic Purposes Project
-Public History Project Module: Bourne Mill, Colchester (From the 16th to the 21st Century) (optional)
-Gender in Early Modern England (optional)
-The Making of Modern Brazil (optional)
-Resistance and Rebellion in the World of Atlantic Slavery (optional)
-Revolutionary Encounters: China and the World, 1780-1930 (optional)
-Mapping History and Heritage in Colchester (optional)
-Supernatural and Natural Worlds in Early Modern Europe (optional)
-Life in the Three Kingdoms: Societies and cultures in early modern Britain and Ireland (optional)
-Consensus Britain? The State and the People, 1945-79 (optional)
-'The Special Relationship'? Anglo-American Relations 1850-2005
-Sex, Class and War at the Movies: Britain, 1930-2000 (optional)
-Witch-Trials in Early Modern Europe and New England (optional)
-Medicine and Society in Britain and France 1700-1860 (optional)
-Reconstructing Family, Residence, Work and Communal Life in Victorian England (optional)
-The African American Experience (optional)
-Human Rights in Historical Perspective (optional)
-South Africa: The Road to Apartheid (optional)
-Literature and the Condition of England (optional)
-Between Protection and Control: Policing Europe in the 19th and 20th Centuries (optional)
-The English Revolution (optional)
-British Social History 1830-1950 (optional)
-Crime and Punishment: England in Comparative Perspective 1650-1900 (optional)
-From Stalin to Putin (optional)
-The Tudors and Stuarts on Film (optional)
-Slavery and Plantation Societies in Latin America (optional)
-The British Empire in the Indian Ocean World, 1780-1930 (optional)
-Women, Gender and Sexuality in US History (optional)
-Metropolis: Urban Germany 1900-1945 (optional)
-The United States and the Vietnam War (optional)

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King’s is internationally recognised as a centre of excellence for the study of medieval history, with expertise in the study of Anglo-Saxon England, Britain in the central Middle Ages together with early and later medieval Europe. Read more
King’s is internationally recognised as a centre of excellence for the study of medieval history, with expertise in the study of Anglo-Saxon England, Britain in the central Middle Ages together with early and later medieval Europe.

This MA programme gives you the skills and analysis you need for medieval historical study and delving into the significant topics of the period, from Magna Carta to the history of medieval women. It will also introduce you to the burgeoning field of digital humanities through collaboration with the Centre for Computing in the Humanities (CCH) where the digital and historical worlds meet.

Key benefits

-One of the best history departments in the world, ranked 5th in the UK for Research Quality (REF 2014) and in the Top 10 departments of History in Europe (QS World University Rankings 2015).

- International centre of excellence for the study of Medieval history.

- Introduces students to the burgeoning field of digital humanities through collaboration with the King's Centre for Computing in the Humanities (CCH).

- The central London location offers students unrivalled access to world-class museums, collections, archives and libraries as well as easy access to resources in Europe.

- Vibrant research culture, including seminars and conferences at which students are encouraged to participate and give papers.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/medieval-history-ma.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

The MA programme is amongst the most successful of its kind worldwide, teaching students the skills and analysis required for medieval historical study and delving into significant topics of the period, from Magna Carta to the history of medieval women. Furthermore, the MA introduces students to the burgeoning field of the digital humanities through collaboration with the Centre for Computing in the Humanities (CCH). Staff and students also regularly contribute to and attend lectures by the multidisciplinary Centre for Late Antique and Medieval Studies (CLAMS).

The History department has traditional expertise in Anglo-Saxon England, Britain in the central Middle Ages together with early and later medieval Europe. Major research projects in medieval history currently being undertaken by MA teaching staff include the AHRC-funded online databases Prosopography of Anglo-Saxon England (PASE) and Henry III Fine Rolls, an AHRC-funded project The Making of Charlemagne’s Europe and the Leverhulme Trust funded project Profile of a Doomed Elite: The Structure of English Landed Society in 1066.

Modules on the MA in Medieval History are taught by weekly seminars where students are expected to contribute to discussion and prepare presentations. Students can also attend relevant undergraduate lecture series such as European History 400-1500 or The Making of Britain 400-1400.

- Course purpose -

To train scholars moving into academic work after completing an undergraduate degree, but also for those who want to deepen their knowledge of the period.

- Course format and assessment -

Students on the one year full-time programme attend 4-8 hours of taught classes per week, whilst students following the two year part-time MA attend 2-6 hours of taught classes per week. The compulsory 15,000 word dissertation enables students to research a topic of their choice, working one-to-one with an academic supervisor.

Career Prospects:

Leads to further research or careers in teaching, archives, the media, finance, politics and heritage industries.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 21 universities worldwide (2016/17 QS World University Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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Through our Archaeology MPhil/ you will conduct original and advanced research into a specialist area of archaeology. Read more
Through our Archaeology MPhil/ you will conduct original and advanced research into a specialist area of archaeology. This is a perfect programme to advance your academic career in archaeology; you will also develop employability skills including project management, report writing, problem-solving, independent working, and research.

Our Archaeology MPhil programme research degree, conducted as supervised independent study, assessed through a single written document that is supported with a viva voce examination.

Both degrees involve the production of new knowledge through original research and advanced scholarship, exploring a field of academic study in detail. This involves detailed understanding of the methods, techniques and approaches needed to produce such knowledge, and the wider context of the subject of study.

These programmes are based in the School of History, Classics and Archaeology and cover a wide range of specialisms. Research supervision is available in the following periods and regions:

Later Prehistory

-Mesolithic/Neolithic transition in north-west Europe
-Neolithic and Early Bronze Age of Britain and north-west Europe
-Copper and Bronze Age in Italy and the Mediterranean
-Iron Age/Roman transition

Classical Archaeology

-Roman Britain
-Roman Europe and Mediterranean
-Roman urbanism
-Greek and Byzantine archaeology
-The Roman/medieval transition

Medieval and Post-Medieval Archaeology

-Early medieval Britain and Europe
-Byzantine archaeology
-Medieval and post-medieval landscapes
-Church archaeology, historic buildings
-Post-medieval archaeology, colonialism, slavery

Thematic research is also strong at Newcastle and research supervision is available in the following areas of enquiry:

Bodies and Identity

-Personhood and identity
-The archaeology of the body and mortuary archaeology
-Art and identity

Landscapes

-Landscape archaeology
-Ritual landscapes
-Historic landscape characterisation

Material Culture

-Ancient technology and economy
-Ancient metallurgy
-Artefact analysis and material culture studies

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Research profile. The MSc by Research in Economic & Social History is aimed at students who have a specific topic of interest into which they wish to conduct their own research. Read more

Research profile

The MSc by Research in Economic & Social History is aimed at students who have a specific topic of interest into which they wish to conduct their own research.

The programme provides structured research training while at the same time enabling you to pursue a research project that you design yourself, in consultation with supervisors. It serves as both a self-contained research degree and a preparation for further study for the PhD degree.

Economic and social history addresses the historical processes underlying the evolution of modern society by employing a range of insights and approaches from the social sciences, including economics, sociology and social anthropology.

Edinburgh has a large and distinguished group of academics in this research area. Their specialist fields provide students with an outstanding range of options, both in terms of historical period and areas of the world.

Facilities

Our home is the William Robertson Wing, an A-listed building on the southern edge of Edinburgh’s Old Town, which is a UNESCO World Heritage site. Designed by the distinguished 19th-century architect Sir Robert Rowand Anderson, the building – part of the University’s Old Medical School – has recently been refurbished to an exceptional standard, providing state-of-the-art facilities for research, teaching and study.

Graduate students are able to use two further large School study and resource rooms, which are open to all staff and students. There is access to lockers equipped with laptop charging facilities as well as standard lockers.

The building is wireless enabled and includes state of the art teaching rooms, meeting rooms, a common room, a refreshment area, and open social/breakout areas.

Programme structure

The programme combines lectures, seminars, tutorials, and computer-lab sessions. The skills and theory imparted in the research-training courses, along with many of the assignments, are designed to feed directly into the final dissertation work.

You will be examined through coursework and a dissertation totalling approximately 30,000 words.

The programme focuses on civil society, material culture, youth, gender, crime, cinema, economic growth and energy policy in a variety of historical contexts.

You take four compulsory courses and complete a dissertation. Each course is assessed by essays, usually of around 2,500 words.

Compulsory courses:

Historical Research: Skills and Sources

Historical Methodology and Historiography

Economic and Social Theory for Historical Analysis

Supervised Reading Course

Option courses may include:

Culture and Society in Early Modern Britain

Material Culture of Gender in Eighteenth-Century Britain

Cinema and Society in Britain

Slavery in the Atlantic World

British at War: 1939–45

Cinema and Society in South Asia

Clothing and Culture in Comparative Historical Contexts

Career opportunities

This programme is specifically designed for students who anticipate progressing to a doctoral programme, but it can also function as excellent preparation for a wide variety of careers.



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The Cultural History pathway encourages you to investigate artefacts and ideas, material objects and mentalities, medical documents and museums, photographs and films and explore key themes that have shaped the past, including national identity, gender, race, sexuality and modernity. Read more
The Cultural History pathway encourages you to investigate artefacts and ideas, material objects and mentalities, medical documents and museums, photographs and films and explore key themes that have shaped the past, including national identity, gender, race, sexuality and modernity.

On this absorbing MA programme you’ll study one of the most exciting fields of historical inquiry; cultural history examines the culture of the time in order to understand how people made sense of the world they inhabited.

It will introduce you to the specialist research methods used by cultural historians, to ongoing historiographical and theoretical debates and to related disciplines such as cultural studies, literary studies, history of art and sociology. You will also get the opportunity to explore the area of cultural history that interests you most in your dissertation.

The MA draws together case studies from across Britain and continental Europe, the European Empires and North America from the 18th century to the present day. Taking the Cultural History MA will:

- Deepen your understanding of the cultural history of Britain and its Empire, continental Europe and North America since the 18th century
- Encourage you to think about a broad range of questions and debates in cultural history
- Allow you to engage with current debates on such themes as gender, modernity, national identity, sexuality and the politics of culture
- Give you the chance to work closely with a dynamic group of young historians and established scholars who themselves research and write about the cultural history of Britain, continental Europe and North America.

Students study two 30-credit core modules and four 15-credit research training modules, culminating in a 60-credit dissertation.

Why History?

Breadth of expertise

The interests of our staff and PhD students are extremely diverse and span the medieval, early modern and modern periods.

Their work encompasses political, social, cultural, economic, military and diplomatic history, across Europe, Africa, Asia, Australia and the Americas.

Active seminar programmes, linked to our research centres and MA programmes, enable staff and postgraduates to present their work and listen to eminent visiting speakers.

These are our on-going seminar series:

Medieval and Renaissance Studies
Eighteenth-Century Worlds
Contemporary Cultural and Social
History
International Slavery
Contemporary History and Policy
New Research (run by our postgraduate students)
Recent conferences and workshops have addressed ‘Religion in the Spanish Baroque’, ‘Text and Place in Medieval and Early Modern Europe’, ‘Re-thinking Post- Slavery’ and ‘British Nuclear Culture’.

Taught programmes that prepare you for future research

By pursuing our programmes you’ll gain the skills and knowledge you need to carry out further research towards a PhD.

Our MA programmes are taught by research-active experts who bring their knowledge of, and passion for, their subjects into the seminar room.

Teaching takes place in small-group seminars or workshops and through one-to-one tutorials, as we believe this leads to the best collaboration between students and staff.

We offer programmes in:-

Cultural History
Eighteenth-Century Worlds
International Slavery Studies
Medieval and Renaissance Studies
Twentieth-Century History
You can also pursue an MRes in History or a vocational Masters in Archives and Records Management.

Support and skills training for PhD students

As a postgraduate research student you’ll receive comprehensive skills from the Graduate School, the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences and History Department.

This will equip you with the research skills you need to successfully complete your PhD.

Our PhD programmes place a strong emphasis on independent research and study, culminating in a 100,000-word dissertation. Two supervisors (normally experts in your chosen field) who will advise and support you through the process.

Our commitment to postgraduate students

We welcome enquiries from all postgraduate students interested in studying here and will give you all the academic, practical and pastoral support we can.

Students have a voice here and are represented on the School Postgraduate Committee. There’s also a dedicated staff – student liaison committee to oversee our MA and PhD programmes.

Postgraduate studentships and bursaries are often available.

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Our Masters programme in Media History draws on the expertise of staff in both the Departments of History and Welsh History and Theatre, Film and Television Studies to provide an interdisciplinary exploration of the history of the mass media in the modern world. Read more

About the course

Our Masters programme in Media History draws on the expertise of staff in both the Departments of History and Welsh History and Theatre, Film and Television Studies to provide an interdisciplinary exploration of the history of the mass media in the modern world.

In Semester 1 you’ll follow a core module that introduces you to both the history and the historiography of the mass media (the press, film and broadcasting), and its political and social function. This is followed by a range of options in Semester 2 that address in more detail aspects of the mass media and its political, social and cultural role, in Britain and beyond.

Alongside this study, you will benefit from specialist research training tailored to your own particular research interests, with specific reference to research in visual and sound media, and in newspapers and broadcasting archives.

There are also classes to help you research and write your MA dissertation, an original research project (15,000 words) undertaken by you and written over the course of the year under the close supervision of a specialist within the Department.

All our lecturers are active researchers who publish their work, and you will benefit from being taught the latest historical theories and techniques. In the most recent Research Excellence Framework (2014) assessment the university was placed in the top 50 institutions for research power and intensity. It submitted 77% of eligible staff and 95% of the university's research was of an internationally recognised standard.

This degree will suit you:

• If you wish to interrogate historical practises at an advanced level;
• If you desire a strengthen your critical and scholarly abilities through engagement with historical sources;
• If you wish develop practical skills and gain hands-on experience in researching Media History;
• If you aim to foster transferable skills and engage in professional and personal development for entering employment.

Course content

Core modules:

Dissertation *
Media History: An Introduction
Research Methods and Professional Skills in History

Optional modules:

Broadcasting Society and Culture in the Twentieth Century
Film and Representation
From Avant Garde to Documentary
Information and Society
Political Culture in Modern Britain, Europe and the Usa
Political Power and the Media in Britain
Politics and Culture of the Cold War in Southeast Asia
Qualitative Data Collection and Analysis
Qualitative Data Collection and Analysis (1120)
Sources for Postgraduate Research in the Modern Humanities and Social Sciences
Understanding the Cold War
Working with History

* Also available partially or entirely through the medium of Welsh

Contact time

Approximately 6 hours a week in the first two semesters. During semester three you will arrange your level of contact time with your assigned supervisor.

Assessment

The course is assessed through a diverse range of assignments, including the 15,000 word MA dissertation.

Careers & Work Placements

Many of our Masters graduates go on to PhD study and academic careers. Others apply their skills in heritage administration, in tourism, museums and archives, or related branches of public administration, the civil service and local government, or go on to careers in related fields such as teaching, journalism or the broadcast media.

Work placements in collaboration with the National Library of Wales, the Royal Commission on Ancient and Historic Monuments in Wales, or another of the heritage agencies based in and around Aberystwyth, are available for course credit in some schemes (please contact us for further information).

Employability

Every element of the Aberystwyth Masters in Media History enhances your employability in both vocational and more generic work situations. Alongside the development of your subject-specific knowledge and experience as a Media Historian, an especially noteworthy strength of this course is the emphasis on personal development. Your strengthened research and critical faculties will make you a strong candidate for any post where ideas and topics need research, analysis, discussion, expansion and classification.

The University’s association with National Screen and Sound Archive of Wales (NSSAW) is a highly significant part of this course, as it will enable you to conduct a hands-on exploration of their superb collections and engage with the practical challenges of research in media archives. Practical expertise, combined with your subject-specific knowledge, will set you above your competitors upon entering the jobs market where experience is at a premium. The study skills, technical knowledge and hands-on experience of historical processes and media studies will give you a tremendous advantage in employment within the discipline.

Beyond Media History-related work contexts, employers in any industry value creativity, research, analysis and discursive skills that you will gain in this course. You will develop highly marketable skills which will, upon graduation, stand you in excellent stead for entry into the general jobs market. The organisational skills you will learn on this course will help you direct and therefore make the most of your individual flair, bringing a balance of skills that prospective employers will find attractive.

Unique Perspective on Media

This course will provide you with a rare understanding of the development of media from its roots to modern expressions. This will equip you with a unique insight on contemporary trends and developments in new media, and you will be able to contextualise modern practices in a way no-one else can. This course offers you the opportunity to develop a unique perspective and therefore an interesting voice on media matters, which will prove to be a significant strength in any future work as a professional media historian, media journalist, subject teacher, author or in role as other kinds of media professional.

Because of the nature of this course’s assessment programme, you will graduate with a wealth of experience in writing and reporting, as well as much experience in critical appraisal by others. The rigorous feedback you receive on your submissions will develop in you a thorough knowledge of the structure, conventions and development of written communications, which will, in turn, make your writing clear, accurate and authoritative.

A host of employers look for accuracy, thoroughness, an eye for detail and the ability to find and prove connections across broad subject matter, and you certainly will have proven yourself, simply by graduating from this prestigious MA course.

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