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This unique international, multi-disciplinary course will develop design managers and leaders as catalysts for strategic innovation and change. Read more

About the course

This unique international, multi-disciplinary course will develop design managers and leaders as catalysts for strategic innovation and change.

The programme comprises compulsory modules of theoretical and analytical topics in areas such as innovation, creativity, team-working and leadership. Special features include analytical design exercises, multimedia educational material, research methods, case studies, design audits and international placements.

The aim of the course is to create closer links between design and industry and to widen the horizons of design management students, enabling you to make informed reference to the world beyond design – to users, the market, new technology, economics, politics, law and the global environment.

Aims

All organisations use design, but few master its use strategically. This course provides the skills and knowledge to students wishing to enter this exciting and rewarding field of endeavour.

This innovative course was one of the first Master’s programmes - globally - that sought to explain the relationship between innovation and design and the importance of applying a strategic approach using design thinking, design methods and process.

Today we remain a unique course internationally and attract students from all over the world, from different creative and design backgrounds, both with one purpose…to become masters of design strategy.

By the time you graduate you will be equipped to:

apply thinking, design methods and process to identify opportunities for innovation and drive changes in commercial, public and/or no-for-profit organisations
explore how strategic design could be used to deliver a whole spectrum of innovation ranging from an innovative business model right through to new products/services
show expertise in your chosen specialism in exciting fields, such as social innovation
critically evaluate the relationship of design, creativity, innovation and enabling technologies
demonstrate personal initiative in addressing challenging issues relevant to industry and other organisations and /or the design profession.

Course Content

The balanced combination of critical examination and rigorous academic research and creativity is a unique characteristic of our Design Strategy and Innovation MA programme at Brunel. You will do a three-phase programme:

Phase One modules: Taught Element (September - December)

Strategic Design Management
Branding Strategy Studies
Innovation Strategy and Management
Design Research

Phase Two Modules: Taught/Tutored (January - April)

Design Innovation Futures: Seminar & Workshop Programme
Design Innovation Research Project 1
Design Innovation Research Project 2

Phase Three Module: Student-led (May - August)

Dissertation

Special Features

'Rich Design' - This is a term we use to describe the many extracurricular activities on offer for Design and Branding students at Brunel.

Brazilian week - We host an annual visit from top Brazilian designers, with joint activities organised with Brunel students. It’s an extremely exciting and rewarding experience for both our students and visitors.

Design consultancies - Many design staff at Brunel are practicing design consultants in their own right, and also work closely with several design consultancies, including Design Bridge. an international brand design agency. This has resulted not only in this company participating in Design Futures, but offering student projects, internships and also graduate employment positions.

Eminent speakers - Every year, our ‘Design Futures’ event offers students the chance to use their research to find design-based solutions to issues facing the world. Design Futures also features eminent guest speakers from all aspects of the design profession, who offer their views on the future of design and its role in meeting global challenges.

Industry and professional focus: London is arguably the most important design and creative capital in the world. Brunel Masters plays a key part in this vibrant landscape. Consequently students leave with a realistic and cutting edge set of skills and knowledge. A world renowned consultancy has praised Brunel design graduates for their ability to ‘hit the ground running’ – meaning they start work understanding modern branding and are able to immediately contribute to strategic thinking within a company.

International flavour: Our MA Design courses draw a truly international mix of students, creating a diverse pool of creative talent at Brunel that attracts employers.

Work Placements

Our students have completed placements and design audits with following major companies and corporations: Grange, Wolff DIms, British Airways, Xerox Europe, HSBC Bank, Black and Decker, IDEG and Hasbro UK.

This might explain why many of our alumni now work for some of the world’s leading consultancies including Saffron, New Edge, Design Bridge, Imagination and Seymour Powell, as well as ‘blue-chip’ companies such as Lenovo, Samsung, British Airways, The Virgin Group, Dyson and HSBC amongst others. Some like Brunel so much they elect to stay on with us for a few more years and study design research for their PhD.

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This MA prepares students from design and other creative disciplines to apply their knowledge and skills in the branding domain. Read more

About the course

This MA prepares students from design and other creative disciplines to apply their knowledge and skills in the branding domain.

The course develops your high-level skills and creative thinking, helping you learn how to clearly communicate strategies for successful brand building, futures forecasting and change management.

During the course you will also gain valuable industry insight from design and branding professionals who are part of Brunel’s extensive network of industry contacts. You will complete an individual design project, supported by personal supervision, and complete a final year dissertation on your specialist subject of choice.

Aims

All organisations use design, but few master its use strategically. This course provides the skills and knowledge to students wishing to enter this exciting and rewarding field of endeavour.

We were one of the first Masters programmes, globally, that sought to explain the relationship between branding and design and the importance of applying a strategic approach using design thinking, design methods and process. Today we remain a unique course internationally and attract students from all over the world, from different creative and design backgrounds, both with one purpose - to become masters of design strategy.

By the time you graduate you will be equipped to:

effectively apply design to create and deliver innovative brand propositions
creatively communicate brand values and deliver brand experiencein engaging and meaningful ways through a combination of tangible and intangle design
demonstrate expertise in your chosen specialism in exciting fields, such as branding for the collaborative economy
critically evaluate the roles and potential benefits of design in brand strategies
show personal initiative in addressing challenging issues that are relevant to the design industry.

Course Content

The balanced combination of critical examination and rigorous academic research and creativity is a unique characteristic of Brunel's MA programme. You will do a three-phase programme:

Phase One Modules: Taught Element (September - December)

Strategic Design Management
Branding Strategy Studies
Innovation Strategy and Management
Design Research

Phase Two Modules: Taught/Tutored (January - April)

Design and Branding Futures: Seminar & Workshop Programme
Design and Branding Research Project 1
Design and Branding Research Project 2

Phase Three Module: Student-led (May - August)

Design Dissertation

Special Features

Brazilian week - We host an annual visit from top Brazilian designers, with joint activities organised with Brunel students. It’s an extremely exciting and rewarding experience for both our students and visitors.

Eminent speakers - Every year, our ‘Design Futures’ event offers students the chance to use their research to find design-based solutions to issues facing the world. Design Futures also features eminent guest speakers from all aspects of the design profession, who offer their views on the future of design and its role in meeting global challenges.

Industry and professional focus: London is arguably the most important design and creative capital in the world. Brunel Masters plays a key part in this vibrant landscape. Consequently students leave with a realistic and cutting edge set of skills and knowledge. A world renowned consultancy has praised Brunel design graduates for their ability to ‘hit the ground running’ – meaning they start work understanding modern branding and are able to immediately contribute to strategic thinking within a company.

International flavour: Our MA Design courses draw a truly international mix of students, creating a diverse pool of creative talent at Brunel that attracts employers.

Employability

The MA Design courses at Brunel have established links with industry. Every year the MA Team run a Design Futures module, which gives students a chance to explore future trends and scenarios, and to use research in order to find design-based solutions to issues facing the world.

As part of this initiative they invite eminent guest speakers from all aspects of the design profession to come to Brunel and give the students their views of the future, and the role that design will play in meeting global challenges. Speakers in recent years have included Sir Terence Conran, Sir George Cox, Lord Michael Bichard and Wally Olins, to name a few.

The MA Design staff also work closely with several branding and innovation consultancies, for instance, Design Bridge, NewEdge and Jane Wentworth Associates. The course also has a good relationship with trade association organisations such as Design Business Association (DBA). Working closely with these organisations has resulted in student projects, internships/work placements and also graduate employment positions.

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Graduate students will find the programme of substantial use in developing their knowledge and skills base for bridge analysis, design and management. Read more

Graduate students will find the programme of substantial use in developing their knowledge and skills base for bridge analysis, design and management.

The programme also offers the opportunity for practising bridge engineers to update their knowledge of current design and assessment codes and guidelines, become familiar with developments in new techniques for the design, construction and management of bridges.

The Bridge Engineering programme encompasses a wide range of modules addressing the whole life-analysis of bridge structures from design to end-of-life.

Optional modules from some of our other study streams are also offered, covering structural engineering, geotechnical engineering, water engineering, construction management, and infrastructure engineering and management.

Graduates are highly employable and may progress to relevant specialist PhD or EngD research programmes in the field.

Programme structure

This programme is studied over either one year (full-time) or between two and five years (part-time or distance learning). It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation project.

This degree is accredited as meeting the requirements for Further Learning for a Chartered Engineer (CEng) for candidates who have already acquired an Accredited CEng (Partial) BEng(Hons) or an Accredited IEng (Full) BEng/BSc (Hons) undergraduate first degree.

Example module listing

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.

Bridge Engineering Group Modules

Structural Engineering Group Modules

Geotechnical Engineering Group Modules

Construction Management Group Modules

Infrastructure Engineering and Management Group Modules

Water and Environmental Engineering Group Modules

Dissertation

Educational aims of the programme

The programme aims to provide graduates with:

  • A comprehensive understanding of engineering mechanics for bridge analysis
  • The ability to select and apply the most appropriate analysis methodology for problems in bridge engineering including advanced and new methods
  • The ability to design bridge structures in a variety of construction materials
  • A working knowledge of the key UK and European standards and codes of practice associated with the design, analysis and construction of bridge structures and the ability to interpret and apply these to both familiar and unfamiliar problems
  • The necessary technical further learning towards fulfilling the educational base for the professional qualification of Chartered Engineer

Programme learning outcomes

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:

Knowledge and understanding

  • A knowledge and understanding of the key UK and European standards and codes of practice relating to bridge engineering
  • The ability to interpret and apply the appropriate UK and European standards and codes of practiceto bridge design for both familiar and unfamiliar situations
  • A knowledge and understanding of the construction of different types of bridge structures using different types of materials (e.g. concrete and steel)
  • A knowledge and understanding of the common and less common materials used in bridge engineering
  • A comprehensive understanding of the principles of engineering mechanics underpinning bridge engineering
  • The ability to critically evaluate bridge engineering concepts
  • The ability to apply the appropriate analysis methodologies to common bridge engineering problems as well as unfamiliar problems
  • The ability to understand the limitations of bridge analysis methods
  • A knowledge and understanding to work with information that may be uncertain or incomplete
  • A Knowledge and understanding of sustainable development related to bridges
  • The awareness of the commercial, social and environmental impacts associated with bridges
  • An awareness and ability to make general evaluations of risk associated with the design and construction of bridge structures including health and safety, environmental and commercial risk
  • A critical awareness of new developments in the field of bridge engineering

Intellectual / cognitive skills

  • The ability to tackle problems familiar or otherwise which have uncertain or incomplete data (A,B)
  • The ability to generate innovative bridge designs (B)
  • The ability to use theory or experimental research to improve design and/or analysis
  • The ability to apply fundamental knowledge to investigate new and emerging technologies
  • Synthesis and critical appraisal of the thoughts of others;

Professional practical skills

  • The awareness of professional and ethical conduct
  • A Knowledge and understanding of bridge engineering in a commercial/business context
  • Ability to use computer software to assist towards bridge analysis
  • Ability to produce a high quality report
  • Ability of carry out technical oral presentations

Key / transferable skills

  • Communicate engineering design, concepts, analysis and data in a clear and effective manner
  • Collect and analyse research data
  • Time and resource management planning

Global opportunities

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.



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The Urban Design MArch is a design-oriented and project-based programme, with a strong research component, which aims to enhance the quality of our cities by bringing innovative design into a new relationship with the latest theoretical research on the special structure of urban form. Read more
The Urban Design MArch is a design-oriented and project-based programme, with a strong research component, which aims to enhance the quality of our cities by bringing innovative design into a new relationship with the latest theoretical research on the special structure of urban form.

Degree information

The programme aims to bridge the gap between architecture and urbanism, and has a strong emphasis on physical design and radical experimentation, combined with rigorous analysis and state-of-the-art theories and methodologies. Students explore design decisions at both a strategic level and the more detailed level of urban regeneration.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four core modules (105 credits) and an urban design report (75 credits). A Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits, full-time nine months) is offered. A Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits) is offered. There are no optional modules for this programme.

Core modules
-Introduction to Urban Design Theory (15 credits)
-Design Thesis Report (30 credits)
-Technical Skills (15 credits)
-Urban Design Thesis Initial Projects (45 credits)
-Urban Design Thesis Final Project (75 credits)

Dissertation/report
The programme culminates with students undertaking a major design project, the 'Urban Design Final Project' in combination with an individual written submission, the 'Design Thesis Report'.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, workshops, case-study presentations, site visits and field trips. As a project-orientated programme, all theoretical research work and experimental design exploration culminates in physical design propositions for specific design projects. Assessment is through design portfolio, essays, oral presentations and a written design report.

Fieldwork
There is one field trip (optional) annually as part of the programme. Maximum cost to the student is £500.

Careers

UCL Bartlett graduates have been very successful in gaining subsequent employment. At present there is a growing demand for our Master's graduates from a wide range of both public and private employers. Graduates of the programme have gone on to work principally in the field of urban design, architecture and urban regeneration.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Architectural Assistant, Wilkinson Eyre Architects
-Assistant Architect, Gustafson Porter
-Graduate Consultant, Buro Happold
-Urban Designer, Publica
-Urban Designer, SOM

Employability
Study at the UCL Bartlett is enriched by the vibrant community of specialist consultants, partners and research associates who provide valuable contact with industry and academia. Many of our staff are themselves in practice. Our students benefit from the most advanced and broad suite of facilities available in any such faculty in the EU. This combination of networks, knowledge and technical expertise makes our graduates some of the most sought after in the world. Some choose to continue with academic research and others go on to roles in architecture, urban design and the built environment.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Bartlett is the UK's largest multidisciplinary built environment faculty, bringing together scientific and professional specialisms required to research, understand, design, construct and operate the buildings and urban environments of the future.

Located in London, it is at the heart of a large cluster of creative architects and engineering firms, next to the UK's seat of government and finance and has all the resources of a world city to hand.

The architecture coming out of the UCL Bartlett is characterised by a high level of invention and creativity. The school is internationally known as a centre for innovative design.

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Our. MA Graphic Design course. has been structured to promote the role of designers as skilled professional communicators, and firmly embed a culture of research and problem solving into creative practice. Read more

Our MA Graphic Design course has been structured to promote the role of designers as skilled professional communicators, and firmly embed a culture of research and problem solving into creative practice.

Our course, taught at UCA Epsom, aims to promote specialism and mastery in your own unique area of graphic design - which you'll identify and develop with us on this MA. Enabling you to produce meaningful outcomes from informed research is a top priority.

Using the extensive industry links brought by our course staff, you'll be encouraged to foster connections with industry partners within your area of specialism. With the help of visiting lecturers, industry experts and live briefs, you'll gain real-life experience of the design industry. And emphasis will be placed on how to present both yourself and your design work in a professional arena.

The industry orientation of this course is concerned with exploring graphic design languages in all their facets. You'll enhance your understanding of the aesthetic and commercial value of your work, and accrue professional experience which will add innovation to your practice.

On this course you'll taught through a range of lectures, workshops, tutorials, live pitches and presentations. We also place a strong emphasis on independent research.

Industry Partner

You'll benefit from well-established industry links with corporate, media, cultural and creative organisations.

Our course has links with:

-Design Bridge

-Pearlfisher (design group)

-FutureBrand

-The Brewery

-The BBC

-Imagine

-Bloom

-Interbrand

We also have regular guest lecturers and recent guests have included:

-Richard Williams - Founder of Williams Murray Hamm

-Tim Perkins - Group Director of Design Bridge

-Philip Carter - Founder of Carter Wong Tomlin

-Helen Healy - Picture Editor for the Guardian newspaper.

Careers

MA Graphic Design alumni go on to work in a diverse variety of exciting careers. Employment opportunities include:

-Graphic design

-Museum design

-Web or interactive design

-Picture editing

-Freelance design or illustration

-Brand design

-Packaging design

-Retail design

-Art direction

-Design management.

Virtual Media Space

Visit our Postgraduate Virtual Media Space to find out more about our courses, see what it's like to study at UCA and gain access to our campus virtual tours.



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Gain practical skills and expand your knowledge of design principles, research methodologies and theory with this postgraduate certificate. Read more

Introduction

Gain practical skills and expand your knowledge of design principles, research methodologies and theory with this postgraduate certificate. Explore visual language, typography, colour and information design through set and self-initiated projects. This course offers an intensive vocational route in the graphic design profession and is an ideal option if you need a bridge to Masters study.

Content

London College of Communication’s vocationally-focussed Postgraduate Certificate will help you to build practice-based and professional skills in the highly diverse field of design for visual communication.

Visual communication is a process by which ideas are made visible and conveyed through media to enhance meaning, experience and understanding. This one-year intensive course re-examines the relationship between design principles, research methodologies and the related theoretical contexts.

The programme is ideal for those from diverse academic backgrounds who wish to extend and develop their prior experiences through visual communication. Students on the course have previously studied subjects from molecular genetics to English, architecture to textiles, micro-biology to fine art and product design to geography. The course is a confidence-building bridge to Masters study as well as providing the foundations for professional career development.

You can expect to become part of a unique learning community made up of staff, guest speakers and fellow students from a diverse range of creative disciplines and cultures. Through tutorials, set and self-initiated projects, workshops and group discussions, you will gain a deeper understanding of the design process that will enhance your practice. Visual language and grammar, typographic hierarchy, symbol design, graphic representation, identity and information visualisation are just some of the areas you will explore.
Personal projects will provide you with a foundation in the principles of visual communication whilst engaging with postgraduate level research methods and conceptual development. Examples of personal projects include: mapping directional devices in the city; the promotion of a typeface; visual analysis of people flow and visual surveys of lettering. Graduates from this course have found employment within high profile international creative agencies, design management, teaching and professional practice. Some have established their own design studios, while others have gone on to achieve highly at Master’s level.

Structure

The Postgraduate Certificate Design for Visual Communication has three components:

Research and Development
Design Resolution
Professional and Academic Context

The course includes: visual language and grammar; typographic hierarchy; narrative and sequential design; symbol design; graphic representation; identity; information visualisation; as well as opportunities to pursue projects of individual interest.

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Gain practical skills and expand your knowledge of design principles, research methodologies and theory with this postgraduate diploma. Read more

Introduction

Gain practical skills and expand your knowledge of design principles, research methodologies and theory with this postgraduate diploma. Explore visual language, typography, colour and information design through set and self-initiated projects. This course offers an intensive vocational route in the graphic design profession and is an ideal option if you need a bridge to Masters study.

Content

Build up a strong vocational portfolio on this intensive 30 week course.

The Postgraduate Diploma Design for Visual Communication provides a unique learning experience across an intensive 30 week programme. The highly structured delivery of the first stage of the course places emphasis on the development of fundamental design skills. This is underpinned with the importance of visual research and the development of critical and analytical skills. During the second stage of the course you will choose from a wide range of postgraduate electives and go on to develop a self-initiated major project that focuses on individual interests.

The Postgraduate Diploma is designed to build design skills even if you are relatively new to the subject of graphic design. The course provides you with a strong, vocational portfolio and is also useful in building your confidence to undertake further postgraduate study at Masters level.

The course recognises that graphic design is one of the most important and influential of what has become known as the creative industries and that it contributes significantly, directly and indirectly, to our economic and cultural well being.

Structure

Phase 1 is delivered through three units. Design Resolution is an intensive series of 'hands-on' studio workshops that develop basic design skills including visual grammar, typography, structure and the grid. Research and Development breaks down the research process and encourages contextual understanding of graphic design practice. It is designed to develop understanding of research methods and to provide you with research skills that can be applied to other units on the course.

The third unit encourages you to position your work within the framework of professional and/or academic contexts.
Phase 2 is also delivered through three units beginning with options from the extensive postgraduate elective program. Typical examples might include letterpress, printmaking, sound design, photography, narrative and sequence, typologies, design and politics, moving image and book design. The final units require you to propose, research and bring to completion a substantial practical project.

The major project builds on the knowledge and skills acquired in the first stage and applies these in the creation of a self-initiated design project based on extensive research, analysis, investigation and a clear research question. The major project is supported throughout with weekly seminars and tutorials.

The course, which fits within the University credit framework, comprises: tutored study, self-directed study and access to facilities. Tutored study is generally two days a week. In addition to this you are expected to attend lectures and work independently.

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Wearable Futures is a cross-disciplinary umbrella programme for designers who are interested in the cluster of technologies and experiences that have the human body and its covering as their centre of focus. Read more
Wearable Futures is a cross-disciplinary umbrella programme for designers who are interested in the cluster of technologies and experiences that have the human body and its covering as their centre of focus.

The course offers a holistic environment based on the integration of creative computing, digital craftsmanship and material cultures, while also incorporating the technologies and advances in hardware that are impacting on manufacturing techniques and associated applications. Wearable futures has come about as part of Ravensbourne’s current commitment to become creative leader in the field of wearable applications and body-centric design. Ravensbourne's digital research culture is contributing significantly in this context.

The main conceptual framework for the course will be provided by theories of digital craftsmanship, body-centric technologies and phenomenological readings and speculative philosophy. These will form an important research foundation for building Ravensbourne’s critical reach and will assist in helping you to sift and prioritise the current trends and thought relating to fashion and discussion around the body within data informed spaces. An interdisciplinary field of study will include interaction and experience design (UX), “making” and open source culture, design innovation and applied philosophy. You will be introduced to philosophical trends and these will tie in with your practice and help you to develop a critical view incorporating design fiction and other emerging theories. You will engage with research methods such as participatory, user study and user-centered design.

"One of the exciting things about the design industries today is that boundaries of former categories such as fashion, product or experience design have been broken down" - Alexa Pollman, Subject leader, MA Wearable Futures.

The course is a platform for investigation, dissemination and analysis around contemporary theory and practice in the wearable industries. The course’s core role will be to foster your understanding of this market and to identify latent demand within the commercial sphere and to highlight future applications and directions. The aim will be to help you to influence the decision makers so that wearable solutions will be accepted and meet the cultural and ethical expectations when designing for the human body and the garment-industry. You are expected to consider the cultural and social role inherent to fashion as a part of wearable futures.

Wearable futures students will focus their investigations on the key flashpoints of the body as an interface for what is a symbiotic, physical and digital exchange. As part of the design methodology of the course, you will be asked to develop future scenarios and narratives in order to help you and your clientele to understand the concomitant social, environmental or cultural challenges of designing for a matter as delicate as the human body.

"At the moment we’re still very much in the “task” piece of wearable computing, not in the symbolic “how do we make sense of it” piece. I think in the wearable space we are still bringing all the old metaphors of computation with us and still interpreting them in a somewhat literal way—that they are a smaller smartphone, or a little computer. It will become much more interesting when we let go of that and work out the promise that wearable computing will make to us." Genevieve Bell, Anthropologist at Intel

Get to know the subject leader: Alexa Pollman

- Tell us about yourself

For me, garments are social reactors and I like to challenge the current notion of ‘wear’. I have experienced the industry from different angles: my original profession was in fashion design, but I have also worked as a creative consultant and spent my fair share of time in showrooms, for both – big and small brands.

I completed the Design Interactions Programme at the Royal College of Art, and collaborating with various disciplines has enriched my perspective as a designer.

Luckily, I have been awarded different grants that have allowed me to pursue my own work - Peut-Porter is my design consultancy agency and platform which researches and provides forecasts on wear and fashion. Currently, I am Designer in Residence at the Design Museum London and will have new work on show from September 2015.

- What's your opinion on the current state of wearable futures?

We currently find a variety of opinions on wearables and truthfully spoken, I see a lot of problems occurring with their application. This is why it is important to train specialists who can engage with the topic in a much broader sense than is currently being done by the industry. Our wearable futures students will be asked to be highly innovative but at the same time engage with the cultural and social impacts of body-centric design. We need them to bridge the gap between artisans and material or textile specialists and the tech world.

The fashion system successfully uses technology in many experience-based ways and this seems like a very natural process to me as the narrative, experience-based aspect seems inherent to fashion. Wearable futures will not only produce gadgets and devices, it will help to define our relationship to technology when it enters our personal spheres, it will look at the moral and ethical side of data-capturing as well as its technological possibilities and ask students to research and design future aspects and needs of wear.

- Is this course right for me?

This course will focus on body-centric design – a topic which is currently being explored in a massive range of disciplines. We will ask for an extremely flexible mind, someone who is eager to work with various media and collaborate with science, engineers and artists to create their own definition of wearables.

Studying an MA should allow a student to find his or her very own position, strength and reason to design. Whether their work will have a technological, experiential , future or fashion focus will in the end be very much up to what they have decided to explore in the process. We want students to become ambassadors who understand not only the technological aspects and applications of wear but the medium that they will most closely be working with – the human body.

- Why are you so passionate about this course subject?

I think the course has potential to become a wake-up call – what are we doing to ourselves and our bodies? How much more obsessed with data capturing and monitoring will we become? We can’t ignore the trends and tendencies but we need to discuss and open up the field, get some creative minds together and talk about the cultural meaning of ‘wear’ and how that can work intriguingly when paired with technology.

For me, one of the big pluses of Ravensbourne is the fact that it doesn’t have a ‘traditional’ fashion orientation but instead is very interested in the digital and technological aspects of education. I especially feel that our MA courses have a lot to offer in terms of a general interdisciplinary approach, more so because they take in a small amount of people. Designers need one another to work and explore their role and as the MA’s share the same space, we will surely see a lot of cross overs with the other courses. Also, we have had quite some interest from big industries and I think we will see some exciting collaborations happening here in the future.

Course structure

1. Technology Issues – will ask you to engage and experiment with technologies used in the body-centric design sector. The three provided project briefs will explore such fields as data-capturing, 3D Printing and alternative production methods or sensory technology. You will work with fellow students and develop quick mock-ups to understand the mediums at hand and create wear with a focus on experiences.

2. Business and Innovation – will help you understand the business and innovative practices used in the creative industries. Could your idea become a successful product and how can you find a niche to place yourself in? Wearable Technology is one of the quickest growing markets of the industry and your contribution to the field could have manifold impacts.

3. Concept & Prototyping – will allow you to develop your personal design method and introduce you to an holistic design-strategy. You will be asked to present your concepts employing various media and design speculative, narrative and plausible futures in order to challenge and understand the needs, hopes and dreams related to wearables.

4. The Research Process – will help you to investigate and strengthen your concepts and ideas by teaching you the skills and methods needed to ground you personal project in an academic context.

5. The Major Project – represents the culmination of the design work and the research you conducted in your studies. In this unit, you will forge a specialist project and work self-managed and practice-based, seek advise from specialists outside the college and present your personal take on the future of wearables.

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You can access six study streams on this Masters programme. Bridge Engineering. Construction Management. Geotechnical Engineering. Read more

You can access six study streams on this Masters programme:

  • Bridge Engineering
  • Construction Management
  • Geotechnical Engineering
  • Structural Engineering
  • Water Engineering and Environmental Engineering
  • Infrastructure Engineering and Management

As well as supporting the career development of Civil Engineering graduates, this programme provides the necessary further learning for engineers working in the construction industry who hold related first degrees such as engineering geology or construction management.

It is also designed to update the technical skills of practising engineers engaged in the planning, design, construction and operation of civil-engineering works.

Programme structure

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time / distance learning for between two to five academic years. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation.

This degree is accredited as meeting the requirements for Further Learning for a Chartered Engineer (CEng) for candidates who have already acquired an Accredited CEng (Partial) BEng(Hons) or an Accredited IEng (Full) BEng/BSc (Hons) undergraduate first degree.

Example module listing

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.

Structural Engineering Group Modules

Bridge Engineering Group Modules

Geotechnical Engineering Group Modules

Construction Management Group Modules

Infrastructure Engineering Group Modules

Water and Environmental Engineering Group Modules

Dissertation

Educational aims of the programme

  • The Civil Engineering programme aims to provide graduate engineers with:
  • Advanced capabilities and in-depth knowledge in a range of specialised aspects of civil engineering
  • It is also designed to update the technical skills of practising engineers engaged in the planning, design, construction and operation of civil engineering works and to contribute to a personal professional development programme
  • A working knowledge of some of the UK and European standards and codes of practice associated with the design, analysis and construction of civil engineering structures and the ability to interpret and apply these to both familiar and unfamiliar problems
  • The necessary further learning towards fulfilling the educational base for the professional qualification of Chartered Engineer in both a technical or non-technical capacity dependent upon module selection

Programme learning outcomes

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:

Knowledge and understanding

  • The mathematical principles necessary to underpin their education in civil engineering and to enable them to apply mathematical methods, tools and notations proficiently in the analysis and solution of multi-disciplinary open ended engineering problems
  • The properties, behaviour and use of relevant materials
  • The management techniques which may be used to achieve civil engineering objectives within that context
  • Some of the roles of management techniques and codes of practice in design
  • The principles and implementation of some advanced design and management techniques specific to civil engineering
  • Mathematical and computer models relevant to civil engineering, and an appreciation of their limitations
  • The role of the professional engineer in society, including health, safety, environmental, sustainability, ethical issues and risk assessment within civil engineering
  • The wider multidisciplinary engineering context and its underlying principles
  • Developing technologies related to civil engineering and the ability to develop an ability to synthesize and critically appraise some of them
  • The framework of relevant requirements governing engineering activities, including personnel, health, safety, and risk issues (an awareness of)
  • The advanced design processes and methodologies and the ability to adapt them in open ended situations.

Intellectual / cognitive skills

  • Analyse and solve problems
  • Think strategically
  • Synthesis of complex sets of information
  • Understand the changing nature of knowledge and practice in the management of culturally diverse construction environments
  • Select and transfer knowledge and methods from other sectors to construction-based organisation
  • Produce sound designs to meet specified requirements such as Eurocodes, deploying commercial software packages as appropriate
  • Dynthesis and critical appraisal of the thoughts of others

Professional practical skills

  • Awareness of professional and ethical conduct
  • Extract data pertinent to an unfamiliar problem, and apply its solution using computer based engineering tools where appropriate
  • Evaluate and integrate information and processes in project work
  • Present information orally to others
  • Show a capability to act decisively in a coordinated way using theory, better practice and harness this to experience
  • Use concepts and theories to make engineering judgments in the absence of complete data
  • Observe, record and interpret data using appropriate statistical methods and to present results in appropriate forms for the civil engineering industry

Key / transferable skills

  • Communicate engineering design, concepts, analysis and data in a clear and effective manner 
  • Collect and analyse research data 
  • Time and resource management planning

Global opportunities

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.



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Our Structural Engineering postgraduate programme is delivered by the Faculty’s own staff, together with practising engineers from consultancies and local authorities. Read more

Our Structural Engineering postgraduate programme is delivered by the Faculty’s own staff, together with practising engineers from consultancies and local authorities.

For practising engineers engaged in the planning, design and construction of structural engineering works, this programme provides an opportunity to update their knowledge of current design practice and to become familiar with developments in codes and methods of analysis.

You will be able to choose from a rich and varied selection of specialist structural engineering subjects. The programme is offered in the standard full-time mode, in addition to part-time and distance learning options.

Graduates from the programme are highly employable and may progress to relevant specialist PhD or EngD research programmes in the field.

Programme structure

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time or distance learning over two to five academic years. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation project.

This degree is accredited as meeting the requirements for Further Learning for a Chartered Engineer (CEng) for candidates who have already acquired an Accredited CEng (Partial) BEng (Hons) or an Accredited IEng (Full) BEng/BSc (Hons) undergraduate first degree.

Example module listing

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.

Structural Engineering Group Modules

Bridge Engineering Group Modules

Geotechnical Engineering Group Modules

Construction Management Group Modules

Infrastructure Engineering Group Modules

Water and Environmental Engineering Group Modules

Dissertation

Modes of study

Apart from the usual full-time mode, there are also part-time options. The majority of Bridge, Geotechnical and Structural Engineering modules can be studied by distance learning through the use of an interactive web-based e-learning platform (SurreyLearn).

Distance learning

This programme can be studied via distance learning, which allows a high level of flexibility and enables you to study alongside other commitments you may have. Get further information about the details of our distance learning programme.

Academic support, facilities and equipment

As part of your learning experience, you will have at your disposal a wide range of relevant software, including ANSYS, ABAQUS, DIANA, SAP 2000, Integer SuperSTRESS, LUSAS, CRISP, MATLAB, PertMaster DRACULA and VISSIM.

Educational aims of the programme

The programme aims to provide graduates with:

  • A comprehensive understanding of engineering mechanics for structural analysis
  • The ability to select and apply the most appropriate analysis methodology for problems in structural engineering including advanced and new methods
  • The ability to design structures in a variety of construction materials
  • A working knowledge of the key UK and European standards and codes of practice associated with the design, analysis and construction of civil engineering structures and the ability to interpret and apply these to both familiar and unfamiliar problems
  • The necessary technical further learning towards fulfilling the educational base for the professional qualification of Chartered Engineer.

Global opportunities

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.



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This course covers the planning, design, analysis and management frameworks of infrastructure systems. In particular, you will develop expertise in the. Read more

This course covers the planning, design, analysis and management frameworks of infrastructure systems. In particular, you will develop expertise in the:

  • Technical aspects of infrastructure engineering within a social, economic, environmental and political context
  • Factors that affect and drive infrastructure planning and funding
  • Interdependent nature of infrastructure across different sectors

You will qualify with a sound understanding of the whole life-cycle of infrastructure assets, the environmental impact of infrastructure projects, and formal asset-management techniques enabling you to maximise the benefits of infrastructure assets in the future.

The lectures given by our academic staff are complemented by visiting speakers from different infrastructure companies such as Network Rail, Thames Water, Environment Agency, Transport for London, ARUP, KPMG, etc., covering different aspect of infrastructure engineering and management. During the academic year, infrastructure specialists carry out Keynote Lectures focusing on important infrastructure projects and approaches. Past Keynote Speakers include Sir John Armitt, Sir Terry Morgan, Sir Michael Pitt, Sir David Higgins, Keith Clarke, James Stewart, Andrew Wolstenholme, Michele Dix, Humphrey Cadoux-Hudson. A number of field visits are also organised to provide an overview of real-life infrastructure operation and management. Past field visits have taken place to both the National Grid and Network Rail Control Centers.

Graduates from the programme are highly employable but have the potential to progress to relevant specialist PhD or EngD research programmes in the field.

Programme structure

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time or distance learning for between two to five academic years. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation.

Example module listing

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.

Infrastructure Engineering and Management Group Modules

Structural Engineering Group Modules

Bridge Engineering Group Modules

Geotechnical Engineering Group Modules

Construction Management Group Modules

Water and Environmental Engineering Group Modules

Wind Energy Group Modules

Dissertation

Modes of study 

Apart from the usual full-time mode, there are also part-time options. The majority of Bridge, Geotechnical and Structural Engineering modules can be studied by distance learning through the use of an interactive web-based e-learning platform (SurreyLearn).

Distance learning

This programme can be studied via distance learning, which allows a high level of flexibility and enables you to study alongside other commitments you may have. Get full information about our distance learning programme (PDF).

Academic support, facilities and equipment

Modules related to the different groups are taught by a total of 20 full or part-time members of academic staff, as well as a number of visiting lecturers from the industry and government.

In addition to the University Library and Learning Centre’s extensive resources, our excellent testing facilities can support experimentally based MSc dissertation projects. 

Educational aims of the programme

The programme aims to provide graduates with:

  • The state-of-the-art of infrastructure engineering and management that is required for the realisation of the complex delivery of new and management and of existing infrastructure.
  • A holistic overview of infrastructure as a system of systems, viewed within the social, economic and environmental context, and the drivers for sustainable infrastructure development and change.
  • A knowledge of the fundamental multi-disciplinary frameworks that can be adopted for the planning, design, management and operation of interconnected infrastructure systems.
  • A specialisation in an infrastructure area of their choice (i.e. bridge, building, geotechnical, water, wind) providing them with detailed background for the analysis and solution of specific problems associated with individual infrastructure components.

Global opportunities

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.



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Join our diverse academic community for a year of challenges and collaborations that will help you change and shape your career trajectory. Read more

About the course

Join our diverse academic community for a year of challenges and collaborations that will help you change and shape your career trajectory. Our students are driven designers, architects, visual and fine artists, performing artists, writers and others who work in the creative and cultural industries. Our faculty members are a lively mix of management specialists and creatives. All of us are passionate about doing work that has a real impact on society.

This unique programme is designed to advance your career as a solo practitioner, an entrepreneur or a member of a larger organisation within the creative economy. During the 12-month programme, you will:

- Build knowledge of business and management within the context of creative and cultural industries
- Gain new methods of learning, creating and managing to improve your career success and satisfaction – in socially responsible and meaningful ways
- Develop a diverse international network of peers, mentors and industry professionals across creative and cultural fields

The interdisciplinary MSc in Management and Entrepreneurship in the Creative Economy is built around the unique learning styles and goals of creative people like you. Designed and taught by Audencia Business School and The Glasgow School of Art’s Institute of Design Innovation (InDI), each module has been created specifically for this programme and integrates a creative mix of teaching and learning methods for both business and arts/design education.

Your programme combines the design approaches and studio (project-based) teaching methods of The Glasgow School of Art (GSA) with the internationally recognised, innovative, collaborative and responsible business education of Audencia Business School. The programme includes:

- Modules designed and taught collaboratively by faculty members at Audencia and the GSA
- Study in Nantes, France, a vibrant, modern city with old-world flair
- Two-week International Winter School in the inspirational Scottish Highlands
- Real-world consulting or research project
- Optional internship in a creative industry
- Collaborative and creative live projects both online and offline, studio (project-based) work and more

Audencia and the Glasgow School of Art

Rather than putting pre-existing management and creative classes on a schedule to form a so-called “new” programme, Audencia and the GSA’s Institute of Design Innovation have jointly designed a customised programme of classes and projects that respond to emerging trends, circumstances and opportunities within the global creative economy.

Every aspect of the programme combines learning in business and management with creative processes and people. The programme is located in Nantes, France, but the GSA faculty members teach one-third of the classes – and the two-week International Winter School, which brings international design schools together in Scotland, is a highlight of the programme.

Taught by Audencia

Shaping a creative career:

Shaping a creative career is an ongoing process which requires the will and ability to keep learning and re-skilling, a good knowledge of yourself and your values and a set of practical tools that will help to enhance your career. This module will mark the start of your journey to design a creative career that is sustainable, enjoyable and fulfilling.

Mapping the creative economy:

Learn what it really means to be a part of the creative economy. Mapping the Creative Economy offers an overview of the development of the cultural and creative industries and their relationship to the creative economy. You’ll learn about important challenges the industries face, such as technological, legal and economic – and the policies adopted to meet those challenges.

Reimagining management:

This module covers the following topics:

- Critical understanding of management
- Management of creativity and innovation
- Sustainable future

From idea to action: starting up:

Building skills to act as bridge between the worlds of creativity and business, you’ll work on a real-life collaborative project where you and your peers will be faced with design, managerial and entrepreneurial challenges.

You’ll learn by doing – working together with a diverse group of students, industry professionals and academic staff.

This experiential work will serve to further develop your career project, as well as help you internalise core entrepreneurial skills and knowledge in an authentic way. Here, you can make mistakes and learn from them in a safe environment.

Creating value in the creative economy:

To have knowledge is a good thing – but to spread it is even more rewarding. During this period, you will be asked to increase societal awareness of the possibilities within the creative economy. How you communicate your knowledge about the creative economy is up to you: conference, digital project, charity work, radio programme, etc. Get creative and begin establishing yourself as a subject-matter expert.

Teaching Methods

A variety of teaching methods are used for the above modules including:

Lectures
Seminars
Workshops
Coaching sessions
Personal blog/vlog
Learning journal
Visits to creative organisations
Group presentations
Debates
Case studies, videos, articles and academic papers
Data visualising techniques

For more information about the course content taught by Audencia please visit the website below

http://master.audencia.com/programmes-english/management-entrepreneurship-in-the-creative-economy/

Taught by GSA

Designing today:

Designing Today will help you develop a critical appreciation of the role of design practice and of designers as drivers of social, economic and organisational change. Your final project will be an exhibition. Topics include:

- Exploring service design and organisational design tools and methods
- Seeing social interaction as value creation
- Considering the contemporary role of designers in the area of management: industrial, experience and knowledge economies
- Understanding design not simply as the manufacture of industrial artefacts, but as an activity that creates value

Designing research:

Within Designing Research, you’ll develop an understanding of user-centred design as an ethnographic and engagement-led process of iterative development built upon collaborative working practices and creative refinement and resolution that responds to a variety of contexts. You’ll be evaluated via a project process journal and reflective writing. Components include:

- Formulating design enquiries (open-ended, empirically validated and discursive) that create the possibility of new knowledge and innovative practices or behaviours
- Methods: critical observation, ethnography, STEP analysis, future casting
- Participation in InDI’s two-week International Winter School to gain international, multi-disciplinary teaching and learning experience and develop a personal and professional network of practitioners, researchers and scholars

From idea to application:

From Idea to Application will help you internalise design practice as the material manifestation and evolution of value propositions. You’ll move from collaborative concept generation to product proposal, refinement and validation as understood across a variety of value regimes: manufacture and supply chain, branding and communication, user experience, etc.

The focus will be on the blend of industrial and digital artefacts, experience of use and the cognitive and narrative dimensions of innovative products and their collaborative production.

You’ll be evaluated through a project presentation and exhibition.

International winter school:

Led by the Institute of Design Innovation, the Winter School is an exemplar of our progressive teaching style and offers a method of research and learning that is both bespoke and distinct. The Winter School brings together international students and academics to fashion a new role for design in the exploration of a contemporary challenge during an intense two-week period.

Leading design academics and students from Köln International School of Design (KISD) and Copenhagen’s KADK (The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, Schools of Architecture, Design and Conservation) will join students and academics of the GSA, Audencia and other institutions from around the globe, forming an international network of diverse disciplines.

This component of the course offers a unique opportunity to examine current issues in a transcultural environment at the GSA’s stunning new campus in the Highlands and Islands of Scotland. Research and teaching carried out during the Winter School benefit organisations and communities as well as students.

Company experience

Research or consulting project

Your project is the culmination of your programme experience and the most ambitious expression of your individual motivation, creativity and ability to deliver. It can take the shape of a research project or a consulting project done during an optional internship. You will conduct secondary research, but great value will also be placed on your own primary research efforts.

For more information regarding the project please visit the website by clicking the link below

http://master.audencia.com/programmes-english/management-entrepreneurship-in-the-creative-economy/

Optional Internship

This component of the program is not required. However, we will encourage and support you in finding an internship that corresponds to your personal creative project and helps you shape your creative career.

Creative culture

The MSc in Management and Entrepreneurship in the Creative Economy is an alternative to an MBA or MFA programme. It offers you a uniquely creative culture with a degree from a respected and socially responsible business and management school.

Student profile

The students who will join this programme:

- Are creative people who are passionate about their area of expertise
- Want to explore fields in creative and cultural industries
- Love working with people from all over the world
- Know collaboration will be across fields and disciplines
- Understand the importance of business and management to the creative and cultural industries
- Are motivated by the ability of the creative and cultural industries to improve people's lives

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The new MRes (Masters of Research) in Healthcare & Design is an interdisciplinary programme that draws on the complementary knowledge and expertise of Imperial College London and the Royal College of Art. Read more

The new MRes (Masters of Research) in Healthcare & Design is an interdisciplinary programme that draws on the complementary knowledge and expertise of Imperial College London and the Royal College of Art.

The programme aims to equip candidates from a wide range of academic and professional practice backgrounds with the tools and techniques to instigate and lead design innovations in a broad range of healthcare environments. Teaching takes place in the RCA and St Mary’s Hospital with a course that is particularly well tailored to those who aim to study alongside employment with eight intensive modules delivered in ‘burst mode’ (four per year in two 2-week blocks) and a supervised major personal design research project. The teaching is delivered in a mix of lectures and practical workshops in group and individual projects where designers, healthcare professionals and clinicians work together often in group based activities to enhance knowledge exchange.

Contexts for healthcare innovation are broad ranging from the physical and psychological to surgery, recuperation and recovery, therapy, transport, services and software. We expect outputs from this course to be implementable in the healthcare industry ranging from product and technology innovations through to software solutions, spatial and architectural to new experience and service designs.

The course builds on the longstanding partnerships between the RCA and Imperial College in developing joint courses since the 1980s. The Helen Hamlyn Centre for design has delivered over 150 healthcare and user centred projects while the Helix Centre at St Mary’s Hospital is the first design studio in a clinical setting and brings designers and clinicians together for the first time to solve healthcare challenges using lean innovation strategy. A key objective of the Helix Centre is to catalyse more innovative approaches to healthcare service delivery with better design and planning, more efficient use of resources and greater focus on patient need. The programme runs in parallel with the MSc in Healthcare Innovation at Imperial sharing aspects of course content in a way that is deliberately designed to bridge the gap between design-driven innovation and the healthcare context. This unique body of expertise feeds back into the MRes programme though teaching, supervision and mentoring.

The programme offers:

  • The opportunity to develop an awareness of the role and value of design in solving healthcare challenges
  • A multi-professional perspective on problem-solving and the importance of clinical/design team collaboration
  • An awareness of the UK health system and the systemic challenges it faces to remain sustainable
  • An environment in which to develop the design led innovation skills to rapidly research, synthesise and prototype a solution to a healthcare challenge
  • The opportunity to work alongside a world-class faculty, who can provide knowledge-based learning and encourage critical awareness of current issues
  • A range of research techniques, tools and frameworks for use in the fields of design and innovation

PLEASE NOTE: Due to UK Visas and Immigration Service visa restrictions on part-time courses, we are only able to offer places for UK Home/EU applicants. International applicants are currently not eligible.



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The master of science degree in game design and development explores the entertainment technology landscape, along with other related areas of software development. Read more

Program overview

The master of science degree in game design and development explores the entertainment technology landscape, along with other related areas of software development. The program has its technical roots in the computing and information science disciplines, while simultaneously covering the breadth of the game development field through course work in topics such as computer graphics, game engines, interactive narrative, and game design. The degree is specifically for students who aspire to careers within the professional gaming industry or a related field such as simulation, edutainment, or visualization.

This is a two-year, on-campus, cohort-based program in which students are admitted through a portfolio review process. During the second year, students form development teams that construct a working game engine and software title as the program capstone experience. This requirement includes both individual and group expectations. The capstone culminates in a defense before program faculty, as well as a public exhibition. Combined, these requirements provide a unique and comprehensive educational experience for individuals who aspire to a career in the game development industry.

Plan of study

The program's curriculum consists of required courses, a choice of five advanced electives, and a capstone experience.

Capstone experience

During the second year, students complete a team-based capstone experience where students present and defend their work. This presentation includes a faculty review, which constitutes the capstone defense, a public presentation, and a demonstration.

Curriculum

Game design and development, MS degree, typical course sequence:
First Year
-Game Development Processes
-Game Design
-Gameplay and Prototyping
-Colloquium in Game Design and Development
-Game Industry Themes and Perspectives
-Advanced Electives
Second Year
-Capstone Design
-Advanced Electives
-Game Industry Themes and Perspectives
-Capstone Development

See website for further details of available electives: https://www.rit.edu/programs/game-design-and-development-ms

Other admission requirements

-Submission of a portfolio and/or scores from the Graduate Record Exam (GRE) is required. If you choose to submit a portfolio it should include evidence of individual and group projects (clearly marked as such) relevant to the area you wish to study within the degree program.
-Complete a graduate application.
-International applicants whose native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). A minimum score of 570 (paper-based) or 88 (Internet-based) is required. International applicants also are required to submit scores from the Graduate Record Exam (GRE).

Due to the cohort nature of the program, students are admitted in the fall semester only. Admission to the program is highly competitive. While GRE scores are not required for domestic students, students may submit scores to strengthen their application. Those applicants with a GPA below 3.25 are required to submit GRE scores.

Additional information

Prerequisites:
Students are expected to have at least one year of significant programming experience in a current object-oriented language—preferably C++ or Java—and a solid working knowledge of website development and interactive multimedia concepts. If students do not have these prerequisites, additional course work may be recommended to bridge any educational gaps.

Maximum time limit:
University policy requires that graduate programs be completed within seven years of the student's initial registration for courses in the program. Bridge courses are excluded.

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This MRes is a research-oriented programme which offers greater independence of learning and increased specialism to those intending to undertake extensive research (e.g. Read more
This MRes is a research-oriented programme which offers greater independence of learning and increased specialism to those intending to undertake extensive research (e.g. a PhD) or mid-career professionals who are seeking new direction or wishing to concentrate on a particular field of study within their current place of employment (such as in environmental or urban design consultancy).

Degree information

Alongside initial training by world-leaders in space syntax research, students will be able to specialise in one of several streams: buildings and organisations; urban, suburban, planned and unplanned settlements; spatial modelling and evidence-based architectural and urban design. If desired, students will be able to develop a research project relevant to the research interests of their company or practice.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four core modules (75 credits), one optional module (15 credits) and a dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules
-Principles of Analytical Design
-Design as a Knowledge-Based Process
-Communication Skills
-Spatial Cultures

Optional modules
You will choose one of the following:
-Spatial Justice
-Architectural Phenomena

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of seminars, lectures, tutorials, field work, independent project work and workshops. Assessment is through coursework, written and take-home examinations, projects, dissertation and presentation.

Careers

Some graduates of this programme are likely to employ their transferable skills and enter the specialism for the first time, others return to their workplace with fresh focus or they may specialise in the burgeoning spheres of expertise that this research field has developed in recent years.

First destinations of recent graduates of this programme and its sister programme Spatial Design: Architecture and Cities MSc include: CABE, Foster and Partners, Aecom, Arup, Qatar Foundation, Cube Design, Portland Design Associates, Levitt Bernstein, Paul Drew Design, Manu Chugh Architects, Buro Happold, Space Lab and Space Syntax Limited, as well as various academic or research positions at prestigious international universities or research centres.

Employability
This programme enhances students' abilities in the fields of evidence-based architectural and urban design, strategic planning and design, urban regeneration, architectural and urban morphology, spatial and network analysis, future and smart cities and transport planning. Graduates can be involved in both professional and academic activities. If for those who go into practice, the programme provides in cutting-edge at evidence-informed and research-based design; graduates who choose an academic path will have the advanced knowledge and skills, which are required for high-level academic jobs. In reality, many graduates will be selected for jobs that bridge the two disciplines.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Bartlett is the UK's largest multidisciplinary built environment faculty, bringing together all aspects of professional specialisms required to research, understand, design, construct and operate the buildings and urban environments of the future.

Students on this programme will benefit from teaching from UCL Bartlett's Space Syntax Laboratory, one of the world's leading architectural/urban research groups and from Space Syntax Limited, an architectural and urban design consultancy that applies space syntax theories and methods in practice on internationally renowned projects.

This programme helps transform students careers by enhancing their fundamental knowledge, skills and capabilities of dealing with the built environment, making them highly employable for the institutions and companies that need world-class thinkers, designers, and researchers.

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