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Graduate students will find the programme of substantial use in developing their knowledge and skills base for bridge analysis, design and management. Read more

Graduate students will find the programme of substantial use in developing their knowledge and skills base for bridge analysis, design and management.

The programme also offers the opportunity for practising bridge engineers to update their knowledge of current design and assessment codes and guidelines, become familiar with developments in new techniques for the design, construction and management of bridges.

The Bridge Engineering programme encompasses a wide range of modules addressing the whole life-analysis of bridge structures from design to end-of-life.

Optional modules from some of our other study streams are also offered, covering structural engineering, geotechnical engineering, water engineering, construction management, and infrastructure engineering and management.

Graduates are highly employable and may progress to relevant specialist PhD or EngD research programmes in the field.

Programme structure

This programme is studied over either one year (full-time) or between two and five years (part-time or distance learning). It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation project.

This degree is accredited as meeting the requirements for Further Learning for a Chartered Engineer (CEng) for candidates who have already acquired an Accredited CEng (Partial) BEng(Hons) or an Accredited IEng (Full) BEng/BSc (Hons) undergraduate first degree.

Example module listing

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.

Bridge Engineering Group Modules

Structural Engineering Group Modules

Geotechnical Engineering Group Modules

Construction Management Group Modules

Infrastructure Engineering and Management Group Modules

Water and Environmental Engineering Group Modules

Dissertation

Educational aims of the programme

The programme aims to provide graduates with:

  • A comprehensive understanding of engineering mechanics for bridge analysis
  • The ability to select and apply the most appropriate analysis methodology for problems in bridge engineering including advanced and new methods
  • The ability to design bridge structures in a variety of construction materials
  • A working knowledge of the key UK and European standards and codes of practice associated with the design, analysis and construction of bridge structures and the ability to interpret and apply these to both familiar and unfamiliar problems
  • The necessary technical further learning towards fulfilling the educational base for the professional qualification of Chartered Engineer

Programme learning outcomes

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:

Knowledge and understanding

  • A knowledge and understanding of the key UK and European standards and codes of practice relating to bridge engineering
  • The ability to interpret and apply the appropriate UK and European standards and codes of practiceto bridge design for both familiar and unfamiliar situations
  • A knowledge and understanding of the construction of different types of bridge structures using different types of materials (e.g. concrete and steel)
  • A knowledge and understanding of the common and less common materials used in bridge engineering
  • A comprehensive understanding of the principles of engineering mechanics underpinning bridge engineering
  • The ability to critically evaluate bridge engineering concepts
  • The ability to apply the appropriate analysis methodologies to common bridge engineering problems as well as unfamiliar problems
  • The ability to understand the limitations of bridge analysis methods
  • A knowledge and understanding to work with information that may be uncertain or incomplete
  • A Knowledge and understanding of sustainable development related to bridges
  • The awareness of the commercial, social and environmental impacts associated with bridges
  • An awareness and ability to make general evaluations of risk associated with the design and construction of bridge structures including health and safety, environmental and commercial risk
  • A critical awareness of new developments in the field of bridge engineering

Intellectual / cognitive skills

  • The ability to tackle problems familiar or otherwise which have uncertain or incomplete data (A,B)
  • The ability to generate innovative bridge designs (B)
  • The ability to use theory or experimental research to improve design and/or analysis
  • The ability to apply fundamental knowledge to investigate new and emerging technologies
  • Synthesis and critical appraisal of the thoughts of others;

Professional practical skills

  • The awareness of professional and ethical conduct
  • A Knowledge and understanding of bridge engineering in a commercial/business context
  • Ability to use computer software to assist towards bridge analysis
  • Ability to produce a high quality report
  • Ability of carry out technical oral presentations

Key / transferable skills

  • Communicate engineering design, concepts, analysis and data in a clear and effective manner
  • Collect and analyse research data
  • Time and resource management planning

Global opportunities

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.



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The computer science program is designed for students who have an undergraduate degree (or minor) in computer science, as well as those who have a strong background in a field in which computers are applied, such as engineering, science, or business. Read more

Program overview

The computer science program is designed for students who have an undergraduate degree (or minor) in computer science, as well as those who have a strong background in a field in which computers are applied, such as engineering, science, or business.

The degree is offered on a full- or part-time basis. Courses are generally offered in the afternoons and evenings to accommodate part-time students. Full-time students take three or four courses per semester and may be able to complete the course work in three semesters. Full-time students who are required to take additional bridge courses may be able to complete the course work in four semesters. Part-time students take one or two courses per semester and may be able to complete the course work in four to five semesters. The time required to complete a master's project is one semester, but can vary according to the student and the scope of the topic. Two semesters is typical.

Plan of study

The program consists of 30 credit hours of course work, which includes either a thesis or a project. Students complete one core course, three courses in a cluster, four electives, and a thesis. For those choosing to complete a project in place of a thesis, students complete one additional elective.

Clusters

Students select three cluster courses from the following areas (see website for individual area information):
-Computer graphics and visualization
-Data management
-Distributed systems
-Intelligent systems
-Languages and tools
-Security
-Theory

Electives

Electives provide breadth of experience in computer science and applications areas. Students who wish to include courses from departments outside of computer science need prior approval from the graduate program director. Refer to the course descriptions in the departments of computer science, engineering, mathematical sciences, and imaging science for possible elective courses.

Master's thesis/project

Students may choose the thesis or project option as the capstone to the program. Students who choose the project option must register for the Project course (CSCI-788). Students participate in required in-class presentations that are critiqued. A summary project report and public presentation of the student's project (in poster form) occurs at the end of the semester.

Curriculum

Thesis/project options differ in course sequence, see the website for a particular option's modules and a particular cluster's modules.

Other admission requirements

-Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work.
-Submit scores from the Graduate Record Exam.
-Have a minimum grade point average of 3.0 (B), and complete a graduate application.
-International applicants, whose native language is not English, must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language. A minimum score of 570 (paper-based) or 88 (Internet-based) is required.
-Applicants must satisfy prerequisite requirements in mathematics (differential and integral calculus, probability and statistics, discrete mathematics, and computer science theory) and computing (experience with a modern high-level language [e.g., C++, Java], data structures, software design methodology, introductory computer architecture, operating systems, and programming language concepts).

Additional information

Bridge courses:
If an applicant lacks any prerequisites, bridge courses may be recommended to provide students with the required knowledge and skills needed for the program. If any bridge courses are indicated in a student's plan of study, the student may be admitted to the program on the condition that they successfully complete the recommended bridge courses with a grade of B (3.0) or better (courses with lower grades must be repeated). Generally, formal acceptance into the program is deferred until the applicant has made significant progress in this additional course work. Bridge program courses are not counted as part of the 30 credit hours required for the master's degree. During orientation, bridge exams are conducted. These exams are the equivalent to the finals of the bridge courses. Bridge courses will be waived if the exams are passed.

Faculty:
Faculty members in the department are actively engaged in research in the areas of artificial intelligence, computer networking, pattern recognition, computer vision, graphics, visualization, data management, theory, and distributed computing systems. There are many opportunities for graduate students to participate in these activities toward thesis or project work and independent study.

Facilities:
The computer science department provides extensive facilities that represent current technology, including:
-A graduate lab with more than 15 Mac’s and a graduate library.
-Specialized labs in graphics, computer vision, pattern recognition, security, database, and robotics.
-Six general purpose computing labs with more than 100 workstations running Linux, Windows, and OS X; plus campus-wide wireless access.

Maximum time limit:
University policy requires that graduate programs be completed within seven years of the student's initial registration for courses in the program. Bridge courses are excluded.

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Developers of computing systems and practitioners in all computing disciplines need an understanding of the critical importance of building security and survivability into the hardware and software of computing systems they design, rather than trying to add it on once these systems have been designed, developed, and installed. Read more

Program overview

Developers of computing systems and practitioners in all computing disciplines need an understanding of the critical importance of building security and survivability into the hardware and software of computing systems they design, rather than trying to add it on once these systems have been designed, developed, and installed.

The MS in computing security gives students an understanding of the technological and ethical roles of computing security in today's society and its importance across the breadth of computing disciplines. Students can develop a specialization in one of several security-related areas by selecting technical electives under the guidance of a faculty adviser. The program enables students to develop a strong theoretical and practical foundation in secure computing, preparing them for leadership positions in both the private and public sectors of the computing security industry, for academic or research careers in computing security, or to pursue a more advanced degree in a computing discipline.

Plan of study

The program is designed for students who have an undergraduate computing degree in an area such as computing security, computer science, information technology, networking, or software engineering, as well as those who have a strong background in a field in which computers are applied, such as computer or electrical engineering. The curriculum consists of three required core courses, up to 6 technical electives (depending on the capstone option chosen), and a capstone thesis, project, or capstone course for a total of 30 semester credit hours.

Electives

Students are required to choose up to six technical electives, from:
-Advanced Computer Forensics
-Web Server and Application Security Audits
-Mobile Device Forensics
-Information Security Risk Management
-Sensor and SCADA Security
-Computer System Security
-Computer Viruses and Malicious Software
-Network Security
-Covert Communications
-Information Security Policy and Law
-Information Assurance Fundamentals
-Secure Data Management
-Secure Coding
-Foundations of Cryptography
-Foundations of Security Measurement and Evaluation
-Foundations of Intelligent Security Systems
-Advanced Cryptography
-Hardware and Software Design for Cryptographic Applications

Curriculum

Thesis/project/capstone course options differ in course sequence, see the website for a particular course's module information.

Other admission requirements

-Have a minimum grade point average equivalent to a 3.0/4.0.
-Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work.
-Submit a minimum of two recommendations from individuals who are well-qualified to assess the applicant's potential for success, and complete a graduate application.
-International applicants whose native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language. Minimum scores of 570 (paper-based) or 88 (Internet-based) are required. Applicants who have completed undergraduate study at foreign universities must submit Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores. GRE scores are also recommended for applicants whose undergraduate GPA is below 3.0.
-Applicants must satisfy prerequisite requirements in mathematics (integral calculus, discrete mathematics), statistics, natural sciences (physics, chemistry, etc.), and computing (programming, computer networking theory and practice, and systems administration theory and practice).

Bridge program

Students whose undergraduate preparation or employment experience does not satisfy the prerequisites required for the program may make up deficiencies through additional study. Bridge course work, designed to close gaps in a student's preparation, can be completed either before or after enrolling in the program as advised by the graduate program director. Generally, formal acceptance into the program is deferred until the applicant has made significant progress through this additional preparation.

If completed through academic study, bridge courses must be completed with a grade of B (3.0) or better. Courses with lower grades must be repeated. Bridge courses are not counted toward the 30 credit hours required for the master's degree. However, grades earned from bridge courses taken at RIT are included in a student's graduate grade point average. A bridge program can be designed in different ways. Courses may be substituted based upon availability, and courses at other colleges may be applied. All bridge course work must be approved in advance by the graduate program director.

Additional information

Study options:
Students may pursue the degree on a full-time basis, on-campus only.

Faculty:
The program faculty are actively engaged in consulting and research in various areas of secure computing and information assurance, such as cryptography, databases, networking, secure software development, and critical infrastructure security. There are opportunities for students to participate in research activities towards capstone completion or as independent study work.

Maximum time limit:
University policy requires that graduate programs be completed within seven years of the student's initial registration for courses in the program. Bridge courses are excluded.

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USF offers a three-year MS in Computer Science Bridge program that provides a unique opportunity for motivated students from a non-computer science background to pursue a Master's in Computer Science. Read more
USF offers a three-year MS in Computer Science Bridge program that provides a unique opportunity for motivated students from a non-computer science background to pursue a Master's in Computer Science. Students who successfully complete the first year of preparatory classes then continue in the standard two-year MS in Computer Science program.

Real-World Experience - By completing an internship at a technology company, working on a faculty research project, or contributing to an open-source project, the practicum course helps students gain real world experience.

San Francisco Advantage - Located in the heart of San Francisco and close to Silicon Valley, which boasts more tech companies than any other region in the US.

Faculty - Comprising of distinguished researchers and accomplished experts from the Bay Area’s tech companies, the MSCS faculty bring real world computing experience into the classroom.

Small Classes - Close interaction with full-time faculty is a hallmark of the program. Our cohort model enhances the experience during our students’ first year, allowing them to take core courses at the same time.

International Students - may be eligible to work for 36 months in the U.S. after completion of the MSCS program via the OPT program and STEM extension.

Who Can Apply?

Applicants with basic introductory programming background in variables, control structures, structured data types, and functions are eligible to apply. These prerequisites can be completed through introductory programming courses at a local community college, university, online, or through self-study.

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This course covers the planning, design, analysis and management frameworks of infrastructure systems. In particular, you will develop expertise in the. Read more

This course covers the planning, design, analysis and management frameworks of infrastructure systems. In particular, you will develop expertise in the:

  • Technical aspects of infrastructure engineering within a social, economic, environmental and political context
  • Factors that affect and drive infrastructure planning and funding
  • Interdependent nature of infrastructure across different sectors

You will qualify with a sound understanding of the whole life-cycle of infrastructure assets, the environmental impact of infrastructure projects, and formal asset-management techniques enabling you to maximise the benefits of infrastructure assets in the future.

The lectures given by our academic staff are complemented by visiting speakers from different infrastructure companies such as Network Rail, Thames Water, Environment Agency, Transport for London, ARUP, KPMG, etc., covering different aspect of infrastructure engineering and management. During the academic year, infrastructure specialists carry out Keynote Lectures focusing on important infrastructure projects and approaches. Past Keynote Speakers include Sir John Armitt, Sir Terry Morgan, Sir Michael Pitt, Sir David Higgins, Keith Clarke, James Stewart, Andrew Wolstenholme, Michele Dix, Humphrey Cadoux-Hudson. A number of field visits are also organised to provide an overview of real-life infrastructure operation and management. Past field visits have taken place to both the National Grid and Network Rail Control Centers.

Graduates from the programme are highly employable but have the potential to progress to relevant specialist PhD or EngD research programmes in the field.

Programme structure

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time or distance learning for between two to five academic years. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation.

Example module listing

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.

Infrastructure Engineering and Management Group Modules

Structural Engineering Group Modules

Bridge Engineering Group Modules

Geotechnical Engineering Group Modules

Construction Management Group Modules

Water and Environmental Engineering Group Modules

Wind Energy Group Modules

Dissertation

Modes of study 

Apart from the usual full-time mode, there are also part-time options. The majority of Bridge, Geotechnical and Structural Engineering modules can be studied by distance learning through the use of an interactive web-based e-learning platform (SurreyLearn).

Distance learning

This programme can be studied via distance learning, which allows a high level of flexibility and enables you to study alongside other commitments you may have. Get full information about our distance learning programme (PDF).

Academic support, facilities and equipment

Modules related to the different groups are taught by a total of 20 full or part-time members of academic staff, as well as a number of visiting lecturers from the industry and government.

In addition to the University Library and Learning Centre’s extensive resources, our excellent testing facilities can support experimentally based MSc dissertation projects. 

Educational aims of the programme

The programme aims to provide graduates with:

  • The state-of-the-art of infrastructure engineering and management that is required for the realisation of the complex delivery of new and management and of existing infrastructure.
  • A holistic overview of infrastructure as a system of systems, viewed within the social, economic and environmental context, and the drivers for sustainable infrastructure development and change.
  • A knowledge of the fundamental multi-disciplinary frameworks that can be adopted for the planning, design, management and operation of interconnected infrastructure systems.
  • A specialisation in an infrastructure area of their choice (i.e. bridge, building, geotechnical, water, wind) providing them with detailed background for the analysis and solution of specific problems associated with individual infrastructure components.

Global opportunities

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.



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See the department website - http://it.rit.edu/. The Internet has brought a new kind of democracy where all information is created equal. Read more
See the department website - http://it.rit.edu/

The Internet has brought a new kind of democracy where all information is created equal. No longer the sole province of experts and the traditional media, it has become grassroots, viral, and global. The sheer volume and lightning speed of information transfer has changed how the world communicates, educates, learns, and ultimately solves problems. As the Web and its related technologies evolve, users will need help in managing these new tools.

Graduate study in a computing discipline that only focuses on traditional computing approaches is not flexible enough to meet the needs of the real world. New hardware and software tools are continually introduced into the market. IT professionals must have a specific area of expertise as well as be adaptable and ready to tackle to the next new thing—or just as often, retrofit available technologies to help their users adapt to the latest trends. The MS in information sciences and technologies provides an opportunity for in-depth study to prepare for today’s high-demand computing careers. Companies are drowning in data—structured, semi-structured, and unstructured. Big data is not just high transaction volumes; it is also data in various formats, with high velocity change, and increasing complexity. Information is gleaned from unstructured sources—such as Web traffic or social networks—as well as traditional ones; and information delivery must be immediate and on demand.

As the users' advocate, IT professionals also need the critical thinking skills to problem-solve in a wide variety of computing situations, combined with an understanding of the needs of their audience. Just knowing how technology works is no longer enough. Today, computing professionals need to know how to make it all work.

The information sciences and technologies program addresses the Web systems and integration technologies, and the information management and database technology pillars, of the IT academic discipline, along with the additional option of discovery informatics. A special topics option is available to support the creation of a customized area of study. The program is offered full- or part-time, on-campus only.

Plan of study

The program consists of 30 semester credit hours of graduate study and includes four core courses, four or five track or domain electives (depending upon capstone option chosen), and either a capstone experience, thesis, or project.

- Track or domain electives

Students choose track or domain electives from the following tracks. With permission of the graduate program director, students may select the special topics track to fulfill the track or domain electives requirement. See the graduate program director for more information.

- Capstone options

Students may choose between a course-based capstone, a thesis, or a project that builds upon their domain study. The course-based capstone option is 3 semester credit hours. Students who choose this option are required to complete one additional track or domain elective. The thesis and project capstone options are both 6 semester credit hours.

International Students

International applicants whose native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language. Minimum scores of 570 (paper-based) or 88 (Internet-based) are required. Applicants with a lower TOEFL score may be admitted conditionally and will be required to complete a prescribed program in English, along with a reduced program course load.

Additional information

- Prerequisites

It is expected that prospective students will have a background in fundamental information technology concepts including object-oriented programming, website development, database theory and practice, and statistics. Students without the necessary background should complete the prerequisites before applying to the program. However, bridge courses are available to satisfy the prerequisites.

- Bridge program

Students whose undergraduate preparation or employment experience does not satisfy the prerequisites can make up these deficiencies by completing prerequisite bridge courses as prescribed by the graduate program director. The bridge courses are not part of the 30 semester credit hours required for the master’s degree. Grades for bridge courses are not included in a student’s GPA if the courses are taken before matriculation; they are included if completed after matriculation. Since bridge programs can be designed in a variety of ways, the graduate program director will assist students in planning and course selection.

- Maximum time limit

University policy requires that graduate programs be completed within seven years of the student's initial registration for courses in the program. Bridge courses are excluded.

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You can access six study streams on this Masters programme. Bridge Engineering. Construction Management. Geotechnical Engineering. Read more

You can access six study streams on this Masters programme:

  • Bridge Engineering
  • Construction Management
  • Geotechnical Engineering
  • Structural Engineering
  • Water Engineering and Environmental Engineering
  • Infrastructure Engineering and Management

As well as supporting the career development of Civil Engineering graduates, this programme provides the necessary further learning for engineers working in the construction industry who hold related first degrees such as engineering geology or construction management.

It is also designed to update the technical skills of practising engineers engaged in the planning, design, construction and operation of civil-engineering works.

Programme structure

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time / distance learning for between two to five academic years. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation.

This degree is accredited as meeting the requirements for Further Learning for a Chartered Engineer (CEng) for candidates who have already acquired an Accredited CEng (Partial) BEng(Hons) or an Accredited IEng (Full) BEng/BSc (Hons) undergraduate first degree.

Example module listing

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.

Structural Engineering Group Modules

Bridge Engineering Group Modules

Geotechnical Engineering Group Modules

Construction Management Group Modules

Infrastructure Engineering Group Modules

Water and Environmental Engineering Group Modules

Dissertation

Educational aims of the programme

  • The Civil Engineering programme aims to provide graduate engineers with:
  • Advanced capabilities and in-depth knowledge in a range of specialised aspects of civil engineering
  • It is also designed to update the technical skills of practising engineers engaged in the planning, design, construction and operation of civil engineering works and to contribute to a personal professional development programme
  • A working knowledge of some of the UK and European standards and codes of practice associated with the design, analysis and construction of civil engineering structures and the ability to interpret and apply these to both familiar and unfamiliar problems
  • The necessary further learning towards fulfilling the educational base for the professional qualification of Chartered Engineer in both a technical or non-technical capacity dependent upon module selection

Programme learning outcomes

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:

Knowledge and understanding

  • The mathematical principles necessary to underpin their education in civil engineering and to enable them to apply mathematical methods, tools and notations proficiently in the analysis and solution of multi-disciplinary open ended engineering problems
  • The properties, behaviour and use of relevant materials
  • The management techniques which may be used to achieve civil engineering objectives within that context
  • Some of the roles of management techniques and codes of practice in design
  • The principles and implementation of some advanced design and management techniques specific to civil engineering
  • Mathematical and computer models relevant to civil engineering, and an appreciation of their limitations
  • The role of the professional engineer in society, including health, safety, environmental, sustainability, ethical issues and risk assessment within civil engineering
  • The wider multidisciplinary engineering context and its underlying principles
  • Developing technologies related to civil engineering and the ability to develop an ability to synthesize and critically appraise some of them
  • The framework of relevant requirements governing engineering activities, including personnel, health, safety, and risk issues (an awareness of)
  • The advanced design processes and methodologies and the ability to adapt them in open ended situations.

Intellectual / cognitive skills

  • Analyse and solve problems
  • Think strategically
  • Synthesis of complex sets of information
  • Understand the changing nature of knowledge and practice in the management of culturally diverse construction environments
  • Select and transfer knowledge and methods from other sectors to construction-based organisation
  • Produce sound designs to meet specified requirements such as Eurocodes, deploying commercial software packages as appropriate
  • Dynthesis and critical appraisal of the thoughts of others

Professional practical skills

  • Awareness of professional and ethical conduct
  • Extract data pertinent to an unfamiliar problem, and apply its solution using computer based engineering tools where appropriate
  • Evaluate and integrate information and processes in project work
  • Present information orally to others
  • Show a capability to act decisively in a coordinated way using theory, better practice and harness this to experience
  • Use concepts and theories to make engineering judgments in the absence of complete data
  • Observe, record and interpret data using appropriate statistical methods and to present results in appropriate forms for the civil engineering industry

Key / transferable skills

  • Communicate engineering design, concepts, analysis and data in a clear and effective manner 
  • Collect and analyse research data 
  • Time and resource management planning

Global opportunities

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.



Read less
Our Structural Engineering postgraduate programme is delivered by the Faculty’s own staff, together with practising engineers from consultancies and local authorities. Read more

Our Structural Engineering postgraduate programme is delivered by the Faculty’s own staff, together with practising engineers from consultancies and local authorities.

For practising engineers engaged in the planning, design and construction of structural engineering works, this programme provides an opportunity to update their knowledge of current design practice and to become familiar with developments in codes and methods of analysis.

You will be able to choose from a rich and varied selection of specialist structural engineering subjects. The programme is offered in the standard full-time mode, in addition to part-time and distance learning options.

Graduates from the programme are highly employable and may progress to relevant specialist PhD or EngD research programmes in the field.

Programme structure

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time or distance learning over two to five academic years. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation project.

This degree is accredited as meeting the requirements for Further Learning for a Chartered Engineer (CEng) for candidates who have already acquired an Accredited CEng (Partial) BEng (Hons) or an Accredited IEng (Full) BEng/BSc (Hons) undergraduate first degree.

Example module listing

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.

Structural Engineering Group Modules

Bridge Engineering Group Modules

Geotechnical Engineering Group Modules

Construction Management Group Modules

Infrastructure Engineering Group Modules

Water and Environmental Engineering Group Modules

Dissertation

Modes of study

Apart from the usual full-time mode, there are also part-time options. The majority of Bridge, Geotechnical and Structural Engineering modules can be studied by distance learning through the use of an interactive web-based e-learning platform (SurreyLearn).

Distance learning

This programme can be studied via distance learning, which allows a high level of flexibility and enables you to study alongside other commitments you may have. Get further information about the details of our distance learning programme.

Academic support, facilities and equipment

As part of your learning experience, you will have at your disposal a wide range of relevant software, including ANSYS, ABAQUS, DIANA, SAP 2000, Integer SuperSTRESS, LUSAS, CRISP, MATLAB, PertMaster DRACULA and VISSIM.

Educational aims of the programme

The programme aims to provide graduates with:

  • A comprehensive understanding of engineering mechanics for structural analysis
  • The ability to select and apply the most appropriate analysis methodology for problems in structural engineering including advanced and new methods
  • The ability to design structures in a variety of construction materials
  • A working knowledge of the key UK and European standards and codes of practice associated with the design, analysis and construction of civil engineering structures and the ability to interpret and apply these to both familiar and unfamiliar problems
  • The necessary technical further learning towards fulfilling the educational base for the professional qualification of Chartered Engineer.

Global opportunities

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.



Read less
See the department website - http://nsa.rit.edu/. Read more
See the department website - http://nsa.rit.edu/

Trends in network communications–unifying wired and wireless infrastructures, Cloud computing, scalability, collaboration tools, and security–can only be coalesced into reliable communication services if there are highly educated and technically proficient networking and system administration professionals who understand both traditional and emerging communication technologies as well as how to apply these technologies to organizational needs and opportunities.

The explosion in ubiquitous computing today means an increased need for greater efficiency and for better management oversight in the provision of IT services. Network environments are not only becoming increasingly complex, there is a greater recognition of the power of information technology to be a strategic enabler of corporate growth and adaptation.

The master of science program in networking and system administration is designed to provide both the knowledge and the technical skills needed to successfully compete in this environment. It is uniquely focused to address current issues in networking and systems administration through investigation of both the theoretical and the practical aspects of this continually evolving field. Course work examines the organizational and technological issues involved in enterprise scale networking, including emerging network technologies, network processing, high performance computing, network programming, and security.

The program is intended to prepare graduates to assume leadership positions in for-profit and not-for-profit organizations dealing with evolving networking solutions or to continue their education through advanced degrees. It is available for full- and part-time study in both an online format as well as a traditional on-campus setting.

Plan of study

The program consists of two required core courses, a three-course knowledge domain sequence, up to four technical electives (depending upon the capstone option chosen), and a capstone thesis or project.

- Knowledge domains

Students are required to complete a three-course sequence in one of the following knowledge domains.

- Electives

Students are required to choose up to four electives from the following choices.

Additional information

- Bridge courses

Students must have solid backgrounds in computer programming (C++ required); networking and systems administration theory and practice; and statistics. Students whose undergraduate preparation or industrial experience does not satisfy these prerequisites can make up deficiencies through additional study. The graduate program director will make recommendations on prerequisite course work. Formal acceptance into the program may be possible even though the applicant must complete bridge courses.

Bridge courses are not part of the required curriculum for the master’s degree. Grades for these courses are only included in the student's GPA if courses are completed after matriculation. Bridge course work can be designed in a variety of ways. Other courses can be substituted, or courses at other colleges can be applied. Contact the graduate program director for more information.

- Study options

This program may be completed on a full- or part-time basis, through on-campus instruction or via online learning. Full-time students may be able to complete the program in two years; part-time students may take approximately four years.

- Maximum time limit

University policy requires that graduate programs be completed within seven years of the student's initial registration for courses in the program. Bridge courses are excluded.

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See the department website - http://www.se.rit.edu/grad. The master of science in software engineering is designed to attract professionals with a formal undergraduate background in software engineering, computer science, or computer engineering and at least one year of professional experience. Read more
See the department website - http://www.se.rit.edu/grad

The master of science in software engineering is designed to attract professionals with a formal undergraduate background in software engineering, computer science, or computer engineering and at least one year of professional experience. The program’s core content ensures that graduates will possess both breadth and depth of knowledge in software engineering. Specialization tracks in software quality and design provide students with the opportunity to match their graduate education with their professional goals.

Plan of study

The program comprises 36 semester credit hours, anchored by either a thesis or a capstone project.

Admission requirements

To be considered for admission to the MS program in software engineering, candidates must fulfill the following requirements:

- Hold a baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution,

- Have a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or higher (Prospective students from institutions that do not use the GPA scale are expected to demonstrate an equivalent level of academic accomplishment. Formal academic background in software engineering, computer science, or computer engineering is a plus.),

- Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work,

- Submit a professional essay (1-4 pages) describing current job (if applicable), relevant experience, and career plans,

- Submit a current resume (including descriptions of significant software projects in which the candidate participated),

- Submit two letters of recommendation, and

- Complete a graduate application.

- International applicants whose native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). Minimum scores of 570 (paper-based) or 88 (Internet-based) are required. International applicants must provide Graduate Record Exam (GRE) scores. Domestic students are encouraged to provide GRE scores.

Professional experience developing software is preferred, but candidates without a background in computing will be considered. Additional bridge course work will be required, and may extend time to graduation.

Additional information

- Bridge courses

Based on the evaluation of academic and relevant experience, the graduate program director may require some applicants to successfully complete bridge courses to fill in any gaps in their background. Successful completion of bridge courses is necessary for registration in graduate-level courses.

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Develop your knowledge, design and analysis skills, engage with modern challenges in structural engineering and transform your professional profile with this accredited technical MSc in Civil Engineering Structures. Read more
Develop your knowledge, design and analysis skills, engage with modern challenges in structural engineering and transform your professional profile with this accredited technical MSc in Civil Engineering Structures.

Who is it for?

This course is for professional engineers who want to specialise in structural engineering or move into this area of expertise to advance their career. Normally students have an undergraduate degree in engineering or a related discipline. Students who don’t have qualifications in civil engineering usually have relevant work experience in civil engineering structures so they are familiar with working within the specific technical domain.

Objectives

From analysing how carbon nanofibers can reduce the effect of corrosion in concrete to gaining insight from experts developing the new Forth Bridge, this MSc in Civil Engineering Structures has been designed to be broad in scope so you can develop your own area of structural engineering expertise.

As a department, we have broad interests from defining new structural forms to practical application of new materials. We believe civil engineering is a creative and collaborative profession, as much as a technical one. This course gives you the tools to immerse yourself in both the analytical and experimental side of the subject, so you can investigate diverse problems to generate your own structural solutions.

The Civil Engineering Structures MSc mirrors industry practice, so you will work in groups with your peers from the first term onwards and learn from a group of world-leading engineers with diverse research strengths. From earthquake engineering to sustainable construction, you have the opportunity to learn in breadth and depth using high-end industry software to develop safe solutions for real-world projects.

Academic facilities

There is a large dedicated lab on site equipped with facilities to investigate different structures and construction materials from concrete to timber. You also have access to other workshops where you can liaise with mechanical or electrical engineers to develop innovative scale models. There is access to specialist soil labs and large-scale equipment including wind tunnels.

We have an extensive library housing all the references, journals and codes of practice that you will need during your studies.

As part of the University of London you can also become a member of Senate House Library for free with your student ID card.

Teaching and learning

You will be taught by the staff team within the School of Mathematics, Computer Science and Engineering and also from visiting industry experts from around the world.

Teaching mainly takes the form of lectures, but IT sessions and seminars also form part of the Masters degree. Modules are shared between two ten-week teaching terms running from October to December and January to March. Although work for the MSc dissertation starts during the second term, you will conduct most of the research work during the summer months.

The length of the full-time degree is 12 months. A part-time route is also available where you can spend either two or three years completing the programme. If you follow the two-year part-time study route, you will need to attend lectures for up to two days each week. Alternatively, you can complete the degree over three years by attending a single day each week. The timetable has been designed to offer flexibility for part-time students.

In the first term you will consider core technical topics and be introduced to new concepts such as structural reliability. In the second term you will begin to focus your studies by selecting your dissertation topic and by selecting options getting involved in a specific areas of your own interest. Spread over the year you will have design presentations, class tests and reports.

If you select an experimental dissertation you will have the opportunity to use a range of materials. Skilled technical support is available in the workshop and you have access to recently refurbished facilities, including specialist geotechnical labs which accommodate a large flexible laboratory space used for centrifuge model preparation and testing. Adjacent to this you have concrete mixing and casting facilities, a temperature-controlled soil element testing laboratory and a concrete durability laboratory.

Assessment

For the theoretical modules, you will be assessed through a combination of examinations and coursework. Examinations are shared between the January and April/May examination periods. For the design-oriented modules you are normally assessed by coursework only, where you will work both in groups and individually on challenging projects.

Modules

There are six core modules which give you a strong technical foundation and three elective modules from which you can choose two. These reflect the specialist expertise on offer within the academic team. These modules will give you unique insight into computer analysis of structures for blast and fire, bridge engineering, and earthquake analysis where you may look at techniques for analysing structures and safe design. In the final part of the programme you undertake a dissertation in which you can explore an area of interest from a proposed list of themes, some of which are industry-related.

Core modules and dissertation
-Advanced structural analysis and stability (20 credits)
-Finite element methods (15 credits)
-Dynamics of structures (15 credits)
-Structural reliability and risk (10 credits)
-Design of concrete structures (15 credits)
-Design of steel and composite structures (15 credits)
-Dissertation for MSc degree (Research Skills and Individual Project) (60 credits)

Elective modules - you will be able to study two of the following elective modules:
-Earthquake analysis of structures (15 credits)
-Analysis of steel and concrete structures for blast and fire exposure (15 credits)
-Bridge engineering (15 credits)

Career prospects

Graduates have secured employment with leading civil engineering consultants, research institutes and government agencies and pursued doctoral studies both in the UK and internationally. The cohort of 2014 have moved on to jobs and further study working within the following organisations:
-WSP Consultant Engineers
-Tully De'Ath Consultant Civil and Structural Engineers
-SSA Consulting Engineers
-Bradbrook Consulting
-Clarke Nicholls Marcel

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Learn about both the technical and the business issues that can bridge the gap between IT security and business risk. Read more
Learn about both the technical and the business issues that can bridge the gap between IT security and business risk.

Who is it for?

This Masters course is aimed at IT professionals with approximately five years’ experience and is intended to provide them with the skills that they need to progress to a management role in information security and risk. The course will appeal to companies and professionals that need to develop or improve their capability in managing IT-related security, in order to enter markets with higher demands of dependability and security, comply with new regulations, or re-qualify for new roles.

Objectives

Concerns about cyber security and information risk have led to a growing market for technical specialists, but there is also a need for more senior professionals with an awareness of both the technical and the business issues who can bridge the gap between IT security and business risk.

On this Management of Information Security and Risk MSc programme you will learn about both the technical and the business issues that can bridge the gap between IT security and business risk.

Understand how to communicate these risks to both the technical staff and the executive business team (CEO, CIO, CFO and COO) in a language they share. Focus on human-machine interaction and decision making within today's increasingly complex Political-Economical-Socio-Technical (PEST) systems.

Find out about latest industry and government standards, legislation and best practice from leading technical experts and network with your peers to compare and contrast best practices from different industries.

Teaching and learning

The modules are taught by academics at the Centre for Software Reliability, within the School of Mathematics, Computer Science and Engineering, and also by visiting lecturers from industry. We also have invited speakers from academia and industry in most modules. Teaching takes place via seminars, lectures, group work and tutorials. The assessment is through coursework only – this consists of written work (individual and group), presentations and peer review.

The modules will be delivered in block mode, with students taking two modules per term. Each module consists of two blocks as follows:
-Thursday evening: 5pm - 9pm
-Friday: 9am-5pm
-Saturday: 9am-5pm

In summary, assuming attendance at the Thursday evening sessions can be done without having to take any time off from work, the students are expected to take eight Fridays off from work in a calendar year (though some employers may allow their employees to take these times off as study leave), and they will need to also attend classes for a further eight Saturdays (i.e. two Fridays and two Saturdays per module). Timetables are for guidance only and are subject to change.

Modules

The course covers the skills and knowledge necessary to be successful in senior roles in information security and risk.

The course supports the extra breadth of knowledge required by people with professional experience to help them progress towards target roles in management or consulting on security, assurance and risk.

Applicants can also apply to enrol on individual modules as CPDs. It will then be possible for you to gradually build credits for the MSc should you wish to take this route. City, University of London is also an approved MoD Enhanced Learning Credits (ELC) scheme provider (ID-1538).

Modules providing Professional Skills
-Information Leadership (15 credits)
-Executive Development (15 credits)
-Socio-Technical Systems (15 credits)
-IT Risk Management for effective performance and the prevention of fraud, error and disaster (15 credits)

Specialised Security and Risk Modules
-Information Security Management (15 credits)
-IT Risk and Resilience (15 credits)
-Quantitative Risk Analysis (15 credits)
-Assurance Cases (15 credits)

Career prospects

This course will appeal to companies and professionals that need to develop or improve their capability in managing IT-related security, in order to enter markets with higher demands of dependability and security, comply with new regulations, or re-qualify for new roles. Graduates should be suitable for consideration as the CSO or Security Architects and Senior Information Risk Managers and would also greatly help them in information security Consultancy and Auditing roles.

Our previous and existing cohort of students have all been employed full-time in a wide range of companies, including multi-billion pound turnover internationals in the aviation industry, global auditing companies (e.g. KPMG), media companies (e.g. Sky and Sony), financial services companies (e.g. Deutsche Bank) in the City of London, small and medium enterprises (SMEs), government departments and NHS trusts. The programme helps students build a strong network with their peers and maintain it as part of their career development.

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Ideal as a bridge to master’s study or beyond if you are new to the study of the classical world. Choose from modules on topics including Greek and Roman literature, history, art and archaeology, all from the undergraduate (BA) catalogue. Read more

About the Classical Studies Grad Dip:

Ideal as a bridge to master’s study or beyond if you are new to the study of the classical world. Choose from modules on topics including Greek and Roman literature, history, art and archaeology, all from the undergraduate (BA) catalogue. Language acquisition is undertaken with postgraduate (MA) students. Perfect as a pathway to further study and as an opportunity to significantly develop your knowledge of the classics.

Key Benefits

- One of the world's largest and most distinguished Department of Classics.

- Unrivalled location for the study of the ancient world thanks to London's unique range of specialist libraries, museums and galleries.

- Ideal preparation for further graduate study in all areas of Classics.

- King's graduates enjoy one of the best employment rates and starting salaries in the UK. Ranked 6th in the UK for graduate employment (Times and Sunday Times Good Universities Guide 2016)

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/classical-studies-grad-dip.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

The Graduate Diploma can be taken either as a self-contained programme, or as a bridge to an MA in Ancient History, Classical Art & Archaeology, Classics or Late Antique & Byzantine Studies.

You can take modules from all three years of our undergraduate (BA) programmes. You are limited to 30 credits at Levels 4 and 5, the remaining credits coming from Level 6 modules (unless you are planning to acquire Greek and/or Latin languages) to a total of 120 credits. There is a large choice of BA modules available, ranging over Greek and Roman Literature, Greek and Roman History, Classical Art and Archaeology and Late Antique and Byzantine Studies.

We also offer Greek and Latin language at beginners, intermediate and advanced levels. If you have a particular interest in acquiring or developing your knowledge of these languages then you will be taught with our MA students and take these modules at Level 7. These are the only modules taken at Level 7 by GDip students. All other teaching is shared with our undergraduate students (Levels 4, 5, 6) except that you will be assessed by coursework essays during which you will receive individual tutorial advice. You can also choose whether you wish to write a dissertation (10,000 words) on a classical topic upon which you receive close supervision. The dissertation is an optional component of the programme.

- Course purpose -

The Diploma is appropriate for you if you are a graduate in a subject not closely related to Ancient History or Classics; it provides a bridge to further study at MA level or beyond, or you can take it as a self-contained programme.

- Course format and assessment -

Modules are largely assessed by coursework but some, such as languages, have in-class tests and end-of-year examinations.

Student Destinations:

Many students go on to pursue an MA degree and then research in our department; others have developed careers in teaching, journalism, publishing, finance, politics, and the cultural or heritage sectors.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 21 universities worldwide (2015/16 QS World University Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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See the department website - http://www.cis.rit.edu/graduate-programs/master-science. The master of science program in imaging science prepares students for positions in research in the imaging industry or in the application of various imaging modalities to problems in engineering and science. Read more
See the department website - http://www.cis.rit.edu/graduate-programs/master-science

The master of science program in imaging science prepares students for positions in research in the imaging industry or in the application of various imaging modalities to problems in engineering and science. Formal course work includes consideration of the physical properties of radiation-sensitive materials and processes, the applications of physical and geometrical optics to electro-optical systems, the mathematical evaluation of image forming systems, digital image processing, and the statistical characterization of noise and system performance. Technical electives may be selected from courses offered in imaging science, color science, engineering, computer science, science, and mathematics. Both thesis and project options are available. In general, full-time students are required to pursue the thesis option, with the project option targeted to part-time and online students who can demonstrate that they have sufficient practical experience through their professional activities.

Faculty within the Center for Imaging Science supervise thesis research in areas of the physical properties of radiation-sensitive materials and processes, digital image processing, remote sensing, nanoimaging, electro-optical instrumentation, vision, medical imaging, color imaging systems, and astronomical imaging. Interdisciplinary efforts are possible with other colleges across the university.

The program can be completed on a full- or a part-time basis. Some courses are available online, specifically in the areas of color science, remote sensing, medical imaging, and digital image processing.

Plan of study

All students must earn 30 credit hours as a graduate student. The curriculum is a combination of required core courses in imaging science, elective courses appropriate for the candidate’s background and interests, and either a research thesis or graduate paper/project. Students must enroll in either the research thesis or graduate paper/project option at the beginning of their studies.

Core courses

Students are required to complete the following core courses: Fourier Methods for Imaging (IMGS-616), Image Processing and Computer Vision (IMGS-682), Optics for Imaging (IMGS-633), and either Radiometry (IMGS-619) or The Human Visual System (IMGS-620).

Speciality track courses

Students choose two courses from a variety of tracks such as: digital image processing, medical imaging, electro-optical imaging systems, remote sensing, color imaging, optics, hard copy materials and processes, and nanoimaging. Tracks may be created for students interested in pursuing additional fields of study.

Research thesis option

The research thesis is based on experimental evidence obtained by the student in an appropriate field, as arranged between the student and their adviser. The minimum number of thesis credits required is four and may be fulfilled by experiments in the university’s laboratories. In some cases, the requirement may be fulfilled by work done in other laboratories or the student's place of employment, under the following conditions:

1. The results must be fully publishable.

2. The student’s adviser must be approved by the graduate program coordinator.

3. The thesis must be based on independent, original work, as it would be if the work were done in the university’s laboratories.

A student’s thesis committee is composed of a minimum of three people: the student’s adviser and two additional members who hold at least a master's dgeree in a field relevant to the student’s research. Two committee members must be from the graduate faculty of the center.

Graduate paper/project option

Students with demonstrated practical or research experience, approved by the graduate program coordinator, may choose the graduate project option (3 credit hours). This option takes the form of a systems project course. The graduate paper is normally performed during the final semester of study. Both part- and full-time students may choose this option, with the approval of the graduate program coordinator.

Admission requirements

To be considered for admission to the MS in imaging science, candidates must fulfill the following requirements:

- Hold a baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution (undergraduate studies should include the following: mathematics, through calculus and including differential equations; and a full year of calculus-based physics, including modern physics. It is assumed that students can write a common computer program),

- Submit a one- to two-page statement of educational objectives,

- Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate or graduate course work,

- Submit letters of recommendation from individuals familiar with the applicant’s academic or research capabilities,

- Submit scores from the Graduate Record Exam (GRE) (requirement may be waived for those not seeking funding from the Center for Imaging Science), and

- Complete a graduate application.

- International applicants whose native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language. Minimum scores of 600 (paper-based) or 100 (Internet-based) are required. Students may also submit scores from the International English Language Testing System. The minimum IELTS score is 7.0. International students who are interested in applying for a teaching or research assistantship are advised to obtain as high a TOEFL or IELTS score as possible. These applicants also are encouraged to take the Test of Spoken English in order to be considered for financial assistance.

Applicants seeking financial assistance from the center must have all application documents submitted to the Office of Graduate Enrollment Services by January 15 for the next academic year.

Additional information

- Bridge courses

Applicants who lack adequate preparation may be required to complete bridge courses in mathematics or physics before matriculating with graduate status.

- Maximum time limit

University policy requires that graduate programs be completed within seven years of the student's initial registration for courses in the program. Bridge courses are excluded.

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This flexible MSc programme is suitable for individuals who already have an accredited undergraduate civil engineering degree and who are seeking to further their engineering skills and achieve chartered status. Read more
This flexible MSc programme is suitable for individuals who already have an accredited undergraduate civil engineering degree and who are seeking to further their engineering skills and achieve chartered status.

The course is accredited by the Joint Board of Moderators as meeting the requirements for further learning for a chartered engineer (CEng) for candidates who already have an accredited CEng (partial) BEng(Hons) or an accredited IEng (full) BEng/BSc(Hons) undergraduate first degree.

You will study a range of advanced civil engineering subjects linked to cutting-edge research. These include earthquake engineering dynamics and design, advanced geotechnics and rock mechanics, bridge engineering and advanced hydraulics. You will also develop the skills demanded in civil engineering consultancy offices around the world.

On the course, you will have the opportunity to use state-of-the-art laboratories and advanced technical software for numerical modelling.

The course is flexible and allows you to combine advanced civil engineering with related subjects including water environmental management, construction management and sustainable construction.

All of the taught modules are delivered by research-active staff and pave the way for a career at the forefront of ambitious civil engineering projects.

Scholarships

Scholarships are available for this course. Please click the link below for more information.
https://www.brighton.ac.uk/studying-here/fees-and-finance/postgraduate/index.aspx

Course structure

Our courses are under continual review. If you have already applied you can find more information on the applicant portal.

The course has an emphasis on practical applications of advanced civil engineering concepts. You will make use of our advanced laboratories, modern computer facilities and technical software.

The MSc requires successful completion of six modules together with a dissertation on an agreed technical subject; a dissertation is not required, however, for the PGDip.

The taught component of the course comprises six core modules, and you can either take all six of these modules or choose four with an additional two approved modules from other MSc courses in the School of Environment and Technology. You can use this flexibility to study related subjects including water and waste-water treatment technology, construction management and sustainable construction.

Core modules cover geotechnical earthquake engineering, dynamics of structures with earthquake engineering applications, seismic design of reinforced concrete members, random vibrations of structures, bridge loads and analysis, rock mechanics, hydrogeology, coastal engineering and wave loading.

Areas of study

• Coastal Engineering and Wave Loading

This module provides a basic understanding of different wave theories and their applications in coastal engineering practice.

You will develop an understanding of the coastal sediment transport processes and the means to deal with issues associated with coastal protection and sea defence.

• Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering

This module provides an understanding of advanced geotechnical design methods with an emphasis on seismic design. It focuses on current design methods for soil and rock structures and foundation systems subject to complex loading conditions.

You will gain experience in using a variety of commercial software.

• Rock Mechanics

The module gives you an understanding of the behaviour of rocks and rock mass and enables you to evaluate the instability of rock slopes and tunnels in order to design reinforcements for unstable rock.

• Dynamics of Structures with Earthquake Engineering Applications

You will be introduced to the fundamental concepts of dynamics of structures. The module then focuses on analytical and numerical methods used to model the response of civil engineering structures subjected to dynamic actions, including harmonic loading, blast and impact loading, and earthquake ground motion.

• Random Vibration of Structures

The module gives you the confidence to model uncertainties involved in the design of structural systems alongside a framework to critically appraise probabilistic-based Eurocode approaches to design.

Stochastic models of earthquake ground motion, wind and wave loading are explored. Probabilistic analysis and design of structures is undertaken through pertinent random vibration theory.

You will become confident with the probabilistic analysis for the design against earthquake, wind and wave loadings through various checkable calculations.

• Repair and Strengthening of Existing Reinforced Concrete Structures

The module gives you an understanding of the types and causes of damage to reinforced concrete structures. It then focuses on current techniques for repair and strengthening of existing structures.

Employability

The course is particularly appropriate for work in structural, geotechnical and coastal engineering.

Graduates have gone on into roles as structural engineers and civil engineers in a number of structural design offices around the world.

Others have been motivated by the research component of the course and followed a PhD programme after graduation.

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