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Masters Degrees (Brain Disorders)

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This MRes is an innovative research-led programme which brings together expertise from across the Faculty of Brain Sciences and offers you the opportunity to work and train with leading researchers at one of the most highly regarded centres of excellence in brain science in the world. Read more

This MRes is an innovative research-led programme which brings together expertise from across the Faculty of Brain Sciences and offers you the opportunity to work and train with leading researchers at one of the most highly regarded centres of excellence in brain science in the world.

About this degree

Students will gain an understanding of the human brain and its disorders from the molecular to systems level that will reflect the interdisciplinary breadth of cutting-edge research in brain sciences conducted at UCL. Students will gain theoretical and practical knowledge of core personal and professional skills that underpin excellence in research.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of three core modules (45 credits), one optional module (15 credits) and an extensive empirical research project (120 credits).

Core modules

  • Research Methods I
  • Research Methods II
  • Contemporary Topics in Brain Sciences Research

Optional modules

Students choose one of the following 15-credit optional modules:

  • Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of Disease
  • Introduction to the Brain and Imaging the Brain
  • Structure and Measurement of the Human Brain
  • Introduction to Cognitive Science
  • Principles of Cognition
  • Molecular Pharmacology
  • Developmental Neurobiology
  • Receptors and Synaptic Signalling

Dissertation/research project

All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation in the form of a journal article and an oral examination.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, independent study, journal clubs, independent and collaborative problem-based tasks, practical demonstrations and classes, computational work, and a supervised empirical research project. Assessment is through online tasks, unseen written examinations, essays, oral presentations, research-based tasks and a primary research article.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Brain Sciences MRes

Careers

This programme will prepare students for research careers in academia, industry or business, nationally or internationally. The first cohort of students on the Brain Sciences MRes will graduate after 2014, therefore no information on graduate destinations is currently available.

Employability

The programme provides a broad understanding of brain sciences. The aim is to give students the best chance of obtaining a place on a relevant PhD programme. In addition the programme includes taught elements that will enhance employability. Transferable skills include statistical training, communication skills, training in research ethics, research governance and in enterprise.

Why study this degree at UCL?

This comprehensive programme will provide core knowledge and skills, and ensure that prospective PhD candidates are thoroughly acquainted with the background as well as with the expanding scope of the field.

The unique curriculum will develop knowledge and insight into the broad and interdisciplinary scope of brain science through practical experience and exposure to contemporary topics in brain sciences research delivered through a series of innovative masterclasses led by internationally renowned researchers at UCL.

With an empirical research project encompassing two-thirds of the programme, quantitative and qualitative tools for research will be developed including core skills in the implementation, management and dissemination of research.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Brain Sciences

80% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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Why study at Roehampton. One of the longest running postgraduate programmes in clinical neuroscience in the UK. It will give you an insight into recent advances in neurosciences of relevance to neurological and neuropsychiatric diseases. Read more

Why study at Roehampton

  • One of the longest running postgraduate programmes in clinical neuroscience in the UK.
  • It will give you an insight into recent advances in neurosciences of relevance to neurological and neuropsychiatric diseases.
  • The programme is recognised by the Federation of Neuroscience Societies (FENS) and included in the Network of European Neuroscience Schools (NENS), which is the highest accolade in European neuroscience teaching.
  • Roehampton is ranked best modern university in London (Sunday Times Good University Guide 2015)
  • We are the most research-intensive modern university in the UK (Research Excellence Framework 2014)

Course summary

This cutting-edge programme offers an exciting opportunity to study modern neuroscience with a focus on clinical implications. You will gain a strong foundation in understanding the mechanisms and treatments of neurological and neuropsychiatric diseases.

This course is designed for students from a range of backgrounds, who are interested in pursuing a career in neuroscience. You will develop a detailed understanding of modern theory and concepts relating to brain research and neuroscience and the application of these principles in the treatment of brain disorders. This course places emphasis on the clinical relevance of recent developments in neuroscience.

The development of your research methods skills is an integral part of the course. You will further your understanding of applied neuroscience with a research project which will develop your data handling and analysis skills, use of applied theory and statistics. 

You will join the Health Sciences Research Centre whose academics are currently investigating a range of topical issues such as the addictive nature of new psychoactive substances, effects of stress on the brain regulatory systems and the mechanisms of brain cell death and repair using neural stem cells. You will be welcome to attend research seminars and discussions on topical developments in neuroscience and health sciences, led by experts. 

MSc Clinical Neuroscience is recognised by the Federation of Neuroscience Societies (FENS) and included in the Network of European Neuroscience Schools (NENS), which is the highest accolade in European neuroscience teaching.

Content

In this postgraduate programme, you will develop an integrated overview of contemporary neuroscience as a rapidly developing discipline with multiple links with molecular biology, genetics, pharmacology and medical sciences. 

You will be introduced to a diverse range of topics and will have the chance to focus on areas that interest you. Examples of topics that you might cover include: clinical relevance of recent developments in neuroscience, brain imaging techniques and their applications in neurology and psychiatry, neurobiological mechanisms of human brain disorders, effects of nutrition and addiction on brain function, and research methods.

You will discuss ethical issues in clinical neuroscience and develop your ability to critically evaluate current developments in clinical brain research, which are relevant to healthcare. 

This course can accommodate students from a range of backgrounds including new graduates from life sciences or psychology as well as health professionals who hold non-traditional qualifications. The programme options of PG Diploma or PG Certificate can be useful to health professionals who wish to refresh update theory knowledge without the commitment of conducting a research project (MSc). It is also suitable for applicants from the NHS, for example neuro-nurses or therapists.

Modules

Here are examples of the modules:

  • The Brain from a Clinical Perspective
  • Biomedical Practical on Brain Function
  • Brain, Diet, and Addiction
  • The Immune Brain

Career options

Health professionals, research careers in academia, NHS or private sector including the pharmaceutical industry. Alternatively, graduates may opt for further academic study at PhD level.

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Discover how insights from linguistics help to explain how humans learn, understand and use languages. Read more
Discover how insights from linguistics help to explain how humans learn, understand and use languages. Our MA Psycholinguistics provides you with a thorough grounding in research from the perspective of linguistics on human language processing, the representation of language in the brain, and first and second language acquisition.

You cover the processing and acquisition of sounds, words and sentences, look at different kinds of language disorders, and investigate the relevance of data from human language processing to our understanding of the nature of language. You also learn how to design and conduct experiments, and analyse the results from them.

Our researchers are using experimental techniques to understand how children learn language, how adults process language, and what happens when language ability is impaired by brain disorders. We combine a wide range of methodologies: corpora, infant behavioural studies at the babylab, response time and eye movement measures for adults

You can choose areas of special study including:
-How words are represented and accessed in the mind
-How speakers understand sentences in real time
-Music, language and the brain
-Children’s English

We are one of the largest and most prestigious language and linguistics departments in the world, a place where talented students become part of an academic community in which the majority of research is rated ‘world-leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’, placing us firmly within the top 10 departments in the UK and ranked among the top 150 departments on the planet according to the QS World [University] Rankings [2016] for linguistics.

If you want a global outlook, are interested in human communication, and want to study for a degree with real-world practical value in a world-class department, welcome to Essex.

Our expert staff

Our staff maintain excellent student-staff ratios with capped language-specific seminars.

In psycholinguistics, Sonja Eisenbeiss, Claire delle Luche and Fang Liu use experimental techniques to understand how children learn language, how adults process language, and what happens when language ability is impaired by brain disorders.

Specialist facilities

-An exciting programme of research seminars and other events
-Our Languages for All programme offers you the opportunity to study an additional language alongside your course at no extra cost
-Our ‘Visual World’ Experimental Lab records response times and eye movements when individuals are presented with pictures and videos
-Our Eye-Tracking Lab monitors eye movement of individuals performing tasks
-Our Psycholinguistics Lab measures how long it takes individuals to react to words, texts and sounds
-Our Linguistics Lab has specialist equipment to analyse sound
-Our Albert Sloman Library houses a strong collection of books, journals, electronic resources and major archives

Your future

Our MA Psycholinguistics can lead to further research in the form of a PhD, or can lead you to a career in areas such as speech therapy, teaching, publishing, journalism, administration and public service.

We work with the University’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Within our Department of Language and Linguistics, we also offer supervision for PhD and MPhil. We offer supervision in areas including language acquisition, language learning and language teaching, culture and communication, psycholinguistics, language disorders, sociolinguistics, and theoretical and descriptive linguistics.

Our graduates are successful in a wide variety of career paths. They leave Essex with a unique set of skills and experience that are in demand by employers.

Several of our MA Psycholinguistics graduates have taken up academic posts at top universities including the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics and the Universities of Tübingen, Hamburg, Kobe, and Thessaloniki.

Example structure

-Phonological Development
-Sentence Processing
-Experimental Design and Analysis
-Assignment Writing and Dissertation Preparation
-The Role of Age in Bilingual Development
-MA Dissertation
-Advanced Phonology (optional)
-First Language Acquisition (optional)
-Second Language Acquisition and Linguistics Theory (optional)
-American Languages (optional)
-Varieties of English (optional)
-Language Rights (optional)
-Semantics (optional)
-Language Learning (optional)
-English Syntax 1 (optional)
-Individual Differences in L2 Learning (optional)
-Syntactic Theory I (optional)
-Variationist Sociolinguistic Theory (optional)
-Sociolinguistic Methods 1: Data Collection (optional)
-Research Methods I (optional)
-English Syntax 2 (optional)
-Syntactic Theory II (optional)
-Sociocultural Linguistics (optional)
-Variation in English II (optional)
-Sociolinguistic Methods: Data Coding and Analysis (optional)
-Research Methods II (optional)
-Graduate Research Assignment (optional)
-Language Attrition (optional)
-Language in Context: From Pragmatics to Conversation Analysis (optional)
-Intercultural Communication: communicating across languages and cultures (optional)

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Clinical neuropsychology is a specialty discipline within psychology which is focused on the associations between the brain and neuropsychological functions, including cognition, emotion and behaviour. Read more
Clinical neuropsychology is a specialty discipline within psychology which is focused on the associations between the brain and neuropsychological functions, including cognition, emotion and behaviour. Clinical neuropsychology is particularly interested in the effects of brain disorders and other clinical conditions affecting the brain on these functions.

Disorders and conditions comprise acquired or congenital neurological and neuropsychiatric conditions in children, adolescents and adults, such as ADHD, autism, stroke, brain tumor, traumatic brain injury, epilepsy, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, drug abuse, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression, etc.

Clinical neuropsychologists can be involved in both the assessment and treatment of people with brain disorders in various applied and often clinical settings, but also in patient related research. Methods used in the field of clinical neuropsychology are neuropsychological tests, neuroimaging and electrophysiological techniques.

With the aging population, the number of people with neuropsychological disorders increases and with this also the demand for well trained clinical neuropsychologists.

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As Psychology and Neuroscience reach out to tackle the big questions facing society today, skills and experience in new and emerging techniques in brain imaging as they relate to cognitive neuroscience are in demand. Read more
As Psychology and Neuroscience reach out to tackle the big questions facing society today, skills and experience in new and emerging techniques in brain imaging as they relate to cognitive neuroscience are in demand.

The MSc in Brain Imaging and Cognitive Neuroscience is an exciting course that offers students the flexibility to develop specific interests, whilst at the same time an excellent opportunity to develop the technical and transferable skills needed to succeed in a wide range of research-related jobs.

The course uses a range of taught modules, a major research placement module and an independent research project leading to a dissertation.

Key features of the course are:

- One to one contact with research active staff
- An opportunity to specialize in Cognitive Neuroscience, gaining specific skills in neuroimaging and programming
- Find out what’s really hot or not in contemporary Cognitive Neuroscience
- Learn transferable skills that enhance employability

This course offers an excellent opportunity for advanced learning in Brain Imaging and Cognitive Neuroscience. For many students this course helps them to develop a more focused set of interests and skills within Cognitive neuroscience so that they can choose the next career step that is best for them. For others, who have already identified the sub-specialty that fires their career aspirations, the course allows them to delve more deeply into their subject and to gain more specific skills and knowledge needed to build their chosen career. An aim of the course is to give students a boost in securing an interesting and exciting job in the workplace or a place on a high quality PhD course after graduation.

About the School of Psychology

The School of Psychology is one of the strongest and most active psychology departments in the country. We are ranked among the top five psychology departments for research and have a reputation for excellent teaching.

With around 800 undergraduates, 250 postgraduates including 100 PhD students, and 140 research and teaching staff we are one of the largest psychology departments in the UK.

The School currently has a live research grant portfolio of £14.1m generating an annual income of around £3.8m. Of our 140 staff, 63% are core funded, and 37% are research funded.

The School hosts four specialist research centres:

- Centre for Human Brain Health
- Centre for Applied Psychology
- The Cerebra Centre for Neurodevelopmental Disorders
- Centre for Computational Neuroscience and Cognitive Robotics

Staff and students benefit from our extensive links with local hospitals and clinics, other universities, schools and nurseries, industrial companies and local and national government departments.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/funding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/postgraduate/visit

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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This course is for speech and language therapists/pathologists, linguists, psychologists or others with a relevant background who have an interest in acquired communication disorders such as aphasia, dysarthria and the communication difficulties secondary to dementia or traumatic brain injury. Read more

About the course

This course is for speech and language therapists/pathologists, linguists, psychologists or others with a relevant background who have an interest in acquired communication disorders such as aphasia, dysarthria and the communication difficulties secondary to dementia or traumatic brain injury.

The MSc will provide you with an up-to-date understanding of the main theoretical and clinical issues and approaches in this field and the implications of these findings for clinical intervention.

Your career

Your masters will give you the skills and knowledge to make a difference. Our MMedSci course provides the necessary training to meet the requirements of the UK Health and Care Professions Council which is the accreditation body for UK speech and language therapy. Our other courses provide professional development training. They can also lead to careers in university teaching and research.

How we teach

We have a reputation for high quality research in the field of human communication and its disorders. That research informs our teaching. We offer professional training for students who are considering speech and language therapy as a career. If you’re interested in a research career, we can prepare you for a PhD.

We also run professional development courses for students already working in the field, so you can study alongside your current job. We have links with the NHS, special schools and specialist charities to ensure that what we teach you is in line with current developments in the field.

We work with other departments across the University including the School of Education, the Department of Psychology, the Department of Computer Science and the School of English Language and Linguistics.

Core modules

PGCert

Acquired Language Disorders; Acquired Speech Disorders; Methods in Clinical Linguistics; Developing an Evidence Base for Practice.

PGDip

Research Methods A; Research Methods B or an optional module if not continuing to the MSc; Two optional modules.

MSc

Research Methods A; Research Methods B; Two optional modules; Dissertation/ Evaluation of Clinical Practice.

Examples of optional modules

Students on the PGDip and MSc also take optional modules, from a range offered both within the department and across other departments in the University.

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Conduct an in-depth study of the grammar of English. Learn about dialectal and social variation, language change and the pragmatics of language use, and study varieties of English used around the world. Read more
Conduct an in-depth study of the grammar of English. Learn about dialectal and social variation, language change and the pragmatics of language use, and study varieties of English used around the world.

If you wish to focus specifically on the linguistics of the English language then our MA English Language and Linguistics should interest you. “Grammar” is the body of knowledge that enables a speaker to produce and understand the language(s) they speak. We study that knowledge, taking a practical approach to our research through analysis of English corpora, recordings and texts.

Our course allows you to cover a wide range of topics related to English, including:
-Dialectal and social variation
-Conversation analysis
-Language change
-Language rights
-Pragmatics

You also have the choice of optional topics including American languages, language and gender, multilingualism and language disorders.

We are one of the largest and most prestigious language and linguistics departments in the world, a place where talented students become part of an academic community in which the majority of research is rated ‘world-leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’, placing us firmly within the top 10 departments in the UK and among the top 150 departments on the planet (QS World University Rankings 2016).

If you want a global outlook, are interested in human communication, and want to study for a degree with real-world practical value in a world-class department, welcome to Essex.

Our expert staff

Our staff maintain excellent student-staff ratios with capped language-specific seminars.

In theoretical linguistics, Doug Arnold, Bob Borsley, Louisa Sadler, and Mike Jones work on the structure of sentences, focusing on English and other languages; Andrew Spencer investigates how complex words are created; and Nancy Kula and Wyn Johnson work on sound structure.

In sociolinguistics, Peter Patrick, Rebecca Clift, Enam Al Wer and Vineeta Chand all work on different aspects of how language varies, and investigate which factors cause such variation. Peter is also involved in language rights, and offers expert opinions in asylum cases where language is used to determine origin.

In applied linguistics, Florence Myles, Monika Schmid, Sophia Skoufaki, Karen Roehr-Brackin, Adela Gánem-Gutiérrez, and Roger Hawkins focus on the learning of second and further languages, whilst Julian Good, Christina Gkonou and Tracey Costley focus on issues to do with the classroom teaching of English as a foreign language.

In psycholinguistics, Sonja Eisenbeiss, Claire delle Luche and Fang Liu use experimental techniques to understand how children learn language, how adults process language, and what happens when language ability is impaired by brain disorders.

Specialist facilities

-An exciting programme of research seminars and other events
-Our Languages for All programme offers you the opportunity to study an additional language alongside your course at no extra cost
-Our ‘Visual World’ Experimental Lab records response times and eye movements when individuals are presented with pictures and videos
-Our Eye-Tracking Lab monitors eye movement of individuals performing tasks
-Our Psycholinguistics Lab measures how long it takes individuals to react to words, texts and sounds
-Our Linguistics Lab has specialist equipment to analyse sound
-Our Albert Sloman Library houses a strong collection of books, journals, electronic resources and major archives

Your future

Our course can lead to careers in areas such as academic research, publishing, journalism, administration, public service and teaching. You develop key employability skills including research design, data analysis, thinking analytically, report writing and public speaking.

We work with the University’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Within our Department of Language and Linguistics, we also offer supervision for PhD and MPhil. We offer supervision in areas including language acquisition, language learning and language teaching, culture and communication, psycholinguistics, language disorders, sociolinguistics, and theoretical and descriptive linguistics.

Our graduates are successful in a wide variety of career paths. They leave Essex with a unique set of skills and experience that are in demand by employers.

Example structure

-MA Dissertation
-Advanced Phonology
-English Syntax 1
-Varieties of English
-English Syntax 2
-Variation in English II
-First Language Acquisition (optional)
-Phonological Development (optional)
-Second Language Acquisition and Linguistics Theory (optional)
-American Languages (optional)
-Sentence Processing (optional)
-Language Rights (optional)
-Semantics (optional)
-Language Learning (optional)
-Individual Differences in L2 Learning (optional)
-Syntactic Theory I (optional)
-Variationist Sociolinguistic Theory (optional)
-Experimental Design and Analysis (optional)
-Sociolinguistic Methods 1: Data Collection (optional)
-Research Methods I (optional)
-Syntactic Theory II (optional)
-Sociocultural Linguistics (optional)
-The Role of Age in Bilingual Development (optional)
-Sociolinguistic Methods: Data Coding and Analysis (optional)
-Research Methods II (optional)
-Graduate Research Assignment (optional)
-Language Attrition (optional)
-Language in Context: From Pragmatics to Conversation Analysis (optional)
-Intercultural Communication: communicating across languages and cultures (optional)

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Study the nuts and bolts of language. sound systems, word structure, sentence structure, and how meaning is conveyed. Learn about the different theories that have been proposed to account for human linguistic ability. Read more
Study the nuts and bolts of language: sound systems, word structure, sentence structure, and how meaning is conveyed. Learn about the different theories that have been proposed to account for human linguistic ability. In this degree you will learn what human languages share, and where they differ.

Our course will interest you if you want a formal and empirical grounding in all core areas of linguistics, and are keen to evaluate the major theoretical approaches in these disciplines.

You study topics including:
-Theoretical and descriptive phonology
-Syntactic theory
-Pragmatics
-Semantics
-Phonetics

Our optional modules are in the related fields of applied linguistics, psycholinguistics and sociolinguistics.

We are one of the largest and most prestigious language and linguistics departments in the world, a place where talented students become part of an academic community in which the majority of research is rated ‘world-leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’ (REF 2014), placing us firmly within the top 10 departments in the UK and ranked among the top 150 departments on the planet according to the QS World University Rankings 2016 for linguistics.

If you want a global outlook, are interested in human communication, and want to study for a degree with real-world practical value in a world-class department, welcome to Essex.

Our expert staff

Our staff maintain excellent student-staff ratios with capped language-specific seminars.

In theoretical linguistics, Doug Arnold, Bob Borsley, Louisa Sadler, and Mike Jones work on the structure of sentences, focusing on English and other languages; Andrew Spencer investigates how complex words are created; and Nancy Kula and Wyn Johnson work on sound structure.

In sociolinguistics, Peter Patrick, Rebecca Clift, Enam Al Wer and Vineeta Chand all work on different aspects of how language varies, and investigate which factors cause such variation. Peter is also involved in language rights, and offers expert opinions in asylum cases where language is used to determine origin.

In applied linguistics, Florence Myles, Monika Schmid, Sophia Skoufaki, Karen Roehr-Brackin, Adela Gánem-Gutiérrez, and Roger Hawkins focus on the learning of second and further languages, whilst Julian Good, Christina Gkonou and Tracey Costley focus on issues to do with the classroom teaching of English as a foreign language.

In psycholinguistics, Sonja Eisenbeiss, Claire delle Luche and Fang Liu use experimental techniques to understand how children learn language, how adults process language, and what happens when language ability is impaired by brain disorders.

Specialist facilities

-An exciting programme of research seminars and other events
-Our Languages for All programme offers you the opportunity to study an additional language alongside your course at no extra cost
-Our ‘Visual World’ Experimental Lab records response times and eye movements when individuals are presented with pictures and videos
-Our Eye-Tracking Lab monitors eye movement of individuals performing tasks
-Our Psycholinguistics Lab measures how long it takes individuals to react to words, texts and sounds
-Our Linguistics Lab has specialist equipment to analyse sound
-Our Albert Sloman Library houses a strong collection of books, journals, electronic resources and major archives

Your future

Our course can lead to careers in areas such as academic research, publishing, journalism, administration, public service and teaching. You develop key employability skills including research design, data analysis, thinking analytically, report writing and public speaking.

We work with the University’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Within our Department of Language and Linguistics, we also offer supervision for PhD and MPhil. We offer supervision in areas including language acquisition, language learning and language teaching, culture and communication, psycholinguistics, language disorders, sociolinguistics, and theoretical and descriptive linguistics.

Our graduates are successful in a wide variety of career paths. They leave Essex with a unique set of skills and experience that are in demand by employers.

Example structure

-MA Dissertation
-Syntactic Theory I
-Advanced Phonology
-Assignment Writing and Dissertation Preparation
-Syntactic Theory II
-Semantics
-First Language Acquisition (optional)
-Phonological Development (optional)
-Second Language Acquisition and Linguistics Theory (optional)
-American Languages (optional)
-Varieties of English (optional)
-Sentence Processing (optional)
-Language Rights (optional)
-Language Learning (optional)
-English Syntax 1 (optional)
-Individual Differences in L2 Learning (optional)
-Variationist Sociolinguistic Theory (optional)
-Experimental Design and Analysis (optional)
-Sociolinguistic Methods 1: Data Collection (optional)
-Research Methods I (optional)
-English Syntax 2 (optional)
-Sociocultural Linguistics (optional)
-The Role of Age in Bilingual Development (optional)
-Variation in English II (optional)
-Sociolinguistic Methods: Data Coding and Analysis (optional)
-Research Methods II (optional)
-Graduate Research Assignment (optional)
-Language Attrition (optional)
-Language in Context: From Pragmatics to Conversation Analysis (optional)
-Intercultural Communication: communicating across languages and cultures (optional)

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Our MA Linguistic Studies is our broadest postgraduate degree, offering you the widest choice of options. You expand your knowledge of language through studying everything from syntax, to computer-assisted language-learning, to language and gender, to language disorders, to multilingualism. Read more
Our MA Linguistic Studies is our broadest postgraduate degree, offering you the widest choice of options. You expand your knowledge of language through studying everything from syntax, to computer-assisted language-learning, to language and gender, to language disorders, to multilingualism.

You build a programme best-suited to your individual needs. This course is ideal if you need to study on a part-time basis and wish to fit your course choices in with your existing commitments, as you can also study on an accumulation basis over a period of up to five years.

The optional modules you choose come from a broad list including:
-Theoretical and descriptive phonology
-Sociolinguistics
-Pragmatics
-Semantics
-Syntax

You also gain a basic familiarity with some common research methodologies and paradigms used in linguistics. You will write a dissertation on a topic of your choice. This takes place between April and September.

We are one of the largest and most prestigious language and linguistics departments in the world, a place where talented students become part of an academic community in which the majority of research is rated ‘world-leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’ (REF 2014), placing us firmly within the top 10 departments in the UK and ranked among the top 150 departments on the planet according to the QS World [University] Rankings [2016] for linguistics.

If you want a global outlook, are interested in human communication, and want to study for a degree with real-world practical value in a world-class department, welcome to Essex.

Our expert staff

Our staff maintain excellent student-staff ratios with capped language-specific seminars.

In theoretical linguistics, Doug Arnold, Bob Borsley, Louisa Sadler, and Mike Jones work on the structure of sentences, focusing on English and other languages; Andrew Spencer investigates how complex words are created; and Nancy Kula and Wyn Johnson work on sound structure.

In sociolinguistics, Peter Patrick, Rebecca Clift, Enam Al Wer and Vineeta Chand all work on different aspects of how language varies, and investigate which factors cause such variation. Peter is also involved in language rights, and offers expert opinions in asylum cases where language is used to determine origin.

In applied linguistics, Florence Myles, Monika Schmid, Sophia Skoufaki, Karen Roehr-Brackin, Adela Gánem-Gutiérrez, and Roger Hawkins focus on the learning of second and further languages, whilst Julian Good, Christina Gkonou and Tracey Costley focus on issues to do with the classroom teaching of English as a foreign language.

In psycholinguistics, Sonja Eisenbeiss, Claire delle Luche and Fang Liu use experimental techniques to understand how children learn language, how adults process language, and what happens when language ability is impaired by brain disorders.

Specialist facilities

-An exciting programme of research seminars and other events
-Our Languages for All programme offers you the opportunity to study an additional language alongside your course at no extra cost
-Our ‘Visual World’ Experimental Lab records response times and eye movements when individuals are presented with pictures and videos
-Our Eye-Tracking Lab monitors eye movement of individuals performing tasks
-Our Psycholinguistics Lab measures how long it takes individuals to react to words, texts and sounds
-Our Linguistics Lab has specialist equipment to analyse sound
-Our Albert Sloman Library houses a strong collection of books, journals, electronic resources and major archives

Your future

Our course can lead to careers in areas such as academic research, publishing, journalism, administration, public service and teaching. You develop key employability skills including research design, data analysis, thinking analytically, report writing and public speaking.

We work with the University’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Within our Department of Language and Linguistics, we also offer supervision for PhD and MPhil. We offer supervision in areas including language acquisition, language learning and language teaching, culture and communication, psycholinguistics, language disorders, sociolinguistics, and theoretical and descriptive linguistics.

Example structure

-Assignment Writing and Dissertation Preparation
-MA Dissertation
-Advanced Phonology (optional)
-First Language Acquisition (optional)
-Phonological Development (optional)
-Second Language Vocabulary: Learning, Teaching and Use (optional)
-Topics in the Psychology of Language Learning and Teaching (optional)
-Second Language Acquisition and Linguistics Theory (optional)
-American Languages (optional)
-Varieties of English (optional)
-Sociocultural Linguistics (optional)
-Sentence Processing (optional)
-Language Rights (optional)
-Semantics (optional)
-Literature and Language Teaching (optional)
-Language Learning (optional)
-English Syntax 1 (optional)
-Description of Language for TEFL/ELT and Applied Linguistics (optional)
-Syntactic Theory I (optional)
-Variationist Sociolinguistic Theory (optional)
-Experimental Design and Analysis (optional)
-Materials Design and Evaluation (optional)
-Sociolinguistic Methods 1: Data Collection (optional)
-Research Methods I (optional)
-English Syntax 2 (optional)
-Syntactic Theory II (optional)
-Teaching, Listening and Speaking (optional)
-The Role of Age in Bilingual Development (optional)
-Variation in English II (optional)
-Sociolinguistic Methods: Data Coding and Analysis (optional)
-Research Methods II (optional)
-Graduate Research Assignment (optional)
-Language Attrition (optional)
-Teaching Practice I (optional)
-Approaches, Methods and Teacher Development for TEFL/TESOL (optional)
-Language in Context: From Pragmatics to Conversation Analysis (optional)
-Teaching Reading and Writing in TEFL/TESOL (optional)
-Intercultural Communication: communicating across languages and cultures (optional)

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The Institute for Neuroscience has clinicians and scientists working together to understand the brain and behaviour. Read more
The Institute for Neuroscience has clinicians and scientists working together to understand the brain and behaviour. From the basic biology of neurons through to complex processes of perception and decision-making behaviour, we address how the mind, brain, and body work together and translate this knowledge into clinical applications for patient benefit.

We offer MPhil supervision in the following research areas:

Motor systems development, plasticity and function

We conduct clinical and preclinical studies of normal and abnormal development and plasticity of the motor system. We run functional studies and computer modelling of motor system activity throughout the neuraxis. We also research the development and assessment of novel therapies for motor disorders/lesions including stem cell and brain-machine interface.

Visual system development, plasticity and repair]]
We research the development and assessment of novel neuro-technological approaches to retinal dystrophy repair including brain-machine interface and stem cells. We use in vitro approaches to look at retinal development and visual system wiring.

[[Neural computation and network systems
We conduct experimental and theoretical (computational) studies aimed at understanding how neurones throughout the brain interact in localised networks to compute complex tasks. Our research looks at the role of network activity in a wide range of neurological, neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders.

Auditory neuroscience

We conduct clinical and preclinical studies aimed at understanding the brain mechanisms involved in detection, discrimination and perception of sound. We are interested in how these mechanisms are affected in individuals with brain disorders, including dementia, autism and stroke.

Pain

Our research focuses on:
-Understanding mechanisms underlying pain, analgesia, and anaesthesia
-The development of methods to assess pain and to alleviate pain in animals and humans

Psychobiology

We conduct studies in laboratory animals, healthy volunteers and patient populations investigating the mechanisms underlying mood, anxiety and addiction disorders and their treatment. Allied research looks at normal neuropsychology, and the physiology and pharmacology of neurotransmitter and endocrine systems implicated in psychiatric disorders.

Neurotoxicology

Our research focuses on delineating the effects and understanding the mechanisms of action of established and putative neurotoxins, including environmental and endogenous chemicals, and naturally occurring toxins.

Forensic psychiatry and clinical psychology

Our research covers:
-The assessment, treatment and management of sex offender risk
-Development and assessment of cognitive models
-Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) treatment for bipolar disorder, psychosis, anxiety and developmental disorders
-Developmental disorders of perception and cognition

Systems and computational neuroscience

We conduct theoretical (computational) and experimental studies aimed at understanding the neuroanatomy, neuropharmacology of vision, visual attention and episodic memory.

Behaviour and evolution

Many research groups take an evolutionary and comparative approach to the study of brain and/or behaviour, comparing brain function and behaviour among such disparate groups as insects, birds and mammals, and studying the ecological and evolutionary functions of behaviour. Much of our work is at the forefront of the fields of neuroethology, behavioural ecology and comparative cognition, and has important implications for the study and practice of animal welfare.

Visual perception and human cognition

We research:
-Colour and depth perception - perception of natural scenes
-Psychophysics and attention - memory
-Word learning in children
-Body image dysfunction
-Visual social cognition and face processing
-Advertising and consumer behaviour

Pharmacy

Our new School of Pharmacy has scientists and clinicians working together on all aspects of pharmaceutical sciences and clinical pharmacy.

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Neuroscience is a discipline concerned with the scientific study of the nervous system in health and disease. Research in the neurosciences is of considerable clinical impact considering the debilitating and costly effects of neurological and psychiatric disease. Read more
Neuroscience is a discipline concerned with the scientific study of the nervous system in health and disease. Research in the neurosciences is of considerable clinical impact considering the debilitating and costly effects of neurological and psychiatric disease. In this regard, a major goal of modern neuroscience research is to elucidate the underlying causes (genetic or environmental) of major brain diseases, and to produce more effective treatments for major psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and depression, and neurological disorders such as multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, motor neurone disease and epilepsy. Improved treatment strategies for brain disorders relies entirely on increased understanding gained from research which integrates molecular, cellular and clinical aspects of disease. In this regard it is clear that interdisciplinary approaches are necessary to understand the complex processes which underlie brain function in health and disease. This interdisciplinary philosophy is adopted in the delivery of our M.Sc. programme in Neuroscience, which is underpinned by the diverse research expertise available within Trinity College Institute of Neuroscience (TCIN).

Course Content:

This one-year M.Sc. course aims to provide a multidisciplinary training in the neurosciences, in topics ranging from molecular to behavioural. The course is ideal for students wishing to extend their specialised knowledge, and for those wishing to convert from their original degree discipline. The programme will equip participants with the skills necessary to progress into a career in biomedical, pharmaceutical or neuropsychological research. Instruction for the course consists of approximately 200 contact hours over two academic Terms to include lectures, laboratory practical sessions, journal club workshops and student-based seminars. Modules are assessed by a mixture of in course assessment and written examinations.

Specialist modules covered include:

Form and Function of the Nervous System, Biochemical Basis of Neuropharmacology, Neuropharmacology, Drug Development, Advanced Neuroimmunology, Experimental Neuroscience, Scientific Literature Skills, Neural Engineering, Neuroimaging Technology, Current Topics in Neuroscience, Cellular Neuroscience, and Research Skills.

The third Term consists of a research project on novel aspects of Neuroscience. Trinity College Institute of Neuroscience is a dynamic research environment with research spanning molecular/cellular neuroscience to clinical/translational neuroscience. Projects across these research areas may be undertaken in consultation with an expert supervisor. For students interested in a project in cellular/molecular neuroscience a range of cellular techniques such as tissue culture, immunocytochemistry, western immunobloting and immunoprecipitation, confocal microscopy, Immunoassays, flow cytometry, Real-time PCR, and high performance liquid chromatography are available. In addition, some projects will involve assessing behavioural, electrophysiological and neurochemical endpoints using in vivo models of neurological and psychiatric disease. For those with an interest in experimentation on human subjects, projects will be offered utilizing techniques such as functional magnetic resonance imaging and neurocognitive testing. A selection of national and international projects is also available, which involve collaboration with other academic institutes and pharmaceutical companies, in Ireland, UK and across Europe.

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Sign up to our. Postgraduate Open Evening. - 31 Jan 2018. New Master's Scholarships available. Find out more and apply. Read more

Sign up to our Postgraduate Open Evening - 31 Jan 2018

New Master's Scholarships available. Find out more and apply.

The aim of our Clinical Neuroscience MSc course is to give you a unique understanding of the principles underlying the clinical presentation and investigation of diseases affecting the brain. We place particular emphasis on the translation from basic science to clinical practice. Our course is suitable for students interested in neuroscience and its applications to neurological or psychiatric diseases.

Key benefits

  • Provides a deep and detailed understanding of brain diseases.
  • Emphasis on the translation from basic science to clinical practice.
  • Designed to introduce the basic scientific concepts which underlie clinical symptoms, signs and practice.

Description

Our Clinical Neuroscience course enables trainees in neurology, psychiatry and related health-care disciplines to study the anatomical, physiological and pathological basis of symptoms and signs of brain disorders. It will provide you with in-depth knowledge and skills related to specialist clinical practice and will systematically integrate advances in genetics, molecular neuroscience, electrophysiology and neuroimaging into clinical practice. You will have the opportunity to work independently within a multidisciplinary environment and at an advanced level develop and sustain evidence-based practice, appraise and conduct clinical research and audit.

Course format and assessment

You will be taught through a mix of lectures, seminars and tutorials.

You will be assessed through a combination of coursework and examinations.

Regulating body

King’s College London is regulated by the Higher Education Funding Council for England

Career prospects

Our graduates pursue clinical and non-clinical academic careers in neurology, psychiatry and allied health care professions.



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Study languages from across the world, from their sounds and structures to their social functions. You explore what features are shared across all languages, and what the significance of their differences are. Read more
Study languages from across the world, from their sounds and structures to their social functions. You explore what features are shared across all languages, and what the significance of their differences are.

Compared to our MA courses, our MRes programmes offer more flexibility and fewer taught modules, as the emphasis of your course is on your dissertation and individual research assignments. You must have a draft research proposal at your application stage, and a supervisor is assigned to you to guide your choice of modules and work on your dissertation.

Our course should interest you if you want to continue your study of linguistics while developing strong research skills. Our MRes Linguistics provides tailored support for the researcher-in-training, in any of our areas, with a range of subject-specific and research-support graduate modules available.

Your taught modules may include:
-Theoretical and descriptive phonology
-Syntactic theory
-Phonetics
-Semantics
-Pragmatics

We are one of the largest and most prestigious language and linguistics departments in the world, a place where talented students become part of an academic community in which the majority of research is rated ‘world-leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’, placing us firmly within the top 10 departments in the UK and ranked among the top 150 departments on the planet according to the QS World [University] Rankings [2016] for linguistics.

If you want a global outlook, are interested in human communication, and want to study for a degree with real-world practical value in a world-class department, welcome to Essex.

Our expert staff

Our staff are internationally renowned. Their books dominate the reading lists at other universities. We maintain excellent student-staff ratios, and we integrate language learning with linguistics wherever there is synergy.

In theoretical linguistics, Doug Arnold, Bob Borsley, Louisa Sadler, and Mike Jones work on the structure of sentences, focusing on English and other languages; Andrew Spencer investigates how complex words are created; and Nancy Kula and Wyn Johnson work on sound structure.

In sociolinguistics, Peter Patrick, Rebecca Clift, Enam Al Wer and Vineeta Chand all work on different aspects of how language varies, and investigate which factors cause such variation. Peter is also involved in language rights, and offers expert opinions in asylum cases where language is used to determine origin.

In applied linguistics, Florence Myles, Monika Schmid, Sophia Skoufaki, Karen Roehr-Brackin, Adela Gánem-Gutiérrez, and Roger Hawkins focus on the learning of second and further languages, whilst Julian Good, Christina Gkonou and Tracey Costley focus on issues to do with the classroom teaching of English as a foreign language.

In psycholinguistics, Sonja Eisenbeiss, Claire delle Luche and Fang Liu use experimental techniques to understand how children learn language, how adults process language, and what happens when language ability is impaired by brain disorders.

Specialist facilities

-An exciting programme of research seminars and other events
-Our Languages for All programme offers you the opportunity to study an additional language alongside your course at no extra cost
-Our ‘Visual World’ Experimental Lab records response times and eye movements when individuals are presented with pictures and videos
-Our Eye-Tracking Lab monitors eye movement of individuals performing tasks
-Our Psycholinguistics Lab measures how long it takes individuals to react to words, texts and sounds
-Our Linguistics Lab has specialist equipment to analyse sound
-Our Albert Sloman Library houses a strong collection of books, journals, electronic resources and major archives

Your future

On our course you develop key employability skills including thinking analytically, research design, data collection using quantitative and qualitative methods, data analysis and essay writing. Our course can lead to a career in areas such as academia, secondary school teaching, forensics, publishing, administration, and public service.

We work with the University’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Within our Department of Language and Linguistics, we also offer supervision for PhD and MPhil. We offer supervision in areas including language acquisition, language learning and language teaching, culture and communication, psycholinguistics, language disorders, sociolinguistics, and theoretical and descriptive linguistics.

Our graduates are successful in a wide variety of career paths. They leave Essex with a unique set of skills and experience that are in demand by employers.

Example structure

-Dissertation (Research)
-Advanced Phonology
-Phonological Development
-Sentence Processing
-Semantics
-Pragmatics: Discourse and Rhetoric
-CA I - Conversation and Social Interaction
-English Syntax 1
-Syntactic Theory I
-English Syntax 2
-Syntactic Theory II
-Graduate Research Assignment

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Our MRes Experimental Linguistics provides tailored support for the researcher-in-training at the interface of theoretical and experimental work in linguistics. Read more
Our MRes Experimental Linguistics provides tailored support for the researcher-in-training at the interface of theoretical and experimental work in linguistics.

Compared to our MA courses, our MRes programmes offer more flexibility and fewer taught modules, as the emphasis of your course is on your dissertation and individual research assignments. You must have a draft research proposal at your application stage, and a supervisor is assigned to you to guide your choice of modules and work on your dissertation.

On this course, specialist modules enable you to gain expertise in the research methodology and experimental design required to conduct empirical research in linguistics. You develop your ability to design experiments, collect and analyse data, and critique recent experimental studies, as well as exploring essential qualitative and statistical techniques.

You also choose from a range of topics across our core areas of linguistics, and in psycholinguistics and language acquisition, including:
-Multilingualism and Language Disorders
-Theoretical and descriptive phonology
-Experimental design and analysis
-Music, language and the brain
-Syntactic theory

We are one of the largest and most prestigious language and linguistics departments in the world, a place where talented students become part of an academic community in which the majority of research is rated ‘world-leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’ (REF 2014), placing us firmly within the top 10 departments in the UK and among the top 150 departments on the planet (QS World University Rankings 2016).

If you want a global outlook, are interested in human communication, and want to study for a degree with real-world practical value in a world-class department, welcome to Essex.

Our expert staff

Our staff are internationally renowned (REF 2014). Their books dominate the reading lists at other universities. We maintain excellent student-staff ratios, and we integrate language learning with linguistics wherever there is synergy.

In sociolinguistics, Peter Patrick, Rebecca Clift, Enam Al Wer and Vineeta Chand all work on different aspects of how language varies, and investigate which factors cause such variation. Peter is also involved in language rights, and offers expert opinions in asylum cases where language is used to determine origin.

In applied linguistics, Florence Myles, Monika Schmid, Sophia Skoufaki, Karen Roehr-Brackin, Adela Gánem-Gutiérrez, and Roger Hawkins focus on the learning of second and further languages, whilst Julian Good, Christina Gkonou and Tracey Costley focus on issues to do with the classroom teaching of English as a foreign language.

In psycholinguistics, Sonja Eisenbeiss, Claire delle Luche and Fang Liu use experimental techniques to understand how children learn language, how adults process language, and what happens when language ability is impaired by brain disorders.

Specialist facilities

-Our Languages for All programme offers you the opportunity to study an additional language alongside your course at no extra cost
-Meet other language enthusiasts through our student-run Linguistics Society
-Our ‘Visual World’ Experimental Lab records response times and eye movements when individuals are presented with pictures and videos
-Our Eye-Tracking Lab monitors eye movement of individuals performing tasks
-Our Psycholinguistics Lab measures how long it takes individuals to react to words, texts and sounds
-Our Linguistics Lab has specialist equipment to analyse sound
-An exciting programme of research seminars and other events
-Our Albert Sloman Library houses a strong collection of books, journals, electronic resources and major archives

Your future

On our course you develop key employability skills including thinking analytically, research design, data collection using quantitative and qualitative methods, data analysis and essay writing. Our course can lead to a career in areas such as academia, secondary school teaching, forensics, publishing, administration, and public service.

We work with the University’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Within our Department of Language and Linguistics, we also offer supervision for PhD and MPhil. We offer supervision in areas including language acquisition, language learning and language teaching, culture and communication, psycholinguistics, language disorders, sociolinguistics, and theoretical and descriptive linguistics.

Example structure

-MA Dissertation
-Experimental Design and Analysis
-Research Methods II
-Advanced Phonology (optional)
-Morphology
-Sentence Processing (optional)
-CA I - Conversation and Social Interaction
-Syntactic Theory I (optional)
-Pragmatics: Discourse and Rhetoric
-Graduate Research Assignment (optional)

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Over the last two decades there has been an explosion of interest in brain science across academia, industry and the media. Read more

Over the last two decades there has been an explosion of interest in brain science across academia, industry and the media. The integration of cognitive brain imaging with neuroscience will play a central part in discovering how the brain functions in health and disease in the 21st century, as illustrated by the Human Brain Project in Europe and The Brain Initiative in the USA. The taught Brain Sciences degree will help you gain interdisciplinary knowledge “from molecules to mind” and enable you to develop research skills in cognitive brain imaging, fundamental neuroscience and brain disorders.

Why this programme

  • You will study the Brain Sciences degree in an institute that strives to understand the brain at multiple levels of function, from cells to cognition using approaches ranging from molecular, cellular and systems level investigations to brain imaging.
  • Lectures will be given by staff who are international research leaders and who publish cutting edge research at the forefront of brain sciences.
  • You will attend seminars on a wide range of topics given by eminent external speakers visiting the Institute from around the world as part of our Current Research Topics course. 
  • You will carry out a research project working in labs equipped with technology and expertise at the forefront of brain science research, including
  • 3 Tesla fMRI system to image human brain function
  • magnetoencephalography and electroencephalography to study neural activity
  • transcranial magnetic stimulation for non-invasive brain stimulation
  • 7 Tesla experimental MRI scanner for studying models of disease 
  • confocal microscopy for high resolution cellular imaging
  • models of disease for pharmcolgical, gene and stem cell therapies.
  • You will receive training in research design, data handling, data analysis, and reporting of results.
  • The brain science programme allows student choice and flexibility. Through your choice of optional taught courses you can develop in-depth specialist knowledge to enhance further academic research as well as transferable skills for a career outside academia.
  • You will join a vibrant community of masters students from other programmes and for your research project you will be based in laboratories alongside PhD students, postdocs and senior researchers.
  • Through the range of teaching methods and assessments used you will gain skills in critical appraisal, independent working, presentations, writing scientific documents and time management.

Programme structure

The programme will consist of compulsory taught courses, selected optional courses and a research project spread over 11-12 months.

Core courses and research project

  • Fundamentals for Neuroscience Research
  • Cognitive Brain Imaging
  • The Research Cycle
  • Current Research Topics in Brain Sciences
  • Neuroscience: Animal Models of Disease and Function
  • Designing a Research Project
  • Brain Sciences Research Project

Optional courses

  • Introduction to Matlab for Biologists
  • Neuroscience: In Vivo Models
  • In Vitro and Analytical Approaches in Neuroscience
  • Bioimaging for Life Sciences
  • Current Trends and Challenges in Biomedical Research and Health
  • Technology Transfer and Commercialisation of Biomedical Research
  • Neuroinflammation 
  • Statistics and Research Design

Teaching and learning methods

Taught courses are delivered by lectures, tutorials, problem-based learning and computer-based sessions supplemented by a wide range of electronic resources for independent or group study. You will use the primary scientific literature as an information resource and through project work will develop skills in team-working, experimental design and data interpretation. Through assessment of coursework you will gain skills in oral and written communication.

Career prospects

The University of Glasgow MSc in Brain Sciences provides you with many career opportunities. 

Research:  MSc students can enter a research career, mainly by undertaking further postgraduate research studies towards a PhD, or by working in research laboratories in academic settings.

Industry: Other options include going on to work in a wide range of commercial sectors including the pharmaceutical or biotechnological industries and scientific publishing.



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